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The Valley Sentinel Mar 18, 1921

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19SJ.
THE VALLEY
Incorporated with The Langley Journal, for Local Information and Constructive Criticism.
No. 41°
LAHGLEY MUNICIPAL
COUNCIL MEETING
Pound By-law Finally Passed—New
Assessor Appointed—Estimates
Estimates Under Way.
The regular fortnightly meeting of the
Langley Municipal Council was held oh
Saturday March 12 th inst, in the Council chambers, Murrayville. .
Reeve Poppy in the chair, with Councillors Brydon, Harris, Taylor, Bray,
Goldsmith and Helle present.
The minutes of the last meeting were
tead and approved.
The Reeve gave a verbal report of his
recent visit ao Victoria, where he had
gone to take up with the Government
cetain matters affecting the municipality
He had no doubt but what the government would attend to the improvement
of the Yale road as soon as the weathe-
conditions permit, and that the municipality would be met half way in the construction of primary roads.
Mr. A. D. Paterson, M.L. A., was expected to make an early tour of inspections of the roads in company with the
public works engineer, to get first hand
•^formation of local requirements. The
Reeve emphasized .the fact for increased
and better road work on account of the
heavy motor trucks and auto travel, a
traffic that was unknown in the past,
but which now had reached such a volume that made it imperative to tackle
road work in a more systematic way
than had prevailed in the past.
Another matter taken up with the
Government was the giving to the
municipality power to again designate
certain improved lands wild lands, where
through lack of attention the improvements have, been allowed to deteriorate
In connection with the imposing of a
road tax of $2 and a poll tax of $5, to be
paid by anyone residing in the munici
pality for over thirty days, the Reeve
pointed out that it applies only to persons not paying property taxes.
COMMUNICATIONS.
Among the communications was
one from the Fort Lgnrley's Women's
Institute, asking for a grant in aid of
their riower show to be held some time
in the summer. Also similar requests
from the municipal agricultural exhibitions. These requests will be taken up
after the estimates have been passed.
The Council was asked to take the
necessary official action to close that
LANGLEY PRAIRIE, B. C, APRIIr, 1921.
mi***,*   J<r
Vol. II.
portion of the old Telegraph trail running through the Allen property. The
request will be complied with when the
owners provide a definite plan showing
What isSrequired, the Council standing
the expense of the by-law that will have
to be passed and published to cover the
case.
The Council was somewhat stumped
by a letter from a a settler protesting
against his rate of taxation. As the
communication was worded it would
take a Philadelphia lawyer to translate
the mysteries of his phraseology. Action
on it was deferred.
by-laws.
By the passing of the School Site
Sales By-law, the School Board is authorized to dispose of the old Otter
school site.
The'much discussed Langley Pound
By-law received its final touches and is
now law. This by-law prohibits .the
roaming of cattle, horses, swine, sheep,
poultry, etc., at large in certain districts
of the municipality. These districts include the main highways, the villages
and towns, and public places; allowing
the farmers of the less settled areas to
still keep their stock on the roads till
November, when the by-law will be enforced in all parts of the municipality.
Pounds will be established and pound-
keepers appointed in various districts.
One hundred dollars fine, or thirty days
in the cooler is provided for in the case
of any one interfering with the pound
keeper or his assistants.
DELEGATIONS.
On behalf of the executive of the G
W.V.A., Dr. Marr attended the Council
meeting and asked that the last Sunday
in April be set aside as a memorial day
on which the graves of departed comrades will be decorated. This request
was granted. The matter of making a
grant of $150 towards helping to defray
expenses was held up pending the
completion of the municipal estimates.
The doctor proposed that all roads in
the municipality other than those
known by their present names, be
named after men who gave their lives
in the late war.
The Aldergrove Agricultural Association were represented by a delegation
composed of Messrs. J. Sherlock and D
Shortreed asking that the Council increase its grant from $75 last year to
$100 this year.
CONTRACTS.
T. Jones was awarded a contract for
ditching on the Alexander road at $55,
and Mr. Rankin for slashing, stumping and grabbing 700 feet on Coghlan
road.
The Council decided that the contract
price received for work on the Chlene
road was excessive, and other arrangements will be made to carry out the
work on more economic lines.
MISCELLANEOUS.
The building of a culvert on the Clyde
road and repair work on the international boundary road in Ward 5 was
sanctioned.
Tenders will be called for work on the
East Langley school road.
It was also decided to register the
road running through lot 6 from the
McLellan road across to the B. C. E. R.
track, and to take up the matter of the
railroad crossing at that point with the
company.
Municipal Engineer Breckon reported
the following repair work for February:
Ward 3, $239; Ward 4, $157; Spence
road, $128; Provincial Highway, $75;
Biggar road, $75; County Line, $41;
ditching in Ward 1, $10.
