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Westward Ho! Aug 7, 1886

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 Westward Ho!
B I-W E E K L Y,
No. 15.
NANAIMO, BRITISH   COLUMBIA j AUGUST     .;th,   1886.
Vol. II.
WESTWARD HO!
PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY
A GREAT WRITER.
Whaf th* Public Owes to "Veritas," the Well-
Known Correspondent.
Bill Nye in Chicago News.
My name is Veritas. I write for the
papers. I am quite an old man, and
have written kindly words of advice for
the press for years. I am the friend of
the public and the guiding star of the
American newspaper. I point out the
proper co'irse for a newly-elected member of Congress, and show the thought-
leu editor the wants of the people. I
write on the subject of political economy. Also on both sides of the paper.
Sometimes I write on both sides of the
question. When I do so it is over the
name of Taxpayer, but my real name
is Veritas.
I am the man who first suggested the
culvert at the Jim-street crossing, so
that the water would run off toward the
pound 'after "a rain. With my ready
pen—ready, and trenchant also, as I
may say—I have in my poor, weak way
suggested a great many things which
might otherwise have remained for many
years unsuggested.
I am the man who annually calls for
a celebration of the Fourth of J uly in
our little town, and asks for some young
elocutionists to be selected by the community, whose duty it shall be to readl
the Declaration of Independence in a
shrill voice to those who yearn to be
thrilled through and through with pa-
. triotism.
Did I not speak through the columns
of the press in clarion tones for a proper observance of our nation's great
natal day in large gothic extended caps
the nation's starry banner would remain
furled and the greased pig would continue to crouch in his lair. With the
aid of my genial co-workers, Taxpayer,
Ole Settler, Old Subscriber, Constant
Reader, U. L. See, Fair Play, and Mr.
Pro Bono Publico, I have made the
world a more desirable place in which
to live than it would otherwise have
been.
My co-laborei Mr. Taxpayer is an
old contributor to the paper, but he is
not really a taxpayer. He uses this
signature in order to conceal his identity, just as I use the name Veritas.
We have a good deal of fun over this
at our regular annual reunions, where
we talk about all of our affairs.
I am also the man who says brave
things in the columns of the papers
when the editor himself does not dare to
say them because he is afraid he will
be killed. But what reeks Veritas th«
bold and free? Does he flinch or quail?
Not a flinch; not a quail.
Boldly he flings aside his base fears,
and with bitter vituperation he assails
those he dislikes, and attacks with resounding blows his own personal enemies, fearlessly signing his name, Veritas, to the article, so that those who
yearn to kill him may know just who
he is.
What would the world do without
Veritas? In the hands of a horde of
journalists who have nothing to do but
to attend to their business, left with no
anonymous friend to whom they can
fly when momentous occasions arise-
when the sound advice and better judgment of an outside friend Is needed—
their condition would indeed be a pitiable oue. But he will never desert us.
He is ever at hand, prompt to say over
his nom de plume, what he might hesitate to say over his own name, for fear
that he might go with a battle of Gettysburg under each eye and a nose like a
volcanic eruption. He cheerfully attacks everything and everybody, and
then goes away till the fight, the funeral and the libel suit are over. Then
he returns and assai's the grim monster
Wrong. He proposes improvements,
and the following week a bitter reply
comes from Taxpayer. Fair Play, thi.
reured three-card monteist, says: "Let
us have the proposed improvements,
regardless of cost." Then the cynical
U. L. See (who is really the janitor at
the blind asylum) grumbles about useless expense, and finally draws out from
the teeming brain of Constant Reader
.1 long, flabby essay, written on red-
ruled leaves, cut out of an old meat
market ledger, written economically on
both sides with light blue ink made of
bluing and cold tea. This essay introduces, under the most trying circumstances, such crude yet original literary
gems as:
Wad some power the giftie gin us, etc.     '
He also says:
The wee sma' hours ayant the twal,
and further on:
THE HOUSE AT MIDNIGHT.
A Lay Sermon First Preached a Good While
Ago, and Worth Being Repeated
Every Year.
Ro'ren J. HrrcU'tte.
flow quiet the house is at midnight!
The people who talk and laugh and
sing in it every day are asleep, and thi
people who fell asleep in it long agi>
come baek into it. Every house has
these two classes of tenants. Do we
love best those with whom we can
laugh and talk and sing, or the dear
silent ones who come so noiselessly to
our side and whisper to us in faint,
sweet, far-away whispers that have no
sound, bo that we lu.tr only their very
Stillness?
I am not tued, but my pen is weary.
It falls from my fingers and I raise my
head, I start to leave the table and
my eyes fall upon a little book lying on
the floor. It is a little "First Reader.'*
He kft k'.h:r.' this afternoon. Ire-
member just how I was impatient because he could hot read the simple
little lesson—such an easy lesson—and
I told him it waa a waste of my time to
teach him, and pushed him away from
me. I remember now. I see the flush
come into the   little tired face, the
much more precious than the Master's
that T cannot teach the little lesson
more than once?
Ah, friend, we do waste time when
we plait scourges for ourselves. These
hurrying days* these busy, anxious,
shrewd, ambitious times of onrs art
wasted when they take our hearts away
from patient gentleness, and give us
fame for love and gold for kisses. Some
day, then, when our hungry souls will
seek for bre«d;; our selfish god will give
us a stone. Life is a simple, easy lesson, such as any child may read. You
can not find its solution in the ponderous tones of the old fathers, the philosophers, the investigators, the theorists.
It is not bn your book-shelves, But in
the warmest corner of the most unlettered heart it glows in letters that the
blind may read; a sweet, plain, simple,
easy, loving lessor And when you
have learned it, brother of mine, the
world will be better and happier.
He Settled the Business Thoroughly.
Chicago   News.
McCoy, when he came to Scott County,
went to work for a farmer named Hitt, who
had a very charming daughter, Emma. A
young man whom Farmer Hirt had repeatedly
driven from,,the, pjace continued to come
around,, paying his addresses to the daughter,
brave, cheerful look- in his eyes—his! »ntl1 final'y the fkljer, despairing of keeping
mother's brave,patientc'ieeriness, Strug-! him ••# '''>' "V milder me8D8> hired McCoy
JOSEPH M. BROWN,
WATCHMAKER.
