BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Westward Ho! Jun 26, 1886

Item Metadata

Download

Media
westho-1.0083896.pdf
Metadata
JSON: westho-1.0083896.json
JSON-LD: westho-1.0083896-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): westho-1.0083896-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: westho-1.0083896-rdf.json
Turtle: westho-1.0083896-turtle.txt
N-Triples: westho-1.0083896-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: westho-1.0083896-source.json
Full Text
westho-1.0083896-fulltext.txt
Citation
westho-1.0083896.ris

Full Text

 BI-WEEKLY.
No. 4.
NANAIMO, BRITISH   COLUMBIA, JUNE 26th.,   18I
Vol. II.
WESTWARD HO!
PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY
PUBLIC SCHOOL EXAMINATIONS.
The Public Examination of the Senior Division of the Nanaimo Boys'
School was held on Friday, June 25th,
1866. The pupils were examined in
tkeir various studies by the Principal,
Mr. David Jones, also by Mr. B. H.
Smith, Collector of Customs.
There was a good attendance of ladies
and gentlemen, who enjoyed the exercises to which they listened,
The rolls of honor and the prizes
were presented to the successful pupils
by Mr. W. L. Jeffery, chairman of the
School Trusfee Board, who accompanied the distributions with appropriate
remarks.
After addresses had been delivered
by the trustees, clergymen and teachers, the pupils were dismissed for the
holidays. Following is the list of rolls
of honor and prize winners!
ROLLS OF  HONOR.
Charles Van Houten won the roll of
honor for proficiency; Richard Gibson
for deportment; Oliver Randle for
punctuality and regularity,
PRIZES.
Writing—Thomas C. Home, 1st
prize.
Reading—William Pollock, 1st prize.
Arithmetic—Samuel Hague, 1st prize.
History—Charles Van Houten, 1st
ptize.
Map Drawing—Frederic Jeffery, 1st
prize; Archie Cowie, 2nd prize.
Composition—John   Corcoran,
prize.
Grammar — David   Renwick,
prize.
Geography—Arthur McGregor,
prize.
Proficiency—George
prize.
Deportment—Byron
prize.
Punctuality—William Parker, 2nd
prize,
Spelling—Ernest Harold.
Report ol Second Division ot Nanaimo Boys'
Public School Examination.
ELECTORS.
Norris,
Gartley,
1st
1st
ISt
and
2nd
Charles Edward Stewart won the roll
of honor for proficiency; Christopher
Ganner for deportment; Arthur Morgan
for punctuality and regularity.
PRIZES   AWARDED.
Fourth Class.—James McKinlay,
special for spelling, and second for proficiency; John Teague, first for reading; Gussie Bate, second for punctuality and regularity; Thomas McLay,
first for geography and spelling.
Third Senior.—Robert Reid, first for
proficiency; Benjamin Brown, second
for punctuality and regularity.
Third Junior.—Sydney Peck, first
for proficiency; Frederic Haarer, second
for punctuality and regularity; Benjamin
Palmer, second for proficiency.
Second—Benjamin Fisher, first for
proficiency.
Over thirty visitors were present, and
short addresses were delivered by W.
L. Jeffery, Rev. A. Anderson and Mr.
Wolfe.
Twelve pupils were promoted to the
senior division, namely; Charles Stewart, James McKinlay, John McGregor,
Gussie Bate, Christopher Ganner, John
Teague, Joseph Muir, Alexander Galloway, Ernest Robson, Peter Aitken,
George Fisher and Thomas McLay.
Public Meeting.
A PUBLIC MEETING WILL BE
HELD AT EAST WELLINGTON
ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30th,
AT HALF-PAST SEVEN O'CLOCK
All the Candidates are cordially invited to attend.    .
ROBERT Q'BRIAN,
To the Electors of Nanaimo City and District
Gentlemen:—At a large and representative meeting of Elector? held at
Nanaimo, on Saturday evening, 12th
June, the following resolution was
unanimously passed, viz:
"That the time is now ripe for the inauguration of a new system that shall
make the representative Independent of
either of the political parties of the
country—that the representative should
be bound to a platform, of principles
enunciated by the electorate, snd
pledged to resign when called upon by
a majority of the electors, for any violation of that pledge."
Having waited in vain for any of the
Candidates now in the field to announce their adhesion to that resolution, and in response to an appeal from a
large body of the electors of this District, I beg to announce that I am a
Candidate for your suffrages, and that
I bind myself to the observance of the
principles herewith expiiess%d, and hold
myself ready,if elected, to resign when
called upon by a majority of the electors
for any failure on my part to act up to
them.
Holding the views I do, and believing
that canvassing amounts to an attempt
at perversion of the intention of the election law—which premeditates, that
the voter shall exercise bis right of voting unconstrained by any influence I
shall not engage in that time honoured
practice. I am ready at all times to
discuss in public, the questions in
which as citizens, we are all interested,
and am confident that an unprejudiced
vole will disclose the fact, that in your
eyes the Government lately led by
Beaven and Walkem, and that now led
by Smithe and Robson, have both been
guilty of maladministration, that adhesion to party instead of constituency
has characterized the conduct of your
representatives in the past, and that no
Government would meet with your approval that would sacrifice the public
domain or rob one constituency in
order to enrich another.
Believing that there is a sufficient
number of independent voters in this
constituency to elect a representative
who shall be bound to you, and to you
only, I take the field with an assure d
confidence in the result, and am satisfied that you will materialize your views
by entrusting me with your mandate."
1. The duty of a Government is to study
the greatest good of the greater number.
2. Within the limits of order and justice,
liberty in its widest sense is the surest weapon of civilization and the keystone of a
nation's anil a people's welfare.
3. Thc administration of public affairs
should be regarded as a sacred trust— thein-
herited rights ami domain of a nation should
be handed down lo posterity, unshorn of any
of their proportions as we receive them, and
unaltered excepting as the public good may
have demanded their enlargement.
4. The person, property, and vested rights
Of every citizen should be safe guarded, but it
should never be forgotten in a new country
that the public Domain is the property of the
people, and that no right can be vested therein, beyond the usufruct in which every citizen is a shareholder.
5. The representatives of thc people should
be dirccily responsible to their constituents
and subject to recall at will.
6. As the density of population, relative
to area increases, the jjumber of delegates to par
liament should decrease in equitable proportion.
7. Education should be universal, compulsory, free, and accessible to all.       . . .
b\ Every facility should be nffolded the.
people for the settlement of technical differences without the intervention of the courts
of justice.
9. A limit should be placed upon the area
of territory and amount of public revenues
that the house of representatives may at any
time alienate for the promotion of the public
q;ood, and no such alienation should be permitted for any other purpose than the public
benefit.
10. Monopoly should not receive the sanction of Parliament, and and the utmost
caution should be observed in the granting of
such exclusive privileges as are proven to be
for the public advantage.