WAGE SCALE REDUCED.
In keeping with the general downward tendency in the scale af wages, the
Council decided upon a reduction of 5
cents per hour for outside municipal
work, to become effective April 1st.
Laborer, 45 cents per hour; man and
team, 90cents; foreman, 50 cents.
A meeting of the finance committee
will be held on March 26, prior to the
Council meeting, when the estimates
for the year will be prepared.
Langley's New Assessor.
The Municipal Council on Saturday
last appointed'Mr. Ivan Hurndall, of
Hunter, assessor, in place of Mr. Mac-
pherson, resigned. There were several
applications for the position, and it is
gratifying to Mr. Hurndall's many
friends to know that he was chosen to
fill this important position. He has
already commenced on his new duties
«»»■
The Modern Dance.
A noted evangelist and social worker
whose life has been devoted to humanity
and the value of whose work it would be
difficult to over-estimate, recently stated
at a meeting in Vancouver that: " The
modern dance as developed in Western
America is sensuous and develops passions that under ordinary circumstances
would remain dormant for many years
to cdme in young lives."
Now to tell a people who, as a nation,
are perhaps freer from misplaced passion
than any other aggregation of human
beings in the world, a thing like that is
to invite criticism and a statement of
plain historical aud physical facts.
The truth is that it is not dancing
that is sensuous, but that refraining
from dancing has always been far more
to blame in that respect. Dancing to
day is quite a strenuous exereise and de
mands the attention of the mind as well
as keeping the body occupied. It is
also a fact that if anybody in a crowded
Vancouver ballroom allowed their mind
to wander from the exiguous business of
steering a course through the whirling
mass of couples they would immediately
come a "prolonged and melancholy
cropper."
80 far from having been developed
into a sensuous performance dancing
today—especially in the. West—has been
purged and purified of all its concomitant
aids to the stirring up of passion.
It is customary to refer to the Victorian age with its stilted mannerisms
and its social restrictions as an age of
purity; it was so in comparison to the
Georgian period, but that still left it
with lots of latitude. The ballrooms
of that day were hotbeds of intrigue;
they were the meeting-places of people
who had to scheme secretly to see each
other, they were provided with almost
privite cosy cornors and "sitting-out"
places with dim lights, curtains and all
the paraphernalia of luxurious idleness.
The great point at a dance was to avoid
dancing as much as possible and spend
the time in more or less dangerous flirtation to soft music.
Life and pleasure were conducted in
whispers. Today we live out loud—
and we really dance.
Not to dance when there is dancing
going on can quite conceivably produce
the effects Mrs. Booth-Clibborn deplores
because to watch other people darce
while sitting in idleness gives the mind
time to wander.
The artificial prudery of the Victorian
age with its crinolined duennas and its
overwise female confidantes of innocent
beauty has left us. The young are no
longer trained to be ignorant of the fact
that they have bodies—an ignorance that
has produced more trouble than ever the
modern frank attitude to life has done.
In ballrooms in the West there are none
of the conditions described in the works
of Thackeray, Lytton, Disraeli and other
novelists of that period; people come to
dance and they do dance. It is the
oldest and most natural physical amusement in the world, if you do it yourself
it is good for you, if you hire someone
else to do it then it is not so good.
The young person who is trained in a
false atmosphere of sirictness and does
not obtain the polish that comes of
mixing with contemporaries becomes
stupid and gauche—but stupidity is not
necessarily virtue any more than virtue
is stupid.
There is glory in perfect motion performed to perfect motion that is part of
the birthright of the race and brings a
lightness to the heart and a feeling of
well-being something akin to what is
produced by a fine landscape suddenly
encountered or the sea beating on
rocks. There is no better illustration of
the old adage that "Satan finds some
mischief still for idle hands to do" than
this question of dancing, if you keep
them dancing they haven't got time for
mischief.—J. Butterfieid in The Sun.
_i. w
THE VALLEY SENTINEL
"A Medico-Politi
cal
Outrage/'
Attempt   Made  to   Encroach
Upon Liberties of People
Rhould Stop.
A. F. Stephens, M.D., formerly Professor of the Theory
and Practice of Medicine and
Dean of the American Medical
College, St. Louis, Mo., in an
article entitleda " A Medico-
Political Outrage," writes:
The political doctors have
steadily encroached upon the
liberties of the people as concerns their health. They propose to enforce* by law, their
arbitrary opinions, be they
right or wrong.
Under the plea of protecting the health of the children,
they are slyly instilling into
the minds of the people the
thought that they are to be
saviours of the race ; the legislatures are being importuned
to enact laws which shall give
them the power to compel
obedience to their commands.
The argument they advance is
made so plausible that the real
purpose lies hidden from view.
