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The Valley Sentinel Apr 2, 1921

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 ■ ■   ■:■■■ ■  ;■ |  ■-.-.   '■■-,   |   ■ .„ . .   ;   ■■■.;.    .
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THE VALLEY SENTINEL
Incorporated with The Langley Journal, for Local Information and Constructive Criticism.
No. 43
LANGLEY PRAIRIE, B.C., APRIL 2, 1921.
Vol. II.
MUNICIPAL FATHERS
HEAR ABOUT SCHOOLS
J. W. Berry, Chairman of Langley School Board, Talks on
Educational Matters.
At the meeting of the. Municipal
Council on Saturday last, at Murrayville, a very concise and lucid presentation of school matters in Langley municipality was presented by Mr. J. W.
Berry, the board's efficient secretary.
Mr. Berry pointed out that the urgent
need of more sehool accommodation
made it imperative to take immediate
steps to go ahead with the policy the
board had outlined, which would at
least bring some relief to the present
serious situation, which he summarised
as follows:
At Murrayville and Langley Prairie
there were 200 children on double shift;
Otter school was taking twice as many
pupils as there was accommodation for.
Milner was fnll and West Langley overcrowded, and the position in the east
portion of the municipality must be ad
justed now. Authority would be asked
to include the extension work, demanded this year, in a by-law, which would
provide for the raising of at least $40,-
000.
The programme- mapped out would
allow for a six room school half mile
east of this town, three rooms to be
used for school purposes, thereby relieving Murrayville, and two rooms to
take the overflow of three senior classes
from Langley Prairie school. Another
room at South Otter was needed and a
two-roomed school at Sperling, which
was central, and would relieve the pressure at East Langley and Springbrook.
The Provincial Government might be
persuaded to take more than a third
share of the expense. At South Otter,
a 50 per cent, allotment should be obtained, as so far no grant had been secured for that district.
Iu the eastern portion of the municipality, said Mr. Berry, it was proposed
that the municipal district arrangement
for school purposes be disregarded and
that Matsqui children join with Langley
and attend where municipal facilities
exist on either side of the municipal
boundary.
A teacher would be installed at Will-
oughby, where the use of the Community Hall had been secured for school
purposes. West Langley would thereby
be relieved and Milner would also benefit by this arrangement.
Mr. Berry was given a most attentive
hearing throughout his remarks.
ROAD IMPROVEMENTS.
The question of road  improvements
loomed up large in the Council's delib
erations, several deputations attending
to press their claims for better roads.
The land owners of Ward 1 handed in
a petition, praying that a ditch be cut
for a distance of 800 feet to a point east
of the Chiene road. The petitioners
agreed to assist in putting the work
through. The engineer and Councillor
Bray were directed to make a report.
The estimates were held over for another fortnight.
HAPPENINGS iN
SURREY MUNICIPALITY
Cloverdale—Ex-Reeve T. J. Sullivan,
and Mr. H. Bose headed a deputation
which attended the meeting of the Surrey Council on Saturday and put the
case forward for grants from the Council
in aid of the Surrey District exhibit at
New Westminster fair, and the Surrey
fair. The Council voted $500 for the district exhibit, $200 of that sum to be
made available at once; and made a
grant of $250 in aid of the Surrey fair.
The Opera House was the scene of a
a very successful dance given by the
High School girls, in aid of the basketball team, last Monday evening. Dancing commenced at 8 p.m. and continued
until midnight, when a sumptuous supper was served. About fifty couples
danced to the exquisite music furnished
by Messrs. Woods, Timms and Wilson,
of Langley Prairie.
Another Game Necessary.
A record breaking crowd gathered at
Mission City last Saturday to witness
the football game between the Langley
United and Clayburn teams. The Pak-
enham Cup, emblematic of the] championship of the Fraser Valley, was at
stake, and both teams were out to win,
the result being that a grand afternoon's sport was dished up. After
ninety minutes of labor neither side had
scored. The game went into overtime,
but in the thirty extra minutes played
so evenly were the teams matched that
time was called without a tally. Local
fans attended, and although they howled themselves hoarse in spurring their
favorites on to victory, it was not to be.
The game is to be replayed this afternoon at Mission, and from all accounts the Langley boys are pledged to
bring back the bacon, even if they have
to use a cannon.
Who's the Better Man ?
