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The Western Clarion Jan 13, 1906

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Full Text

 WESTERN  CLARION
Published in the Interests of the Workinq Class Alone. '%'"-
JAN 15 $08
a**-
This ia   aee
NVKBBS    0W0I
Vancouver, B. C,  Saturday,  January 13, 1906.
-p
* ■ 1    1   1 1 1 11 r
Subscription MM
nn Tata
81.00
IR. RALPH S-VHTH CRITICIZED
though an Acknowledged Authority on Th.ology, Doubt Exists as
to Hi- Infallibility in Regard to Mundane Affairs.
Ir. Ralph _' ' .« recently address-
a Sunday night corgivgatlon
in
local    Methodist    church.     We
lote the following from the Naiiai-
Herald's      port of Mr.    Smith's
ion.     With  the theological    en-J
the    address    I have        quarrel;
Smith's guess    is     is good   ir
t  is  likely     to  be.     1   Uurtiore
I only references mads 'o   P -m-
affairs:
r.  Smith said:    "That life genei-
litnl    been very  pi  i.-vunt   and
;ht  lo him, as he bad '■ "   nany
rs tried to see.t iat   ths good   of
was greater thai,  the  ond,    the
-dng8 were  li-ore  mi_iurou&    than
mi ..'-•'  .ie:-, the joys    than   tho
frows, i.  >i-'ved irom a broad and
eral stttflfrpoij'.    The s»>ciel _ior-
L'fonnation 01    -ie race depended
n the reform .t*-     of tho units of
race;     strai.^e e. cuses,  however,
te sometimes giv«.*i   for the discov-
weo-'-nesa  of  out   '-haracter,    for
j was  -ho toct   ai   of hei-'-iii'W.v
once,  tho teach  ig  that wc  were
persona'*/ to    lame,  we  all lnited wen uiesse:   and ali'O transfer-
them    to our children,  but   the
tardl-,   doctrine thet sought to ex-
Iratc       .'If at the expense   of   its
cnts win      ' loo'ish    as    il   was
irardly.       ,'ersonnl    responsibility
the    basis    of    character  and
wing thc blame on our ancestors
jld only result in excuses for conned faults.    Then  there  was   the
■K-sition     to    Maine environment,
extent  of    the influence on     our
Jracter was  no doubt incalculable
to blame them for our weakness
to    encourap; and excuse   our-
f.-es,   for   we  must  remember   that
(troinm it was the creation of hu-
niiy    und     we    could not expect
pn     to    b<* better thin the race.
1st •'...» individual,  then tho envir-
(iood individuals were    an
point    iruarantee ol Rood   environ-
»t, bm f?i*od environment was not
jara-i" •    of    good    individuals',
is    ' vays sweetly saying it Is
Iter fu.   utir on.    There    waa    the
Ier doc tun    of despair, everything
|ng to the   levil; the Almighty had
the Univeise, and everythinfea waS
rse, even the foundations    of   so-
jty.   This doctrine was tin     hopt>-
cry of the   i-v/mpe' w "  and was
tainly not ....... had cre-
Kl the Anglo-Saxon race. '
The mental attitude of the aver-
person is simply a reflex of the
i-.s and disappointments, ot the
cesses and failures which go to
up every-day life. If the gam-
strikes a streak of luck, whether
1 result of "rigging thu game,"
blind etissedness of fate or e lau-
ble exercise of the "indivi . ial in-
It&ve," there is no virtue in being
»sed at the result. Much Ies-' is
[possible o bane a scheme of so-
economy upon such a fr-cak
nidation. To construct a theory
life from the f ragmen tory cupir-
ce of one individual, be that self
| any other, is to war, r as far
tho facts as one lilt varies from
Jther. Yet this '• thp mistake
lit Mr. Ralph Smitl t akes.
Is individuals, we a ■ lies sum tool two factors, iniieiitud probities, placed in contact wi tl an
hronment. Our inheritan - 1k>-
|gs mainly to the physicn'.. N t-
insists in endowing -<s vith ie
lokcd nose or the re Inir of an
kestor.       Medical m-c    shows
It in our blood run ue dis•■ i-es
jour parents. Tern, .ancc people
ert that a craving tor drink- n
}nsmittcd from parent io offspring
th<* latter as it may, U 6 former
demonstrates scientific truth.*.,
because the s tine uuths arc
P»ted as having been writ :en by the
ker of the Almighty b.v thousand
Srs ago, it forms one of the few
plges that spans, tho ru.f between
nee and religion. Mentally we
erlt a capacity, a can"as withl un-"
elUgfble outlines of a 'detune that
|y be completed in a thousand dif-
ent ways. Coining into the world
I bear a relationship to tho sp-rios
ly. We bear absolutely no rela-
fnship to any particular mental or
>ral plane. The germ ot a given
itality may exist, but environ-
it is the soil and climate in
jich tho germ must unfold and de-
Dp. Environment is the hand
lit paints tho canvas which deter-
ses our mental status. A tree
ited on a bleak, wind-swept
st, cut back by winter frosts and
nsr by the hot sands of summer
grow gnarled and twisted and
of symmetry. In like manner,
human being brought op in ig-
Innco and poverty, worked to the
lits of emdnirance, and snubbed by
|se whom he falsely believes aru
superiors, will develop blunt 1
allies and an ill-balanced charac-
t The samo fundamental laws
Kern all life. The human hieing Hike
plant is limited to the possiblli-
Of the soil and atmosphere in
It grows. Again this fuct
a, ready acquiescence in modern
1 Society makes no apolof"
[taking the child from a disrepu-
nt. .
ilnont characteristic of man
tt-wer of adaptation. While
plastic stages his   aharacter
may have been moulded by a kindly
environment. Later on in life a conflict arises between the fundamental
law of life—self-preservation—and'the
ethical laws of moral rectitude, in
other words economic necessity demands one line of action, moral rectitude demands another, l'.conomic
n-*cessit,v fights with tho stomach;
moral rectitude fights with the bfrain.
A warm sympathy exist* between
these two organs; the stomach is tlie
lire-grates and boiler; the In ain is
tho engine. When the steam gets
low in the boiler the engine slews
down, resulting in a corresponding
change in tho work iccoimilished.
The slower vihratilons create u different form of light. 'tfonxl locti-
tudo sinks into the world ol ajhstract
things. A live ass is seen to lie
more beautiful than a dead lion,
and in spite of moral qualms, thc
individual dec-ides, while in Rome, to
do as the Romans do.
The variation in prison population
between summer und winter, between "good times" and "hard
times," speaks plainer than words
of the influence of economic environment upon morals. The New York
State Board of Lunacy estimates
that seven thousand young women
in New York and Brooklyn go insane every year owing to lack of
sufficient food and clothing. How
many more become prostitutes? How
many become thieves? How manv
commit suicide? Hid all this nisery
occur through some deficiency of
character in these women, or is it
traceable to an evil economic environment? Are the thousand and one
frauds, adulterations, falsifications
and hypocrisies which engulf un all,
and the enormous increase of suicide and crime of every description
which damns the present day to be
explained by a few self-satisfied
words about character? What are
the factors that operate upon, and
influence character? The every-day
surroundings in which we live. This
too, is environment. Then, if a
lowering of the general character be
observed wc must seek its cause in
the environment. Want, and thc
fear ot want, breeds rogues, vagrants, murderers, suicides, lunatics,
prostitutes nnd drunkards, and again
on the other hand, a thief may bu
so placed that cupidity finds its
greatest gratification in being honest. Man in his activities vill conform to the basic laws of energy-
will follow the line of least resistance.
To say that "good individuals are
an absolute guarantee of .cod environment," when the t*ood individual can only appear as a resultant
of a good environment, is to reason
in a circle; to beg the question, in
fact.
It is true that hope has an energizing influence, but if hope be not
based on justifiable grounds it becomes blind credubllity, like the ostrich trying to evade its pursuer by
hiding its head in thc sand. Its effect is to weaken rather than to
strengthen. No doubt the "doctrine
of despair, everything going to the
devil," grates on the ears of thejtaa*ii
whose life work has been to lift himself oui, of his class. But how does
the condemnation of the existing economic order fit in with the everyday experience of the worker? It
may be "the cry of the incompet--
ent," but incompetent to do what?
Incompetent to lift ourselves out of
our class.
The present economic order as
founded upon the exploitation of a
propertyless class. That class can
no more release itself from exploito-
tiontion without remodeling the
whole economic system than tho lower story of a building may be removed without changing thc character of the edifice.
To talk of "individual initiative"
and "character" as a remedy for
working-class exploitation is merely
a play upon words—a lullaby. It is
true that on individual may by cunning, climb on to the shoulders of
his fellows and out of his class, but
all the runners in a race cannot win
n prise. The ethics of tho prize ring
forbids the victor gloating over his
victory. Tho tenth man in a well
may climb a column of his follows
and reach the surface; but having
done bo, his duty is to take prompt
measures to rescue his benefactors,
not to pat his chest and call attention to his own superior abilities in
escaping their predicament. It is
class activity that is necessury to
solve a class problem. We might
lift ourselves out of our class, but it
would be at the expense of our fellows. We believe that by concentrated action the whole class can be
lifted and placed on a footing of
manhood instead of merchandise.
This hope appeals to us more strong-*
ly than the personal hope of being
classified among the successful—the
competent.
Working to this ond we necessarily
come In conflict with those who
would have affairs remain as they
arc, no better evidence of which is
required than the fact that instead
of appealing to the intellect,; the appeal is made to racial prejudice and
ignorant vanity by a re-hash of the
worn-out drivel about Anglo-Saxon
superiority.
.   ' P.  WILLIAMS,
Nanaimo, B.C., Jan. 10, 1906.
A telegram from Winnipeg, published ln a local evening d»!Jy says:
"That Winnipeg is profitable for
loan sharks, who prey upon the mis.
fortunes of the illiterate, and make
exorbitant profits out of the necessities of tho poor and financially embarrassed, was shown by some
astonishing facts which were presented to tho Trades and Labor
Council. W. H. Reeve, the president
of the Council, brought before the
members striking instances of the
grasping usury of loan companies
now flourishing in the city, and operating e-iwcially in the North End.
He told of a man who secured tbe
loan of 930 for three months. He
was compelled to pay $12 for use
of $80, but the company deducted
tho f 12 for interest when the transaction was made, so that the man
only received $18, while paying back
to the firm $30. They had an additional interest on $12 in the meantime. It figures out at over 160
Iter cent, interest." In the same paper, or any Vancouver daily for
that matter, may be found advertisements of "money to loan," con
cerns which can skin Winnipegs shy
locks by a block. Indeed, the advertisement of one -outfit of sharks
states in plain figures "10 cents per
dollar per day." -t seems brutal
enough for capitalist property to
rkb the workers of the product of
their labor in the field of production. But for the ruling class to allow such damnable hold-up and
swindles to be perpetrated upon men
whose necessities drive them well-
nigh to desperation, is inconceivable
—even under capitalism. But it's a
glorious system, and there's so much
"prosperity."
 o	
"Collier's" has cast Vancouver's
horoscope and discovers that the city
is likely, in the not distant future/
to become a great metropolis with
a few millions, more or less, of a
population. This prognostication
has set the local business mouth to
watering in fond anticipation of the
glorious era of exploitation and profit-mongering ,that is of necessity implied in the fulfilment of such a rosy
prediction. Judging from the result
of similar experiences elsewhere it
might be well to suggest to the
workingtmen that if Vancouver should,
be builded to metropolitan proportions they will own mighty little of
lt when the job is completed.
PREDICT COMING  EXPLOSION
Railway Magnates and Others Foresee tbe Collapse of American Democratic Institution As a Result of Congested Economic Conditions.
In the opinion of Mr. James J.
Uill we are fast reaching the point
at which, according to European wri--.
ters of the last century, American
democratic institutions will explode
and the man on horseback will arrive. That is to say, the public
lands, or free lands, as they are
sometimes called, are being rapidly
taken up, and will soon be no relief
for the congested economic conditions of the crowded centers of population.
In a letter to the national irrigation congress, Mr. Hill calls attention to the fact that since 1898,
when 8,453,896 acres of public land
were taken up, the amount has risen year by year until,, in 1908, it
amounted to 22,650,928 acres. Mr.
Hill declares that most of this public domain has been gobbled up by
"lumber kings and'cattle barons,"
who are depriving bonafide settlers
of the land to which they are entitled.    He says:
'"Except in a few secluded spots,
where the influence of the railroad
companies as colonizers has been exercised to secure actual settlement
on their lands, the influx of actual
cultivators is so small as scarcely to
be reckoned with. Those who go
upon government land in our day for
the purpose'of making homes are a
handful."
Commenting on these facts in a
well written article, the New York
Evening Mail says:
"A handful upon 22,650,928 acres!
It.is true—most dismally true. Thero
must be an end to this. It is as
much a fact now as it was in the
days of Caesar and of Gracchus in
Rome, and as it was when Count
Rumford saved Bavaria from its
hordes of sturdy beggars, that the
only salvation of a slum-cursed nation is access to the land. In one
way or another that must be had.
"The ring ot land-grabbers must
be throttled, or the nation will suffer for it. The irrigation -works,
with their chance for small settlers,
are an alleviation of the situation,
but only an alleviation. National
assistance to irrigation is equivalent
to saying, 'It there is any land left
so arid and desolate that the lumber kings and cattle barons do not
want it, wo will spend hundreds of
millions to make some of it available for use by the people.' But if
we have statesmen who are capable
of handling tho subject, they will
regain possession for the people of
the vast domain that has been stolen."—Kansas City Journal.
What the "lumber kings and cattle
barons" have been doing with what
is commonly termed the public domain, Mr. Hill and his kind have
been doing with the means of transportation. Tho former will havo a
long road to travel yet before they
succeed in as completely seizing upon the countries' lumber and pastoral resources as tho latter have
upon its transportation facilities. In
either event it is but the logical
working out of the present system
of property in the means of wealth
production which has for its underlying motive the reducing of the
wealth producers (workers) into proletarians and the coinage of profits
out of their wage servitude.
Mr. Hill's apparent disapproval of
the action of "lumber kings and
cattle barons" may be readily understood when lt is rcmemhW-d that
the railroads would derive a much
larger volume of traffic from a territory possessing a numerous population engaged in diversified industry, than from ono devoted exclusively to lumbering or cattle-raising.
There is usually a well-defined material reason for tho opinions of
foremost citizens of the Jim Hill
type.
The New York Mail is somewhat
mixed in its reasoning. The only
"salvation of a slum-cursed nation"
no longer lies In access to the land
alone. This might have been the
case in former times when the mat
ter of fashioning    the resources    of
A NOTED CERMAN SOCIALIST
August Bebel Acknowledged by Capitalist Press to be a Vigorous
Champion of the Movement for Labor's Emancipation.
the earth into form for human consumption, was a process carried on
by the individual, practically unaided by his follows. Today the man
with access to the land is practically helpless unless coupled therewith
he also posessos access to the machinery of production, which implies
all that constitutes the great modern system of making and distributing things, factories,, mills, shops,
mines, railways, steamships, etc.