Nothing is hinted, at the present time, about compulsory
treatment. That will come
later as a matter of course.
Let us inquire into the fitness of the doctors who are to
examine our children; those
to whom we are to be compelled to submit our children
for inspection. In the first
place, who is it that usually
occupies the office of health
inspector? The head of the
medical departments is always
selected from the old school.
He is, in most cases, a man
holding the degree of M.D.
as the sole recommendation
for appointment to office. He
is not, as a rule, one with a
wide experience in practice,
or one who is absorbed in his
profession because of a love
for it. A really capable physician would not accept any
such position.
It should not require the
blast of a trumpet to awaken
the people to a realization of
the dangers that threaten them
from the medico-political in
terference with the people's
rights as regards their persons.
Each individual should con
tinue to safeguard his health
and the health of those who
are dependent upon him in
the manner that seems to him
best. His decision in such
matters should stand above
the law, for bodily health can
not be legislated into anyone.
No man's right to select whatsoever means he may desire
to give him health should be
taken away and the enforced
adoption of allopathic means
substituted, especially when
such measures are admittedly
inadequate and very often
destructive to life.
There is no more pernicious
officialism than may be found
in the political doctor if given
a little authority. He is usually a man narrow of mind and
arrogant in his usurpation of
privilege. Cloth him with
power, and the rights and
liberties of others disappear.
The trend of the times
ought to be a warning to the
men who think. If the forces
which are now incessantly at
work to establish medical
supervision over the people
are successful, the time is not
far distant when no'man can
truthfully say: I am free in
my own person. I have the
God-given right to select the
practitioner/)f my ohoice, and
whatever method of treatment
I deem best.
There are functions connected with the public health
which may be safely delegated
to the State; but compulsory
examination of school children
is not one of them, for once
compulsory examination is
conceded, it is but a step to
compulsory treatment by the
allopathic school with all its
poisonous serums^ vaccines,
and death-dealing coal tar
products.
It is impossible to conceive
of legislation more obnoxious
than this to a people who
proclaim themselves free and
independent*
Langley Prairie Hardware
W. T. EGGINS, Proprietor
Full lines of Builders' Supplies. Paints, Oils and Stains,  Roofing
Materials, etc.
Farm Implements, Garden Tools, Kitchen and Dairy Utensils,
Cutlery, etc.
Phone. Milner 57 STOVES AND HEATER S
SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS.
Free Buss to  Langley Prairie from
Fort Langley, Milner, Otter
and Murrayville.
On Good Friday the Langley
Theatre will provide free transpor-
tion from Fort Langley, Milner,
Otter, and Murrayville and return,
to their patrons for the special
matinee showing for that day,
when a brand new picture, entitled
"Down Home," will be shown for
the first time in British Columbia.
"Down Home" is a great picture
with a strong story 4old in a big
way. It will keep you on the
brink between laughter and*tears.
If you have seen the play "David
Harum" or read the book, you can
form some idea of what to expect
in "Down Home," which is along
similar lines and written by the
brother of the author of "David
Harum." Your time will be well
spent in seeing "Down Home."
Don't miss it.
In order to obtain free transportation it is only necessary to purchase a regular ticket for the
big show, at, children 25 cents,
adults 50 cents. The car will leave
from the school house in each locality  at  the   following   hours:
Leave Murrayville 1:15 p.m.
"     Otter 2:00
Fort Langley 3:00
Milner 3:45
Returning Murrayville...4:00
Otter 5:00
Milner 6:00
"        Ft. Langley...6:30
Will
u
If
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Constance talmadge
A Temperamental Wife"
assies
An enjoyable time was spent' at
whist drive and concert given by the
Langley United Football Club last
Wednesday evening in the auditorium
of the Langley Theatre.
In our next week's issue will appear the first instalment of a series of
articles on poultry raising by Mr. H.
E. Upton, supervisor in charge of
poultry husbandary for the S. S. B.
A dance will be given by the
Murrayville Tennis Club in their
hall on Thursday, March 24th.
The Lynden 4-piece orchestra have
been secured for the occasion.
A special Easter musical service
will be held in the Langley Prairie
S. S. Hall on Sunday evening, the
27th inst., at 7:30. The Rev. J. H.
Matthews will give an address.
Langley Theatre,
MONDAY NIGHT, MARCH 21 '
The Athon Co.
In the two big plays—
"JIELLO, BILL!"
The fnniest ever written.   A laugh
every minute—then some.
Also, the only play ever endorsed by
the Americcan Federation of Labor,
"CAPITAL AND LABOR,"
A play every man, woman and child
should see.
CLIFF LANCASTER
in his funny vaudeville act.