The Milner branch of the United
Farmers are coming down to debate
with the local branch as to to who is the
better business man—the farmer or city
man? Milner will argue for the affirmative while Langley Prairie will defend
the negative. There should be a large
attendance. See bills for further particulars.
$200,000 TO BE SPENT
BY GOVERNMENT
Continuation of Work on the Pacific
Highway to be Proceeded with
Immediately.
Mr. A. D. Paterson, M. L. A. for
Delta, passed through Langley Prairie
on Saturday last, on his way to his
home near Ladner, from a visit to Big-
gar Prairie., where he had been looking
over the proposed land reclamation proposition at that place.
In course of conversation Mr. Paterson intimated that it was his intention
tion at the close of the present session
of the Legislature to visit the different
municipal Councils, to confer with them
in regard to the distribution of the provincial grant to the Delta district. The
programme is expected to include the
hard-surfacing of the Pacific Highway,
from Cloverdale to the Serpentine flats,
at an expenditure of some $200,000. The
detour at Cloverdale will bb along the
McLellan road to Johnston road to the
hard-surfaced portion of the highway at
the green timber.'' An effort Will also
be made to hard-surface the Yale road
from Langley Prairie  to Murrayville.
Incidentally Mr. Paterson mentioned
that his "job" at Victoria was no snap,
and was considerably more strenuous
than farming. He is on four important
committees which with his other duties,
keeps him at work long beyond accepted union hours. However, Alex, is a
glutton for. work and he has a reputation for getting results.
Spring Planting.
The Timms Market Gardening Co. are
busy with their spring planting and
this week some five acres of Cuthbert
raspberries are being set out. The
work has been carefully done and with
proper attention from now on the venture should prove a profitable one. The
inside crops are all planted and making
splendid growth towards maturity.
+ .*-
Social and Personal.
A surprise party paid a visit to Mr.
and Mrs. W. Cambridge on Tuesday
evening, when a very pleasant time
was spent. Progressive whist was indulged in, interspersed with voc.il selections. Those present were: Mr. and
Mrs. Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. Woods, Mr.
and Mrs. T. Calow, Misses J. Michaud
and M. Logan, Messrs. O. Lee and O.
Thome. The happy gathering broke
up about 1 p. m.
Mr. R. J. Wark, claims agent for the
P. G. E. railway, with headquarters at
Victoria, visited his old home in Langley Prairie on Saturday, returning to
Victoria oh Monday.
CONDENSED NEWS
OF GENERAL INTEREST
Mr. R. H. Brown is opening a carpenter shop in the premises now occupied
by the Langley Service Garage. He
expects to be ready for business about
the 10th of April. In addition to handling all classes of joinery and store
fittings, Mr. Brown will carry a line of
sash and doors.
I The fortnightly dance given by the
j flay ton buds was held on Wednesday
pght. The music, supplied by the
"Langley trio," was the big feature. Of
course the "eats" made a big hit, as
they always do, The next dance will
held on April 13th.
Mr. W. Brandow, who is operating
two trucks in transfer work, has just
obtained a jitney licence and will shortly trade in one of his trucks for a baby
grand Cheverlot touring car. He will ■
specialize in trips to White Rock and
other pleasure resorts this summer.
Mr, F. Pollard is moving his tinsmith
business to the premises where the Service Garage is vacating about the 10th
of the month.
Mr. A. Fitchet has sold his chicken
ranch at Hunter station to Mr. Reed,
who has just arrived from the Prairies.
Mr. Reed will take possession immediately. This is further evidence that
the Fraser Valley has the climate and
the soil that attracks.
There is to be a general meeting held
at Abbotsford on April 13th, in the G.
W. V. Rooms, to discuss forming a lacrosse and baseball league in the Valley. A good attendance is necessary in
order to ensure the success of the undertaking.
The premises now occupied by F.
Pollard across from the B. C. E. R. station will be taken over by C. Finch,
who intends branching out into the real
estate and insurance business. Mr,
Finch expects to move in about the
middle of April.
Mr. J. W. Berry left on Thursday
for Ottawa, where, among otner matters, he will lend his assistance to the
Dominion Government in straightening
out some of the many problems affecting
the soldier settlement question in this
Province, with which he is familiar.
Don't forget the auction sale on Tuesday April 5th, at Brar.dow's bam. The
sale is held under authority of the Soldier Settlement Board.