11. A strict adherence to clauses 11 and 16
of the "Act of Constitution of British Columbia," 1872, Is an impcritave duty of the
House of Assembly.
12. The dignity of labour should be upheld
by the maintenance of a high grade of intelligence amongst labourers and every effort to
lower the standard of intelligence and public
interest amongst the labouring classes by
adulterating the ranks with inferior material
should be sternly discountenanced.
13. The rights of minorities should be
guarded from invasion.
14. Good government is as far from revolt*
tldnary communism as It Is from autocracy or
bureaucracy.
15. Upon calm deliberation and with due
respect for the dignity of thc public trust, the
House of Assembly should at all times be responsive to the public will as expressed by
the voice of the people.
I have the honour to be, Gentlemen,
Yours very sincerely,
ROBERT S. B. O'BRIAN.
TO
THE  ELECTORS OF  NANAIMO
ELECTORAL DISTRICT.
Gentlemen:—Having received the
nomination as the Workingmens' Candidate, I come before you hoping
that I will receive your support in the
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS
coming general election
to represent your interei t in the Provincial Legislature, and I trust that
my principals and hone; ty of purpose
is well known to the gre^
the   people   of   Nanairfio
nd
,as a member
t majority of
Gentlemen:—Having received a pressing
request from a large number of Electors desiring me to offer myself as a Candidate at
the ensuing Provincial Election, I have acceded to their request, and I now have the
honour to offer myself for your political confidence, and at once pronounce myself an Independent Candidate.
I will only in the limited space of this address give a brief outline of my political opinions, hoping at an early date, to have the
pleasure of meeting you in public, then to
more fully explain my  policy.
Although opposed to the principles of the
late Settlement Bill creating monoply, and
other actions of the late government, I shall
offer no factious opposition but shall use
my best endeavours to promote the intrests
of the Province In general and this district
in particular (being second to none in importance.)
Am decidedly in favour of a Chinese restrictive policy, but not such extreme measures as were used in the neighbouring territory.
If elected, I would consider it my bounden
duty to put forth any measnre that would
have for its object the safety of life and
limb of employes in our coal mines; and the
exemption from jury duty of firemen, engine-
men, and other employes placed in positions of trust in the mines wherein the safety
of thc workman depends, will have my earliest
attention.
If elected. I am strongly in favour of a
liberal outlay up»n roads and bridges, being
the principle means by which the country can
expect prosperity by opening up for settlement large areas of unoccupied land which
are known to exist in our district and giving
settlers easy access to market; main trunk
roads such as the Alberni and Victoria roads
shall have my special attention.
Briefly mentioning the above outline of
policy I wait with confidence the result of
the election. As a resident of the district
for thirteen years, I am personally acquainted
with most of you, and hope to personally
solicit thc support of all.
I am Gentlemen,
Yours very respectively,
<>»:». THOMPSON.
Notice.
A. II.  JOHNSTON A CO.,    |)av(.     [)CCn
appointed Agents for thc
llltrHMI COM MIIIA FIHKINSI'HAM'E
COMPANY,
to act for Nanaimo and vicinity, and
are now ready to accept risks,
M. H. Cowan,
Secretary and Treasurer.
Victoria, May 31st, 18?^
WOMEN AND POLITICS.
Politics with the sterner sex in the city
are becoming somewhat warm. Canvassing is going in briskly and good
humoredly. The contagion has spread
to the fair sex, many of whom are engaged in actively canvassing the business men of the city for their protegees.
The government candidates' cause must
be a hopeless one when women have
to enter the heated arena in behalf of
j;he "piebald" thicket.-7)>«« .__
City and
District. I believe in, dnd will sup-
I>ort, a law for the enforcement of the
resignation of any member whose conduct is not strictly in accordance with
the pledges given to his constituents,
when shown to be dissatisfied and unsatisfactory to the majority of those
whom he represents.
I will now  present for  your consideration the following principals:
That I will adopt and support if
given your confidence, and I do not
doubj that justice will prevail in time.
It is now in the Interest of all who are
suffering from injustice to endeavour
to hasten the day, whpn justice shall be
practicable.
The land of a country is Nature trust
to all its people.the producers create all
wealth by labour from the land and
waters, and all men should have a
share in Nature's resources.
The opposition to all laws under
which public land now passes into the
hands of corporations, the most of it
by fraud.
The forfeiture of all unearned land
grants to individuals and corporations.
The prohibition of the possession of
land to foreigners and non-residents.
Passing of a law defining the amount
of land to be acquired or held by any
one citizen, by gift, purchase or inheritance.
Protection to the workingmen from
competition with imported cheap
labour contracts.Chinese labour, and
convict prison labour.
The enactment of such laws as will
give to mechanics and labonrers not
only a first lien on their work for full
wages, but also the legal rignt to collect
the said wages without any cost to them
whatsoever in the courts or elsewhere.
The establishing of an Arbitration
Board to settle disputes between employees and employers, and render
strikes unnecessary.
temperance. The regulation of the
liquor traffic should be directly in the
hands of the people.
The establishing of a Provincial
University where all can receive a free
education.
That all jurors be paid for their time
and expenses.
The repeal of all professional and
othcr monopolies that exist in our Provincial statutes.
I am not in favour of the present
Government or any othcr Government
that would give away thc public lands,
and grant monopolies to the peoples'
rights, all important laws should be
referred to thc people, viz., Land
money, commerce, public improvement and foreign relations.
The enactments of such laws as will
afford a more speedy, effectual, and
inexpensive remedy for employers who
may have reasonable claims for damages against persons or corporations.
I will use my best endeavours to encourage all honest industries, and promote the interest of capital and labour,
so that they may work harmoniously to
develope the resources of the Province.
The above is respectfully submitted
to the Electors of Naanimo Electoral
District.
I am Gentlemen,
Your obedient servant,
JAMES LEWIS.
JOSEPH M. BROWN,
WATCHMAKER,
WATCHES   AND    CLOCKS
VV     CLEANED AND REPAIRED   AT   VERY    REASONABLE
RATES,
Next door to James Brown's Tailoring Establishment,
FRONT STREET, NANAIMO.
tl Apl24.86
JAMES M. BROWN,
Merchant   Tailor.
Five Doors North of the Post-Oftice,
FRONT STREET,  NANAIMO.
West of England   Cloths,
Tweedi, and Serges.
Uirimported Direct, "S3!
ALWAYS ON HAND, FOR SALE AND
MADE TO ORDER.
yroTiE.
Assessment Act and Provincial Revenue Tax Nanaimo District.
Notice is hereby given, in accoro..
ance with the Statutes, that Provincial
Revenue Tax and all Taxes levied under the Assessment Acts are now due
for the year 1886, and payable at my
office, Nanaimo; Assessed Taxes, if
paid on or before June 30th, 1886, are
collectable at the following rates, i. e:
Y% of 1 per cent, on Real Property.
5 cents per acre on Wild Land.