5—REELS PICTURES—5
If a good crowd turns out Monday
night this clean company will appear
here every Monday night. If the size
of the attendance is not encouraging
then farewell to good road shows for
the valley.:
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THE VALLEY SENTINEL
CLOVERDALE—Mr. S. Howe,
proprietor of the Cloverdale Hotel,
who has been confined in the hospital
for several weeks, is progressing towards recovery and hopes to be home
again shortly.
Friends of Mrs. Kendall will be
pleased to kndw she has returned
home from the Royal Columbian
Hospital, where she underwent an
operation.
Magistrate J. Stilwell Clute imposed a fine erf $300 and costs on
Mrs, P. McGrew, in Police Court on
Thursday morning, for an infraction
ofjthe Narcotic and Drugs Act. The
arrest was made at White Rock by
customs officials.
Mr. C. Lemax has returned from
Victoria. Among other things he reports the defeat of the private bill for
the incorporation of Port Mann.
The High School pupils are holding
their dance in the Opera House on
Monday, March 28th. Admission
will be by invitation.
WHITE ROCK—The G. W.
V. A. are holding a dance here on
Friday, April 1st. The Blaine orchestra will furnish the music.
Westminster Market Prices.
The Sentinel intends to makea feature of the market reports. Below
will be found quotations for Fridao,
March 18 j
POULTRY- •
Hens, light, per lb ..
Hens, heavy, per lb.
Ducks, lb 	
PILLING THE SILO
The corn, sorghum and other crops
similar to these should be allowed tp
ripen before being cut for the silo,
but should be cut before any of the
leaves dry and .fall off. In other
words, let it ripen to a point that
will give the highest germination test
of the seed without loss. of leaves.
The largest percentage of nutrient3 is
formed during the last two weeks preceding this stage. When the crop is
cut to» early it gives a low tonnage of
dry matter and a low percentage of digestible nutrients. In case of frost
the sooner the crop is cut the better.
The cutter knives should be well
sharpened and set so as to make a
clean complete cut. This saves
power and gives a better silage.
When the crop is partially shredded it
does not pack well, air cannot all be
expelled and the silage is likely to be
of an inferior quality.
The filling should not be too rapid,
as there is a possibility that the silage will not be well packed. At ordinary rate of filling two good men
should be placed in the silo to distribute, mix and tramp the corn as it
comes from the cutler. To insure
good silage every phase of this work
must be carefully done. Good men
only should be assigned to this part
of the operation. Men who will take
advantage of their boss should not be
put in the silo.
If the corn has been frosted or is a
little dry when it is put into the silo,
water should be added. The best
way this can be done is to connect a
barrel with the blower and allow a
small stream of water to enter and the
water will be blown up with the corn
into the silo. Corn a little dry does
not pack well or keep well. Enough
water should be added to cause the
corn to pack well.
In sealing the silo, all that is necessary is "to wet the corn thoroughly
and tramp it well. If this is done
there will be a very small amount of
spoiled silage.
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 S5
 80
Tu'GGS-'
Eugs, wholesale, dozen ,    .30
Eggs, retail, dozen 85
BUTTER-
Prime ranch, per lb      .05
POBK-
Heavy .' 15
Pork, prime, lb	
VEAL-
No. 1. lb *3
BEEP-
Alberta. lb M .18
Local, lb e    .08 .10
VEQETABLES-
Potatoes, saok  1-00 1.50
Potatoes ton 1100 1500
Cabbage, sack    150 3.00
Parsnips, saok  3 50
Turnips, saok  »   1.00
Carrots, red, per saok   80 .90
Beets  1.00
Onions. Okanagan. saok    1.15  1.50
Onions" saok  1 00
FRUIT-
Apples. box    3.50  3.50
The real estate and insurance business of Tugaw & DeWalt has been
taken over by Mr. J. D. Skinner of
Vancouver. He will represent among
other companies the Wawanesa Mutual Insurance Company of Manitoba, which appeals td the farmers. A
copy of this company's annual statement will appear in next week's issue
of The Sentinel.
The Royal Bank staff expect to be
installed in their handsome new block
early next week, when Manager J. H.
de Canonville will be in a better position than ever to Serve his many
patrons.
The residents of Biggar prairie are
endeavoring to interest the Government in a ditching programme that
will bring under cultivation some
1500 acres of choice agricultural land
in that valley.
A few street lights in the business
section of the town would not only
give it an up-to-date appearance but
would be a great help to the travelling
public.
A meeting was held in the S. S
building, Langley Prairie, on Wed'
nesday, March 9, with a view to
forming  a Boardof Trade  here.
Notice will be given in these col
umns of further proceedings.
Langley Prairie General Store
Groceries! Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes
[Hardware.
A.  C. McNAB, Proprietor.
Everybody knows where. Phone Milner 4.
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A. P. SLADE & COMPANY
WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
FRUIT, BUTTER,  EGGS, CHEESE AND  POULTRY
155 Water St.
Victoria. VANCOUVER, B. C.    Prince Rupert.