Granted access to the land, while
the modern machinery of production
and distribution remain as at present—capitalist property—the product
of the worker upon the land must
needs be surrendered into the hands
of that property, and the toiler
again stripped ,of all right to his
means of existence, will be forced to'
once more drift as a derelict upon
the troubled sea of wage-slavery. All
of which means the perpetuation of
the slum-curse that the Mail practically admits now rests upon the nation.
Subterfuge after subterfuge may
be tried in order that human society may escape the curse that has
been called down upon its own head
because of its unsufferable ignorance
and folly in so long allowing itself
to be class-ruled and class-outraged.
The curse that rests upon humanity-
today is the curse of capital. That
curse must be borne patiently, even
to the bitter end, or that portion
of human society upon which it foils
most heavily (the working class)
must rise in its might and bring
to an end its baneful sway.
Not back to the land, but working class mastery of all the means
of producing and distributing wealth
should be the slogan of tbe workers.
With the resources of the earth and
the machinery of production rescued
from the polluting embrace of capital, and made free of access to every human being for the purpose of
supplying himself with the things
needful for his existence and comfort, that which the Mail refers to
as thc "slum-curse" will vanish as
dew before the morning sun.
The setting free of the means of
labor, and the consequent freeing ot
labor itself implies a political upheaval such as the world has probably never seen before. This upheaval must of necessity come >at the
hand of the working class itself. The
present ruling class (capitalist) is
daily proving itself incompetent to
deal with the gigantic powers that
have sprung forth as a result of the
mathematical precision with which
the development of capital has concentrated the wealth of tho world
and impoverished the class that produced It. The present system of
property can no longer conserve the
needs of human society. -Not only
Jim Hill and tho "Mail," but thousands of others proclaim it from the
house-tops, though perhaps unwittingly. Every appeal or effort that
is made to relieve the distress that
prevails in every center ot population of any consequence, proclaims
to the world that capitalist property has been "tried and found wanting." That capital cannot provide
for its dependents. That the rule of
capital must be broken and that
form of property bo swept from the
board to make room for another
better suited to human needs at this
staire of history.
Statesmen are needed, and thoy
must needs be statesmen in every
sense of the word. Men who realize
and understand the trend of development all down through the ages, and
can thus recognize the nature of the
next scene shifting upon the great
stage of human events. They must
be men who, realizing the task in
hand, will leave no stone unturned
to accomplish it, and not stop to
count the cost. These men can come
only fron the ranks of labor for this
class in human society alone is Interested in their coming. The tlmca
are ripening. We shall not have long
to wait.
The following, which appeared in
the News-Advertiser, of this city,
on Jan. 9th, is a manifestly fair account of the position held- in the
German Socialist movement by Herr
Bebel, and a deserved tribute to the
courage with which he defends it.
The Western Clarion is not disposed
to hero-worship and attaches but
little importance to individuals no
matter how strong their personality
or commendable their characteristics.
That which makes Bebel and others
what they are upon the stage of events, is the movement behind them,
and whose spokesmen and warriors
they are. lhe German Socialist*
movement hurls its challenge into
the teeth of the German ruling class
through the instrumentality, of Bebel
and others, and that challenge cannot be ignored because it embodies
the program of the next politico-economic change in human society made
absolutely imperative by the economic development of the past. The
voice of a Bebel is merely the voice
of a new order of human society announcing its approach. Bebel, with
his powerful personality and dauntless courage, is but a human epitome of the movement whose creature he is; a movement virile, bold,
aggressive and all-conquering, because it carries within itself the key
that alone can unlock the gates of
the future to still further human pro-*
gross towards a more perfect civilization. The render should remembjen
that in the following, it is the German Social Democracy that is pictured, and not Herr Bebel as an individual or a personality, apart
from it:
"Bebel—Buclow," the title of so
many Gorman newspaper articles
during the Reichstag Session, is one
of the best evidences of the position
occupied in German public life by
the acknowledged leader of the Social Democratic party.
August Bebel, a turner by trade,
is practically the only man in the
Reichstag who fearlessly criticizes
Uie Kaiser's policy, and so much importance is attached in governing
circles to the effect on the German
people of this criticism that it is almost invariably roniicd to at once
bv the exponent of that policy, the
Imperial Chancellor, Prince von Bue-
low.
This rhetorical duel between the
leader of the "men who possess nothing," as the German Socialists
call themselves, and the Kaiser's
highest official, has become one of
the great features of the Reichstag
debates. The news that "Bebel will
speak tomorrow" fills all the raller-
ies of the House, and "Bebel spricht'
(Bebel is speaking) is one of the few
messages that bring the members of
every party to their places.
COMPELLING ATTENTION.
Bebel is described as no orator,
as merely a clamorer, but the whole
House listens attentively to him for
two or two and a half hours. The
press accuses him of merely stringing together sentences which contain nothing new, which become
wearisome with their repetition of
the old story, but every newspaper
in the Empire, whether representing
the ultra-Conservatives ot the radical factions, devotes articles to every speech he makes on Imperial politics.
This may be partly due to the
fact that behind Bebel are three million voters representing a vast mass
of discontent which might one day
take inconvenient shape; it is equally due, however, to the Socialist
leader's personality.
The members of the Reichstag are
not moved by his eloquence as are
the great crowds of working men
and women, whom he influences in a
way that no other public speaker
in Germany can equal, but they appreciate a man who has the couraire
to speak his mind. In Great Britain the policy pursued by tho government is tho policy of a party
whose confidence the Ministers possess; in Germany the only policy
pursued is tho policy which the Kaiser personally considers will be beneficial to the people. The MinBsters
and Secretaries of State are appointed by the Kaiser, and remain
in office ,'ust as long as they please,
being paid by the people. The Kaiser thus dictates his Government's
policy, and, moreover, he also himself enters the arena of politics.
The ordinary combatants in this
arena adopt the tactics that have
been employed in similar situations
before today, and they look on with
bated breath when the despised Socialist leader stands up manfully to
dispute the ground with the other
leader, who has such enormous advantages over him.
A REBUKE TO "YOUNG MASTER'
With all his vivacity, Herr   Bebel
knows exactly how far he can go,
though his boldness has sent many
a thrill of excitement through the
House.
Perhaps his most daring venture
into the field of personalities was hill
public rebuke, from his place in thet
Reichstag some sessions ago, of the
German Crown Prince. His Imperial Highness had made a remark
about the Socialists which the party
considered derogatory to them. Be-'
bel gently reprimanded the '.'young
master" for this, and as suavely recommended "the young man" to be
more careful in his language when
speaking of a large body of citizens
who might one day be his subjects.
The President stood up excitedly
with his hand on the bell, bu*. as
no name was mentioned he could
not stop the speaker, though he
could see by the faces of the members that every body knew to whom
Bebel was referring.
Herr Bebel is always intensely in
earnest when addressing the House
on what he considers to be the mistaken policy of the Government. His
eyes glisten, he shakes his head till
the wealth of his grizzled hair looks
like a lion'e mane, he gesticulates
freely, his right arm is constantly in
movement, and he is perpetually
pointing with his finger to his sworn
(enemies, the reactionary parties, now-1
deprecating, now threatening, now
prophesying. This, too, lends a certain charm to his speeches, for the
Reichstag debates are usually intensely dull.
His power in his own party is enormous, so much so, that his political opponents style him "the Dictator." He and his co-leaders use
every endeavor to prevent factions,
knowing that their strength lies in
keeping well together. Radicalism
in Germany is practically effete and
Liberalism seems to have lost all
its stamina, so that the cause of
"the people" is left in the hands of
the Socialists.
A LIFE-LONG COMBATANT.
Dissension, sometimes strife, there
must be in such a large party as
the Social Democrats have now become, and Herr Bebel evidently
thinks that seemingly arbitrary measures are occasionally advisable in
the interests of unity. At the present moment there is especial need of
an undivided front; millions . of workers are suffering severely under a policy which taxes them for the benefit
of the great landowners, and the
government is about to ask the
sanction of thc Reichstag to fresh
taxation.
The power ot Bebel's elO(|uence
over "the masses" and the strength
of his character in the councils of
the party will undoubtedly assure
him a predominant influence over the
policy of the great party as long
as he lives. This influence is being
felt at the present moment, for there
is reason to believe that to it, probably in spite of opposition on the
part of less advanced leaders, is due
the more pronounced revolutionary
tactics that the party is openly
adopting.
For 43 years, since he was 22
years old, Herr Bebel has fought
manfully by word of mouth and in
writing for the betterment of the
position of the working class. He
has in this time braved fearful odds,
for the *hole forces of Junkerism
and reaction have unceasingly been
arrayed against him.
No amount of scorn, ridicule, and
persecution has even daunted him;
indeed, their only effect has been to
increase his popularity with his followers. He has several times been
in prison or "high treason against
the German Emperor," and only the
immunity enjoyed by members of
the Reichstag has saved him from
being frequently punished for plain
speaking there.
"THE NEW MODEL."
He is a comparatively rich man.
For he retired from his turnery business with a fair competence, and his
best known book, "Die Fron und der
Socialism," has been roost successful
from a pecuniary point of view. He
is' constantly being twitted by his
opponents on this account; he is told
that he does not act up to the principles he teaches, that it is unjust to
tho party which wages such deadly
war against capitalism when the
leader himself is a capitalist. His
standpoint is, however, that it is a
principle of Social Democracy that
every man is entitled to keep and
enjoy what he has earned by his
own honest , labor, whether manual
or mental.
Herr Rebel's ideals will not be
realized in his lifetime, but he has
achieved a monumental work in the
interests of the working class, and
he and his colleagues have built up
a power which will never bo trampled under foot.
A handbill calling a meeting of unemployed, in Bolton, Eng., wound
up as follows:
Her Ladyship: "Doctor, do tell mo
tho truth, what is the real cause of
my illness?"
Doctor: "Well, madam, you have
been feasting too much lately, eat
dry toast and drink soda water for
the next three days and you will be
all i<ght."
Unemployed Workman: Just tell
me what's the matter with my wife?
Doctor: "Why, man, she is starving for want of food, she has no disease, but is very weak. Give her
port wine, eggs and chops.
Unemployed Workman: Yes, but
where shall I get them from?
Doctor: Ohl ask the (Prime) ma-
Utsr,
. :('f  HE WESTERN  CLARION
Published in the Interests of the Working Class Alone.
355.
•-■■mmm
-3f
■JAN 15 1066
%
i
Vancouver, B. C,  Saturday,  January 13, 1906.
■5t
IR. RALPH SMITH CRITICIZED
igh an Acknowledged Authority on Tbsology, Doubt Exists as
to Nis Infallibility in Regard to Mundane Affairs.
ir. Halph Smith recently address-
ta Sunday night congregation   in
local    Methodist • church.    We
\le the following from the Nanai-
ilerald's report of Mr.    Smith's
mon,     With  the  theological   end
[the    address   I have no quarrel;
Smith's guess    is    as good   as
Bu is likely    to  be.     I therefore
ic only references i.mde to   u un-
affairs:
|r. Smith said:   "That life gener-
liad     been  very  pleasant   and
1  to him, as he had for   many
its tried to see. that tho good   of
was  greater than  the bad,    the
tshiiiKh  were more numerous   than
misfortunes,  the joys    than   the
rrows, if viewed from a broad and
oral standpoint      The social morn-formation of  the  race depended
km the reformation of thu units of
ra'-e;     strange excuses,  however,
re sometimes given for the discov-
(ed weakness of our character,   for
era was Uie doctrine of hertdl-U")
Jtlm-nci",   tho teaching  that we were
jt  iwrsonaHy  to blame,  we all incited weaknesses and also transfer-
id them     to our children,  but   the
fwardly doctrine that sought to ex-
erstt Itself at the exj-enae   of   its
rents wns as foolish     as    it   was
Iwardty.       Personal    responsibility
sh    the    basis    of    character and
Ironing the blame on our ancestors
wild only result in excuses for con-
guod faults.    Then   there   was    thc
u'-tiMlioii     to    blame environment,
extent  of    the influence on     our
larai'tcr   was no doubt  incalculable
pt to blame them for our weakness
M to    encourage and excuse   our-
Ives,   for   we  must   remember   that
|\iromikt*nt  was the creation of hu-
imiy    end     we    could not expert
■nn     to     be better than the race.
Irst  the individual,  then the euvir-
|mw-nt.     Good indtvldualH were    an
solute guarantee of good   eoviron-
i-ni, but good environment was not
guarantee    of    good    individuals,
ope is always «■*«■<• tly saying it is
jitter further on.     There    was    the
per doctrine of despair, everything
Ding to the devil, the Almighty had
ft the Universe, and everything *a*
|or»>,  PV4*n   the  foundations    of   SO-
ety.   This doctrine was the    hope-
as try of the incompetent and was
|rrtiiitily not  the stud that had cre-
•<' the Anglo-Saxon race."
j The mental  attitude   of  thc   avcr-
■I- person  is  Minply  « reflex of  the
)pos  and  disappointments,    of    the
esses  and failures which   go    to
Ji-l-e ufi every-<lay life,     lf tbe gam-
■ r str*«-s a streak of luck, whether.
a  result   of   "rigging   the  game,"
t Mind nissedness of fate or a lau-
oxercise of the "individual  in-
laiive,"   there is no  virtue in being
eased at the result.     Much less   is
possible  to base a scheme of   so-
|nl    economy    upon    such    a freak
limitation.     To construct  a  theory
life from  the frogmen'ory operates nf one individual,  be  that self
an.-,   other,  is to  wander as     far
\om ihe facts as one life varies from
Bother.       Vet    this Is tho mistake
Jim  .Mr.   Ralph Smith  makes.
I An individuals, we are thc sum toll of two factors,    inherited     pro-
lvttles,  placed  in contact  with   aa
|vironn»ent.      Our    inheritance    be-
mainly   to  tho  physical.     Nate insists in endowing us with thc
Inked nose or the red hair of   an
kestor.        Medical     science    shows
It in our blood runs thc diseases
U>ur parents.     Temperance people
i-rt that  a craving for drinks   is
Hsmitted from parent to offspring
th.- latter as it may,  the former
demonstrates   scientific   tniihs,
because     the    same   truths  are
Itinl as having been written b.v the
V of tho Almighty six  thousand
l* ago,  it forms ono uf  thi   few
cs that  spans  the gulf between
and religion.       Mentally   we
a capacity, „ canvas with un-*
plgfble outlines of a picture that
\\ie completed in a thousand dif-
wnys.   Coming into thc world
tra  relationship tithe species
Wo h«ar absolutely  no   reia-
Jip to any particular mental or
plane.    The germ of a given
ulity    may    exist, but environ-
ls    tho    soil    and climate in
tho germ must unfold and de-
I'-nvironmcnt     is   the hand
paints  tho canvas  which deter-
our    mental status.      A   tree
*d     on     a     bleak,  wind-swept
»". cut back by winter frosts and
by  the hot sands of   summer
I" grow gnarled and twisted   and
of symmetry.    In like   manner,
human being brought up in   Ig-
"nnco and poverty,  worked to   (he
f^ta ot endurance, and snuht>ed   by
whom he falsely believes   are
■•* superiors,     will  develop blunted
rult'os and an ill-balanced charac-
fr-  t Tho same    fundamental   laws
fivcrn all life.   The human living Wko
™ plant is limited to tho posstblli-
[?■ ot tho    soil and atmosphere   in
nu* it grows.      Again   this    fuct
ids a ready accnilosconco in modern
"asre.     Soole.y    makes no apoloev
*>r taWng the child from a dlerepu-
taWo parent.