TX/ATCHES   AND    CLOCKS
vv     CLEANED AND  REPAIRED   AT   VERY     REASONABLE
RATES,
AT^L    WORK   do™   on
the premises.
N«xt do.r to JttmeR Brfflwfl.'i Tnllorlrrg r»«
tablishmi'iit.
FRONT STREET, NANAIMO.
tl Apb4.86
•.u !.•  -j- • ..       .      1 1 to trash him every time he came near,
g.ing with his disappointment and pain. I        . '
1 see him lie down on the floor,' and
Once
or maybe more, the young man
__^^__ -^^^—,^—^—m ■. Cimi, "aw the girl, took his trashing, and
the little face bend over the trouble-: departed. But one day there came the end
some little lesson, such a simple, easy ' of this sort of thing. McCoy, returning from
lesson, any baby might read it. Then, j town, where he had gone as driver and escort
after a little struggle alone, it has to be! ££_*• daughter, approached the father, .ay
given up, and the baffled little soldi-r,
ingi
Breathes there a man with soul so dead
Who never to himself hath said, etc.
Old Settler is a young tenderfoot who
came here last spring and tried to obtain
a livelihood by selling an indestructible
lamp chimney. He did well forseveral
weeks by going to the different residences and throwing one of his glass
chimneys on the floor with considerable
foice to show that it would not break.
He did a good business till one day he
made a mistake. Instead of getting
hold of his exhibition chimney, he I
picked out one of his stock and busted
it beyond recognition. Since then he
has been writing articles in violet ink
relative to old times, and publishing
them over the signature of Old Settler.
Old Subscriber is a friend of mine
who reads his r.aper at the hotels while
waiting for a gratuitous drink. Fair
flay is a retired monte man, and Pro
Bono Publico is our genial and urbane
undertaker.
Iamji_very. prolific writer, but all
my workvisoiot printed. A venal and'
corrupt press at times hesitates about
giving currency to such fearless, earnest
truths as I make use of.
His essay is not so much the vehicle
of thought as it is the accommodation
train for fragments of his old school
Reclamations to ride on.
But to Veritas we owe much. I say
this because I know what I am talking
about, for am I not old Veritas himself.
Haven't I been writing things for the
paper ever since papers were published?
Am I not the man who for years has
been a stranger to fear? Have I not
again and again called the Congressman, the capitalist, the clergyman, the
voter, and the philanthropist everythtng
I could lay my tongue to, and then
fought mosquitoes in the deep recesses
of the swamp while the editor remained
and took the credit of writing what I
had given him for nothing? Has not
many a paper built up a name and a
libel suit upon what I have written, and
yet I am almost unknown? When people ask: Who is Veritas and where does
he live? no one seems to know. He is
up seven flights of stairs in a hot room
that smells of old clothes and neglected
thoughts. Far from the "maddening
throngg" Constant Reader has so
truly said, I sit alone, with no personal
property but an overworked costume,
a strong love for truth, and a shawl-
strap full ot suggestions to the overestimated man who edits the paper.
So I hattle on, with only the meagre
and flea-bitten jgward of^ seeing _my
name in jJiinjt "anon,";_as. Constant
Reader would say. All I have to fork
over to posterity is my good name,
which I beg leave to sign here.
Veritas.
with one more appealing look toward
me for reinforcements, sighs and goes
away from the lesson he cannot read to
the play that comforts him.    Andtherj
lies the little book, just as he left it.
Ah, me, I could kneel down and kiss
it now as though it were alive and
loving. .....
Why, what was my time worth to me
to-day? What was there in the book I
wanted to read one-half so precious to
me as one cooing word from the prattling lips that quivered when I turned
away. 1 hate the book I read. I will
never lock at it again. Were it the last
book in the world, I think I would burn
it. All its gracious words are lies. I
say to yog, though all men praise tbe
book, and though an hour ago I thought
it excellent, I say to you that there is
poison in its hateful pages. Why, what
can I leam from books that baby lips
cannot teach me? Do you know I want
to go to the door of his room anri listen ;
the house is so still; maybe he is nut
breathing. Why, if between my book
and my boy I choose my book; why
should not God leave me with my|
books?   My hateful books.
But I was not harsh. I was only a
little impatient. Because, you see, his
lesson was so easy, so simple. Ah,
me, there were two of us trying to read
this afternoon. They were two easy,
simple lessons. Mine was such a very
simple, easy, pleasant, loving one tp
learn. Just a line, just a little throb of
patience, of gentleness, of love that
would have made my own heart glow
and laugh and sing. The letters were;
so large and plain, the words so easy
and the sentences so short. And II Oh,
pity me, I missed every word. I did
not read one line aright. See, here is
my copy now, all blurred and blistered,
with tears and heartache, all marred
and mispelled and blotted.; I am
ashamed to show it to the Master. And
yet I know he will be patient with me;
I know how loving.nnd gzntla He will
Lbe. Why, how patiently and loving all
these years He has been, teaching me
this simple lesson I failed upon to-day.
But when my. little pupil stumbled oft
'Well, Mr. Hltt, I've settled this business
' of that young fellow's coming around here to
tee Em."
"What do you mean?" asked the farmer.
"I mean that he won't come any more, an'
you can bet on it."
"Why,. Mac, you haven't killed him, have
you?" asked the farmer, fearfully,.-   ,
"No.   Better than that."
"What then?"
"I've married Em."   '
Thc old  farmer flew into a dreadful rage,
but   McCoy had the girl, and there was no
getting away trom him, so Farmer Hitt, like
a sensible man, made the most of it, and gave
his son-in-law a piece of land which he is now
tilling, while "Em'! minds the babies like a
dutiful wife.
m i »
A New Portrait ol the' Premier.
There has just been placed on exhibition in
thc Ridean Club al Ottawa, a portrait in oil
of Sir John Macdonald, pain'ed by Mr. A. O.
Patterson, ~R. C. A. of Toronto, which re-
fleets tfB highest credit upon that gentleman's
artistic skill. Sir John favored Mr. Patterson
with a number of sittings. The artist has
liien very successful in his work. He has
received many congratulations.
JAMES M. BROWN,
Merchant   Tailor.