W. S. McLEAN
Carries complete stocks of
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes,
Notions, Gents1 Furnishings, etc,
The Goods are of the Best Quality. A trial will convince you.
Langley Prairie. B. C.
VALLEY MEAT MARKET
Langley Prairie, B. C.
ALL MEATS ARE LOCALLY KILLED.
NO STORAGE MfiAT HANDLED.
Try our Home-Made Sausages—they are fine.
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Job Printing
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5   | Ijljt j you can get exactly what your proposition   j>
| M*. | caj|s for right here at Langley Prairie
lilfflliiill 5 We have a very complete equipment,
111       and are in a position to give you Service
o y       and Quality of the best, and at prices that   §
§   will compare favorably with those of the cities.
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Rear of the Theatre, LANGLEY ?RASR!E.
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THE VALLEY SENTINEL
Published Weekly by
The   Valley  Sentinel Printing and
Publisning Company
AT
Langley Prairie, B. C.
Advertising rates on application.   Discount on yearly contracts.
Subscription Rates—Canada, $1.50 per
year.   Other countries, $2.00.
FRIDAY, March 18, 1621.
THE VALLEY SENTINEL.
IN makfng their initial bow to
the people of the fruitful Fraser
Valley, on the South side of the
river particularly, between the
Fraser River and the international
boundary line and from New Westminster to Chilliwack, the publishers of The Valley Sentinel
do not think it necessary to apologise either for the name of the
journal or for its appearance at
this time, which they believe to be
most opportune—for the reasons
following.
In the first place, as to the name:
As " The Island," to the people of
the Maritime Provinces, can have
only one meaning, Prince Edward
Island, so ".The Valley'' in British
Columbia vernacular, can, broadly
speaking, mean only the Valley of
the Fraser—that great historical
Canadian Pacific waterway with
which the fortunes of the country
have been inseparably bound up
since the discovery and navigation
o the noble stream to which he
gave his name by the lion-hearted
Simon Fraser, in the dawning days
of the last century. And for such
a rich and splendid heritage as the
Fraser Valley, what could be more
necessary and fitting than aSentinel
to watch and guard its interests ?
The Journal, intermittingly issued from this office for some time
past, has broken ground, so to
speak. The Sentinel, by the leave
and with the support of the people
of the district, has come to stay
and make its regular rounds at
least once a week.
That the Fraser Valley, the
southern side of the Fraser particularly—the richly endowed and
boundlessly potential district municipalities of Langley, Delta, Surrey, Matequi and Sumas, with the
many thriving, promising centres
within their borders—have reached
a stage of progress and development where a centrally situated
local journal, devoted to their interests, is an absolute essential for
further growth and advancement,
has begun to be keenly realized
throughout the districts referred to.
Engrossed in their own strenuous,
intensive, and complex affairs, the
city papers can devote only spasmodic and fragmentary attention
to matters outside the urban limits,
with the natural and inevitable
result that rural interests, necessary systematic rural publicity,
and the rural view-point in public
generally, are neglected and to a
great extent unvoiced—certainly
fall far short of being accorded
that place in the press of the province which their importance and
the welfare of the country as a
whole imperatively demand.
It is to supply that crying lack,
to fill this long felt want, that the
Valley Sentinel has made its advent. The immediate location of
its publication has been dictated
by circumstances partly fortuitous
and by considerations of central
and convenient situation to means
of communication and transportation. It is the hope, aim, and objective of the publishers to do their
part, with the co-operation of the
people of the district concerned, to
enable The Valley Sentinel to
translate its name fully into service for the splendid constituency
in which it has cast its lot and
whose interests are its own.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Old ex-Kaiser Bill is reported to
have his eye on conditions in Germany, cherishing the fond hope
that by some turn of fortune he
may again find himself the ruler
of his beloved fatherland. Bill
had best focus his optic on things
in a more congenial clime.
*    *    *
A prisoner, while working at the
Oakalla gaol farm in Burnaby, recently, was accidentally killed.
Upon his mother's plea the Provincial Government granted her the
sum of $1500. Of this the undertaker got $432, and the lawyer
$500. Under the circumstances
they should both be flogged.
9p       «J»       *p
"Come ye out from among
them, and be ye separate," is the
Biblical quotation, Honest John
hurled at Canon Hinchcliffe the
other day in the Local Legislature,
advising him as it were to break
away from his political leader, if
he wished to keep his skirts clean.
John may not be a can(n)on, but
he can ffre some pretty hot shots.
Brace Up
i
PHONE 66 U
By taking our COMPOUND SYRUP
HYPOPHOSPHITES. A stimulating
nerve force builder.     $1.00 per bottle.