A prominent characteristic of man
!' ,ln P°wer of adaptation. While
m   its   plasUc stages his   aharacter
may have been moulded by a kindly
environment. Later on in life a conflict arises between the fundamental
law of life—self-preservation—and'the
ethical laws of moral rectitude, in
other words economic necessity demands one line of action, moral rectitude demands another. Economic
necessity fights with the stomach;
moral recti tude fights with the brain.
A warm sympathy exists between
these two organs; tho stomach is the
fire-grates and boiler; the biuin is
tho engine. When the stoam gets
low in the boiler the engine slews
down, resulting in a corresponding
change in thc work accomniished.
The slower vibrations create a different form of light. Moral lecti-
t'lde sinks into the world of abstract
things, A live ass is hem to be
more beautiful than a dead lion,
and in spite of moral qualms, thc
individual decides, while in Koine, to
do as the Hotnans do.
The variation in prison population
between summer and winter, between "good times" and "hard
limes," speaks plainer than words
of the influence of economic environment upon morals. The New York
State Hoard of Lunacy estimates
that seven thousand young women
in New York and Brooklyn go insane every year owing to lack of
sufficient food and clothing. How
many more become prostitutes? Hew
many become thieves? How nianv
commit suicide? Did all this nisary
occur through some deficiency of
character in these women, or is it
traceable to an evil economic environment? Are the thousand and one
frauds, adulterations, falsifications
and hypocrisies which engulf us all,
and the enormous increase of suicide and crime of every description
»hic-h damns the present day to be
explained by a few self-satisfied
words about character? What are
thc factors that operate upon, and
influence character? Thc every-day
surroundings In which we live. This
too, Ih environment. 'lhn, if a
lowering of tbe general character be
observed we must seek its cause in
the environment. Want, and thc
fear of want, breeds rogues, vagrants, murderers, suicides, lunatics,
prostitutes and drun-ufd-, and again
on the other hand, a thief may be-
so placed thut cupidity finds its
greatest gratification in being honest. Han in his activities vill conform to the bask laws of energy—
will follow the line of least resist-
on. c.
To say that "good individuals arc
an absolute gtiarunt«* of k*c. .'I environment." when thc good individual can only appear as a resultant
of a good environment, is to reason
in a circle; to beg the ifuestion, in
fact.
It is true that hope has an energizing influence, but if hope be not
based on justifiable grounds it becomes blind creduliility, like the ostrich trying to evade its pursuer by-
hiding its heud in the sand. Its effect is to weaken rather than to
strengthen. No doubt Uie "doctrine
of despair, everything going to the
devil," grates on the ears of ihataatir
whose life work has been to lift himself out of his class, liut how does
the condemnation of the existing economic order fit in with the everyday experience of the worker? it
may bo "the cry ot the inro-mpet-
ent," but incompetent to do what?
Incompetent to lift ourselves out of
our class.
The present economic order ds
founded upon the exploitation of a
property less class. That class can
no more release itself from exploitn-
tiontion without remodeling thc
whole economic system than the lower story of a building may be removed without rhungiirg the character of tho edifice.
To talk of "individual initiative"
and "character" as a remedy for
working vlasN exploitation is merely
a play upon words—a lullaby. It is
true that an individual may by cunning, climb on to the shoulders of
his fellows and out of his class, but
all tho runners in a race cannot win
n prim, The ethics of tho prize ring
forbids the victor gloating over his
victory. Tho tenth man in a well
may climb a column of his fellows
and reach the surface, but having
done .so. his duty is to toko prompt
measures to rescue his benefactors
not to pat his chest and call attention to his own superior abilities ln
escaping their predicament. It is
class activity that is necessary to
solve a class problem. We might
lift ourselves out of our class, but it
would be at the ex|ienso of our fellows. Wo beliove that b.v concentrated action the whole class can bo
lifted and placed on a footing of
manhood instead of merchandise.
This ho|>e npi-eals to us more stronlg-1
ly than Uie personal hope of being
classified among tho successful—the
competent.
Working to this end we necessarily
come In conflict with those who
would have affairs remain as they
aro, no better evidence of which Is
required than the fact that instead
of appealing to the intellect,, the appeal ls made to racial prejudice and
ignorant vanity by a re-hash of Uie
worn-out drivel about Anglo-Saxon
superiority.
P. WILLIAMS.
Nanaimo, B.C.. Jan. 10, 1900.
a      ,i i i"   n ss sir *
tafcwcrlplloB Urtoe
Sl.00
A telegram from Winnipeg, published ln a local evening ds'Jy says:
"That Winnipeg is profitable for
loan sharks, who prey upon the mis.
fortunes of Uie illiterate, and make
exorbitant profits out of the necessities of the poor and financially embarrassed, was shown by some
astonishing facts which were presented to the Trades and Labor
Council. W. H. Reeve, Uie president
of the Council, brought before the
members striking instances of the
grasping usury of loan companies
now flourishing in the city, and operating especially in the North End.
He told of a man who secured the
loan of 930 for three months. He
was compelled to pay $12 for use
of $30, but the company deducted
the $12 for interest when Uie transaction was made, so tbat Uie man
only received $18, while paying back
to the firm $30. They had an additional interest on $12 in the meantime. It figures out at over 160
par cent, interest." In the same p_-
per, or any Vancouver daily for
that matter, may be found advertisements of "money to loan," con
cerns which can skin Winnipegs sh\
locks by a block. Indeed, Uie advertisement of one outfit of sharks
states in plain figures "10 cents per
dollar per day." -t seams brutal
enough for capitalist property to
rkb the workers of the product of
their labor in the field of production. But for Uie ruling class to allow such damnable hold-up and
swindles to be perpetrated upon men
whose necessities drive them well-
nigh to desperation, is inconceivable
—even under capitalism. But it's a
glorious system, and there's so much
"prosperity."
,   .         0
"Collier's" has cast Vancouver's
horoscope and discovers that the city'
is likiely. in tbe not distant future,'
to become a great metropolis with
a few millions, more or less, of a
population. This prognostication
has set the local business mouth to
watering in fond anticipation of the
glorious era of exploitation and profit-mongering that is of necessity implied in Uie fulfilment of such a rosy
prediction. Judging from the result
of similar experiences elsewhere it
might be well to suggest to the
working-men that if Vancouver should",
be builded to metropolitan proportions they will own mighty little of
It when the job is completed.
PREDICT COMING  EXPLOSION
Railway Magnates and Others Foresee tbe Collapse of American Democratic Institution As a Result of Congested Economic Conditions.
In the opinion    of Mr.  James   J. j
Hill we are fast reaching the   point !
at which, according to European wn- j
ters of the    lost century,  American
democratic   institutions   will  explode
and thc man on horseback will    arrive.      That    is    to say,  the public
lands, or free lands,    as    they    are
sometimes    called, are being rapidly
taken up, and will soon be no relief
lor  the    congested    economic conditions of thc crowded centers of population.
ln a letter to Uie national irrigation congress, Mr. Hill calls attention to the fact thut since 1898,
when 8,453,896 acres of public land
were taken up, the amount has risen year by year until,, in 1903, it
amounted to 23,650,9__ acres. Mr.
Hill declares that most of this public domain has been gobbled up by
"lumber kings and cattle barons,"
who ure depriving bonafide settlors
of tbe land to which they are «-ntit-
led.     He says:
"£xcept in a few secluded spots,
where the influence of the railroad
companies as colonizers has been exercised to secure actual settlement
on their lands, the influx of actual
cultivators is so small as scarcely to
be reckoned with. Those who go
upon government land in our day for
the purpose-of making homes are a
handful."
Commenting on these facts in a
well written article, the New York
livening Mail says:
"A handful upon 22,650,928 acres!
It is true—most dismally true. There
must be an end to this. It is as
much a fact now as it was in the
days of Caesar and of Gracchus in
Home, and as it was when Count
Kumford saved Bavaria from its
hordes of sturdy beggars, that the
only salvation of a slum-cursed nation is access to thc land. In ono
way or another that must be had.
"Thc ring of land-grabbers must
be throttled, or the nation will suffer for it. The irrigation works,
with their chance for small settlers,
are an alleviation of the situation,
but only an alleviation. National
assistance to irrigation is equivalent
to saying, 'If there is any land left
so arid and desolate that Uie lumber kings and cattle barons do not
want it, wo will spend hundreds of
millions to make some of it available for use by the people.' But if
we have statesmen who aro capable
of handling Uio subject, they will
regain possession for thc people of
thc vast domain thnt has been stolen."—Kansas City  Journal.
What tho "lumber kings and cattle
barons" have been doing with what
is commonly termed tho public domain, Mr. Hill and his kind havo
been doing with the means of transportation. The former will have a
long road to travel yet before they
succeed tn as completely seizing upon the countries' lumber and pastoral resources as tho latter have
upon its transportation facilities. In
either event it is but Uie logical
working out of tho present system
of property lu the means of wealth
production which has for its underlying motive the reducing of the
wealth producers (workers) into proletarians and thu coinage of profits
out of their wage servitude.
Mr. Hill's apparent disapproval of
the action of "lumber kings and
cattle barons" may be readily understood when it is remembered Uiat
tlie railroads would derive a much
larger volume of traffic from a territory possessing a numerous population engaged in diversified industry, than from ono devoted exclusively to lumbering or cattle-raising.
There is usually a well-defined material reason for tho opinions of
foremost citizens of the Jim Hill
typo.
Tho New York Mail is somewhat
mixed in its reasoning. The only
"salvation of a slum-cursed nation"
no longer lies in access to the land
alone. This might have been tha
case in former times when the mat
ter of fashioning    the resources    of
the earth into form for human consumption, was a process carried on
by the individual, practically unaided by his fellows. Today the man
with access to the land is practically helpless unless coupled therewith
he also posesscs access to the machinery of production, which implies
all that constitutes the great modern system of making and distributing things, factories,, mills, shops,
mines, railways, steamships, etc.
Granted access to the land, while
the modern machinery of production
and distribution remain as at present—capitalist property—the product
of Uie worker upon the land must
needs be surrendered into the hands
of that property, and tbe toiler
again stripped of all right to his
means of existence, will be forced to*
once more drift as a derelict upon
the troubled sea of wage-slavery. All
of which means the perpetuation of
Uie slum-curse that the Mail practically admits now rests upon the nation.
Subterfuge after subterfuge may
be tried in order that human society may escape Uie curse that has
been called down upon its own head
because of its unsufTerablc ignorance
and folly in so long allowing itself
to be class-ruled and class-outraged.
The curse that rests upon humanity
today is the curse of capital. That
curse must be borne patiently, evtn
to the bitter end, or that portion
of human society upon which it falls
most heavily (the working class)
must rise in its might and bring
to an end its baneful sway.
Not back to tho land, but working class mastery of all the means
of producing and distributing wealth
should be thc slogan of tbe workers.
With the resources of Uie earth and
the machinery of production rescued
from the polluting embrace of capital, and made free of access to every human being for the purpose of
supplying himself with the things
needful for his existence and comfort, that which the Mall refers to
as the "slum-curse" will vanish as
dew before the morning sun.
The setting free of the means of
labor, and the consequent freeing of
labor itself implies a political upheaval such as the world has probably never seen before. This upheaval must of necessity come at the
hand of the working class itself. The
present ruling class (capitalist) is
daily proving itself incompetent to
deal with the gigantic powers that
have sprung forth as a result of the
mathematical precision with which
the development of capital has concentrated the wealth of the world
and impoverished the class that produced it. The present system of
property can no longer conserve the
needs of human society. Not only
Jim Hill and the "Mall," but thousands of others proclaim it from the
house-tops, though perhaps unwittingly. Every appeal or effort that
is made to relieve the distress that
prevails in every center of population of any consequence, proclaims
to the world that capitalist property has been "tried and found wanting." That capital cannot provide
for its dependents. That the rule of
capital must be broken and that
form of property be swept from the
board to make room for another
better suited to human needs at this
stos-c of history.
Statesmen are needed, and thoy
must needs bo statesmen in every
sense of the word. Men who realize
and understand the trend of development all down through the ages, and
can thus recognise the nature of the
next scene shifting upon the great
stage of human events. They must
be men who, realizing the task in
hand, will leave no stone unturned
to accomplish it, and not stop to
count the cost. These men can come
only fron tho ranks of labor for this
class in human society alone is interested in their coming. The times
are ripening. We shall not have long
to wait.
A NOTED CERMAN SOCIALIST
August Bebel Acknowledged by Capitalist Press to bo a Vigorous
Champion of tbe Movement for Labor's Emancipation.
The following, which appeared in
the News-Advertiser, of this city,
on Jan. 9th, is a manifestly fair account of the position held in the
German Socialist movement by Herr
Bebel, and a deserved tribute to the
courage with which he defends lt.
The Western Clarion is not disposed
to hero-worship and attaches but
little importance to individuals no
matter how strong their personality
or commMi-laMii their characteristics.
That which makes Bebel and others
what they are upon Uie stage of events, is the movement behind them,
and whose spokesmen and warriors
they are. The German Socialist
movement hurls its challenge into
the teeth of the German ruling class
through the instrumentality, of Bebel
and others, and that challenge cannot be ignored because it embodies
the program of the next politico-economic change in human society made
absolutely imperative by the economic development of the past. The
voice of a Bebel is merely the voice
of a new order of human society announcing its approach. Bebel, with
his powerful personality and dauntless courage, is but a human epitome of Uie movement whose creature be is; a movement virile, bold,
aggressive and all-conquering, because it carries within itself the key
that alone can unlock the gates of
the future to still further human pro-*
gress towards a more perfect civilisation. The render should rernemrjen
that in the following, it is the German Social Democracy that is pictured, and not Herr Bebel as an individual or a personality, apart
from it:
"Bebel—Duelow," the UUe of so
many German newspaper articles
during the Reichstag Session, is one
of the best evidences of the position
occupied in German public life by
the acknowledged leader of Uie Social Democratic party.