1-5 of 1 percent, on Personal Property.
Yi of r per cent, on Income.
If paid after Jun« 30th, 1886:
Y? of 1 per cent, on Real Property.
6 cents per acre on Wild Land.
Yi of 1 per cent, on Personal Property
Yi, jf 1 per cent, on Income.
Marshall Bray.
Assessor and Collector.
January 26th, 1886.
ROCK BAY SHIP YARD.
GRAY & DUMBLETON.
BUILDERS AND DESIGNERS
—OP-
STEAMBOATS,   LAUNCHES   AND
SAILING VESSELS.
IMPORTERS OF   MACHINERY   AND   MECHANICS
TOOLS OF THE LATEST PATTERNS.
Agents for the New Improved Coal Oil Englnei.
VICTORIA, n. «'.
Dr. L. T. DAVIS.
Graduate of Queen's University, Montreal.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
NANAIMO, B, C,
Office.—Smith's Building, Commercial St.
Office hours: 10 a.m. to 12; 2 p.m. to 4 p.mj
6.30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
FIRE!
Liverpool and London and Globe
Insurance.
iETNA INSURANCE CO.
OF HARTFORD, CONN.
RISKS ACCEPTED AT CURRENT RATES.
W, K. LEIGHTON,
Agent,
i .   V
WESTWARD HO !
SATURDAV June 26, 1886
MINING DANGERS.;
In their final report the British mines
commissioners say that the most extensive colleries are susceptible of perfect
ventilation by means of properly constructed furnaces, or by mechanical
contrivances such as are already in use
at most of the collieries. In referring
to the numerous casualities reported,
due to falls of the roof and sides of
workings, the commissioners suggest,
amon« other things, the proper training
of each miner to the best modes of
timbering and of otherwise protecting
his working place, as well as the maintenance of enlarged supervision. It
appears to be the opinion of the commission, in regard to explosions due to
sudden outbursts of gas in mines, that
safety would be much more likely by
increasing vigilance on the part of officials and workmen than, as noted by
Nature, through placing reliance on the
issuing of meteorological warnings.
Speaking further of explosions, the
commissioners say that the dissastrous
effects of fire-damp explosions in coal
mines are almost always aggravated by
the existence of coal-dust in dry mine
workings and roadways. It appears
that the firing of powder shots in a dry
mine-working, where dust exists in
abundance, must always be liable to be
attended with disastrous results, if the
air in such a locality is contaminated
by fire-damp to ever so small a degree.
After alluding to the only partial efficacy of water, and of deliquescent
salts in conjunction with water, when
used for the purpose of removing the
dangerous coal-dust, the commissioners
conclude that the dangers which attend the firing of powder shots in dry-
mine-workings, where there is an
abundance of dust, and where the air
may contain perhaps but a small pro-
proportion of fire-damp, cannot be effectually guarded against, On this account they recommend the abolition of
the use of powder in mines where the
conditions above indicated exist, unless unusual precautions be taken to
remove the dust. The commissioners
conclude by urging that all mines be
examined by means of indicators capable of detecting as small a proportion
as 1 per cent of gas, such examination!
to be made before the commencement
of each day shift, and that the Secretary of State require safety lamps to be
used in all dry mines where the air may
be laden with coal dust and where firedamp exists. The report calls attention to the fact that the ordinary safety
lamps have ceased to afford protection
from explosion in the present improved
ventilation of collieries. The State is
asked to prohibit the use of such lamps
where such improved ventilations exists
in mines. Thc commissioners express
the hope that the great progress which
has recently beeu made in the construction of portable electric lamps may
lead to a speedy utilization of such
lamps to an important extent in coal
mines.—Victoria Times
Political Meeting.
Dunsmuir and Raybould
Denounced.
On Wednesday evening a large and
representative meeting of the electors of
Nanaimo City and district was held in
the Institute Hall, Nanaimo. The
meeting was called by Messrs. Raybould and Dunsmuir, the other candidates being invited, and two of them
Thompson and O'Brian occupying seats
on the platform.
Mr. Raybould made a doleful attempt to reconcile his actions with his
platform as enunciated four years ago,
and referred his questioners to Mr.
Dunsmuir to sustain the line of conduct he had pursued. He was frequently interrupted by questions, but
good order and good feeling prevailed.
Towards the close of his address he
was interrupted by John Wilson, who
put some very pertinent questions to
him and Mr. Dunsmuir relative to the
value of the Island Railway Lands.
Following the first speaker Mr.
Dunsmuir proceeded to give an account
of his stewardship which he did in an
able manner making for himself probably the best fight that could have been
made. When he came under the
crossfire of questions however,delivered
to the [.oint by Mr. Gemmell, Mr.
Hoggan, Mr. McKinlay, Mr. Hodgson,
Mr. Waddington and others, the structure he had erected tumbled to the
ground, and much exasperated, he took
his seat after having indulged in much
unseemly personality.
During his remarks Mr. Dunsmuir
referred to the fact that Mr. Gordon
had unjustifiably brought the names of
Messrs. Crocker and Stanford before
the House of Commons when opposing
the Settlement Bill, and, pointing at
him, accused him of having unjustifiably
interfered in the matter of the altera
tions of the alignment and curvature of
th« Island Railway.
Dr. O'Brian followed, and in a short
and pointed speech rung down upon
him the inductions of his own logic.
He evidently had the feeling
of the whole meeting with him, and
took his seat amidst the plaudits of the
audience.
Mr. George Thompson in a few brief
and manly sentences stated his platform
and as the hour was growing late did
not detain the audience with a prolonged speech. .
Mr. Dunsmuir claiming the right to
wind up the meeting made very pointed personal allusions to Dr. O'Brian.
In fact, all through his address he
seemed to be animated by but one
motive, to destroy the private character
of the only man he seemed to be afraid
of; He wound up his address by declaring that if O'Brian were elected, he
would be the greatest tyrant in the
country.
Dr. O'Brian promptly replied that if
after four years in the Legislature, he
should return to the electors with no
better record than that of having violated his pledges, and having grown
rich at the expense of his constituency,
the electors would be justified in branding him (as Dunsmuir was now branded) as the greatest tyrant in the Province.
Mr. Gordon who had early in the
evening been invited to a seat on the
platform by Mr. Dunsmuir, stated that
he was not a participant in this election,
that up to a certain period he had always been on friendly terms with Mr.
Dunsmuir, but that for some reason
Mr. Dunsmuir had latterly not been so
friendly as formerly, that references
which he made to Standford and Crocker, and at which Mr. Dunsmuir had
taken umbrage were simply the opinions of the people of California culled
from the California papers, and read
by him in the House of Commons in
support of the stand he had taken on
the Island Railway question, and in
maintenance of his pledge to the electors that he would oppose the construction of the road by any syndicate.