A. M. PLEWES, DRUGGIST
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
LANGLEY BAKERY
LANGLEY PRAIRIE, B. C.
PHONE 36 X
Bread Wholesale and Retail.   Gakes and Pastry
fresh daily.
A. WARMAN, Proprietor.
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I To test the value of this Paper we offer the |
| following SPECIALS for the WEEK of MARCH §
| 21st to 26% to all bringing this advertisement    §
| Tea, our 45c. value for 40c per lb. §
| Coffee, 50c. value  for 45c per lb. |
| Rolled Oats, 6-lb. sack, 40c. value for 35c 1
| Cornmeal, 5-lb. sack, 40c. value for 35c |
| Quaker Oats, 20-lb. sack, value $1.20 for $1,10 |
| Royal Crown Washing Powder, large packet, 5
| 40c. value for 35c |
|    No. 2. Wheat, per sack $3.40 1
1
I   DesBrisay Jobbing Co. |
| LANGLEY PRAIRIE I
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YALE HOTEL
YALE ROAD
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Now open for business.   Modern and up to date
throughout.
WE  ARE  PLEASED TO SERVE AND SERVE TO PLEASE.
PHONE 56 L
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When you want anything Electrical
Call and See
GIBSON
ELECTRICIAN
THEATRE BLOCK, LANGLEY PRAIRIE.
Do it Electrically. We'll tell you why.
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THE VALLEY SENTINEL
~-\
CONDENSED NEWS
OF GENERAL INTEREST
Happenings   Here   and" Elsewhere
Boiled Down for Convenience Sake.
THE FEEBLE-MINDED
AND SO CALLED UNFIT
Some Caustic Remarks on an Interesting and Mucn to the Fore Question of the day.
Mr. G. W. Enright, Biggar road, had
the misfortune to lose his barn and contents, as well as a Reo truck, by fire on
Monday night. The loss just at this
time is a great handicap to Mr. En-
right's spring opeaations, but with his
characteristic aggressiveness he is setting about to repair the damage. The
fire was caused by a calt overturning
a lantern. The loss is partially covered
by insurance.
A very successful series of short lee
tures was held in the Murrayville hall
last week. The lectures, which were
held under the auspices of the Langley
locals of U. F. of B. C, were addressed
by members of the. faculty of agriculture of the University of British Columbia. The various branches of agriculture were touched on by the different speakers in a very lucid and interesting manner, to the apparent appreciation of those present.
The Langley Sunday school managers
are giving a concert to-morrow evening
at 8 o'clock in their school building.
The Comet concert party of Vancouver
has been engaged to take part, and they
come highly spoken of as entertainers.
The proceeds ate to be devoted to the
building fund.
The local Women's Institute are holding a military whist drive and dance in
the Langley Theatre on Thursday, 31st
inst. at 8:45 p.m. Cards will be played
till 11, after which there will be refreshments and dancing. Tickets of
admission are 50 cents, which may be
obtained from members or at the door.
Professor Thomas Huxley, known the
world over for his common sense and
fearlessness in attacking present day
fallacies, deals in the following article
with what is popularly called the "un
fit." The professork's handling of this
topic is well worth reproducing and we
make no apologies for so doing:
"In a large proportion of cases, crime
and pauperism have nothing to do with
heredity; but are the consequence,
partly of circumstances and partly of
the possession of qualities, which, under
different conditions of life, might have
excited esteen and even admiration. It
was a shrewd man of the world who, in
discussing sewage problems, remarked
that dirt is riches in the wrong place;
and that sound aphorism has moral
applications. The benevolent and open-
handed generosity which adorn a rich
man may make a pauper of a poor one;
the energy and courage to which the
successful soldier owes his promotion,
the cool and daring subtlety to which
the great financier owes his fortune,
may very easily, under unfavorable
conditions, lead their possessors to the
gallows, or to the jail. Moreover, it is
fairly probable that the children of a
'" failure " will receive from the other
paren* just that little modification of
character which makes all the difference.
"I sometimes wonder whether people
who talk so freely about exterpatingthe
unfit ever dispassionately consider their
own history. Surely, one must be very
" fit" indeed not to know of an occasion
or perhaps two, in one's life, when it
would have been only too easy to qualify
for a place among the " unfit."
hi
* The Langley Prairie Women's Institute has just issued a very attractive
programme for the coming year. There
are to be monthly addresses on various
subjects of interest; also discussions on
topics of vital importance to all. Space
will not permit publishing the programme in ful]. Copies can be obtained
from any of the officers.
Good Friday Football Match.
The Langley United football
team will meet the Sapperton aggregation on the local grounds on
Good Friday in a friendly game.