August Bebel, a turner by trade,
is practically the only man in tbe
Reichstag who fearlessly criticizes
the Kaiser's policy, and so much importance is attached in governing
circles to the effect on the German
people ot this criticism that it is almost invariably reoiied to at once
bv Uie exponent of that policy, Uie
Imperial Chancellor, Prince von Bue-
low.
This rhetorical duel between Uie
leader of the "men who possess nothing," ns the German Socialists
call themselves, and the Kaiser's
highest official, has become one of
the greot features of the Reichstag
debates. The news that "Bebel will
speak tomorrow" fills all the e_ller-
ies of the House, and "Bebel spricht'
i Bebel is speaking) is one of the few
messages that bring Uie members of
every party to   their places.
COMPELLING ATTENTION.
Bebel is described as no orator,
as merely a clamorer, but the whole
House listens attentively to him for
two or two and a half hours. The
press accuses him of merely stringing together sentences which contain nothing new. which become
wearisome with their repetition of
Uie old story, but every newspaper
in the Empire, whether representing
Uie ultra-Conservatives ot Uie radical factions, devotes articles to every speech he makes on Imperial politics.
This may be partly due to Uie
fact that behind Bebel are three million voters representing a vast mass
of discontent which might one day
take inconvenient shape; it is equally due, however, to the Socialist
leader's personality.
The members of Uie Reichstag are
not moved by his eloquence as are
the great crowds of working men
and women, whom he influences in a
wny that no other public speaker
in Germany can eqUal. but they appreciate a man who has the courasre
to speak his mind. In Great Britain thc policy pursued by tho government is the policy of a party
whose confidence the Ministers possess; in Germany the only policy
pursued is the policy which the Kaiser personally considers will be beneficial to tho people. The Ministers
and Secretaries of State are appointed by the Kaiser, and remain
in office just as long as they please,
being paid b.v the people. The Kaiser thus dictates his Government's
policy, and, moreover, he also himself enters the arena of politics.
The ordinary combatants in this
arena adopt the tactics that have
been employed in similar situations
before today, and they look on with
bated breath when tho despised Socialist leader stands up manfully to
dispute thc ground with Uie other
leader, who has such enormous advantages over him.
A REBUKE TO "YOUNG MASTER'
With all his vivacity,  Herr   Bebel
knows exactly how far he can go,
though bis boldness has sent many
a thrill of excitement through the
House.
Perhaps his most daring venture
into the field of personalities was hid
public rebuke, from his place in Uie.
Reichstag some sessions ago, of Uie
German Crown Prince. His Imperial Highness had made a remark
about the Socialists which the party
considered derogatory to them. Be-'
bel gently reprimanded the '.'young
master" for this, and as suavely recommended "the young man" to be
more careful in his language when
speaking of a large body of citizens
who might one day be his subjects.
The President stood up excitedly
with his hand on the bell, but aa
no name was mentioned he could
not stop the speaker, though he
could see by the faces of the members that every body knew to whom
Bebel was referring.
Herr Bebel is always intensely in
earnest when addressing the House
on what he considers to be the mistaken policy of the Government. His
eyes glisten, he shakes his head till
the wealth of his grizzled hair looks
like a lion'e mane, he gesticulates
freely, his right arm is constantly in
movement, and he is perpetually
pointing with his finger to his sworn
bnemies, the reactionary parties, now*
deprecating, now threatening, now
prophesying. This, too, lends a certain charm to his speeches, for the
Reichstag debates are usually intensely dull.
His power in his own party is enormous, so much so, that his poli-
Ucal opponents style him "the Dictator." He and his co-leaders use
every endeavor to prevent factions,
knowing that their strength lies in
keeping well together. Radicalism
in Germany is practically effete and
Liberalism seems to have lost all
its stamina, so that the cause ol
"the people" is left in the hands of
the Socialists.
A LJFE-LONG  COMBATANT.
Dissension, sometimes strife, there
must be in such a large party as
the Social Democrats have now become, and Herr Bebel evidently
thinks that seemingly arbitrary measures are occasionally advisable in
the interests of unity. At the present moment there is especial need of
an undivided front; millions of workers are suffering severely under a policy which taxes them for the benefit
of the great landowners, and the
government is about to ask the
sanction of the Reichstag to fresh
taxation.
The power of Bebel's eloc|uence
over "the masses" and the strength
of his character in the councils of
the party will undoubtedly assure
him a predominant influence over tbe
policy of the great party as long
as he lives. This influence is being
felt at the present moment, for there
is reason to believe that to it, probably in spite of opposition on Uie
part of less advanced leaders, is due
the more pronounced revolutionary
tactics that the party is openly
adopting.
For 43 years, since he was 22
years old, Herr Bebel has fought
manfully by word of mouth and in
writing for the betterment of the
position of the working class. He
has in this time braved fearful odds,
for tbe <rhole forces of Junkerism
and reaction have unceasingly been
arrayed against him.
No amount ot scorn, ridicule, and
persecution has even daunted him;
indeed, their only effect has been to
increase his popularity with his followers. He lias _averal times been
in prison oi "high treasoi against
the German Emperor," and only Uie
immunity enjoyed by members of
Uie Reichstag has saved him from
being frequently punished for plain
speaking there.
"THE NEW MODEL."
He is a comparatively rich man.
For he retired from his turnery business with a fair competence, and his
best known book, "Die Frau und der
Socialism," has been roost seccessful
from a pecuniary paint of view. He
is constantly being twitted by his
opponents on this account; he is told
that he does not act up to the principles he teaches, that it is unjust to
Uio party which wages such deadly
war against capitalism when the
leader himself is a capitalist. His
standpoint is, however, that it is a
principle of Social Democracy that
every man is entitled to keep and
enjoy what he has earned bv his
own honest . labor, whether manual
or mental.
Herr Bebel's ideals will not be
realised in his lifetime, but be has
achieved a monumental work in the
interests of the working class, and
he and his colleagues have built up
a power which will never bo trampled under foot.
A handbill calling a meeting of "n-
emplo ed. in Bolton, Eng., wound
iip as   ollows:
Her Ladyship: "Doctor, do tell mo
the truth, what is the real cause of
my illness?"
Doctor: "Well, madam, you have
been feasting too much lately, eat
dry toast and drink soda water for
the next three days and you will be
all right."
Unemployed Workman: Just tell
me what's the matter with my wife?
Doctor: "Why, man, she is starving for want of food, she has no disease, but is very weak. Give her
port wine, eggs and chops.
Unemployed Workman: Yes, but
where shall I get them fro.a?
Doctor: Oh I ask the (Prime) Minister, w
two
iHliiuiriri-_nsi
Tata* W*fitt_t_*   {%em%\m,    V/stt^™?*      **!****  C6Mfl_B-A.
Hatniflay ... January i3t
u
Ib taUoB
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^t^%MW^**S%>*iWN*»WW
Saturday In ths
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Saturday .. .January 13,1906.
BARKING UP THE WRONG TREE
'A no inconsiderable portion of the
Socialist press of this western continent Is in a continued torment because of what it looks upon as criminality in high places. It is fearfully wrought up over the crime of
tbe amalgamated as told by Law-
son, the exposures incidental to the
New York insurance investigation,
the inside working of the Beef Trust,
end the thousand and one similar af-t
fairs that make up the story of
thievery, graft and swindle as practiced upon each ot_er»by tbe members of that choice coterie of confidence operators that constitute the
modern business world.
Granted that all of tbe accusation^
made by Uio Lawsons, Steffins, Tarbells and others of like kidney be
true, and that the big business pirates and kings of finance have compelled countless thousands of lesser
thieves to walk the plank, it still
affords no reason why anyone who
views things from the standpoint ot
the working class should shed a tear
or lose a moment's sleep. The producers of wealth are not robbed of
their product through amalgamated
copper deals, or Standard Oil and
Beef Trust schemes to crush out "independents" and other small-fry com-i
peUtors. Such schemes, along with
those of Uie insurance companies,
hanks, loan, investment and other
like concerns, are purely incidental
to the disposal of the proceeds of
the robbery of labor. This robbery
is effected in the field of producUon.
All of the phenomena complained of
logically follows as a sort of aftermath.
If one bunch of business experts
succeeds in despoiling another bunch
of any share of Uie plunder resulting
from the robbery of labor, there is
no logical reason why the already
fleeced workers should be disturbed
over it. It would be all the same
to them whether the proceeds of the
robbery were divided equally among
the participants, or some should obtain a larger share than others. In
neither case would any benefit accrue to those who had been fleeced.
Ia the indiscriminate scramble to
secure possession of as much as possible of the wealth stolen from labor la the field of production, it is
reasonable to suppose tbat the participants will resort to oftentimes
questionable practices to gain their
ends. That is they will be questionable from the standpoint of those
who get the worst of tbe deal. But.
however lr-d may be their complaints there is no good reason why
the sympathy of those should be
aroused who stand neither to win nor
lose by the transaction.
Some papers are just now engaged
ln making much fuss over tha affairs
of the Panama Canal, and are asserting that graft galore is in evidence in connection with the scheme.
In this they see the "people's money" being squandered to enrich a
lot of grafters and boodlers. As the
money is to come from tbe United
States treasury, and even tho novice
In Socialist philosophy knows that
government, like all Uie rest, to be
but an "executive * * • for managing the common affairs of tbe
whole bourgeoisie," (Communist
Manifesto), this money belongs to
the capitalist class of that country.
They are the "people" in this case,
and If they see fit to use their own
money for the purpose indicated, it
is their own business. Tha, wage-
mule or other outsider who would
dare question the transaction ought
to be put In the chain-gang for life
as an Impudent intermeddler in oth
er people's affairs. In Uie building
and subsequent operating of the
"big ditch" somo persons will be
robbed, but it will not be Uie "people" referred to. It will be the
Workers who build and operate it. As
long as capitalist property holds
sway, this and all similar enterprises w 11 be used as levers to
mjmma profit from the hide and carcass of tho only useful portion of
the human family, the working people.
Out the stupendous robbery practiced upon; the working class In the
field of wealth production accrues
the enormous volume of plunder over
which Uie business fraternity has
such a "monkey and parrot" time
in "dividing-up." So long as tbe
workers may be kept Interested in
Uie squabbles occurring in tbe ranks
of the business world, so long will
they fall to discover the source of
their own poverty and misery, and
take proper measures for relief.
The plunder of labor at the nahds
of capital in the field of wealth production is made possible solely by
virtue of the ownership and control
of the means of production by the
capitalists. This gives to capital
absolute control of the products of
labor, and out of which it is continually adding to its already unwieldy bulk and enormous power.
This form of property Is, at this
stage of the game, made possible
only by the capitalists holding control af the powers of the state, I.e.,
government. By the exercise ol
those powers the rights of capitalist
property are kept intact and its victims, the wage.slaves, held in subjection. The very keystone of the
arch of human slavery is now. ns it
always was, government with its
military arm as a last resort. In
other words, slavery rests upon the
law of force, whether Uie form of
that slavery be, chattel, feudal, or
wage.
Presumably, chattel masters, and
feudal lords played scurvy tricks on
one another upon occasion. This,
however, by no means altered the
status of their slaves. The same is
true of capitalists and their wage-
slaves of today. To whatever extent capitalists may swindle each
other, Uie fact still remains that
the wage-slave is still a wage-slave,
and compelled to surrender his hide
down to the last sguare inch to the
particular capitalist gang that may
for the moment have Uie cinch upon
his means of living. The wage-
slaves' deliverance from capitalist ex
ploitation depends upon his breaking
the rule of capital over his means of
living. This means the striking
down of capitalist property. The
blow cannot be struck except by the
workers wresting Uie powers of government from the hands of their capitalist masters and using those powers to set themselves free.
To fix the attention of the workers,
upon the robbery which is practiced
upon them in Uie field of wealth production, and to persistently point
out to them the line of action to be
followed in order to bring it to an
end, should be the duty of the Socialist and tbe Socialist press. In
deluding themselves aad others -into
believing that the various grafting
schemes referred to are of any other
interest to tbe wage-slave than to
merely show the inherent rottenness
of capitalism's own family affairs,
they are barking up the wrong tree.
o
the future be adorned with Uio mot-
tos mentioned it should meet with
approval of tbe "World," because
of Its well known loyalty to '"facts"
It's no doubt weU-meaaing little
"squirt" at the men who "attack
religion, the marriage ceremony and
the home," is quite in line with its
conception of facts. It really
sounds good coming as it does from
a sheet that upholds the capitalist
system of property which has molded religion into a hypocritical mask
for its thievish profit-mongering proclivities, made of the marriage tie a
grotesque farce, and the home to at
least thousands of the working class
a thing unattainable, and to other
thousands a coarse travesty upon a
dog kennel. Bc that as it may,
however, the silly "World" squirts
forth tbe following as a clincher:
•"The chief point in the platform
which indicates the socialistic aim
they are driving at is included in the
following paragraph from their manifesto: 'The substitution of text
books on history, ethics and political economy written from the working-class standpoint for those now
in use that uphold and honor the
capitalist system. Especially -will
we oppose the cultivation of the Jingo and military spirit in the yowig.
and the glorification of murder and
robbery under the guise of war and
conisliest, and. instead, seek to inaugurate courses of exercises havinr-
foT their object the physical and
mental improvement of Uie children.' "
Surely that is a clincher, and taken from thc wicked socialists at that (
It clearly proves all that the World
insinuates about the murderous proclivities and general all around cus-
sedness of the had socialists, as any
one can readily see. No wonder
thev consider themselves afuelched.
Vancouver is especially fortunate in
being honored with a newspaper,
whose intellectual pabulum is of sm-h
an exceptionally high order as to
preclude the possibility of its field of
usefulness being "cribbed, cabined,
and confined," to the narrow and
vulgar limits of advertising cheap
real estate schemes, interspersed
with an occasional futile" attempt at
sandbagging one railroad in the interest of another equally as bad.
But    the   Socialists.      Squelched?
Most decidedly so.
o
ANOTHER AGREEMENT.
trick and device Imaginable will
order to win   out
Just as
there are
necessary
of trade,   so are
of  lnbor power.
SQUELCHED.
The Vancouver Socialists are now
squelched. The "World," the local
squirt-gun that "prints the facts,"
took a shot at them on Monday last
that was a prize-winner for logic and
consistency. It all happened inconsequence of the Socialists putting
up four candidates for the School
Board Election on Jan. 11. Under
scare-bead lines, tbe following hot
squirt was delivered:
"Are the peculiar doctrines of local socit/ism—the kind of thing
which Mr. Hawthornthwaite, M.L.A,
promulgated a few weeks ago—to be
inoculated In the public schools? Is
Uie young idea of this city to be
taught to shoot straight at every
owner of property with a bullet or a
ballot, or both? These are no idle
questions, for the socialist party,
quietly reckoning on public apathy
in all that concerns the schools—and
not without justification—-has four
candidates in the field and is out to
elect them all to the board of school
trustees of which body they would
form a majority. If they succeed,.