' Fiw Doors North of the Post-Office,
FRONT STREET, NANAIMO.
West of England   Cloths,
Tweedj, and Serges.
(STImported Direct. *^|
ALWAYS  ON  HAND,  FOR  SALE ANO
MADE TO ORDER.
TEMPERANCE HOUSE.
BASTION STREET, Opposite the Literary
Institute, Nanaimo, B. C.
Mrs. J. K. Gilbert,
Having furnished this establishment with all
the necessaries appertaining to a
First Class Boarding and Lodging House
Can now accommodate Transient and Per*
maneat Boarders or Lodgers.
Board and Lodging per week..,, $6.00
Board and Lodging per day....  1.00
Board per week   5.00
Single Meals 'O
Beds 50
The Swallow, -which' has just been com
pleted for sea at Sheerness, England, hes cost
about $250,000. She is.the first of anew
and much needed class of speedy and heavily-
armored gun-vessels in which hitherto the
British Navy has been deficient. The Swallow
is armed with four Norfendelt gum, four Gardner guns, eight five-inch breech loading guns
mounted on Vavaseur fittings, and she carries
star torpedoes.     Her engines are of 1,500
horse-power,
■  n> > s»
Very obliging.
"t can't find my tooth brush anywhere,"
said* young lady, looking all over the house
for the article.
"I'll len' you mine," accommodatingly
suggested the colored kitchen girl.
"Oh, no, thanks!''1 replied the young lady
turning away,
"You needn't hab no combustion about
taWn' it, miss," persisted the girl, "for I'sc
used yours sometimes when I couldn't find
»i 11
mine.
ROCK BAY SHIP YARD.
a single word—is my t^ne, linen* tWtjpuJpose
UFair Applicant—"I desire, sir, an absolute
separation from my husband."
Attorney—"Upon  what ground,  madam, :
do you base your plea?"
"We are not suited to each other. He does
not appreciate thc finer sensibilities of my
more delicately organized nature, and—but,
perhapss that is sufficient."
"I fear,   madam,  in  the absence of more
substantial  cause   for complaint  an action j
would not lie."  ,     .,  .     |
'•N'otTieV Il'is'you, sir, I engage fir'that ;
GRAYSOUMBLETON.
BUILDERS ANH DESIGNERS
—Of—
STEAMBOATS, LAUNCHES, and
SAILING VESSELS.
 1—
IMPORTERS OF   MACHINERY   ANO  MECHANICS
TOOLS OF THE LATEST PATTERNS.
Agents for the New Improved Coal Oil Engines.
VICTORIA, II. V.
Dr. L. T. DAVIS.
Graduate of Queen's University, Montreal.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
NANAIMO, B. C.
Office.—Smith's Building, Commercial St.
Office hours: 10 a.m. to 12; 2 p.m. to 4 p.m;
6.30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
D. DAVIS.
S^ort Bridge, Victoria Crescent,
Nanaimo.
BOOT AND SHOEMAKER.
Only I'(rst-( Ibmsj Material Cued.
No Cheap and Worthlas* Goods Kept by tke Afcett
_.C- "•- ..-WW.-
fff-im
• U.-*t"" WESTWARD HO!
SATURDAY August 7, 1886
Every dry season demonstrates more
and rrore the necessity of having an
abundant and wholesome supply of
water brought into the city. Not only
would the health of the people be safer,
but their comfort would be increased;
the verdure of gardens and open spaces,
the greenery of the trees, would all repay to a certaint extent the cost of the investment. Besides pleasing the eye and
the other senses, the immunity from
any such catastrophe as overtook Vancouver would be worth all the money
spent upon water works. The Nanaimo
Water Works Company have the water,
the charter, and one-third of the money
needed to supply the city with a much-
needed commodity. Why do not those
who have money invested at 4 per cent,
in the Savings Bank take shares in the
Company? The stock-books have been
open since June 2nd. It is the intention of the Company to float the scheme
in Victoria should the people of Nanaimo be so apathetic much longer. We
have been informed of an individual
who has wasted much valuable time in
trying to persuade people that the Company was a monopoly, and everyone
would be obliged to take water from it
and have their wells closed up. That
statement is untrue, and looks malicious
when we know who gave utterance to
it. Anyone who wishes may read the
act of incorporation, and any subscriber is entitled to a copy of the bylaw s; and, if after a perusal of both, he
would still believe our yious friend we
would think his case beyond hope.
The frequent occurrence of shipwrecks in the Gulf of Georgia is calculated to create the very erroneous impression that the Gulf is dangerous.
Nearly all the accidents that have occurred during the past five or six years
have resulted from hugging the western
shore of the Gulf and endeavouring
without pilots to slip throug Plumper's
or the Active Pass, instead of keeping
well to the east and avoiding the intricacies of the archepelago. The Thresher,
the Rosenfeld, the Alki, all came to
grief in the same neighborhood in fine
weather, and with a deliberation that
looks almost premeditated. But when
the strength and variations of the currents and tides through the narrow
passes and among the islands is understood, one can readily conceive how
quickly a large ship would become un-
managable. Safety lies first in carrying
a pilot, secondly in keeping well to the
eastward, and in future accidents occurring in the vicinity of the recent
wrecks with the character it has earned
for itself are likely to be regarded by
the underwriters as being due less to
sinister fortune than to sinister design.
We have refrained from referring to
the libel suits brought against us by
old Dunsmuir, for reasons that will be
made apparent later on. Nothing that
we then published was libelous in any
degree, because in the public interest
a newspaper has the right, and the right
is fully recognized all over the world,
to criticise the conduct of a public man
and to criticise the character of any
public company. A newspaper has the
right to publish a rumour as a rumour,
and no such publication is ever regarded as libelous unless malice can be
proven. In the case of Dunsmuir the
malice has all been upon his side. He
was greatly annoyed (perhaps with reason) because in the public interest we
believed it to be of the utmost importance that the Dominion Government
should thoroughly know the character
of the man they had to deal with, and
in the interests of Canada they should
make a most searching investigation
into his financial standing before paying the $750,000, and handing us all
over to his tender mercies for all time
to come.