Having taken his seat Mr. Dunsmuir
proceeded in the most uncalled for
manner to give a garbled statement of
a private conversation, into which he
had entrapped Mr. Gordon, and stated
that Mr. Gordon whilst favourable to
the present scheme had told him, that
his opposition would help it. He
succeeded in conveying the impression
that Cordon had acted treacherously lo
his constituents.
With much heat, Mr. Gordon
arose and in a few scathing remarks
laid bare the true inwardness of Dunsmuir as it had never been done before.
The excitement had attained fever
heat. Dr. O'Brian here arose and
called for threa cheers for Gordon
which was responded to with deafening
effect followed by a tiger. Dunsmuir
could not obtain a hearing, a perfect
storm of groans and hisses arose whenever he attempted to speak. As the
meeting broke up Gordon.O'Brian Paw-
son and the other candidates were cheered to the echo, and it is now generally
conceded that Dunsmnir has sealed
his own doom. This first encounter
has been unfortunate for Messrs. Dunsmuir and Raybould, and is a premonition of what is to follow.
THE  NATURE OF THE RAILWAY PROBLEM.
[BY i:iClfARI)';T. ELY, in HABPBR's magazini:.]
I propose to show in these articles thai
our abominable no-system of railways has
brought the American people to a condition
of one-sided dependence upon corporations,
which too often renders our nominal freedom
illusory. I propose to call the attention ol
my readers to the distinction between the
form and the substance of liberty, anil to enforce upon them thc truth that the shell wit!-'
•ut the kernel is a gift to be scorned. Finally,
with such means as are at my command, I
desire to urge them to make a mighty effort
to overthrow the power of our industrial masters, and to make them our servants, as they
should ever have been, to the end that a noble
democracy in social and political life may once
mor.- flourish among the American people.
But no guilds and no laws of the Middle
Agis did or could confer such outrageous
privileges as the great railway magnates of
this country once bestowed upon a private
corporation, namely, the South Improvement
Company, the infamous predecessor of the
well-known Standard Oil Company. Here
are the words of its special | agreement with
the Central, Lake Shore, Erie, and Pennsylvania railways. These corporations pledged
themselves at all times to "co-operate as far
is it (namely, the party of the second part)
legally may with the party hereto of the first
part (the South Improvement Company) to
maintain the business of the party hereto of
the first part against loss or Injury by competition, to the end that the party hereto of
the first part may keep up a remunerative,
and so a full and regular business, and to that
end shall lower or raise the gross rates of transportation over its railroads and connections
as far as it legally may, for such times and to
such extent as may be neeessary to overcome
such competition. The rebates and drawbacks to [the party of the first part to be
varied pari passu with the gross rates." The
Standard Oil Company has entered into like
agreements with railway corporations, and it
has been authoritatively stated that it once
received ten millions of dollars in rebates in
eighteen months! Is it, then, any wonder
that it has crushed out competition and
smothered honest industry? It is impossible
in this paper to dwell longer on this, and indeed it is scarcely necessary, for Mr. Hudson,
in the work already mentioned, has described
the infamy in terms which must make the
blood boil in the veins of every honest and
patriotic citizen. This may serve as the chief
example of a multitude of smaller outrages.
The student of the nature of thS railway
problem must next notice that we have to do
in this with the problem of political liberty.
Economic power carries with it political
power. Sooner or later those who control
the avenues to material well-being control the
State, as matters are with us. We are not
dealing with the question what ought to be, 1
but what is and will be. Our great Hamilton
well said: "A power over a man's subsistence
amounts to a power over his will." It is also
implied in sueh common assertions of everyday life as that the member of a family who
carries the purse will rule the house. Now the
railways represent the largest aggregations of
wealth, and exercise a controlling influence in
economic life. The consequences just described as inevitable have followed surely and
swiftly. The King of Belgium long ago remarked that, as far as real power was concerned, he should prefer the position of president of the. united Belgian railways to that he
then occupied; and he spoke with a clear perception of the nature of the preponderating
influence of the railway.
The political power of the railway corporations in the United States is a matter as well
known as is the corruption by which it has
been acquired. The State of Pennsylaania
has long been regarded as the special property
of the Pennsylvania Railway corporation to
such an extent that, in ordinary conversation
in that commonwealth, any endeavor to obtain justice in opposition to the will of that
potential body is discouraged as useless;
while the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania,
once renowned for imtelligence and integrity,
is now a by-word and a reproach, and an
author of a legal work finds it necessary to
warn his students not to attach weight to its
decisions, as it is a tool of corporations. The
Supreme Court of the United States includes
two judges who are regarded as railway judges.
Thc Senate of thc United States has become
the stronghold of the great corporations, estimates having been made that even one-fourth
of its members are railway representatives.
Frequent allusions to our "House of Lords"
are heard, and in the labor press one sees references to the expediency and ultimate necessity of the abolition of this stronghold of our
largest financial interests. Look to California, and you will find a Legislature which is
said to be the tool of the Central Pacific,
and you discover a Railway Commission un-
able to enforce the laws of the land. In Ohio
you learn that the Standard Oil Company, a
creature of the railways, controls the Legislature in opposition to the interests of the
people. Nor do even our municipalities escape this malign influence. When the election of the fall of 1885 was held in Baltimore,
word was sent to one of the leading politicians, who hoped to obtain a municipal office,
in his campaign utterances to be sure not to
touch on the subject of railways. This ia the
condition to which our railway kings have
(Continued on the third page.)   .
jambs K-A-iFivinir,
Importer oJ English, East#m and Ami ri<'»n
■ mi 1      pm    ■     nmm ■ w  "     ** * mtf* T -■■■—■ -- ■        ■■■«
T. W. Glaholm.
IMMENSE STUCK, PRIME GROCERIES, FRESH PROVISIONS.
""»■>*•■
A. B. Johnston.
c
V%
WHARFINGERS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Importers and Dealers in Groceries, Provisions, Grain, Feed,1
Hay and General Farm Produce, invite inspection of their
large and carefully selected stoclr of the above line of goods!
tow on view at their new store, Bastion Street, under the
Foresters' Hall, Nanaimo. Agents for P. C. S. Company's
line of San Francisco and Portland steamers, P. N. Company*
East Coast steamers, B. C. Express Company, and Saamch
Lime. In stock, Kurtz's Cigars* The trade sup*
plied with the above celebrated Cigars at Victoria prices.     ;
THE CELEBRATED EASTERN LIGHT OIL
In stock, the quality of which we guarantee. Also Fish Oil,
Shingles ("sawn and split), Nails in any size and quantity.
Orders solicited and goods delivered free of charge to anyi
part of the city or vicinity. We make a Specialty in Tea!
ftnd Coffee, the latter we roast and grind daily.
NANAIMO DRU
E. PIMBURY & 00,
 DISPENSING	
Chemists and Druggists
Commercial St*, Nanaimo, B. O.
All possible care is taken to avoid low priced drugs and
chemicals, it being of the first importance to th?. sick that
preparations used In compounding medicine sitould be of
the required official strength. Physicians and others can depend upon having their prescriptions faithfully compounded.