Uie blackboards of the classrooms
may be adorned with such mott.os
as, "Profits for the masters, wages
for the slaves," "Workers,- you have
nothing to lose but your chains,"
and so forth. The schools of the
city would then be in Uie hands of
men who attack religion, the marriage ceremony, and tbe home." N
Of course everybody in "Vancouver
knows that neither Hawthornthwaite
nor any other sane Socialist ever
advocated any shooting "straight at
every owner of property" with bullets, ballots, or anything else. This
docs not necessarily deter Use
World from printing the "facts"
however.    Should the blackboards in
Word comes that the 100,000 skilled men in the building trades of
New York city have signed agreements with the employers covering
periods from one to three years. The
prevailing wage in most of the
trades is to continue, but the house-
carpenters and the cabinet makers
secure a slight advance. The agreement dates from Jan.  1.
Some of those persons who are
afflicted with the trade union microbe of the alleged revolutionary
brand are howling like coyotes because the New York men made their
agreement to begin Jan. 1, instead
of May I, upon the grounds that at 1
its expiration, if upon the latter
date, the opportunity for pressing
demands for an increase would bc
better. At that period of the year
building operations are in full swing
while the contrary is true of the
mid-winter season. Of course, the
credit for securing Jan. 1, as the
date of agreement is given to the
"leaders" of the "pure and simple"
unions, and is pointed out as an act
of treachery upon their part, that
secures to the employers no inconsiderable advantage in the making
of future agreements.
The wise trade unions at this
stage of the game, are not looking
for trouble. The circumstances of
the labor market will bring trouble
enough of themselves. If wise, they
will take advantage of the most favorable terms that ran he obtained
now, without laying plans reaching
too far Into the future. This seems
to be what the unions of New York
City have done in Uie present instance. As trade union action, it
is logical. Trade union action is
nothing but traders' action, i.e., Uie
action of sellers of labor power, and
its action must be determined by
those same circumstances and conditions that surround the sale of merchandise in general. In the buying
and selling of merchandise, the buyer as a rule holds ah advantage in
determining when delivery shall be
made and other matters incidental
to it. This is more particularly
true of the purchaser, of the merchant
dew labor power. If employers in
making agreements with employees
prefer to have such agreements terminate with the year rather than at
some other period, it is not within
the power of ths employees to gainsay it. It is hardly worth while
for their "leaders" to connive with
Uie employers for the purposo of fixing such date, even were they inclined to do so.
The same iiquabbllng that occurs
within the ranks of sellers of sll
other commodities or merchandise,
occurs within the ranks of those who
sell labor power. Combination will
work against combination, and    ev
cry
be resorted to In
in    the    delightful    game
more business men than
to meet the requirements
there more sellers
This condition affords the groundwork for all sorts
of bickering and quarreling within
their respective camps.
There is much of enmity being
stirred up within the ranks ot the
workers in the United States at Uie
present time through rival organizations of labor. Each In engaged in
bitter attack against the others, und
each has about equal justification
for its action. These quarrels are
bound to arise out of the conditions
now prevailing in the labor market
of capitalism. Such quarrels will
continue so long as the workers have
no conception of their position in
capitalist society, nor of thc necessary line of action to lift themselves
out of it.
The acUon if "labor leaders" is
typical of the makeup of their following and the purpose of their or-
gaiiiiUitu.il. An ortfani'-atioii can ex..
press nothing in advance of the conception of thos.* who constitute its
membership. Though blatant members of. and spokesmen for a trade
union may voice the most radical or
revolutionary' 'sentiments, the fact
still remains that the organization
cannot go beyond trade union lines,
i.e., dealing with the circumstances
surrounding the sale of labor power.
A striking instance of this is afforded in the recent attempt at building
a "union" in opposition to the American Federation of Labor. While
certain spokesmen for the now organization prate loudly of class-
consciousness, class struggle ond revolution, it is to bc noticed thut the
union itself, true to the union instincts, busies itself with siiih matters as alone can come wiihin its
-scope as an organization of sellers
of the merchandise labor-power. All
that it has so far done is to "bawl
out" its older and better established
competitor, and engage rn two or
three petty little strikes in the "economic field."
While the attack and counter-attack, crimination and re-crimination
is going merrily on between thex-
merchandising fartions within tbe
wage-slave class, the revolutionary
movement of labor must push forward the work of educating tho laborers to a correct understanding of
their position as the exploited victims of capitalist property and patiently and persistently point out the
road they must travel if they would
free themselves from its bondage.
The so-culled "labor leader" whether of the alli-K»il new school or the
old who still bellOW it possible to
raise the working class to better
conditions under capitalism is altogether too blind to tho facts thot
stare him in thc fare daily to be
worth wasting time over. He is too
dull to be able to accept an argument though il be bristling with
truth.
So long as workers pin their faith
to trade union action so long will
ihey spend their time endeavoring to
adjust themselves to the circumstances that surround them under capitalist rule. They will fight and
quarrel among themselves, either singly or by faction; they will make
such agreements with employers fromi
time to time as may appear in their
judgment to be advisable; rival factions will vilify and abuse each other without limit, but never until
they have realized Uie utter ho-wles**
ness of labor's struggle against capital in the economic field can they
be expected to act in unison along
the line of revolutionary action
against the master class for the purpose of bringing to an end iu pre*-
and    unscrupulous
»_.. 1 »■■-■» ■■"•"**
PLATFORM
rWW-MWTttWOftDttUTt"
tory
Wb.tu Tb.y Meet; Wb„, Th-, k„
Phoenix Trades and Labor   fw.
McCU every aliernat-. \i'T*-
Presldcnt. M. J. {*M!ll,: V|£g_
dent. N. Lmleux. w'*
Arms, T. B. OosgroM, *"'•*••
Treasurer, Webster Ho*-,..,-,
UoJt. 198. Phoenix, Ii, c.
S'*-.'re'_t.
Phoenix
W. F.
Miners'
M.     Merit
Union.   No, 1
every Siiordi
evening at ?..» o'clock j„ hjJJJJ
hall.    V. Ingram, preekket  w ,
l'ickard, secretary. *
Socialist fclirj
ghT "Every    I .ocal    of  th.   8oei*ln 1
Psrty of Cssada should no 4 ^
undsr  this   bead,   f 1 00 ,,.f mwi
Secretaries please note.
SOCIALIST PAUTY OF CAKAOl |
Haadquarters, Vancouver, Bc.
nonunion Executive Commit'-*,
A. II. Strbbings. John K ii .!,•«,,,,
Krnest Burns. C. Peters, Alt _»^
A. J. Wilkinson, Iressuia, j g
Morgan, secretary, _M li-.ru-.-1 g^
Vancouver,   It C.
LAICAL VANCOl'VKIt. No. 1, 3,*.,
of Canada- Huttings neethkji <-.
cry Mor.day rvenia-- st haedqui*.
tci-s. logics!.ie Uloc-. til its*
Street, iroom 1. stxood floor , It
ui stional meetings every ttuaditpa
H o*. lock p.m., is Hulls.*a H_l,
Conicva Street.
I». p. KILLS, SecnttR
Box S.16.  Van-outer  ilf
We   the Socialist Party of Canada,
in convention assembled,  affirm our
allegiance to ond support of the prtn-   ^
ciplcs    and   program of the international revolutionary working class,    j
Labor produces all wealth, and to
labor It should Justly belong. Io
thc owners of the means of wealth
production belongs the product ol
labor. The prvsent economic system is ba*-d upon capitalist ownership of the means of wealth production; therefore all the products of
labor belong to the capitalist tlo*«.
Thc ca|»itall8t is master, the worker
is slave.
So long os the capitalists remain
in possession of tho reins of government all the powers of the state will
be used to protect ond defend their
property rights In the means of
wealth production and their control
of the product of labor.
The capitalist   system  gives  to th*
capitalist an evcr-swcllin- stream of
profits,  and  to  the  worker  an ever-',
Increasing   measure   of   misery  and,
degradation.
The  interest   of  the  working class,
lies in the direction of sotting itself!
free from capitalist exploitation   by
the abolition of the wage ay* tern. Td
occompiikh     this     nweasitatc*     lb«>
transformation  of capitalist  proper-!
ty  in the   means   of  wealth produc- j
tion into collective or working-, lass j   -
property. _    LOCAL TOHOIiTO - M<*u 'it* t_
The  Irrepressible  conflict   of  inter-!    Ud*m^mfm^ X_f"__?*!
ests between the capitalist and   tbe i    "s-hurst  M.     *■    Date, Beam*
worker   is  rapidly  culminating  in a '
struggle for |»o»se*sioti nf the power ■
of government—thc capitalist to hold; — at   ■ Wa
the worker to secure it by political   WANTKI)
action.   This Is the class slni*a*Ir.
Therefore, we call upon all work-j
ers to organize under the haniv-r ol
the Socialist Party of Canada with |
the object of conquering the (wbllc
•lowers for the purpon* ft set ting up I
and enforcing the economic program j
of the working da***, at /ollows:
1. The  transformation  as  rapid!v ;
as possible,  of capitalist   i-u;«T'y in '
the means of wealth production 'natural  resources,  factoiies,  mills, rati- .
ways,  etc..)  into  the collective  pro-
r«rty of Uie  working clss-s.
2. Thorough and democratic organization and management of 111-
dustry by the workers.
3. The establishment, as speedily
as possible, of production for use
in-itead of production for  profit.
The Socialist Party, when in office
shall  always  and   everywhere   until ,
the    present    system    is   abolidied,
make the answer to this question its '
guiding rule of conduct.     Will   thin
kvi.-loMnn  advance  the  interests    of.
the working class and old  the work-'
ers  in  their  class  struggle     against
capitalism?   If It will,  the Socialist
Party is  for  It;   if  It   will   not.   th*
Socialist Party is absolutely opposed to it.
41   Henry
organiM-r,
street.     W.  0. GribUt,
130 Hogarth A-t
by Chicago * buna's
house, special reprtsanlaths :-*
each province In Canada. .*-»_-•
$20,00 and cx|»-nK« paid »<•.-
Kxpense money advanced. B_t-
neea successful, posltloti |-rn_uw.
.No investment required Prrdatt
•xperfetnee not o**rn'.)-i '<■< aiming.    Address
Genera! Manager, 132 la-t St
Chicago,  11! . I'.9.1
l.KAHN ML"EOHAI'llV aad M _
ACCOl-KTINO. #_U :o I10U |W
rnonh salary a*»ur*.-il <><r ,•:»**•
ten under bond. You don't ;*- a
until you have a soatiloa Lv(tr.
system of telegraph s. booM in An-
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IN V KM A NIL ladirs -,.-- ut.-**
ted. Write for ca'e'ogoi- Hera
arkool of Telegraphy. ClTt—ilHi
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esit conscienceless
rule.
_DWA*I> Bisi..
Gso.
A. C. BBTDOS-'ICX.
MCCSOMiH.
IWO, MY0IR-M6K i HcCRNMN
SARTUBTERS, 80l.il ITORH, ETC.
Tel. tat.  p.o. Box re
3M lnfl-M Uml     -    VucMvtr, I. C
ASA WORKING TOOL
for the student and the writer
as an authoritative reference boor;
for schools, teachers, families,
business and professional men,
there is one book which offer-
superior advantages in the solid
value of Ha information, and the
ease with which it is obtained/
One's admiration for Webster's
International Dictionary increase?
daily as it comes to be better
known. It never refuses the infor
mation sought and it never overwhelms one with a mass of misinformation illogically arranged.
The St. James Gazette of London,
England, says: For the teacher, the pu
nil, ths student ind the litterateur, there
m nothing better; it covers everything,
The New snd Xalsrgsd Edition recently to-
wed baa ttfiOO new words aad phrases, a 00a*
pletely revised Biographical Dictionary aad
Oasatteer of the World, MO pages sad MM
dlust rations.
Our name la on ths tltla-pajre* of all th*
authentic dictionaries of tbe Webster series
LET US BEND YOU FREE
"A Test ia -ssssnalatles" which affords t
pleasant and instructive ovenlns's entertain
ment.  Illustrated pamphlet also five.   •**
0. A C. U ntHIAM 00, PuUk,Bprinsnald. Mm
In accordance with this prlndnU'
thc Socialist Party |Jo<ljf--i Itself to
conduct all thc public affairs plecad
In Its hands in such a manner as lo
promote the interests of the working class alone.
^■""■■"■•-••'^-^m mmtmmmmmwmnwtanmm*
This i*»u~ u N.. :i.v> i' •'•■» >'
ths number upon your aiMreaa ahx
your nub* rlj'tlua expires -It- ms
number. If further copies ers tasted, renewal should tie mad* at (*•
If care Is taken lo renew before th*
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rmeipt of papers.
Ar-m.ICATION tint MKM-
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hereby  apply   for  membership
I,      TIIL      I'N'JEI'SiaNKD.
in Local
 r-oclallat   Party   of
Canada.
I recognize the clnwi atrucfln
between the capitalist claaa and
the worklna; claaa tn be s
struggle for political suprem-
scy, 1. e., possession of tho
reins of government, and which
neceasltates the organisation of
the workers Into a political
party distinct from ond opposed to all "fiartlee of the capitalist class.
If admitted to membership.
I hereby agree to maintain or
enter Into no relations with
any other political party, and
piedge myself to support by
voice, voto and all other legitimate means the ticket and the
program of the Socialist Party
of Canada only.
Applicant	
Address	
Occupation	
Age	
Cltlsen	
Admitted to Local 1»0..
 Chairman.
 .Kec,-H«c.
KMAhi.lSHl-.i. i*»4
The VOICE
The IM* later faytt is Cist*
Alwjysa fearless* npooeot is the
cause of labor.
For one dollar the papr* will -*
•ent to any address for one rear.
Workingmen ofall countries a"'1
•ooii recognize the fart Hi»i the?
uio»t npport and read tin ir l»'«-»
papers.
Issued every Friday.
Tit Vtlci P-lllM-l Cr. ll_it««
WINNII10, MAN.
Five yearly Bub. cards—$3.75.
Miners Magazine
Published Wsskly by tha
Wwtsra rstftratlM 01 m%v%
A Vigorous Advocate ol Vshot*
Causa
Clear-Cut and Aggressive,
Per Year 11.00.       81s Months. «*
Address:
MINBRS' MAGAZINE.
Denver. Colorado.
jrtiirf'l
,lvU-.t"':
ItntHacers and other* who r*Bi\-« •*',1, ,n»»c|_l
ily of having Ihelr Pnlent businr" "-11*" M,
l>, »ip,rtar"-hrellmlaaryadvice f■*"• V **»
moderate. Oar fcwnlsr's AdvlKf " ' !iCa
rw-nest. Mat loo h UnrVm, New York I.i/e •>
Mo-Ureal: aud Washington. l-.C
. V.S.A. Sat--day . > .JaUmary 13,1906.