The men who threatened to rebel
a few years ago, and who three years
ago denounced the Dominion Government in unmeasured terms from the
floor of the House of Assembly at
Victoria, have been stricken with a
new craze, and offer such adulation to
Sir John Macdonald that one knowing them is tempted to ask: "Is there
any money in it?" We rejoice that they
have at least the wisdom to pretend an
affection for Sir John, because when
we came to the Province, four years
ago, and attempted to defend him, we
were howled down and called "a
Canadian."
Almost Incredible.
New York, July 24.—A remarkable
accident occurred in New York city a
few days since. A woman was walking
along the east side of Sixth aveuue
when suddenly she was seen to whirl up
into the air to the height of thirty feet
or more, and fall bruised and senseless
to the pavement. The cause of this
strange casualty was a telegraph wire,
which had been cut and allowed to
drop across the elevated tracks with one
end swinging down on the sidewalk.
A swift passing train struck the wire,
twisted it about the woman's head and
hurled her into the air. . Although seriously injured, the vietim of this startling calamity may recover.
»«»■
Haitian and Btaeh.
Edward Hanlan, who is now in Boston, says he will shortly leave for England to see if he can't make a match
with Beach. Hanlan said he thought
Mr. Innes, his backer, had posted a
forfeit for him to row a match with the
Australian, but finding that it has not
been done, he will go and try to at-
range a match for himself—that is, if
Beach does not leave for home before
he can get across the Atlantic.
e » »
Estates in Scotland, aggregating 70,-
000 acres, were recently put up at the
London auction mart and bought in
because the highest bona fide bids were
below the lowest valuation. The average British and Irish land owner is no
longer to be envied as a wealthy man.
In many cases he is land poor, and
would be glad to invest his capital in
something else. The Radicals are not
much in love with the idea of the nation buying him out at what he would
consider a reasonable priee. They
would rather starve him out;
sfcl 4 » '
The Esquimau Graving Dock.
Ottawa, July 25.—The Department
of Public Works has been notified by
Contractors Messrs. Larkin, Connolly,
& Co., that the graving dock, at Esquimau, British Columbia, has been completed. The last stone of the, dock was
laid on the 25 th of June, the work having been done in eighteen months. »nd
completed four days before the stipulated time in spite of the fact that all
the heavy plant required bad to be conveyed by rail from Quebec across the
continent, and then by sea to British
Columbia from San Francisco.
A Bravo Girl.
George and Mabel were walking down the
avenue, and George was showing her how
much he knew.
"Yes," he said, "science is constantly
making some pew discovery. Now, there's
the tyrotoxicon."
"What is that ? It must be something, horrid." ...
"It is. It's a terrible microbe that gets
through our entire system. 1 It is caught by
eating ice cream," and here George looked
straight ahead with all thc indifference he had
in stock.
"What kind of a disease does it give you?''
she inquired, suppressing a shudder.
"I don't know, exactly, but I should think
it was something like the small pox, only a
great deal worse."
She didn't speak for two or three minutes.
Then she laid her hand on his arm, and said
in a lew voice:
"George."
"What is it, dearest?"
"I have been vaccinated."
In George's humble estimation the tyrotoxicon is the biggest failure oh record.
>
A LADY LOSES HER JEWELRY.
Thirteen Thousand Dollars' Werth of Diamonds
and Other Gems Stolen from a
Baroness.  -
. Philadelphi, Pa., July 24.—"Pauline, my jewels?" cried the Baroness
von Oppen, with sudden excitement,
as she was about to register at the Hoed
Lafayette yesterday afternoon. "Have
you my jewels?"
"No, madame," replied Pauline Re-
naud, the lady's French maid, "I have
not your jewels."
The Baroness dropped her fan, made
a hasty search, and discovered that she
had been robbed of $13,000 worth of
diamonds, pearls and other gems. The
robbery is supposed to have occurred
in a railway car, during the lady's journey hither from New York. The
Baroness Von Oppen is an elderly Russian lady, and a connection of the
Jerome family of New York. Since
her divorce from her husband, several
years ago, she has been a resident of
England. She came to this country
for travel in the latter part of June.
She is a lady of fine accomplishments,
writing; and speaking French, English,
and her native language with equal
facility. To a reporter she told the
followiug:
, "When we boarded the train at Jersey city it was too crowded for my
maid and myself to secure seats together. We were forced to take seats
far apart. I sat by the side of a lady
of refinement, elegantly dressed and
decidedly good looking. Soon we entered into conversation, which was
very agreeable. I revealed who I was,
and she told me her name. What it
exactly was I now forget. When the
collector came around I opened my
bag. Seeing my jewel case the thought
struck me to show her its contents,
which I did. They consisted of a
diamond necklace, diamond and pearl
pendants, a diamond brooch and bracelets, etc., value in all about $13,000.
At Trenton the lady got off. She had
a large number of small parcels, which
she carried in her arms. In some manner when she was going out, she must
designedly or by accident have taken up
the bag. I began reading when she
left, and did not miss the reticule until
I was about to register."
The Baroness is a lady of high character, and carries credentials from
such well-known Britishers as Lord
Randolph Churchill, Edmund Yates
and Henry Labouchere.
«<»
A correspondent has inspected the
interior of the late King Ludwig's palace at Chiemsee, where no one was
allowed to penetrate during the lifetime of the king. The castle is built of
granite and other stone, and stands on
a baoad eminence which slopes down
on both sides to the lake. The situation is peculiarly charming. In the
interior there is not a single room that
resembles any other in the palace. One
of the floors is of rosewood inlaid with
woods of darker colors in various designs. The tables are of malachite,
lapis lazuli and porcelain. The hall of
mirrors is 260 Bavarian feet long. It
takes 2,500 candles to light it. The
floor of this hall is a light brown rosewood, inlaid with laurel wreaths and
French lilies. The King used to pace
the mirrored hall and other rooms of
this superb palace in the light of 6,000
candles, and would spend the entire
night in this solitary walk. The smoking room of the palace is upholstered
in white satin, with a white satin sofa
in which ate worked sylvan scenes. The
floor is of violet wood, which emits a
delicate perfume.