A set of chemical apparatus is kept for the purpose of testina
the purity of drugs.    The largest assortment in the city or
Patent Medicines,  Perfumery, Sponges,
Hair Brushes, Comba, Tooth Brushes
Toilet Soaps, Pure Drugs,
In fact all articles usually found rn first-class drug stores
A     LARGE     STOCK     OP
BOOKS    AND    STATIONERY
ALWAYS ON  HANZ1
NANAIMO
PIONEER NEWS AGENCY
Established. 1&7&.
BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS
A Full Stock of Goods in our Line
AMERICAN 2 CANADIAN PERIODICALS
To order at Publisher's rates with Premiums, etc.
<& CO-,
VICTORIA GRESGENT, NANAIMO, B. G.
i
G. BEVILOOKWAY
Cres=scexrt ^tor©?
IHjafcr is ell glasses of
QR00ERIE5 AND DRY GQQP§
Highest Oast) Price Paid tor
FUilS, /
Sfe
brought us. They arc kings in very truth,
and we are their subjects, to whom the right
of free speech and of an independent press is
denied. We read of an earlier period when
America was proud of the sturdy honesty, the
manly intrepidity, and the vigorous independence of her citizens. Is this passing away?
In the testimony given before the Senate
Committee of 1883 on Labor and Capital,
one witness spoke of the subserviency of
American-born laborers as a well-known fact,
nnd no contradiction has appeared. The Germans have a forcible expression to indicate
this, namely, "Hundedemuth," the humility
of a dog. Can it be that this is a characteristic of the descendants of a generation which
knew Washington, Hamilton, Jefferson, and
Patrick Henry and that long line ol Revolt
tionary heroes? Indeed, it Is impossible,
Our subjection will not endure forever. Our
labor organizations are a pledge that it will
notj and for this cause, if for no Qther, we
may rejoice in their might.
It ii a trite remark that there is at least a
kernal of truth in every cause which finds its
advocates, This holds even with regard to
the teachings of anarchists and revolutionists.
It is thc kernel of truth which our own American Revolution emphasized, and which is to
day preserved intact in the Constitution of
Maryland. It is the sacred right of revolution against oppressors who can be disloged
in no other way. If representatives of corporations should ever intrench themselves in our
Legislatures and in our judicial service, and
pervert the will of the people and prevent its
free expression, the right of revolution will
become the duty of revolution, Happily
nffalrs are not In this condition, We can by
the ballot yet secure reform, and put an end
to the chief causes of corporate abuses. It
took the English Government one hundred
years to wrest political power from the East
India Company, but tho riotous days of the
political glory of our railway corporations
are, than is reason to hope, already numbered,
The railway problem ii the problem of labor.
No other single person, natural or artificial,
employs so many men as the great railway
corporation, The number of railway employees in the United States, according to the
last census, was nearly 420,000,
This employment Influences labor in other
channels both directly and indirectly. It has
more power than resides elsewhere to depress
wages, to extend the hours of labor, and to
subject it in other respects to abuse. Its influence for good or evil on the laboring classes
exceeds any other in the United States, It
might set an example in regard to kindly
treatment, satisfactory tenure of office, fair
wages, and wholesale environment for health
of mind and body, which woald speedily lead
to an elevation of labor. But it is not merely
as an example that the railway problem is the
problem of labor. It is in many branches interested in production, and its reduction of
wages will often force a reduction even upon
competitors who desire to do the very best for.
labor. It is an unfortunate feature of our
competitive economic system that meannesses
are forced upon the well-meaning, and thus
an ascendency is frequently given to the worst
elements in industrial society. An illustration of this may again be taken from that rich
storehouse of facts furnished us by Hudson,
The anthracite coal combination of Pennsylvania, one of the most remarkable monopolies
in the United States, comprises six railways,
which own 195,000 acres of anthracite coal
land out of a total of 270,000 acres, Not
satisfied with its oppression of the consumer,
it presses with remorseless weight on the
agents of production, the miners. It appears
that private mine owners, after a strike of
some weeks' duration, had decided to advance
the wages of this wretched class) but the railways, fearing the effect on their own laborers, trebled the freight rates of these men I
Thus was the matter decided against the unhappy toiler.
»n
The Habitually Cheerful Man.
Your habitually cheeeful man is an old
fraud and a liar. He is well dressed, while
his children are the rag-bags of the neighborhood. He has a dollar for cigars, while his
wife   wears a bonnet six years  old.     He
flasses for a whole-souled fellow with the pubic, but a fault-finder at home. You'll see
him taking the cool breezes on the river,
while his family are sweltering in a stuffy
house on some back street. I want to see a
man grin when there's anything to grin at,
but when Green gets up in the morning and
declares that he hadn't had a meal fit to cat
for the last three months, and that he can't
see why his wife is always groaning around
nnd his children always whining, he has no
business to stop the first man he meets with
a smile clear back to his ears, and shout out:
"Why, old fel, how solemn you do look I
Brace up, man—life is worth the living ten
times overl"—Detroit Free Press.
Little Tommy Knew the Faots.
As young Smithers moved out the
card-table he asked, casuallv, "Where
is that bright-red table-cover you used
to have?   I always liked that."
••You wouldn't like it now," interposed little Tommy.
"Tommy," said his sister Clara, "run
away and play, there's a dear."
"I won't," answered Tommy. "Sister's—"
"Shi Tommy, hush I"
"Won'tI" answered Tommy again.
And, as he was hustled from the room,
he yelled: "Sifter's made a petticoat
outen that table -cloth I" '
V.. A. HORNE,
General Blacksmith and Wagon Maker.
BASTION STREET, NEAR THE OLD BASTION. NAN AIMO.
JJrins; f reeured tht services of a first-class HerM-aboer, I an now prepared to fill all
Orders with Promptitude and dispatch,
DONALD    SMITH,
Notary Public, Conveyancer, Accountant, and Real Estate Agent,
BENTS AND DEBTS COLLECTED.
AGENT AT NANAIMO FOR
fhecnix Fire Insurance Company or London.     Established 1873,     Losses paid eve
£14,000,000  Sterling.
Commercial Union Insurance Company of London, Capital, $11,500,000,
RISKS   ACCEPTED   AT   CURRENT   RATES   OF   PREMIUM,
OFFICE—Cornhr of Commkih iai. and Wharf Struct',
Naeeimo. B, C,
IDENTICAL   HOTEL,
NORMAN SMITH,
paer-iETtH, •
VICTORIA  CRESCENT,     NANAIMO.
W.M.HOSIE.
Painter, Grainer, Gilder, Glazier,
Pajw-Haajer,   Sign-Writer  and    Musician,
Ctr. Wallace and Campbell Sts. Nanaime.
NANAIMO   BREWERY.
MILL STREET, NANAIMO.
JOHN     MAHRER,
PROPRIETOR.