■>_w_aaii
W W&8T3-&N OLAEIOB,  VAWOOUVIE,   BRITIBH  COLtJUBU.
THUS.
:    I
PLAIN FACTS ABOUT SOCIALISM
Conversation Between Smith and Jones Touching Upon Politico-
Economic Questions as Reported by Or. W. J. Curry.
"Come ln, Jones, and take a seat.
"Well, Smith, 1 see we have some
.socialist agitators in town at last,
and the worst of It is, one of our
good Orlts has gone clean crasy.
Ho has not only joined the Socialist
partv but, has actually painted the
red dag of anarchy on their reading
room window.
"Yes, I believe that something in
thut line has struck town, and what
. it hah cotne to stay. The
s . am a revolutionary Socialist m> a -It. full siwsi, and warrant**!
not to fade, shrink or grow moss.
Hut tell me, what do you know
about Socialism? What books have
jou read on the subject?"
-Well, the fact is, I have better use
for my time than in reading such
rot. nesides, 1 wns told that it
would unsettle the mind and might
cause brain fever. And 1 read either In the Vancouver World, or the
Ladies' Home Journal that Socialism Kant to divide everything- up
and to destroy law and religion. In
fact one of the great statesmen of
H. C. told me Just before last election that it would not only destroy
Christianity, but all the otheiMilesH-
ings of thin great and glorious clvi-
UsaUon."
"Opod for him! When he laid bis
eari* hue-- to make that noise did you
notice how they were slit, and what
corporation brand hc was marked
with. Jones, I'm surprised that a
man of your sense would have a
mind too weak to stand unsettling.
What do you suppose your brain was
intended for? There Is a proverb
that tells us that a wise man changes his mind, but a fool never does.
How on earth could you expect to
gain any correct knowledge from the
popular palters and magazines on a
subject  sO  unpopular  as  Mxialism,'"
•Why, don't they tell  Uie iruth?"
"Yen, when lb pays. They arc
just as truthful as their advertisements of chewing tobacco, whiskx-.v.
or patent medicines. They are run
by i.u-.ine*!< men, and competition is
war. Don't you If now that the capitalist class, and those who from infancy have lieen trained to su|«,*ort
IU »>M<*m, hate Socialism like the
d.-vil hnii-s holy water? A socialist
paper in to thc average capitalist
line a rvd rng to n mad bull, 'flic
( api'iiliM controls ail Ui* av#nw* of
informa'ion, and very few of our editor*, teachws or preachers daro—even If th<-y would—ssoak favorably of
Kocialism. We don't blame them,
bul the syatwii which makes us all
uion* or less sluves. 1 can asmuvlyiiuj
Jones, that socialism is no graft
and that to champion a cause as unpopular takes vimie courage, and it
costs money. Thi* is why the capi-
laltxt mind can't grasp the prot.b-m
and honosUy thinks the upper story
of the siN-ialiht is out of repair. To
him the idea of inventing money ami
energ-v in lh<- 1'o-operat.ivc t'ommon-
wenlth is like buying town lots In
Paradise. Tata my advice and read
up the subject, nod don't make a
don'ry of yourself by displaying
such ignorance of a world-wide mow.*
ineiit which already numbers its adherent* by millions and ultimat«ly
must   surreed."
"Don't be too bard on a man who
hus not had a chance to get the correct story. I dropiH.il in this morning on purpOHc to get somo pointers
fur a feller can't buck socialism properly without knowing its weak
points. If you ran show mo thnt it
don't  mean dividing up or anarchy,
I'll look into the matter. Say,
Smith, wouldn't it be a joke if a
<lved-in-thr-wool Orlt and a lender in
the i ;ii,i\ i like me was to turn into
a iT*ti»* rosrin' socialist agita-
tin
", m glad you aro taking a
ma i .-•*.• jnal view of the subject.
How can a man Judge a thing he is
ignorant of? What would you think
of a Judge ao prejudiced that he
sentenced a man to bc hanged without even hearing tho defence?    And
States today 8,000 millionaires and
Ave million ot the working class who
are paupers for want of work, and
there are sixty million paupers in
Kurope."
"The papers say thai this is an
age of  pr- ;perity."
"So ' .8 for the people who control ... ,. Wall Street reports In-
oi-m un that John D. Rockefeller ha-
an income of $10,000 per hour and
that 250,000 capitalists in Uie Unit**! States own between them one
hundred billion dollars in wealth. I
will give you an idea now how prosperous your class is:
In England a Royal Commission
has reported that, over a third of tho
population is underfed and miserably clothed and housed. The effects of this chronic starvation and
suffering is evidenced in 'the fact that
out of 187,0iiO men recently examined for volunteers, 150,000 were rejected because physically unfit, and
yet we know that several times the
standard tor recruits has been lowered to correspond with the decline
of the  Knglihh working class.
"London has nearly two milion
Iieople In extreme poverty, and a
million more with but a week's wages between them and pauperism,
while one out of every four people
who die in that city dies a pauper.
There are in East l^ondon thousands
of men, women and children who
spend their uiehts and days in the
streets because they cannot afford
shelter and we notice that thc Knglihh navy recently launched a battleship that  cost ten million dollars.
"Things in America are a little
better, for over a million poverty-
stricken emigrants arrived last year,
during which year government re-
portS showed that fifty per cent, of
lhe working class were out of employment part of the time—that two
million children and five million women have been forced into the labor
market through poverty and yet the
capitalists tell us .lhat 'Socialism
will destroy thc home.' Destroy the
home* Thc same government report
states that fifty per cent, of the
working class who live in cities have
a 'home' consisting of one miserable
loom in n. tenement house, and in
this on" room the whole family eats,
sleeps, lives and dies.
"We are moreover, informed that
this 'prosperity' kills fifty per cent,
of the children of the working class
of cities before they are five years
old, while the mortality in the upper class is only one-fourth of this.
Child slavery today is mostly more
cruel and destructive to body and
mind than the negro slavery ever
was, and yet you people oppose the
only  way to abolish it.
"The inadik-ning |>nrt of it is thut
it is not necessary for while there
is far more poverty and suffering
than in any other stage of human
history yet the powers of producing
the necessaries and comforts of life
STB tenfold what they were even a
century' ago,
""Today five men with modern machinery can feed a thousand; five
men can clothe a thousand or make
boots and shoes (or five thousand.
"There are today, millions of men
out of work and millions of acres of
land UBMSed and yet millions of T«eo-
ple suffer famine! This is the way
the capitalist   runs  things.
"We know that under co-operative
production a working day of even
live hours would give every man, woman and child in the world all the
comforts and luxuries of life, and yet
people, through an ignorant prejudice, ofipose the only means by which
this can be done."
"Say, .Smith, this is horrible, but
why d</n't the papers show it up?"
"Haven't I told you that all but
the Socialist |iapers are controlled
by the very class whose system produces this misery, and they are paid
"If you  figure it out, you  will see
to misrepresent and repress facts,
that every  millionaire can only   accumulate his wenlth b.v mnkitu* pau<
that is what you people do with so-1 l>cra and wage-slaves and that Bock*
(ialism, and the worst of it is you
arc condemning your best friends,
and you don't know It. You just
read some of those! hooka and attend
our meetings, and I'll bet a yearling
' alf to a new hat that inside of ninety dux i you will be walking around
town with thc chip of Socialism on
your shoulder anxious for some Grit
or Tory to tackle you."
"1*11 take you up. And if you
have time you may explode a tew
more of them bombs now. They aro
not half bad, and my hide is as
tough as yours, anyhow. Ilut to be
candid with you. Sn-ith, I don't
want any revolutionary calf on my
ranch, as I have enough trouble
with my stock now. ltlaa-e away,
and if 1 nnd we'll have to divide up
I'll sell the ranch tho first offer 1
get."
"Vou havo Uie right stuff in you
to make a livo Socialist, -and now
wo Will get down to business.
"Scientific Socialism is that
science which treats of the laws and
forces which govern and produce social development and is based on
historical facts and logic. History
tolls un that the material Interests
of tho ruling classes forced primitive
communism to bo replaced by chattel slavery, chattel slavery by feudalism, and feudalism by capitalism.
So. recent economic developments assure us that capitalism is soon to ha
replaced by a system In which Uio
producers of wealth will also own
fho means of wealth  production."
' You mean that those who actual'
ly build thp railroads, ships, mills
and factories, etc . ur-ci run thorn
will own them and all tho wealth
that through them Is produced?"
VYe*, that Ih the Idea. Why should
the millions of tho world's workers
1k> sufferinii from poverty while that
class which only by reason of their
owning the capital which lobor produces, possesses all the good things
of life?      There   are In tho   United
feller's billion dollars means lhat
about half a million workers have
been deprived of all that makes life
worth Irving, and yet his money is
taken to support churches and with
the proceeds of his oil ho is to lighten the darkness of tho heathen.
"No, the capitalist is too class-
conscious, too wise to cut his own
throat by exposing to the public
gaze capitalism's hellish products of
misery, crime and death, for if he
did it would lie swept off the earth
In six months. Thc capitalist is
now sowing the wind; soon be will
reap the whirlwind, as ruling -classes
have before done.
"Tho fart, that wo take it for
granted that those of tho useful
class are usually poor and of the use
loss class usually rich proves that
our education is provided by those
whose interests it is to warp our
minds and morals in order that we,
will defend this condition as tho corned and permanent order of society.
The capitalist class controls our education.
"Well, I admit I can't see any flaw
in your proposition, but what sticks
tho most of us ls, how can ono got
hold of tho capital without stealing
it?
"In tho first place, you must ro-
momber thnt thc Revolution is going on every dny now in tho minds
of tho working class and socialism
is simply ono of its expressions, not
its cause, and Uio socialist vote
doubles every two years. Wo think
that in the moro advanced countries
Itfbor will gain control of Uie reins
of government through the ballot,
and wo nro sure if society escapes
a deluge of blood it can only lie
-through thc policy of the Socialist
party. Constitutions and laws are
umde bv mnn thoy can bo amended
or overthrown. Today we see tho
political agents of tho capitalist
class declaring war or enforcing
peace;     making   and   breaking civil,
moral and religious laws as tho capitalist interest demand."
"From recent exposures made by
Lawson and others, we know that
some of the greatest thieves of the
age, and liars, are not only out of
jail, but are actually occupying Uie
high places of society. The law is
their servant, not their master.
"So, when through the ballot the
producer becomes the dominant class
law* and other social institution wilt
be conformed to interests of that
class. By legal enactment the capital and natural resources can be restored to society to which it really
belongs. Competition will be replaced by cooperation, and production for profit by production for
use."
•"'What will become of the capitalist?"
''When the change comes, Uie remnant of that class which survives
by reason of their having devoured
their competitors will probably be
regenerated to useful and contented
members of society. Socialism will
abolish economic classes and all will
be producers. *
"But what about dividing up?"
"Why that is just what socialism
will stop. Farmers are producers,
not capitalists. Modern machinery
has enabled you to produce five
times as much as your grandfather
could and yet you get Uie same—a
bare living, and Uie capitalist gets
the balance. Ine United States census report of 1900 shows us that
the average farmer and workman
produced in one year $2,450, while
his average income was only $437,
so that every time you vote the old
ticket you tell the capitalist you like*
to divide up and give him and the
commission men five times what you
keep for yourself and family. You
farmers feed the world and yet work
harder and have less comfort and
pleasure than any class on earth. If
you would only use your brains
more you could soon, through Socialism, double your income and divide up the work with those who now
do nothing; productive and every oth*.
er producer could lo the same. Under Socialism the armies and soldiers
clerks, salesmen and servants and
Uie drones will be put to work producing wealth for all. The motto
of Socialism is. 'all for each, and
each for all.' Today competition
wastes over one half our lalior. Capitalism has had its day of rarnoge
and its crimson sun is now sinking
in the west. Everywhere we read
the hand-writing on the wall:—
"Weighed in the balance and found
wanting.* Capital cannot longer
provide for society and its further
existence is a colossal crime. Thc
law of self-preservation is everywhere forcing on the Revolution and
in Kussia we see the beginning of the
end of capitalism. Today the one
great cxfiression of that power that
worketh for Uie righteousness, is
Wefl in the socialist movement."
"Well, Jones, I must say you seem
to have the right and left bower
and nil the trumps—in fact I'm eu-
chrod."
"Yes, I admit I hold a good hand,
but as we are going to be partners
soon, it will be all right for you
to."
"Hold on, though, I forgot something! As a leader in the Church
and a family man, I must know If
Socialism opposes religion."
"It depends on what you call religion, but 1 know that a few preachers—whose living is not depending
on men like you who want to divide up with the capitalists—are coming out flat-footed for Socialism.
Quite a number more are now climbing up on the fence and looking
over."
"You will find that preachers will
not forget how to flop over when Uie
present attitude toward negro slavery assures us of this.
"Francis '.'illard, who was considered quite as wise and religious as
the average rancher or member of
Uie W. C. T. IT., said in her last address to the annual convention of
that society: *I believe in the things
Socialism stands for and were I not
entirely occupied would go Into the
movement heart and soul, as in fact
1 have done in my public utterances
for years. Oh, that 1 wero young
again, it would have my life. It is
Hod's way out of the wilderness into
the Promised Land. It is thc very
marrow of Christ's Gospel. It is
Christianity applied."
"Francis Willard did not believe in
a 'miracle of grace' softei. ng thc
heart of Uie capitalist. She was a
proletarian revolutionary Hodaliat,
and knew that if tho laboring cluss
should be free it must frea itself.'
"Judgo W. K. Richards, I Washington, in a published address said:
I am a Socialist and a Christian.
Socialism has to do with Uus right
relations of men economically and
and not with sentiment of faith.
It cannot possibly come in conflict
with your religion unless your religion interferes with just and wholesome economic relations, and not
only so but if you profess to teach
a religion based on justice and fair
dealing among men you cannot honestly oppose the only practical way
by which justice and fair dealing
can bo realised.'
"If it should happen that some
socialist should expose your hypocrisy and inconsistancy as a teacher
ot religion, don't jump at the conclusion that ho is attacking religion.
If you do you make it manifest to
all impartial observers that you are
not able to defend yourself and that
you are driven to the necessity of
bearing false witness against your
neighbor as tho only way to defend
your religion."
"Now, Jones, if your religion is
not based on truth and brotherhood
the sooner you discard your religion
for a good one, the better."
"Smith, you have done Uio job,
and from this on no one in Chilliwack iu going to kick harder on "dividing up" with the Capitalist than
this same Jones. You go to Ash-
well's, Henderson's or Parson's and
get a hat in each place if you want
and tell them I'll sqjuare up the next
time T come to town. Hero I've
been dividln* up all tha time, voting
for lt at every election, and only
just now found it out I"
STARVING IN JAPAN.