»< >
A fellow by the name of Rowden
(whose proper name should, however,
be Rowdy) was sentenced the other
day in London, England, for libel upon
a young lady, the Hon. Violet Lane
Fox. ' The libel consisted in his having
hid a notice of his marriage to the
young lady, with whom he was not acquainted, published. He had followed
her from place to'place, and succeeded
at one time in obtaining an introduction
to her, when she promptly turned her
back upon him at a nobleman's house,
which he had entered uniswited. Patience ceased to be a virtue with her at
last, and he ha; gone to jail for 18
months as a cure for his extraordinary
6 of love-sickness,
Iffanaimo and Wellington,,
Importer of English, Eastern and American
MERCHANDISE.
A. E. Johnston.' T. W. Glaholm.
IMMENSE STOCK, PRIME GROCERIES, FRESH PROVISIONS.
mtwsifww
«H UFJfJtJL^ KP
fXJ%
c
Nana±ncio   <&  OJaem-SLirnJia
WHARHNGERS & COMMISSION IV1ERGHANTS,
Importers and Dealers in Groceries, Provisions, Grain, Feed,1
Hay and General Farm Produce, invite inspection of their
large and carefully selected stock of the above line of goods
tow on view at their new store, Bastion Street, under the
Foresters' Hall, Nanaimo. Agents for P. G. S. Company's
line of San Francisco and Portland steamers, P. N. Company'»
East Coast steamers, B. C. Express Company, and Saanich
Lime. In stock, Kurtz's GlgfiPSi The trade supplied with the above celebrated Cigars at Victoria prices.     •
THE CELEBRATED EASTERN LIGHT OIL;
In stock, the quality of which we guarantee. Also Fish Oil,1,
Shingles (sawn and split), Nails in any size and quantity.1
Orders solicited and goods delivered free of charge to anyi
part of the city or vicinity. We make a Specialty in Tea
•tnd Coffee, the latter we roast and grind daily.
NANAIMO DRUG STORE.
E PIMBURY & CO,
DISPENSING
_     Tjim I
Chemists and
Commercial St., Nanaimo, B. O.
All possible care is taken to avoid low priced drugs and
chemicals, it being of the first importance to th$ sick that
preparations used in compounding medicins* should be of
the required official strength. Physicians and others can depend upon having their prescriptions f ai 11 ifully compounded.
A set of chemical apparatus is kept for the purpose of testing
the purity of drugs.     The largest assortment in the city 01
latent Medicines,  Perfumery, Sponges,
Haii* Brusnes, Combs, Tootli Bi-nsnes
Toilet Soaps, Pure Drugs,
In fact all articles usually found in first-class drug stores
A     LARGE     STOCK     OF
BOOKS    AND    STATIONERY
-AX.-W.A.YS  ON" HA.NT*
NANAIMO
PIONEER NEWS AGENCY
.  . 1
Established l&TS.
BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS
A Full Stock of Goods in our Line
AMERICAN S CANADIAN PERIODICALS
To order at Publisher's rates with Premiums, etc.
&, CO.,
VICTORIA CRESCENT, NANAIMO, B. C.
G. BEVILOCKWAY
Crescent Store,
Dealer in all olasses of
GROCERIES AND DRY GOODS
Highest Cash Price Paid for
!FTJ]RS. SKXfcTS and. HUDES lN
. \
H
Lighting the Lachine Canal.
For some time past active preparations have been going on with a view
to lightning the Lachine canal by electricity. The flume building and machinery are now all ready with the exception of some friction clutches, and
it is expected that the canal will be
lighted for the first time by electricity
the latter end of next week or the be
ginning of the week following. It is
the intention to light the canal as far as
No. 3 St. Gabriel lock. Up to the
Wellington bridge it will be lighted on
both sides, as well as the four new St.
Gabriel basins, and the lower end of
the canal in front of the mills and factories. There will be 160 fifty candle
power incandescent lamps placed about
150 feet apart. The cables will be
passed across the canal in four different
places, so as to convey the electricity,
and also provide for the return current.
There will be three sets of cabals to
suit the various places—one a nine-
conductor cable, another a five conductor, and the other a single conductor. Two of these will be placed
at each crossing, one for carrying the
electricity to the lamps and the other
for carrying back the return current,
The dynamo house has been erected
just opposite to the Messrs, Ogilvie's
new elevator.    The tail-race, through
the large weir, will be used to build the
flume in.   The water to run the turbines (water power only *being used)
will be taken from BasbNo. 2, through
two gates four feet square each, or
thirty-two square feet of water in all.
The water will cause no  extra current
or loss of. water through the canal, as
the dynamos will be run only at night,
when there is always a surplus of water
running to waste.    There will be three
56-inch turbines, which will be placed
Under a ,ten-foot head of water, and
each of which will give 80 horse power,
There, will also be three dynamos, one
to light the canal, a second to light the
harbor,, and  the third  a spare one,
which can be used in case anything
might happen either of the other two.
The dimensions of the dynamo-house
itself is 32 by 36 feet, and two stories
in height.   The lower flat will be used
altogether by the driving machinery,
and the dynamos will be on the upper
flat and connected  by belting.   The
machinery is geared by counter shafting, so toat 1,400 revolutions a minute
can be secured if necessary. The lighting of the harbor will also be under the
management of the canal officials.
Nothing Like  It.
There's a symmetry of motion
To my sympathetic notion
In the pitcher as he curves the ball.
Th'ereJs'jin idyl, grea! in dictioji,
Quite exciting as a fiction,
Is the batter when he flics the wall.
And the pose of grace and beauty
Of the catcher doing duty,
Is an epic quite excelling all.
But for poetry of motion,
To my unpretentious notion,
There is nothing like the umpire's gall.
—Chicago Rambler.
He Didn't Want the Earth.
Lynn Union.
He said he had no wish to be opulent, with a
bank-book rotund and distended and corpulent; but he didn't wish to live like the
primitive quakers or butchers or bakers or
candlestick-makers, but in a fine brown
stone surrounded by statues and set in a
lawn of some forty-seven acres.
Applause for dear clothing was not worth thc
winning, he desired no wardrobe of purple
and linen; but he didn't wish to go attired
like a sailor or dress in a uniform suit like
a jailer, nnd all that he wished was some
two dozen changes made up in good style
by a fashionable tailor.