T.   D.   JONES   &   CO.
(DIAMOND DRILL PROSPECTING COMPANY.)
Are open to receive applications for Borings fjr Coal Oil, Coal
aad other Minerals-BY CONTRACT.
ADDRESS
T.   D.   JONES   &   CO.,   NANAIMO.
LOOK OUT
-IN NEXT ISSUE FOR-
THE ADVERTISEMENT OF
Carthew's Hotel,
John Carthew, Proptr.
COMOX, B. C.
c. c. Mckenzie,
Land Agent, Cue tern's House Broker, Conveyancer A eeeuntant
OFFICE—VICTORIA   CRESCENT.
•fay be found is) thc Office at other Hours, but always between 1 1 a. aa. and 1 p. km.
Town Lots and Farms or Sale.
Monty to Loan on Mortgage at Low Rates,
DEW DROP HOTEL,
HALIBURTON  STREET       .      .      .      NANAIMO.
Ueorge Raker, Proprietor.
First class aecommodation'for regular Boarders and Lodgers, and the Travelling Pobkjc
MEALS:
Breakfast, 6130 to 8;   Dinner, rt to 2;   Supper, 5:30.10 c^o,"
NONE BUT THE BEST BRANDS
OF
Lltjuors, Wines, Ales, Porter and Cigars Dispensed ai the Bar.
The Lansdowne Brewery.
H. Rosewall, Proprietor.
Comox Road.
ALE and PORTER.
NEWCASTLE HOTEL.
COMOX ROAD, NANAIMO.
M.    P.   SMITH,    Proprietor.
rhebtstlqualities of WINES, LIQUORS and CIOARS diaaosued
at tbt Bar.
OLD   FLAG   INN.
Near Ike Mechanics' Institute, aad only three minutes walk from Steamboat Leading.
NANAIMO, V. I.
J. E. JENKINS, Proprlttor.
SUPERIOR ACCOMMODATION FOR TRAVELLERS.
The Bar is well supplied with tht bast of
WINES,   LIQUORS,   AND   CICARS.
ROYAL HOTEL AND RESTAURANT.
Th«   Largest    and  Best    Hotel  in
the   City.
,    MEALS AT ALL HOURS.
Oysters, etc.,. Supplied at any Time.
]STEW    BUTCHER   SHOP.
COSMOPOLITAN   MARKET,
Commercial Street, next door to the Minor*' Exchange Hotel, Naiafast,
E.   QUENNELL,
Having opened as above, will keep constantly on hand an uisrtaeat ef
MEATS AND VEGETABLES,
And hopes te receive a continuance of the patronage 10 liberally bestowed 4 <r|a/ tbe fit
ten years.
' tie., delivered to all parts ol the City Irtt ol cave.
THE   NANAIMO   PHARMACY.
G.   H.    BLAKEWAY,
Dispensing Chemist and Druggist, Bookseller and Stationer.
VICTORIA CRESCENT, NANAIMO, B. C.
Christ-iBM aad New Yaar'e Card* at Blalceway'a Drag ted Sttliostry
Store.
tF-PRICES TO SUIT THE TIMBS.^B
A First Class, FRENCH COOK has charge of   tht Cuisine
R.    WATKINS,
PROPRIETOR.
JOHN HOOPER,
VICTORIA CRESCENT.
SADDLER AND HARNESS MAKER.
Dress Making is carried on in connection with the above business
Special attention is invited to a select assortment of Hand Painted Velvet
suitable for brackets, etc.
J.    T.   O'BRIAN,
Albert Street Nanaimo, B. C.
Teaming and Druying Done on Short Notice.
Woed. aad Coal Promptly .Delivered to any part of the City.
EDWARD HUGHES,
Long  Bridge,  Nanaimo.
STRONG  BOOTS   AND SHOES  FOR  WINTER WEAR
MEN'S, WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S
CHEAP  FOR   CASH,
PROVINCIAL  HOTEL,
VICTORIA   CRESCENT.
Under the present management this fine Hotel has been re-fitted asd re-painted
.in.l  now affords
Flrit-Cliss Mult and Accomodations lor Travellers and the «eiteral Public.
The Bar is Supplied with the best of
WINES,      LIQUORS,      AND    CItJAVS.
BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISES.
J. B. JOHNSON,     Proprietor.
ORIENTAL   HOTEL,
Victoria Crescent.
A.   EASSON, Proprietor.
The Bar, which has been recently beautified, will always be found veil Hacked with ihe
best brands   of
WINES,    LIQUORS,   AND    (IWABS.
A well supplied RESTAURANT in connection with the ettve.
G.   MONTGOMERY,
Corner Albert and Commercial Streets.
DEALER  IN
Groceries,     Fruits,   Vegetables,    Cigars,    Tobacco
Candies, etc.
FREQUENT    CONSIGNMENTS     OF    FRESH    FRUIT. WESTWARD HO!
SATURDAY    June 26,1886
Wellington Meeting.
The meeting called by Messrs.
Raybould and Dunsmuir at Wellington
■was numerously attended. The fine hall
was well filled and the kindly forbearance and spirit of fair play that Wellington is noted for was observed by
the audience througout. Mr. Dunsmuir addressed the people at great
length and in a clear business like way
showing of course the bright side of his
stewardship to the electors
Mr. Raybould followed in a gentlemanly but sickly attempt to prop up
the Smithe administration.
He was followed by Mr. Thompson
who delivered a short speech referring
to his long residence amongst them at
Wellington, and explaining that he
would offer no factious opposition to
the Government. Some general discussion here ensued on the temperance
topic all of the gentlemen shirking the
question. Mr. Thompson very cleverly saying that he thought "prohibition
would be brought about by keeping
the people from the whiskey, and not
the whiskey from the people."
Dr. O'Brian was then called upon,
and stated that notwithstanding the
fears of his friends he expected and
felt confident that he would receive a
fair hearing at the hands of the Wellington electors. He said that although
Mr. Dunsmuir had seen fit to resort to
gross personalities, he intended to
smother his emotions and show Mr.