A million people aro said to be
starving in Japan, and a similar
number are tramping through the
highways and byways of England,
looking for employment which i9 not
furthcoming. Starvation has for
centuries claimed its victims by Uie
thousands, among the yellow and
black races. It L_* also left a few
marks of misery in rich and popul-
our American cities. England in thd,
past has shipped many of her paupers to America. Japan has been
sending hers to the Philippines, Hawaii, Mexico and British Columbia,
and some ot them to the United
States. Now that she acknowledges
a surplus million that are unable to
procure the necessities of life at
home, we may expect an increased
immigration of the little brown
men.—Vancouver World, Jan. 9,
11*06.
How many of the starving Japanese belong to the ruling class of that
country? How many of England's ar*
iBtocratic and capitalistic bums and
loafers are among those who ' me
are among those who "are trajnp-
trampjng Through highways ar.d I y-
ways . . . looking for employment which is not forthcoming*.""
Has "starvation for centuries claimed its victims by the thousands among the yellow and block races" and
"left a few marks of misery in rich
and populous cities," because the resources of the earth were exhausted,
or the starving ones were too lazy
to draw upon these resources for
sustenance? Has England in Uie
past shipped paupers to other countries because the resources of that-
country were over-taxed, or because
those resources and the machinery of
production have been seized by the
ruling class and held as capital, to
be used only for the profit of the
thieves? The "World" in its infantile wisdom is occasionally incline-
to doubt tbe socialist contention
that capitalist property is fundamentally based upon the robbery of lalior* and that Uie misery and suffering so appallingly wide-spread among the workers of all countries is
the logical result of such rotfbwy.
As the "World" evidently recognizes
the existence of this veritable avalanche of misery, would it kindly offer a correct explanation of its cause
so that proper steps might be taken
to ubolish it.
 o	
It is claimed that the Cape Mudge
Indians are developing a very* marked degree of business sagacity. Long
contact wilh the superior Anglo-
Saxon civilization has resulted in so
bleaching 'their complexions that
many of them show little trace of
Indian origin. According to C. J.
South, superintendent of the Children's Aid Society, a very profitable
business has been builded up by
shrewd ones among them, in the
sale of young girls to white purchasers. Mr. South says, "<*irls with
white skin, dark brown hair braided
down their backs, big innocent, childish eyes, are being sold today and
have been sold for years in British
Columbia to the highest bidder."
This might appear duite startling
but for the fact that this sort of
traffic is no new thing. It has long
been prevalent in every civilized
country of the earth. It is a part
of, and incidental to this age of buying and selling. The incentive of
gain has long been held up as a
most worthy one. Sometimes, it is
true, this dear old "incentive" appears rather coarse and disgusting,
but nothing should be done to ''destroy" it. Mankind would "lapse
into barbarism" without it. At
least, that is what we are told by
capitalist apologists.
Millions of Hollars    Produced    by, Become    Shippers.       So  announces
Mines of British  Columbia.     Smelters Literally  Spouted  ('olden     Pro
fits. Conditions of Metal Markets
were Such as to Prompt the Operation of Mines Large and Small, and
the Development of Hundreds of Embryo Producers—Railways are Reach-
in? into New Districts and Making
it Possible for Many Properties    to
the daily press in flaring headlines.
And these are tho same smelters, the
capitalist owners of which ore . just
now refusing to grant an eight-hour
shift for its wage-labor. Instead ot
tbe 12 hours of servitude exacted at
present. Great is capitalist property; great is "prosperity"—-for Uio
men who own the jobs.
Big REDUCTION Sale
IN MERCHANT TAILORING
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—ALL, our—
Fall And Winter
Stock. Mast be Sold
Before Spring Goods
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Give Us a Trial.   Fit Guaranteed.
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same as a poets** atawp. Counterfeits are sobs
Urn-si psrforatstf es Ursa edges, sad somo Unas osljr
oa two. J oka ■. Stetson 0a.. et Phil edslphie is a
uaa-ualoa seawrn.
JOHN A.  MOrnrr.  Praslde-%. OrsafO. M. J.
MARTIN    LAWLOR,   Sacretsry,    ll W awrly    Plfes
New York.
Money
by buying thto
reliable, honest,
high grade sewing machine,
STRONGEST GUARANTEE.
National Sewing Machine Co..
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.
FACTORY ATBBLVIOBNB. IU-
Hudson's Bay Company, AgsnU
MATCHLESS LIGHT
There Is no home too small *o use Electric light. Every dwelling should uso lt—everybody  should use it.
The children—bless them!—thoy cannot upset the Electric Light
and burn tho house down.   They can do no harm whatever   with
Electric Light. __■»_'._..        _
lt can be lighted or extinguished by a touch of the button. No
lamps to clean, no smell of   Coal Oil, no disfigurement of walls.
When a small amount of light is ncodod.  fl or 10 candle power lamp* mny be Installed,  thus reducing the total expense of llghtr
ing by this method. .___.       * _
Call and see us In reference to installing Electric Light to taxs
tho place of your Coal Oil Lamps.
B.C ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO. four
TUB W-ftTOMLIt dUiJOK,   VAKOOmrgt,   r-t-ftttt COtPliBU,
Saturday .. .January 13, \<M.
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NEWS AND VIEWS
*»fi-i'*-.*S
g  AS GIVEN OR EXPRESSED BY SOCIALISTS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION
9   -- w-_ 1-. b, p. p-_TT_P_ECE, to whom all correspondence for this department should he addressed.
wha%m #rofit?
(Petting something for nothing.
fTiat ls robbery?
Same thing.
Then capitalism is based upon robbery?
Yes.
And, in order to perpetuate its
rule, the church, school, press and
other a_ciicies of capitalism propound the sacredness of "profit."
How's that? '
Tho church seeks to show that profit has divine sanction—more especially where tho big thieves blow back
with a handsome donation for "missionary work."
In Iho schools our youngsters are
taught to figure out the rent, interest or profit on a given amount or
under certain conditions, thus instilling the young minds with .tho righteousness and morality of profit-
theft.
The press glorifies and kow-tows
to those who get away with the
most profit-swag. The more extensive the plundering and theft from
ths workers, the more "prosperity,"
"good management," "executive ability," or "brains."
How many wage-earners could secure jobs from capitalist concerns if
they did not collectively produce enough during their work-day to pay
tlieir own wages, and leave some
•jver for the job-owners?
No "business" could live were it
otherwise.
Now, what would you call the amount the boss has over after he sells
your product in the "open" markets
of the world; pays your waves and
makes deductions for "salaries" and
the reproduction of machinery, etc?
Profit—dividends.
Exactly—something for nothing-
robbery of labor, the source of all
wealth.
How dp you like it?
Well, it's getting harder all the
time to make ends meet.
Why?
Because there are so many looking
for jobs, and who must find work
or starve.
Why?
BeCause as capitalism developed
and the means of wealth production
concentrated in the hands of the
trusts, etc., and modern power and
machinery was introduced, fewer men
are needed to do the world's work.
And?
Well, you see, when there's so
many men looking for jobs, competition forces wages down, and so long
as men are dealt in like other commodities, it will get worse Instead
of better.
But, how can it be otherwise?
By the workingmen taking possession, politically, of the reins of gov-
power and transforming, by legal enactment, all property which is used
to rob labor into working-class property—collectively owned property.
Then?
Food—pure food—will be produced
to eat; clothes—not shoddy—will be
made to wear; houses—modern—built
to be lived in by those who work.
In short, there will be no more
"profit"—robbery of labor.
But that would be Socialism?
Well, what of it?
What have tbe workine-class got
to lose but its poverty?
Oh! the Socialists are too extreme!
All right, comrade, let's hear from
you a year hence. When you get a
job, write.
SPEN CE'S BRIDGE, B. C.
SPENCE'S BRIDGE, B. C, Jan.
2.—Had I not been away from home
a good deal lately 1 would have
dropped a line to you ere this. I am
glad to see a '-'News and Views" column in The Clarion, and it looks
prosperous, with two men devoting
their entire time to sub-rustling. The
good work done for Socialism by
such methods cannot be over-estimated, as I can testify, having been
around with Com. Sibble for a part
of two days, and watched the way
he went after the boys.
The Clarion is a good straight Socialist paper—no fooling about it—
and every worker ought to subscribe
to it.
There ls no news of importance
from this part of the country. I
notice, however, a decided increase
in the interest taken by the workers
in Socialism, which is not scoffed at
as it was two or three years ago.
The work on the new Nicola Valley railway still progresses. Last
Fall I believe there waa upwards of
1,500 men employed at one time,
the great majority of whom were
without homes in the strict sense of
the word, ln fact very few ot them
were Provincial voters, for no doubt
many of them never had the chance
of staying long enough in any one
district to earn the privilege of getting on the list. The law should be
that a resident of British Columbia,
with the proper qualifications could
vote in any district at Provincial
elections, and a Canadian citizen in
any part of Canada at Dominion elections.
I suppose The Clarion will bo taking- up subscriptions on the 22nd of
January for the Russian Revolution
and I herewith enclose one dollar to
help the comrades who are struggling so bravely in that country, and
are opening the eyes ot the world.
Com. Burns, in elucidating theie-
marl.s of the writer last Sunday evening in City Hall, put it this way:
"Ia other words, the previous speaker says that if the workers do not
bang together, they must hang separately,"
* *    *
With Com. Stebbings as chairman, and Corns. Wilkinson, Bums,
Parr and Pettipiece as speakers, Local Vancouver, S. P. of C„ held a
fairly good propaganda meeting in
the City Hall last Sunday evening.
Though raining, still thero was a
fair-sized and interested audience. An
unusual number of ladies were present, and pretty little Miss Parr gave
two or throe piano selections worthy of older musical talent-
* •    *
A daily press despatch speaking of
a demonstration of hungry working-
men and women in London, says:
"During the progress of the service,
they marched up the steps singing
tha 'Marseillaise." Here tbe motely
crowd was joined by contingents
from other quarters, and all, to the
number of .1,000, began filling Into
the cathedral. Such a scene has not
been witnessed at St. Paul's since
twenty years rigo."
* *   *
During a recent trip of the Cun*
ard steamer Lucania, a few Socialists on board arranged Socialist
meetings among tho third-class passengers. At the first meeting 15P
men were present, and at the second
800. Speeches were made in half a
dosen different languages. Whatever
the number of first-class passengers
who attended the meetings is not
given.
+   *   *
An unemployed demonstration In
front of the Guild Hall, London, recently, was dispersed by the police.
This'is the only way capitalism can
settle the unemployed problem.
e    *    e
A preacher by tbe name of Richmond has been turned out of his
pastorate at Stamford, Conn., because he is a Socialist. The comrades everywhere should be rery
careful not to antagonize the church.
Industry and self-denial n.ey or
may not be virtues worthy of commendation. It depends wholly upon
circumstances. If a person by his
own industry and self-denial succeeds In laying by the wherewith to
afford him protection against the
chilling blasts of adversity, surely
no sane individual could offer reasonable objection. If, however, the
wherewith was obtained at the expense of the industry and self-denial
of others, tho matter would wear a
somewhat different aspect.
light housekeeping in London Ib
to mean electric cooking. New opart
ment houses are now being equipped
with suitable apparatus. This will
not be of particular interest to a
very large portion of the city's population as they have nothing to cook
SOCIALIST VOTE IN TORONTO.
The municipal elections in Toronto
were held on New Years Day, the result being an encouraging vote for
the three Socialist candidates for
the School Board. The vote cast
in thc last three municipal elections
for candidates of Local Toronto, S.
P. of C, for the Board of Education, is as follows:
1904.
Phillips Thompson    1131
John A Kelly      861
Fred Peel       381
1905.
James  Simpson,   (elected)    5930
Phillips Thompson   2438
1906.
Phillips Thompson    3808
W. H. Rawbone   1388
Fred Peel   1187
In 1904 and 1905 the votes were
confusing as each voter had six
votes and could give as many as
three to one candidate. The cumulative vote has been abolished, however, and tbe 1906 vote ls straight
one man one vote. Thompson is
better known than the other two
candidates, so Peel's vote can be
taken as the class-conscious vote.
The socialist manifesto asked voters
to abstain from voting for Socialism if they could not vote the
straight Socialist ticket and for no
other candidates whatever. For Mayor and Aldermen property qualification laws barred the socialists out,
so we called upon all socialists to
write "for socialism" across their
ballots.
Next year Toronto Local hopes to
be able to nominate candidates   for
Mayor and aldermen as well as   the
s.hool board.
Toronto, Jan. 2, 1906. W.W.
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"A good speaker or two Is the
very thing we need. . ."—H. Siegfried, Revelstoke, B.C.
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AMONG   THB   WORKERS.
CLARION  QUESTION  BOX.
Mrs. P., Vancouver—1. If Socialist Party representatives had it In
their power to do so—under capitalism—all taxes would be placed on
capitalist property, i.e., property used for the purpose of exploiting lar
bor. 2. Certainly, the po.l tax, as
obtains in B.C., would be abolished.
3. Your individual property, (home,
etc.,) would not be taxed at all,
and I should say your water, light,
and street-car fare would amount to
very little if anything at all. 4. I
don't know. I'm not an authority
on the future. I'm more interested
in the abolition of the wage-system,
and my removal from the category
of a commodity than such things as
you mention. However, there is no
reason why there should not be
municipal laundries, bakeries, kindergartens, etc., in addition to parks,
beeches, etc., even under this system of property ownership. 4. The
Socialists would abolish all the property qualifications under the sun.
Who does the voting, anyway? I
confess It's -capitalist property voicing its demands through its agents
or owners, fi. There's fire-fighting
acfuipment, bells, halls, hose, engines, firemen, etc., to save life and
property—though primarily the latter
Try falling off a scaffolding, and see
how long it will take tho officials
to get your crushed or wounded body
landed in the new General Hospital-
Wireless power transmission is now
prophesied by one of the progenitors
of the wireless telegraph system. Ln
view of what has been achieved there
is little ground for considering this
prophesy extravagant.
The ominous silence in regard to
affairs in .Russia at present is strong
ly suggestive of a butchery of revolutionists alongside of which the
slaughter of the Communards of Par-
ix in 1871, will pale into insignificance.
According to the Winnipeg Voice,
the English printers brought over to
that city for the purpose of breaking
the printers' strike, have turned out
to be union men and have joined the
strikers. It rather looks as though
the printers were going to win out
in the present eight-hour struggle.
 o
Among tho numerous huge engineering enterprises now in hand by
the United States government is the
dam over the SAlt River Canyon in
Arizona. It is to be the highest
dam In the world and will create a
lake covering 250,000 acres of now
barren land. The dam will be 240
feet high nnd the water will be carried to Phoenix, 60 miles away, by
canal and spread over 200,000 acres
of fertile land. This and similar undertakings afford striking evidence
of what may be accomplished by collective labor when once organized
and directed to useful purpose.