He wished no rich viands to gladden his peptics or to coddle his stomach like chronic
dyspeptics; but he wished a ensine and a
French cook to cater, a professional expert,
no commonplace waiter, no statesque,
boarding-house, imbecile bungler to scatter
his chaos of pie and potato.
He wished no small army of liveried dependents, no uniformed lackeys and cringing
attendants; but he didn't wish to live like
a hermit or miser, but in plentiful leisure
£S better and wiser; and some twenty servants and forty good waiters would make
life worth lieing for him and Eliza.
The population of Chicago, as indicated j
by a new director/just issued, is r<vrr 750,- ]
OOo, an increasj of 50,0:0 in population over J
bst year,
.     . HORNE,
General Blacksmith and Wagon Make;
BASTION STRFFT, NEAR THE OLD BASTION. NANAIMO.
Hying procured thc services ofa first-class Horse-slioer, I am noW prepared to fill al]
Orders with Promptitude; and dispatch.
DONALD    SMITH,
Notary Public, Conveyancer, Accoun ant, and Rea! Estate Agent.
RENTS AND DERTfi OOI.f.ECTEn.
AGENT AT NANAIMO FOR
Pbcenlx   Tire   Insurance Company of London.     Established  1872.     Losses paid ove
£14,'-co,cm Sterling,
Comiiierni;d Union Insurance Ooirpany of London, Capital. $ia,^oo,orv>.
KSKS    A<<El>TEt>   AT   < ITBBEST   It.VJTKS   OF   I»T! 5311■».
OFFICE—Corner op Commercial ami Wharf Stents,
Nanaimo, B. C.
  HHHi- <
LOG : OUT
-TN NEXT ISSUE FOR
.
THE ADVERTISEMENT Ol'
Carthew's Hotel,
John Carthew, F^optr.
COMOW B. C.
IDENTICAL   HOTEL,
NORMAN SMITH,
PROP1F.T0R.    •
VICTORIA  I'RF.SCENT,     VANAIMO.
11 < > <
V..M.HOSIE.
Painter, Grainer, Gilder, Glazier,
a» 1
c. c. Mckenzie,
Land Agent, Cut tern's Home Prtler.rrnsnmer ' rcrj/ntent
■.     .       OFFICE—VICTORIA   CRESCENT.
May be found h the Office at other Horrr-, but ah' •■ry. betsweri *• •.».:•.      rl  % I), n*.
Town Lots and Farms or Sale.
Money to Loan on  Mortgage at /.oio Rates.
Wd
■J
uiisM. io\ Vjs:
Paper-Hanger,   Sign-Writer  and    Musician.
Cor. Wallace and Campbell Sts.  Nanaimo,
DEW DROP HOTEL,
HAMRURTON   STREET -       -       MWNATMn
I      Heorirc Baker.  '" ,'>v >
First cla.s accamXrodalfon'for recnlar Bonr 'era ri id T n-Ice *s     ■-•' *' •■ Tr-v p'- r- ful ,:.
ME4.T.S:
Breakfast, 6no to 3;   Dinner, r< to p;   'npner, -;_   to 6:-r,o.
NONE BUT T'-|- j»5*T ""HWOS
r-.P
tUpion. KWites. Alts, Porter p.id rear's Dispenser! at the Fir
W*\\\\\\m
NANAIMO   BREWERY.
MILL STREET, NANAtt#T.       .0 L\
joilf'mah.her,
PROPRIETOR,
The Lansriowne Brewery
•
.
H. Rosewall. Pror?r;er^r.
Y At i>*.M VL ( I Comox Road.
ALE and POR^FT?.
T.   D.  JONES  &  CO.
(DIAMOND DRILL PROSPECTING COMPANY.)
Are open to receive applications for Borings f jr Coal Oil, Coal
and other Minerals—BY CONTRACT.
ADDRESS
T.    D.   JONES   &   CO.,   NANAIMO.
NTTW    ■BTTTrTT^-R   «HOP.
COSMOPOLITAN   MAWET,
Centnurcla) Street, next door to trie Mlnero'Exchange Hotel. Waaaiiiel
E.   QUENNELL,
Having opened as above, will keep constantly on hand an assortment of
MEATS  AND  VEGETABLES.
sntinuance of the patronage so liberally !
ten years.
Meets' etc., delivered lo all parts of thc City free ol charo?
And hopet t» receive a continuance of the patronage so liberally bestowed A "\ni tie r
ten years.
NEWCASTLE HOTEL,
COMOX  ROADJ  NANAIMO,
H.     P.   SMITH,    Proprietor.
fhe best qualities of WINES, LIQUORS «nd CIGARS dispensed
al ihe Bar.
'.   . i
1 .      !
OLD   FLAG   INty.
Near the Mechanics' Institute, and only three minutes walk from Steamboat Landing,
NANAJMO,' V. I.
J. E. JENKINS, Proprietor.
SUPERIOR ACCOMMODATION FOR TRAVELLERS.
.   in—03-:   .' • • .
The Bar is well rMinniierl with the best of
.   WINES,   LIQUORS,    AND   CIGARS.
THE   NANAIMO   PHARMACY.
G.   H.    BLAKEWAY,
Dispensing Chemist and Druggist, Bookseller and Stationer.
VICTORIA CRESCENT, NANAIMO, B. C.
1 ■      '
nhrlitiwn and New Year's Cards at Blakeway's Drug and Stationet?
Store.
tyPRICES TO  SUIT  THE  TIMES."^B
EDWARD       TJGHES,
Long  Bridge,   Nanaimo.
ROYAL HOTEL AND RESTAURANT.
The    Largest    and   Best    Hotel  in
the   City. v-\
MEALS AT ALL HOURS.
Oysters, etc., Supplied at any Time.
A First Class] FRENCH COOK has charge of   ihe Cuisine
It.    WATKINS,
PROPRIETOR.
; STRONQv SOOTS   AND SHOES  FOR  WINTER WEAR
MEN'S, WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S
CHEP  FOR   CASH.
PROVINCIAL  HOTEL, fl
. '(£'** .       •       JV •Vl6T0RrA • CRESCENT.
j -w"     ~
.Under Che present management this fine Hotel has been re-fitted and re-painted
I ind  now affords
Firsi'Clau Mialt and Accomodations for Travellers and the General Public.