Dunsmuir and the audeince, that he
could, and would be a gentlemen, and
would extend to the other candidates
that consideration and courtesy that
the rules of debate demand, but which
Mr. Dunsmuir seemed deternined to
deny him (O'Brian), He who at the
age of 16 years had taken up arms in
the defence of his country during the
fenian invasions, he who could trace
his ancestry back through generations
of patriots, he whose immediate forefathers had been engaged in all those
sanguinary struggles that had resulted
in the retention to the British Crown of
the greater and best half of this great
continent felt astounded. He could
not identify himself when he looked at
the picture that Mr. Dunsmuir had
portrayed. He was accused of being
an agitator, a communist, a socialist,
an internationalist, an anarchist, a ni.
hilist, a monopolist, and no Scotchman. The indictment was a terrible
one, but one that he thought required
no refutation at his hands. It was true
he had looked into the literature of the
subjects referred to—that he believed
a germ of truth was to be found in some
of them, but he did not believe that
public opinion was ripe for the application of the principles the social economists propounded—that a long time
must necessarily elapse before practical
effect could be given to the doctrine
that taught the extension of liberty and
abolition of exclusive privileges to be
the aim of politics. Mr. Dunsmuir
displayed great ability as a business
man, and had shown that he possessed
in a marked degree one of the characteristics of anqther great Scotchman,
the Hon. Alex. McK.enzie.in the ability, with which he could explain a matter of business in a clear comprehensive and coherent manner. There were
other points of resemblance, the one
had arisen fromf the position of a stonemason to that of premier of the great
Provinces of Canada, the other from
the humble sphere of a coal-miner to
the eminence he now occupied in the
commercial arena,
Whether it was because Scotchmen possessed some inherent virtue that enabled tnem
to usurp so large a share 01 the world's attention, or whether nationality had anything to
do with it he did not know, but there was
much about the one that reminded him of the
other, Mr. D. had stated that no agitatiou
had taken place over thc Clements Bill; but
that was disingenuous. Mr. I), had raised
an agitation himself, and had fought the bill
in the House, The agitation had extended
to Ottawa, and even to England. The Walkem
Government had been defeated in consequence
of the passage of the Clements Act, and he
thought it absurd in the face of the facts to
state that there had been no agitation against
the Clements Bill. People, antl they had tht:
right to do so, held different views in regard
to every question that affected the welfare of
the country, Some looked at the financial
aspect ofevery question. Some believed that
every elector was more or less influenced by the
pecuniary effect upon himself of every measure
that engaged the attention of Parliament, and
, civss not surprised that Mr. Dunsmuir, :rs a
usiness man, as a man confessedly loud of
money and of power, should tal;c that view,
For himself, and h; believed the majority of
the electors, he could say that he did not look
ubon measures so much from their pecuniary
a .pect as he did from the a;pect of principle. He
thojghl that every measure introduced iuto
the House of Assembly was based upon some
recognized principle of fair play and jusiice,
and whenever an act was introduced that in
his opinion violated those well-established
principles, that were adopted often after generations of struggling, for the protection of the
weak, and balancing of thc rights of all the
citizens of this province, he would oppose it,
as he had opposed, antl would continue to oppose, the legislation and the legislature that
had assumed the responsibility of creating the
Settlement Act, or rather that portion of the
act that referred to the Esquimau and Naiai-
1110 Railway. What were thc facts in connection with that railway?
After giving a resume of the history of the
railway land reserve up to the date of the passage of the Clements Act, and the repeal of
fie statute setting aside the railway reserve for
the use of Canatla in the construction of
the C. P, R., he continued: During that
ten years the possession of the Island Railway
r:serve was a disputed questi-n. Applications for coal lands within that belt made to
the Dominion Government being referred to
the Provincial authorities, and application
made to the Provincial Government being re
tared to the Dominion. In fact both parties
disowned it, whilst the Victoria press kept up
a constant warlike attitude towards Canada
(at that time endeavoring to overcome ii sue
perable obstacles, in order to carry out her obligations in regard to the transcontinental railway)—for failing to constrnct the Esquimau
and Nanaimo Railway. And now he came
to a period and to a condition of things upon
which Mr. D. and himself agreed. Both
agreed that it would not pay as a commercial
venture per se. Both agreed that the Gulf of
Georgia afforded the best means of communi-
tion and transport. Moth agreed that it was
the people and the press of Victoria that had
created and maintained the fight—Canada
policy. Both agreed that the expected results
would not flow from the construction of the
road. At that time, 1882, an election occurred in British Columbia. At that time
Mr. DeCosmos was bullying the Dominion
into undertaking the work, and at that time
Mr. Dunsmuir, himself on his way to Europe,
was making proposals to the Dominion Government in respect to the construction of the
road, and Mr. DeCosmcs was endeavoring to
impress upon the Dominion the assurance of
success afforded by the fact that Messrs.
Crocker and Stanford were interested with
him. Mr. D. was elected to represent Na>
niamo, although absent from the country at
the time, and the impressinn prevailed with
regard to him, and they had the recorded
avowals of the other candidates to that effect,
that he and they would oppose the construction uf the railway by any syndicate, The Settlement Act was at once conceived—designed to settle
the existing difficulties (?) with Canada; and although
the Ksquimalt and Nanaimo Kailway was not a necessity; although they had the pledge of Sir Hector
Langevin that the road would be built by the Government of Canada after the completion of the transcontinental line; although the members stood pledged
to oppose construction, by a syndicate; although the
redemption of the Dominion's pledge to Cape Breton
Island last session in regard to a similar work proves
that there was no occasion to doubt the intentions of the Dominion—the Provincial Government
at the Instligatlon, SO he says himself of Mr. Smithe,
" dragged the Island Kailway scheme into the settlement. Now, he could overlook thc violation of the
iiapliei pledge; he could overlook the impatience of
\ ictotia; he could overlook the eagerness of Mr.
Dunsmuir to protect his own interests as a private
citi/eu, but he could not overlook the abdication of
itj functions by the Government—the violation of a
very generally accepted axiom that a member of parliament shall not be a contractor with it. He could
not overlook the enormity of the monopoly created by
the act in respect to the coal of the railway belt. The
first Settlement Act was disallowed. The general
public did not expect to see it revived. Nevertheless
it was revived, aud a contract was awarded to Mr.
Dunsmuir, in violation of another accepted rule and
well-known safeguard of the people, 'lenders were
never called for to ascertain who would build the road
for the least land and the least money. He, shortly
after arriving ill the province, took a stand against the
act, and chiclly for the reasons stated he had attempted
to have introduced into the bill two clauses—the one
to modify the taxation clause in the interests of the
general public; the other to provide for the acquisition of coal lands from the Company by intending
operators on some fixed basis. He had taken part iu
an agitation to that effect, but he refused to be saddled with the responsibility of all the clap-trap that
had appeared in the columns of the Free Press. He
believed it was not too late to affect such a remodet-
I ing of the act as would be satisfactory to the people
and fair to the contractors. If elected he would endeavor
to secure such a modification, and secure to the people
their undisputed right to engage in the coal business,
and repeat the history of Robert Dunsmuir—a right of
Which they had beeu deprived by the absence from
the Kailway Act of any provision securing to the people the right to acquire coal lands on any terms whatsoever. It was possible that during his lifetime Mr,
D. might not act in a hostile spirit; but whilst he was
mortal the bill was not, and he knew that Mr. D. as a
business man would not rely upon any verbal assurance from any quarter, but demand, under similar
conditions, that the important features of a contract
should be embodied iu the document. Looking to
the future he could see how the next generation would
feci the weight of our stupid blundering, aud perhaps
be unable 'to correct it. He intended, if elected, to
act in consort wiih the mainland members to check the
preponderance of Victoria's voting power by ttistri-
tmiing the representation over the island, His sentiments were well known in the community, and his
platform had been before them for some time. He
aid not canvass, and had no committees. _ He trusted
solely to the existence of solid principles in the minds
uf the majority uf the doctors, whom he believed
would vote conscientiously, and if returned he would
maintain tfiem to the letter, never swerving an inch
front the position he bad taken.