A good crowd were in evidence at Mr.
Lundy's weekly sale held here Thursday
last. There was a large amount of furniture, which found ready sale. Pigs
and poultry also realized good prices.
On Wedneseay evening the Fort Langley basketball team journeyed to Murrayville and got trimmed to the tune of
19 to 10.
mm
j^.
■■ ■ ■ < THE VALLEY SENTINEL
Published Weekly by
The   Valley  Sentinel  Printing and
Publisning Company
AT
Langley Prairie, B. C.
Advertising rates on application.   Discount on yearly contracts.
Subscription Rates—Canada, $1.50 per
year.   Other countries, $2.00.
SATDURAY, April 2, 1921.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
If if is good business for the
nearby cities to stage a "buy, build
and bank in your home town" campaign, why will not the same idea
work out to advantage right here
in Langley Prairie ? Let the local
merchants take hold of the idea and
make it worth while for local buyers to spend more of their money
at home. Too often- money is
spent away from home for goods
that the local merchant can supply
at city prices, and often at a lower
figure. Newspaper advertising is
the big factor in the case. Let the
people know through the local
press what you are offering to* get
and hold their trade. Make it so
interesting they can't afford to
"overlook you. "Buy, build and
bank in your home town" is a'good
slogan to nail to the masthead.
The local mercants are entitled to
every support, and by helping
them you are helping yourself.
*    *    *
"Our young women are spending
as much to-day on personal dress
and decorations as their grandmothers spent on the household,
and their demands are becoming
so great that young men are unable
to contemplate marriage." Thus
saith a well known Montreal divine. We have not seen any reply to this accusation as yet, but
surely some champion of the fair
sex will be forthcoming to remove
such a slur upon them. Surely it
is not the truth? What have the
girls of the Fraser Valley to say
about it?
w    *    *
It now transpires that the finest
of wine can be brewed from the
Canadian thistle. This will be
glad tidings to the man who has
worked overtime trying to exterminate this pest. Now it will" be
different. He will assiduously
cultivate his arch enemy and delight in the after effects.
*    *   -*
"Yesterday—strong and robust,
in the best of condition:  To-day-
mourned by loving friends and relatives:—that has been the fate of
many men who recently took out
North American Life policies."
—Extract from the company's literature under the caption, "The
Uncertainty of Life." Not a very
pleasant prospect to hold out for
a chap who is fondly clinging to
old mother earth and looking forward to one continual round of
pleasure. It certainly sounds
rather sudden like to us.
*    *   *
We all pride ourselves on the
glorious traditions of British jup*
tice, etc., but right here we rise to
exclaim that the manner in which
Magistrate South, of Vancouver,
has been handling it, ii likely to
make most loyal subjects blush for
shame. This man South should
get a taste of the medicine he so
unmercifully handed out to the unfortunate drug slave Kehoe—24
kshes and imprisonment; while
one Bussey, a confessed trafficker
in opium and kindred dope, goes
free with a paltry fine. Are the
people going to stand' for such an
unequivocal travesty on justice?
It is more than likely they are.
LANGLEY TRANSFER
General Trucking
Contracts taken
W.   BRAN DOW
Phone 36Y
Langley Theatre,
LANGLEY PRAIRIE.
Every Saturday
Entertainment is as necessary to
health and happiness as is food
and clothing.
Come and see the joys, sorrows
and predicament of others and you
will realize that your lot is not so
bad afte'r all.
The Best Cure for
Grouch and Wrinkles
CLOVERDALE
OPERA HOUSE
Every Thursday
The pick of the Big Photo Plays.
The same that are patronised by
millionaires in the big cities are to
be seen here at popular prices.
r
3t=ll=3F==)G
Langley Service Garage
Storage.        LANGLEY PRAIRIE . Service Car
CARS FOR HIRE DAY AND NIGHT.
Repairing by Expert Mechanic—Satisfaction guaranteed.
PHONE 55 R. P* F. CAGNACCI, Proprietor.    j*
3F=U
ir==ii==ir===]i=^r=^i=^E==]r==ii==ir=
HUGH GIFFORD
Plumber
Tinsmith
i       Heating
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Phone, Milner 54 X.
3F=)P=1[
r
]   Langley Prairie Hotel
Now open for business
Your patronage is cordially invited.