,    '       jjl   The Bar is Supplied  with lire Lrci: of
'    • WINES,      I.HHOHS,      AM»     4IUAIIS.
BILLIARD ROOM ON TWE PREMISES.
i-.,—. .-,, * j-J. P. JOHNSON,      Proprietor.
2T
;-■> .1
JOHJST hooM,
VICTORIA CRESCENT.
SADDLER    AND    HARNESS    MAKER,
Dress Making is carried on in connection with tht above, business
Special attention is invited to a select assortment of Hand Painted Valves
suitable for brackets, etc.
 ,,,,',■ 1 ■.„ -■),.,.   .   .•-■,■'
'   "'I
':       '•
J.   T.   O'BRIEN,
Albert Street Nanaimo, B. C.
	
Teaming and Draying Done on Short Notice.
Wood, and Coal Promptly* Deliverer! to any part of the Citye
ORIENTAL      O T J 50J j ,
■ 11 < v j  > » .'    •. •     ^rVjctoriji  Crescent.
. A EASSfXN,   Proprietor.
rhe >ar, whick has been recently beautified, will always be found well stocked wjth,the
... r . »»•• '>eat brands  of
n   i il-, i ;.j\YS <■'•>.■
MIXES,    I.HtlORS.   AM)    ( KiARS.
A Well supplied RE^I'AURaNt
in connection with tire .-iIiot
G. MONTGOMERY.
Corner Albert and Commercial Streets.
•      ..;', . DEA1.KR   IX
Groceries,     Fruits,   Vegetables,     Cigars,     Tobacco
Candies, etc.
lis nsO   3d:
oj  v    _
,ti9»,b)i   ^<fi^r:COmiGNM^T^     of     i-RESII     frUIT. WESTWARD HO!
SATURDAY August 7, 1886
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS
Home ISTews.
City, Island, And Province.
Mr. George Walker is progressing favorably.
The Mayor of the city and another member of the Hospital Board came to grief a few
days aga on the way to the Hospital.
Jamicson will assert himself sometimes.
Dr. O'Brian has removed from his old
quarters to the house on Haliburton street,
opposite the site of the V. C. Co.'s offices,
whioh were burned down about two year,
ago,
Mtss Lula Collin comes to us with an ce-
tablished reputation as an elocutionist. Too
little attention is paid to this particular branch
of stvdy in our schools. Wc bespeak for
Miss Collins a liberal house on Saturday at
Ihe Institute Hall. This is a class of entertainment that imparts instruction whilst it
entertsins, and is suitable for children equalio
with adults.     The cost of admission is y5
While the train bearing Sir John and Lady
Macdonald was taking on water at the tank
at Port Arthur, one of the photographers
asked permission of Sir John to take his and
her ladyship's photograph. Sir John with a
smile said, All right; fire away. Just at that
moment the train commenced to move, and
Sir John said, I guess you'll have to fire on
the wing. However, the train again came to
a standstill, and the artist secured two excellent photos.
UNITED ANCIENT ORDER OF DRUIDS,
Prosperity Grove, No. 1, of the United Ancient Order of Druids was instituted on Tuei-
day evening, 3rd inst., at the Forester's Hall,
by J. H. Knarston, Special Deputy Grand
Arch, of San Francisco. The Grove starts
under brilliant auspices wi.h thirty-five charter members. After the institution and election and installation of officers, the members,
with their invited guests, adjourned to the
Royal Hotel, where a bountiful spread had
been prepared. After doing justice to the
good things that had been provided, the
balance of the evening was spert in speech
making, song ands toasts by the members.
The officers for the ensuing term are as
follows: N. A., Thomas Harris; V. A., Robert Rivers; Secretary, J. T. Greenwell; Treasurer, John Hilbert; Conductor, Jos. Ganner '
I. G., Thomas Wakelam; O. G.. Nicholas
Johns; R. H. B. to N. A., Mark Bate, Sr.j
L. H. B. toN. A., George Bevilockway; K.
H. B. to V. A., James Andrews; L. H. B. to
V. A., Jos. Forrest. J. P. A., Wm. H.
Becker. Medical Examiner, Dr. L. T. Davis.
The next meeting of the Grove will be
held on Monday evening, at which eight new
members will be initiated.
The Order of Druids is one of the most
ancient Orders. In centuries preceding the
Christtan Era, and at the time of the invasion
of France and England by the Romans, the
Druids was the most prominent and powerful
Order. They presided over the religious ceremonies of the people and were the judges,
legislators, etc. The Order first assumed its
present character in England in 1781.
Itt objects are: To unite men together, irrespective of nation, creed or tongue, for mutual protection and improvement; to assist
socially and materially, by timely council and
instructive lessons, by encouragement in business, by assistance to obtain employment
when in need; to foster among its members
the spirit of fraternity and good fellowship;
and, by a well regulated system of dues and
benefits, to provide for the relief of the sick
and destitute, the burial of the dead, and the
protection of the widows and orphans of its
deceased members.
Mount Benton a la Fret Prow.
Mr. Editor: In the last issue of the Free
Press I notice a remarkable statement. He
says: "From Benson's hoary peak could be
seen the famed city of Vancouver, while our
noble water-way, with its archipelago of
islands, looked like 'shining ribbons.'" This
really sounds sublime; but I must say taat
the editor should make an ascent upon his
own account brlore he talks so knowingly. I
am constrained to think that he presumed
largely upon his information from the gentlemen and ladies who visited Mount Benson's
"hoary" peak. In the first place, the famed
city of Vancouvar can not be seen from Benson's apex; and—well, the water and archipelagos look about as much like ribbons as a
needle resembles an anchor. Fiat justitia,
ruat caelum.
The Mt. Benson Guide.
NOTICE.
ALL PERSONS OWING AC-
COUNTS to the Estate of JOHN
WHITFIELD are hereby notified to pay
the same to the undersigned.
C. C. iMcKENZIE,
Victoria Crescent.
Bankrupt Sale 11
-OF THE-
WHITFIELD
STOCK!
WITHOUT RESERVE FOR CASH
ONLY
Comprising ASS
A FINE LOT OF Ladies.
uses and Child-
_ Boots  and   Shoes,
Clothing and Underclothing* Hats, Jewellery, Lcath-
J. E. BTJLMER,
Manager
Subscribe
Now
For
Westward Hoi
Institution ol a New Grow In Nanaimo,'
Published Every
WEDNESDAY
AND
:    .--
SATURDAY.