INELIGIBLE.
Iktsttt*
Cannot Sit Nor Vote in the
Local Legislature.
the interposition of any trustee or
third party, in whole or in part, any
contract or agreement with Her
Majesty, or with any public officer
or department, with respect to the
public service of the Dominion of
Canada, or under which any pubcil
money of the Dominion of Canada
is to be paid for any service or work,
shall he be eligible as a member of
ths   Provincial   Assembly   of this
Province; nor shall he vote or sit in
the same.
EXCURSION!!
P. S. N". Co 's Steamer
"Amelia"
WILL MAKE ANEXCURSIONTO
VANCOUVETl,
—ON--
SUNDAY, JULY 4th.
The first through Train of the C.P.R.
will arrive on the 4th of July at Vancouver. There will also be an excursion from Victoria at the same time to
same place.
Further particulars next issue.
Ladies' Fashionable Bazaar.
Mrs. J, C. McGregor,
VICTORIA   CRESCENT.
THE PRINCIPAL DRESS-MAK-
•     ing antl Millinery Establishment in the
Cit)\   Carries a large assortment of—
HATS, liONNETS,
FLOWERS, LACES,
SILKS, FANCY GOODS,
AND
LADIES' APPAREL.
Employs the Largest Force of Skilled Assistants of auy Dry House in town.
Agent for the "WHITE"'Sewing Machine
PALACE RESTAURANT
AND
CHOP HOUSE.
OYSTERS, CHICKENS,   GAME,
and every Delicacy in Season.
Served at all hours and in the best style.
ELECTORS RESERVE YOUR PLEDGES.
I beg to announce myself asaCandi
date for the Local Legislature at the
forthcoming Election.   See address
Geo. Thomson.
D. DAVIS.
Commercial   Stkket,   Nanaimo.
BOOT AND SHOEMAKER
Only rirMt-t'luNN Material lined.
No Cheap and Worthless Goods Kept by the Above
HIRST BRO'S,
—:o:— 1
COMMERCIAL ST.,  NANAIMO.
—:o:—
The above Firm carry a Full Stock
of Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardware,
Agricultural Implements, Jewelry, Cutlery and Faricy Goods, &c,
IMPORTED DIRECT.
ACT OF CONSTITUTION OJ
THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA.
Section n "No person whosoever
holding or enjoying, undertaking or
executing, directly or indirectly,
alont or with any other, by himself,
or by the interposition of any trustee,
or third party, any contract or agreement with Her Majesty, or with any
public officer or department, with
respect to the public service of this
Colony, or under which any pubiic
money of this Colony is to be paid
for any service or work, shall be eligible as a member of the Legislative
Assembly, nor shall he sit or vote in
the same."
Section 16. "No person whosoever
holding or enjoying, undertaking or
executing, directly or indirectly, alone
or with any other, by himself or by
HALTER WILSON,
IMI'OKTKK OK
Stoves, Grates, Ranges, Pumps,
Lead Pipe, Zinc, Etc.
AND MANUFACTURER OF
TIN, COPPER, ZINC AND SHEET IRON WARE.
Al.SO METAL ROOFER.
HKI'AIUIMl DOJJE AT SHOUT NOTICE.
COMMERCIAL STREET, NANAIMO.
R.  CRAIG,
Blacksmith.
Horses Shod with Scientific Accuracy by a SMITH
of many years' experience.
Waggons of all Kinds Made to Order.
REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE AT LOW RATES.
GENERAL  ULACKSMITHING  DONE WITH
EXPEDITION AND ACCURACY.
BASTION STREET, NANAIMO, B, C,
2 tm     leAi
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
111 Hi
GROGEBitS.PBGflSIONSlOLCTIltl,
SUQARS""^xtra *ar8e importation of finest _ grades sold,
in barrels or smaller quantities at Lowest Possible Prices.
Island & Portland Flour
HAMS AND BACON,
Tqels and Oan.ri.ed. Goods:
Full assortment direct from packers.      *;■.;;
BUTTER, CHEESE, FRUITS      !
AND VEGETABLES.
A large and varied stock of Clothing sold cheap for cash.
The Farmers' Store, Comox.
Tho Crescent Store, iNmiUKWJ.
ARTHUR BULL0C4
DRY GOODS AND M1LLIMC
Go to Arthur Bullock's, the leading and fashionable dry
goods house of Nanaimo, where the public will find a large
and complete stock of Dry Goods, Millinery and Men's Furnishing Goods,   Being a direct importer from the European
and Eastern markets, I am enabled to offer Goods utmost
goods than any
elegant styles in
JUJ
ADIES' CLOAKS k DOLMANS
GREAT BARGAINS IN FUELS AND DIAKTS.
Terms Oash. ARTHUR BULLOCK, Cresoont Store.
AGENT NORTH BRITISH AND MERCANTILE INSURANCE COMPANY.
Jxa Abrams. D. X MoLkan.
VANCOUVER CLOTHINC HOUSE,
Jets. Abrams <Sc Co.
Larg6 and complete stock ot Men's, Youth*', Boys' and Children's
OVERCOATS
.A-ISTO
ULSTERS.
QUANTITY, QUALITY AND CHEAPNESS NEVER BEFORE EQUALLED Rl
Shirts, Collars, Gloves, Gents' Furnishings, Mitts, Ties, ana
Braces are Specialties.     A direct importation of a large
lot of Underclothing, also a large parcel of French
HAND-MADE SHOES AND CERMAH SLIPPERS
Never before introduced into this Market.
NO TROUBLE TO SHOW GOOXM5.
Farmer's Market.
E. HODGSON, Proprietor.
COMMERCIAL STREET,
NANAIMO.
Having purchased the above POPULAR MARKET from Mr. David
Hoggan, I will keep constantly on
hand a full assortment of
MEATS   AND VEGETABLES
Orders for Hotels, Families and
Shipping supplied at short notice, and
delivered free of charge.
iJgT Dealer in Horses, Cattle, etc,
DISCOUNT FOR
CASH.
We have lately received a large—in
fact the largest, cheapest, and best line
of
ENGLISH MERINO
UNDERCLOTHING,
from $1.50 a suit upwards.
A large and well selected stock of
English clothing from $15 to $22 per
suit. We have the largest stock cf
white and colored shirts, hats, caps,
and ties, boots and shoes in Nanaimo.
(STThe above goods will be sold
at five per cent, discount for cash.
COME ONE ! COME ALL I
JAMES ABRAMS & CO.
/!
»

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.westho.1-0083896/manifest

Comment

Related Items