1
J. S. DONNELLY
RIGHT AT THE B. C. E. R'Y STATION.
L
3t=JI=IG
ii ii=H
i
■i" ■  ■<
-"— *
Optical Service for Valley Residents.
EYES
EXAMINED
CLASSES
FITTED
The Morris Optical Co.
OPTHALMIC MANUFACAURINQ
OPTICIANS
549 Granville St., Vancouver, B.C.
Consult Mr.  L. R. MORRIS,
PLEWES' Drug Store, Langley Prairie.
m    m    im    ■    ■    ■ ■ i ■    ■■  n    n    u -11    n    »    n    n    w    h|i THE VALLEY SENTINEL
See about Seed Oats
 Now ——-—
Last Fall was very poor for the harvesting of a good quality
of Seed Oats. Many were loft, and those harvested are very
liable to be low in germination.
B. & K. Victory and Garton Seed Oats
We harvested before the rains, grown in the Fraser Valley,
and are bright, plump, free from weed seeds, high in germin-'
ation.   They mature early and are heavy yielders.
Place your Orders Early as Supplies are Limited
Phone 30
THTBRACKMAN-KER MILLING CO., Ltd.
Langley Prairie, B. C.
-—PHONE 694	
J. H. Todd's Music House
(Next  City Hall)
PIANOS. VICTROLAS, EDISON DIAMOND AMBEROLAS,
SHEET MUSIC & RECORDS-EVERYTHING IN MUSIC
New Home Sewing Machines
' Wholesale and Retail
521 Columbia St.,  NEW WESTMINSTER, B, C.
WESTMINSTER IRON WORKS, LTD.
Machinists, Engineers and Blacksmiths.    Manufacturers of Ornamental and Structural Iron Work
SMOKE STACKS FIRE ESCAPES       TANKS        ELEVATORS
PLATE WORK ELEVATOR ENCLOSURES PATTERNS
GASOLINE LOCOMOTIVES     GASOLINE DONKEYS     FORCINGS
SILO RODS        MOLE PLOWS
Phones 53-6">3 Office and Works, 66 10th Street P.O. Box 933
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
*-   *
.lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli
Subscribe to
The Valley Sentinel
$1.00 to Dec. 31
Boost your Home Town
m 11111111111 i 111 i 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 e l: i e 1111111111111111 i: i -. i r 1111 -
Brooding, Rearing,
and Management
of Young Chicks
(By H. E. Upton, Supervisor in
Poultry Husbandry)
(Continued from astweek)
(one-half incn mesh) 12 inches high
and 12 inches wider in diameter than
the hover itself, completely around the
brooding aparatus. The chicks will
then be prevented from getting too
far from the brooder during the first
day or so, and become chilled. This
may be gradually enlarged and taken
away at the end of the first week.
Ventilation: Much criticism has
been offered in respect to the brooder
house described herein because of no
ventilators being provided. Results,
i.owever, are the things looked for and
better results have been obtained in
this house than in 8 other types, too
elaborate to mention.
Any person knows that a body of
heat attracts a body of cold. Therefore, the fresh air will be continually
attracted into this wooden house
through the cotton mesh. Openings
in other parts of the house create
draughts and cause chilling. In warm
weather all the openings will be
used. The cone oh the top should be
left open to allow of continual air
circulation through the house. A
duck and wire door should be built,
to take the place of the wooden door,
for summer use.
Length of Time to Give Heat:
There have been many chicks killed
even by old-time poultrymen by taking the artificial heat away too quickly from them. Heat should be supplied growing chicks until they are
at least six weeks of age. In fact,
.in the ordinary B. C. season, it is
well to supply heat for at least eight
weeks. When the heat is to be taken away, the same should be done
gradually and some method provided
to give a form of weaner er artificial
brooding apparatus for young chicks
to gather round until they are ready
to go to roost of their own accord.
Perches should be provided in the
brooder house when chicks are six
weeks of age. We usually find that
a small wire hoop, when constructed
by putting an old blanket across the
same and letting it hang down round
the edges in the form of a circular
hover, and secured firmly from the
ceiling, so that the blanket will just
barely touch the chick's back when
standing up, will act as an artificial
weaner. A system of forced roosting is elaborated on by the Board
and a description of same can be had
on application after the end of February.