A Live Readable
Ne-vrspaper,
The Paper for the People.
Local
Provincial
General
FIRE!
A. G. HORNE & SON,
"Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
If you wish to insure your property
you cannot do better than   call upon I
SSUteKS S3 CR0CER1E8, PROVISIONS & CLOTHING,
the vEtna Insurance Company of Hart-
ford, Conn.     Risks are accepted at CRESGHHT,   J®£L&A3MOu
current rates. *    { -
 j SUGARS""^'x*'ra lal'ge importation of finest grade* Bold ]
in barrels or smaller quantities at Lowest Possible Prices.
tt.  CEAIG,
Blacksmith.
Herses Shod with Scientific Accuracy by a SMITH
of many years' experience.
Waggons of all'Kinds Made to Order.
MPAHUN8 PROMPTLY OONE AT LOW RATES.
GENERAL BLACKSMITH1NG DONE WITH
EXPEDITION AND ACCURACY.
BASTION STREET, NANAIMO, B. C.
Notice.
A. K.  JOHMSTONetCO..   t,ave     Deen
< ppointed Agents for the
SMIITIBH COLUMBIA riKEINSUHABiCE
COMPANY,
to act for Nanaimo and vicinity, and
are now ready to accept risks.
M. H. Cowan,
Secretary and Treasurer.
Victoria, Ma* tist. 18M.
Ladies' Fashionable Bazaar.
Mrs. J. C. McGregor,
VICTORIA   CRESCENT.
THE PRINCIPAL DRESS-MAK
I    ing and Millinery Establishment in the
City.   Carries a large assortment of--
HATS, BONNETS,
FLOWERS, LACES,
SILKS, FANCY GOODS,
AND
LADIES' APPAREL.
Employs the Largest Force of Skilled Assist
ants of auy Dry House in town.
Agent for the "WHITE"' Sewing Machine
PALACE RESTAURANT
AND
CHOP HOUSE.
OYSTERS, CHICKENS,   GAME,
and every Delicacy in Season.
Served at all hours and in the best style.
FIRE!
Liverpool and London and Globe
Insurance.
JBTNA INSURANCE CO.
OF HARTFORD, CONN.
o	
RISKS ACCEPTED AT CURRENT RATES.
W. K. LEIGHTON,
Agent.
The tows of the Day.; hirst bro'S,
—:o:—
COMMERCIAL ST.,  NANAIMO.
The above Firm carry a Full Stock
I of Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardware,
ONLfX   50  CENTS i Agricultural Implements, Jewelry, Cut-
Price:
FOR 3 MONTHS
lery and Fancy Goods, Sic,
IMPORTED DIRECT.
Island & PortlandFlour
HAMS AND BACON,
Teas ancl Canned. Goods.1
!„v.:        Full assortment direct from packers.
BUTTER, CHEESE, FRUITS
AND VEGETABLES,
A large and varied stock of Clothing sold cheap for cash. '»
The Farmers' Store, Comox.
The Orescent SI ore, Nanaimo,
ARTHUR BULLOCK,
DRY GOODS AND MILLINERY
Go to Arthur Bullock's, the leading and fashionable dry
goods house of Nanaimo, where the public will find a large
and complete stock of Dry Goods, Millinery and Men's Fur«
nishing Goods. Being a direct importer from the European
and Eastern markets, I am enabled to offer Goods at most
reasonable rates. My stock of Millinery is now most complete, and I can show a more fashionable and stylish class of
goods than any other house in British Columbia. Some
elegant styles in
LADIES' CMiMIli
GREAT BARGAINS IN fWjjjjjg AND BLANKETS.
Terms Cash. ARTHUR BULLOCK, Orescent Store.
ACENT NORTH BRITISH AND MERCANTILE INSURANCE COMPANY.
Jab. Abbahs.
D. J. MoLhan.
VANCOUVER CLOTHING HOUSE,
Jets. .AJtoreixrLS & Co.
Large and complete stock of Hen's, Youths', Boys' and Children's
OVERCOATS
ULSTERS.
QUAUTITY, QUALITY AND CHEAPNESS NEVER BEFORE EQUALLED 11
N111IHO.
Shirts, Collars, Gloves, Gents' Furnishings, Mitts, Ties, anu
Braces are Specialties.     A direct importation of a large
lot of Underclothing, also a large parcel of French
HAND-MADE SHOES AND GERMAN SLIPPERS
Never before introduced into this Market.
NO TROUBLE TO SHOW GOODS.
WESTWARD HOI will be delivered by the carrier as above
TO ANY
Part of the City or Vicinity,
50 cents for Three Months.
Apply to the   Carrier:
Charles Van Houten,
WALTER WILSON,
IMPORTBR OF
Stoves, Grates, Ranges, Pumps,
Lead Pipe, Zinc, Etc.
AND MANUFACTURER OF
TIM, COPPER, ZINC AND SHEET IRON WARE.
AlSO METAL ROOFER.
■EPAIBIXU DOME AT SHORT KQTKE.
COMMERCIAL STREET, NANAIMO.
,"»Il"J
Farmer's Market.
E. HODGSON, Proprietor.
COMMERCIAL STREET,
NANAIMO.
Having purchased the above POPULAR MARKET from Mr. David
Hoggan, I will keep constantly on
hand a full assortment of
MEATS   AND VEGETABLES
Orders for Hotels, Families and
Shipping supplied at short notice, and
delivered free of charge.
J" Dealer in Horses, Cattle, etc.*1^
'■:!     UV ' 1(J .1.' 1   • .  '
DISCOUNT FOR
CASH.
We have lately received a large—is
fact the largest, cheapest, and best line
of
ENGLISH MERINO
UNDERCLOTHING,
from $1.50 a suit upwards,
A large and well selected stock of
English clothing from $15 to $22 per
suit. We have the largest stock of
white and colored shirts, hats, cape,
and ties, boots and shoes in Nanaimo.
eJSTThe ?bove goods will be sold
at five per cent, discount for cash.
COME ONE I COME ALL I   *
JAMES ABRAMS & CO.

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