The Sapperton boys are a good
bunch of sports and the home team
are anxious to see a big turnout of
fans. The home team will be composed of the following players:
S. Brown, "Doc"Allard, J. Pefizer,
A. Bodaly, C. Swanson, Carl Swan-
son, L. Blacklock, H. Blacklock,
Gene Black. C. Allard, S. Winter-
bottom, J. Sims, C. Taylor, C.
Coghlan.    Kick-off at 3 p.m.
The Sentinel makes its bow to
the public with a very fair advertising patronage,' for which we are
duly grateful, and we hope those
who have withheld their support
will eventually get in the procession and be numbered among the
elect.   Thank you.
Mother—He seems an easy going
person.
Daughter—Well, he isn't. He was
dreadfully hard to get rid of.
Henpecke—I always let my wife have
the last word.
Bolter—You must be glad, though,
when she reahes it.
Rector—" What a well-behaved little
boy yours is, Mrs. Wicks." " Yes, just
like his father. My husband always gets
a few weeks taken off his sentence for
good conduct."
Langley Service Garage
Storage.       LANGLEY PRAIRIE    Service Car
CARS FOR HIRE DAY AND NIGHT.
Repairing by Expert Mechanic—Satisfaction guaranteed.
PHONE 55 R. P- F. CAGNACCI, Proprietor.
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HUGHGIFFORD
Plumber
Tinsmith
Heating
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Phone, Milner 54 X.
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I   Langley Prairie Hotel   1
J. S. DONNELLY
Announces the opening of this Hotel
on or about March p
When your patronage is cordially invited. 1
I     RIGHT AT THE B. C. E. R'Y STATION.
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Optical Service for Valley Residents.
EYES
EXAMINED
GLASSES
FITTED
The Morris Optical Co.
OPTHALMIC MANUFACAURING
OPTICIANS
549 Granville St., Vancouver, B.C.
Consult Mr.   L, R. MORRIS,   March 21st, at
at PLEVVES' Drug Store, Langley Prairie.
. THE VALLEY SENTINEL
h-
Is Canada
Overgoverned?
Eminent Writer Directs Attention to Overdose of Officialdom in our Dominion.
In the following pointed and
well-timed article, Dr. J. McK.
Jordan points out the costly and
top-heavy manner in which Canada
is carrying on her public affair?.
It will stand perusing:
If Canada's undeveloped condition is
caused by any one thing more than
another it is because of her ponderous
expensive system of government.
Animals and birds always migrate to
to the most prolific feeding grounds.
The human being is no exception to
otner forms of natural life, and the fact
that seven million Canadians and their
decendents are now citizens of the
United States substantiate the statement that Canada is undeveloped.
Between the cost of sustaining her
colossal government system, her church
organizations, legal departments, sociaj
welfare societies and heath systems,
with their destructive tendencies, Canada staggers under a burden which is
bound to force the productive population
to seek better stamping ground.
The old saying " pigs is pigs," equivalent to "facts is facts," applies, and
it cannot be denied, war or no war, it
was only a matter of time when we
would arrive at the situation we am
now facing. With our small population,
less production than consumption for
those that are here, the compound
interest on vast sums of borrowed
money which was not used for production purposes, but rather borrowed for
the purpose of erecting government
structures in every province, and keeping up a government retinue, Wb could
not expect any other than our present
position.
The cities of London and New York,
each with populations almost equal to
the whole of Canada, are governed by
one body, while Canada supports ten
lieutenant-governors and parliaments,
to say nothing of her standing army,
mounted police, dominion police, provincial police and civic police forces,
exclusive of every known kind of inspector. Is it any wonder then that
with this load the population not only
.does not increase as it should normally,
but the burdened get out from under ?
A big whistle is quite appropriate for
an ocean liner, but install the same
whistle upon a small tug boat, the steam
becomes exhausted with the first blast
and with it both sound and power of
propulsion are gone.
This would seem to be the position in
which Canada finds herself—her whistle
is altogether too big for the boat.
The present method of increasing
taxation will not eradicate this condition, but rather increase it, and something must be done and don? quickly if
Canada is to be saved fiom peril.
Open to Public Next Week.
The new Langley Prairie Hotel,
being erected^by Mr. J. S. Donnelly,
adjacent to the B.C.E.R. station, is
receiving its finishing touches and if
nothing unforeseen happens it will
be open to the public early next
week. The hotel hag been built
with a view to convenience and comfort to the travelling public and its
ten well lighted and well furnished
bedrooms should be much appreciated by those in search oi a sound
night's sleep. A well appointed dining room will cater to dictates of the
inner man, while mild liquid refreshments can be had on the premises..
A barber shop and pool room are also
located in the building. The structure was erected under the supervision of Mr. C. Perry of Vancouver,
local labor being employed. The
building Is a credit to fhe town and
is another evidence of the progress of
Langley Prairie.