What Age Chicks to Put in Brooder: Chicks of the one age" only
should ever be placed in one brooder.
It is cheaper to run another brooder
than to put two different lots of
chicks hatched even a week apart in
the one and same brooder.
Feeding Chicks: After chicks are
from 48 to 60 hours of age (prefer-,
ably 60 hours) the operator may then
give them the first feed. There are
several preparations advised for the
feeding of baby chicks,-but the best
to advocate is as follows:
We prefer dry bread soaked in sour
skim-milk, the milk squeezed out, and
the bread, which should be of a
crumbly wet consistency, placed on a
shingle for fifteen minutes only, four
or five times a day from the first
feied (chick two days old) to the
fourth day of feeding. If this cannot
be obtained, feed well-baked johnny
cake, crumbled up fine or coarse oatmeal. After the chick has become
four days old, the chick feed, either
commercial or made up of the following constituents, should be fed:
Cracked wheat  15 lb.
Pinhead oats or granulated
oatmeal  10 lb.
Fine-screened cracked corn  151b.
Broken-rice 2 lb.
Fine cracked peas  31b.
Chick grit 51b.
Fine charcoal 2 lb.
Or, this formula may be used with
as good results, yet not giving so
much variety:
Fine cracked corn  151b.
Cracked wheat .15 lb.
Pinhead oats  ..! 10 lb.
both these should be thoroughly mixed before being fed to the chicks.
The above mixtures may be fed as
often as five times a day. In fact,
smaller quantities, fed more often give
better results to growing chicks, as it
induces them to take more exercise.
When one io raising chicks on ground
where they may secure worms and
insects, they can feed this chick-feed
alone with good results in the early
spring, if some sour milk or buttermilk is provided.
The chick-feed may be given two
or three times a day, and bran and
rolled oats (equal parts) or johnny
cake may be fed twice a day, alternating the chick-feed and dry mash.
After the chicks are a week old, the
mash may be gradually richened by
adding more rolled oats to the bran,
and introducing middlings or low-
grade flour into the mash; a good
grade of sifted beef-scraps should
also be gradually introduced into the
mash.
All changes, both of mash and hard
grains, should be made gradually, allowing three to seven days for the
change to be accomplishfd.
One should gradually change from
the bread-and-milk formula, cutting
down the number of feeds per day
and gradually introducing the following formula, which can be used from
the age of seven days to three weeks:
Parts by weight—
Wheat-bran  4
Corn-meal  3M.
lifted  beef-scraps   2
Middlings    \'->
Rolled oats or oatmeal  2
This must be mixed well in a dry
form before being fed to chicks, and
be placed in small grain pans at intervals.
From three to eight weeks of age, a
mash composed of the following con-
*"■■■■■
■MM THE VALLEY SENTINEL
stituents may be used:
Parts by weight:
Wheat-bran  2
Corn-meal     3
Ground or crushed oats  2
Middlings    1
Beef-scraps   ]i
Linseed or soy-bean meal  %
Any of the stoves sold to care for 500
to 1000 chicks are recommended for a
house about 10x12 ft. in measurement.
This house should have the brooder
stove placed in the centre so that the
house can be moved about from place
to place as well as insuring plenty of
dry floor space for the chicks.
Anthracite coal must be used in
operation of these brooder stoves and
in this section we are forced to use
what is termed "Banff Anthracite
Coal." This coal will cost about $28.00
per ton. Directions are usually given
to the operator of the stoves on the
setting up of the same. The purchase
price of a "Buckeye No. 19" Stove this
year is $45.00. In conjunction with
the stove, the operator will have to
buy five pieces of flue-pipe, one roof
i)!ate and one cone cap for the flue.
These extra appliances usually cost
a?)out $2.75.
The stoves should be operated for at
least three days before the baby chicks
are to be placed in the brooder house,
so that the required temperature
would be maintained when the chicks
are ready to go in the house. The
proper temperature at the chicks' back
should register 95 degrees first week;
90 decrees the second week, and 85
degrees the third week.
It is to be recommended to the operators of these stoves that they lay a
piece of asbestos in under the brooder
Ftove if such is possible. Where this
is not possible, the operators should
provide themselves with a piece of tip
to lay in front of the brooder stove,
when cleaning out morning and night
to prevent fire.