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Five Clarion sub. cards—$3.75.
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According to dispatches, women
slaves are used in the shops of the
pump trust, "at work that requires
the strongest of men, working amid
steam, dust and grime that would
brutalize the most hardened male
worker, and at a wage of $1.25 for
ten hours' killing toil." What a
dreary waste life would be for these
female wage.slaves were it not for
the consolation of religion, the sacredness of tlie marriage tie and the
protection of the home.
o
Five Clarion sub. cards—$3.75
To Publishers
Of Country Weeklies:
vier Type, dipoint, almost new, cost 52
tls t pound a year agot will sell at
23cts a lb.    Following is a sample of the Typet
Harlfurd. Conn., Jsn. io.—A certificate
of incorporstion ol the Cassc* & Pacific
Railway Company of Hartford, has been
filed with the secretary of state. Tbe
authorized capital stock of the company
is J40.000000. These figures exceed
those of any other company which has
filed such a certilic-.tr with the iecreiary
WRITE.
Western Clarion,
Box 836. VANCOUVER, B. C.
BIO CROPS. j
According to all accounts the season just closed has oeen toarkwd
with excellent crops of all JtoO*
throughout this Western Cont__B-t.
Canada is especially boastful in rw
gard to tho enormous wheat crop ol
the middle provinces. Tm *-*-*"*■
crops of tho United States is report
ed to amount to 2,70O,O00;O0OUus_- «-*-..»wl.\  ^f _-
els, the largest on record.  This spten> __.      h-vo tWO  caSSS (lOO  pOttttdlj Of Br«.
did season's    harvest   has ruralshad   W cr  a»t»-«-
material for much newspaper    Jubilation over the unprecedented   prosperity, more especially of the former
The cartoons of Uncle Sam sitting
contentedly upon the fence surveying
his immense field plethoric with
with corn, wheat, pumpkins, spuds
oats, barley, rye and other stomach-
filling good things affords a pleasing
picture happily suggestive of the
wave of prosperity that has fairly
overwhelmed the honest agriculturist
in return for his season's labor.
The season's crop has undoubtedly
brought a by no means inconsiderable harvest of prosperity, but the
farmer, especially he of the smaller
farm, will havo considerable difficulty in locating it around his modest
promises. The entire crop, outside
of such portion as may bo conmmied
by the farmer and his family direct,
must be turned over to the tender
morcios of capitalist property in the
shape of railroads, elevator cousin--*,
milling and manufacturing trusts,
etc., at prices not determined l>y the
farmer, but by influences outside of
him and beyond his control. After
settling his season's bills, the honest farmer will, as a rule, find himself fortunate if he can play even on
the year's work. The year's work
will not only include bis own, but
that of every member of his family
capable of lending a hand. His prosperity will be confined to playing
even, or ot the most obtaining some
trifling sum to the good.
But the prosperity accruing to the
owners of capital out of the converting of this huge moss of product into
form available for human consumption, will be something worth talking about. Out of this process, the
result of the labor of thc farmer and
his fellow-slave the wage-worker of
factory, shop, mine, railway, etc.,
fabulous millions will be harvested
by that class in human society whoso
sole function is to seize the wealth
produced by the laborers. The owners of capital will much more than
play oven upon tbe season's hnrviest.
They will have millions to tho good
as a nsfiird for their industry in not
sweating. Without lifting u hand
in useful service during the year they
will receive an enormous plunder
taken from the toil nnd sweat of the
horny-handed ami thick-headed sons
of toil both rural and urban.
The history of this continent has
been an almost uninterrupted one of
good crops each year, and at the
same time it has been a history of
an ckjually uninterrupted reduction
of thc small farmer from the position of an independent small producer, to that of a brutally rolfbwl tenant farmer or a plundered wage-
slave outright. A heavy season's
crop coupled with a shortage elsewhere does nothing more than afford
perchance, a temporary check to thc
process. In the long run, the result is equally certain that he must
be dispossessed of his independence,
and converted into an appendage to
capitalist property and compelled to
contribute the bone, flesh, blood and
sinew of himself and family to its
ever-widening and deepening stream
of profit.
Uncle Sam silting upon thc fi-ncc
serenely surveying the season's crop
is strikingly suggestive when it is
realized that this shrewd and calculating gentleman typifies the capitalist class of tha United States. Small
wonder there is a look upon his crafty visage that says: "B'gosh, that
looks good to ine."
Speaking ot big crops brings to
mind the fact that each recurring election in the good Uncle's domain,
as well as in Canada, dim-lows a
bountiful and easily gullible crop
of political suckers, made up largely
of that class that produce the enormous wealth of these countries and
got Just about enough out of it to
keep from starving or being arrested
for indecent exposure. It will be interesting to note whether succeeding
elections will show diminitlon of thlti
crop.
 o	
Five Clarion sub. can.8--$3.75.
tions of tbe lal>or marU-t, in which,
bv force of circumstances they are
compelled to sell their labor-power
in order to exist. In so fur as any
understanding of the lat«»r problem
is concerned, Qompers is undoubtedly Ignorant enough to satisfy all
requirements. It is eniirely unnecessary however, to attribute to lhat
(h»tinguisb<_ individual, the defeat
of cotton spinners or Other* in their
wagS--traggt*S against un overstocked market. The gent has enough of
a load to carry, as It, and beside*
t would not square with thu facts.
It is said that the mowing down
of unarmed workingmen in St. Petersburg, on Sunday, Jon. 22, 1905,
broke the "Little Father" superstition and convinced the Russian
workmen that autocracy was a thimr
not to be reformed, but overthrown.
How many more Haselton, Brooklyn, Cour de Alene, Chicago, Color
ado and other similar affairs will be
needed to convince the workmen of
this Western continent that tho samu
is true of capital, is as yet, a mystery.
 o
The press dispatches being the
startling news that an operation is
to be performed on Mrs. Herman
Oelrich's 150,000 pet dog Louisette.
She is suffering from a tumor. The
middle room of the third floor of the
Oelrich Mansion, on Fifth Avenue,
New York, is to be used as the private hospital. It is equipped with
the very finest of surgical appliances.
Louisette is of French extraction,
and is In no way related to the Oel-
richs family by birth. It is to be
hoped that the tumor is genuine and
not an appendicitis story gotten up
for the purpose or masking some criminal surgical practice. I-ouisctte's
income is derived from the same
source as that of the Oclrichs family. It conies from thc sweat of a
lot of wage-mules, the most of whom
will read such news as above referred to with open and undisguised admiration. There is no fool like the
wage-mule. In fact the dog's position in human society is pcrfornble,
although the dog is not to btome
for thst.
o - —
Certain semi-anarchistic helly-ach-
ers" are giving their <lln.iar.llve intellects and vocal organs much exercise of late by decrying the efforts
of those whom thoy term "political
socialists." Their noise is most
convincing in view of the fact that
the present system of property which
makes of the workingman a slave,
and his power to latyor, merchandise)
which he must preforce surrender to
his capitalist master in exchange for
his food, etc, is protected, defended
and made possible only by the organized powers of the political state,.'
I.e., government. The so-called political socialist at least has sense
enough to know that the economic
rulo of capital over labor can be
broken only by the workers wresting
from capitalist control the power,
(government) by which such nils Is
maintained. In other words the economic rule of capital over labor
cannot be broken ivcapt by first
breaking Its political rulo.   What   tl e
belly-achers" referred ■<* J- n iw  has  conditions,"     not   by    _omperi«n,
not y.t been recorded ln the minutes,  wh-tsver that Is, but by ths coadi-
Tho loftiest elevator in the world
is reputed to belong to Switzerland
and is installed opposite Lucerne at
tho famous natural mountain observatory of Burgenstock. The elevator
la pictureerfocly hidden in a grotto,
which is reached by a picturesque
road from Kohrsiten cut out of the
mountains overhanging the lata. Tho
elevator is operated by electricity,
and has a carriage twelve fool auuare
carrying seven passengers.
The carriage rises to a total huigh|
of 000 feet in Jess than three minutes, so that mountain climbing by
electricity is far easier than by an
alpenstock. Thu first 21.3 feet pass
through a wall of masonry, and the
following .'IH7 feet in a steel lattice
work, daylight and an increasingly
Wider view lending delight to the
swrtft Journey.
A gallery leads from the landing
to the top of Hammolschwand mountain. 8,800 feet above sea level.
There is provision with two stool
cables for the elevator to be lowered
bv hand should tho magical electricity fail.—Ex.
"If tbe workers want to know
what Qomporlsm means they should
look at the misery, the hopelessness
of the defeated cotton spinners at
Fall River."—Exchange
What has Oomperlein got to do
with the state of affairs at Fall
River? Nothing; absolutely nothing.
The cotton spinners, 111* their follow workers olsowhere and in all
lines, are victims of the wage-system, Thoy havs been defeated In
their various struggles for '--better
conditions,"
A denpal-'h from San Juan to the
New York Post says that all the laborers in 1'orto lllco's sugar industry may go on strike this month.
There 925,0-0 men, women nnd Chil-
dren-onc-fourth of the population Of j **• been saved In the production d
Negligee Shirts
Itot Tm Cart- to Us.
Exclusive pattern* are sow _**-
some of the choke oast wt.l u» toU
early, and some of ths snigas »«
cannot duplicate. If yon mmswfmt
unusual styles It will iammm*. *m» xs
corns promptly.
Flatirtu Hats
T.t laartos-1 toll tat ti t_« Shim
These Hats have bees swUiualssU-
cally recsivsd by young mu fron
the very first day ws brought tfcsn
out.     Neither   trouble  nor    tip
the  island—engaged  In  the   industry
These    employe*     are  making   more
money      than    ever before,   but   they
have   been   stirred   to   dissatisfaction
by an agitator who is said to be   a
represent stive of  the  American   Fed
• •ration  of Labor.   Tho planters gin
as a reason for refusing  «n ine-envoi wages tho statement tn-u the. • X-
fiect a decline in sugar prim ut 90
per rent,  next spring.     It  is i,*;*i-t-
ed  that  this year's sugar   -|..;>  will I
be worth  110.000,00(1.      lie  in.-v.l
one     influence  of  the  agita'or    over
people who arc "making •.••■•t* mOtt-
ev than    ever    liefore,"  Is a   ■•rk<r
for fair.     He must really be n i o«-
erful cuss to be able to induce w.irk*
men  to go  on strike  when    hey  ore
already   enjoying   wages,   *Wfh   ttaUh
nious     wage* an thin- Porto    Hit an
slaves no doubt are    gcltiti-r     Ihej
agitator  is  nn  all  around  had  man j
who     cnuseth      much     trouble   thst
would not otherwise occur      Yes, In-1
deed.
UlSSe   goods,   «S   you    Will   irwmit-Ai}
acknowledge upon examination.
KILR0Y, MORGAN CO.. Ltd.
M
BURNS & CO.!
rUAOWAR. an.
Second Maad Dealer
PRVnCIXIN. II. o
PENTICTON. Jan. 6—-Penticton
local is still gaining members and
now has a total of 2fi, with morn nn
the anxious seat. We are hof-end of
a change of heart on the *>nrt ,J un
other hnlf dotao or so before spring
and a consoifuent increase in our
ranks to that  extent.
For lack of a suitable hall no putt-
He meetings have been held as yet.
but this state of affairs will soon be
remedied and we will be enabled to
deal to better advantage with the
unregenerute capitalistic inindnd
workingman who -.-erslsl in blocking
the path of progress to their more
intelligent comrades hy their apathy j
and unthinking oppoHition.
Com.   Harry  Sibble,     the    Clarion j
sub-rustler, spent about a week wilh
us in   I'ccember,    and left with   be-,
twoen  25 and .'10 scalps dangling at'
hin belt.   When tho pay streak pinch-!
ed  out,   he hit  tho  trail   for     Fair-'
view and    the    Lower Similkameen,!
where    ho will, no doubt,  find bus!-:
tiesH good, especially along the   new
line of  railway  tho Croat  Northern
Is building Into that favored region.
Com. Van Rita writes from I-each-
Isnd that the December mooting of
the local there was well attended,
and a good    program was rendered.
Cook    Stove*   and   Tools   i
Hiw*. laity.
W« buy and sell all   ktn<i« ol \ \
scrap   metal,     old    ninhi-'.'
ruhbsr,  sacks,   bottles. sU.
St ores-1 ."Wl Cordova St B .
hardware A Junk. 101 Powell
St.. new and second-hand furniture.
IS7t       V.scsm- I S
t eeeeammooaoweaaaoaaem***
8. T. WALLACE S
CASH GROCERY STORE
We also carry a Ml lis* of Kursl-
ture, on easy payments, at priest
that cannot be duplies!-d Kmalj
Inspect our stock.
C«r VmahutiT Hn ui Harris Strut
VANCOUVER 0. C.
•Ml
■lllf
C. PETEM SuH<
Hand-Mad/ Swot* and Shora lo ant" Is
sll stylra.   Srpslitaa ptmmyllt anri anils dowt.     Stock   of Mapl*   ready-mad*
Shars always oa hau'l
MM l«WnNf Am      Bmsi PliMasi
LEE & MORGAN
Sanitary Expert*     r'umblng In   all
Its branches.       Estimates furnish*).
Com.  Van Hiso road a paper wMrh,tiapaira, stove connections, etc.
was well received.
Officers were elected for the Peachland local as follows: Organizer, th**
H. Van Hiss; Sec., It. Kirfcby; Rcc.-
Soc., A. Huston; Treas., E. Hay-
ward.
Peachland local contains considerable talent and will give a good account of Itself in tho effort being
mado up and down tho valley to
arouse and organize ths Socialists of
the Okanagnn.
Kolowna Local has nothing much
to report lately. One new member
was added a short time ago, and
more are manifesting an interest in
the movement who will likely join
a little later.
In thc Similkameen the comrades
appear to bo resting on their oars,
especially at Hodley, whore a strong
local tmould exist.
alalia is probably the banner Socialist camp of the district, a com-
raed from there claiming that out of
14 votos In the place 11 were social-
Around Okanagan Falls and Fair-
view we also have some wido-awake
members who lose no opportunities
to preach ths gospel of economic
frosdom.
CHARGES  IlKASONAIILB
•N VUTMIMTCI AVE., Csretrif rmt-
BRIDSON'S BAKERY
hmt* Strati, tmiat ttn
TRY OUR BREAD,  CAKES. ETC.
WAOELABOR
ANO CAPITAL ;:
BY KARL MAIIX.
■ >
11
  i >
Single   eoples,   I   cents;    <* \[
copies, St cents; IS copies. *>-* ,.
cents;  40    copies, 11.00;    IO"
eoples and  ovsr,   I  cents P*r
copy. _
These rates Include posts*-* |*
to any part ot Canada ot the ,,
United Kingdom.
"The Wegtwn Clarion"
HHMMIMtoMMlMM*-*
Jmmm,

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