CARNCROSS & HUGH
NOTARIES
LICENSED
CONVEYANCERS
INSURANCE      REAL ESTATE
CLOVERDALE, B. C.
Langley Theatre
LANGLEY PRAIRIE.
GOOD FRIDAY
Special Show Afternoon and
Evening.
A continuous Performance from 2 to 6 and
8.30 to l^pm-
A BIG NEW PHOTOPLAY
"DOWN HOME"
FIRST SHOWN IN B. C.
" Down Home " the skies are blue,
" Down Home " the girls are truer,
" Down Home " our woes seem fewer.
Ain't it bo?
" Down Home " the laugh rings clearer,
" Down Home " the friends are dearer,
And Heaven, somehow, seems nearer.
Better Go 1
FREE   EXCURSION
From Langley Fort, Milner, Otter, and
Murrayville.
(See news item for particulars.)
NO ADVANCE IN PRICES.
Children 25c. Adults 50c.
The Yale Hotel.
The new Yale Hotel, recently
opened by 1'urner Bros., is a well
built and laid out hostelry, with most
every modern convenience, steam
heated and eventually each of the 16
bedrooms will be furnished with hot
and cold water. The dining room
will soon be open, wh«n a competent
chef will cater to the public palate.
A comfortable office and lounging
room is met with off the grotrnd floor
entrance. In the rear is the near-
beer bar and pool room. The proprietors are out to give service.
»»»
CLOVEREALE
OPERA HOUSE
Every Thursday
The pick of the.Big Photo Plays,
The same that are patronised by
millionaires in the big cities are to
be seen here at popular prices.
NEXT WEEK
New Service Garage.
This week saw the commencement
of work on the foundation of the new
Langley Service Garage, for Mr. P.
Cagnacci, who finds his present premises too cramped for his- rapidly increasing business. The building is
planned to be 40-70 , feet, with a
frontage on. the main street and will
stnad on a concrete foundation. A
service car will be kept to attend to
emergency cases, and a large show
room will display the various makes
of cars for which Mr. Cagnacci has
secured the agency, including the
Chevrolet, Hudson. Cadilac, Essex,
Chalmers, Oldsmobile, and traffic
trucks. This garage will be in a position to handle anything in sight in
their line of business.
Fatty Arbuckle
Fat and Funny—in
"THE COOK/'
AND
Good Advice.
In recent address before theRoyal
City Boad of Trade, Dean Clement,
of the U.B.C, speaking of co-operative marketing said: "Co-operative
marketfng of agricultural products not only benefits the
producer, by ensuring a reasonable return for. his services,
but also tends to benefit the consumer in the long run by minimising the cost of marketing services."
■»—«i i
F. POLLARD
PLUMBER
TINSMITH
AND
SHEET METAL WORKER
Estimates furnished.   All work
High Class.
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Opposite the B. C. E. Railway
Station.
Constance Talmadge
IN
" The Temperamental Wife/'
There is no better way of improving your time than attending
these wonderful entertainments.
Langley Theatre,
LANGLEY PRAIRIE.
Every Saturday
Entertainment is as necessary to
health and happiness as is food
and clothing.
Come and see the joys, sorrows
and prediqament of others and you
will realize that your lot is not so
bad after all.
The Best Cure for
Grouch and Wrinkles v
NEXT WEEK
FAT FATTY ARBUCKLE
IN
"THE COOK."
AND
Constance Talmadge
IN
"THE TEMPERAMENTAL WIFE."
The Langley restaurant has been
sold by Mrs. Wilkens to Mrs. Wol-
man, who expects to move the business into the Yale Hotel next week.
Under the auspices of the Langley
Prairie branch of the Church of England Guild a military whist drive and
concert is to be held in the Langley
Theatre ou Wednesday, April 6th.
The funds are to he devoted to the
building fund.
mmt*
mmmmwmm
mmt THE VALLEY SENTINEL
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The Valley Sentinel
Published every Friday at Langley Prairie, B.C.
We aim to reach every part of the South
•Fraser Valley.   Send along your
Subscriptions and Ads.
Price $1.00 to end of this Year
Our Solicitor will call on you
is
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THEVALLEY SENTINEL
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"YOU'R PINCHED."
A tale with a moral for all jealous wives
A picture to brighten stenographers' lives
Demonstrates that both hub and stenog maybe pure
Makes the faith of the wife in her helpmate more sure
It's a swishy,  French farcy depiction!
Out!   We!  Bingo!  It's fast!
You'll say so when you see Constance Talmadge
in the John Emerson-Anita Loos Special
" A Temperamental Wife."
Cloverdale, Thursday, March 24th.
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SOMETHING PEPPY
■     AT    '   '
THE LANGLEY THEATRE
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| Saturday, March 26th, at 8.30 p.m. |
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