In actually operating the stove itself, the process is the same as building any fire in the initial stages. The
Thermostat should be watched and so
regulated that the damper will open
when the thermometer at the chicks
back registers 90 degrees. After the
fire has been started it will have to
be cleaned and re-fiilled every 12
hours. When re-filling the practice is,
first to shake down the stove until
red coals are noticed in the ash-pan.
The ashes should then be removed,
and the fire itself poked down upon
the grate. The brooder damper should
be left off the stove, so that the coals
in the fire-pot will burn brightly for
a few moments before re-filling. After
the coals have burned brightly new
coal may be placed upon the top of
the fire, poking the same down firmly
so that there will be a compact bed
of new coal on top of the fire. The
damper should still be left off for a
few moments, until the operator is
assured that the fire is burning brightly. As soon as this assurance is given,
he may then put the damper on the
bottom of the stove and not look at
the same for a half-hour. The operator
rj. „,,-.-? f-j,em go back to see that the
stove is burning all right, and will as
a rule not have to bother with the
stove again for 12 hours.
There are many other types of
brooders which burn oil, gas or electricity. There is also a type known
as the tireless brooder, but these types
of brooder are not to be recommended
to the settlers' at present.
Litters: There are various kinds of
litter • which the ordinary farmer or
poultry man can use. Dry-clean litter
to the depth of 1% inches should
always be present on the wooden house
floor. The most recommended type of
litter is termed "oat hulls." These oat
hulls are a refuse from the mills that
make different Oat preparations. If
the same can be secured at an ordinary cost they will be found to give
very good satisfaction.   For farmers
This must be mixed well without
adding any liquid. <
The same may be placed in hoppers before the growing stock all the
time if on a good range. From this
time on the mash may be changed to
suit the nee Is of the stock as their
development will indicate. All changes in feeding must be made gradually.
After chicks become six or eight
weeks old, the practice of feeding
commercial chick-feed may become either too expensive or the chicks may
have attained such a size that the
chick-feed will be so small that the
birds will not relish the same. Should
this be the case the following mixture may be substituted:
Medium-size cracked corn ....2001b.
Cracked wheat  100 lb.
This should be fed until chicks are
large and old enough to handle a
larger-size grain, which is usually at
the age of from eight to eleven weeks.
At this time, it is advisable to feed
two parts of hen-size cracked corn to
one part of wheat in conjunction with
the dry mash recommended.
Chopped lettuce, carefully sprouted
oats chopped fine, lawn-clippings and
dandelion-leaves will answer for
green food. Later on rape, kale, clover, alfalfa, cabbage and mangels are
good. Chopped green onions are
very beneficial.
Plenty of grit and occasional feeds
of charcoal should be given growing
stock. Chicks should always bo kept
scratching if one is to have good Results. Clean, fresh water, in clean
utensils, is essential. Even if sour,
skim or buttermilk is provided in
abundance, water should be placed in
front of the chicks from 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. daily during the first three weeks.
CO-OPERATION
"Say, Doc," said the brawny scrubwoman, "yer gettin' a perty good thing
out o' tendin' that rich Smit'h boy,
ain't yer?"
"Well,!" said the doctor, secretly
amused, "I get a pretty good fee, yes.
Why?"
"Well, Doc, I 'opes yer won't fergit
that my Willie threw the brick that
'it 'im."
Home  Furnishers!
To the Home Folk of the
Fertile Fraser Valley
Out of the High Rent district.    You can't beat our
Prices.    1500 feet floor space.    $40,000 stock
Reliable Furniture Co.
"The Store you can depend upon"
Cor. Sixth and Carnarvon Sts.    Where the^Car turns
NEW WESTMINSTER
TSSA
FORD CARS AND FORDSON TRACTORS
RIDLEY-KENNEDY
Exclusive Ford Dealers
ON EASY PAYMENS.   NO FINANCING FEES
Columbia Street, near City Market
NEW WESTMINSTER,
B. C.
Change in Business
We have taken over the Real Estate and Insurance business
of Messrs. Tugaw & DoWalt, and we will carry on the business under the management of Gordon E. Herbert. A. M.
Tugaw will continue with the new firm. With our office in
Vancouver we are in a position to give the best possible service in connection with land sales, loans, life or fire insurance. Farmers would do well to get particulars of our FIRE
INSURANCE before placing or renewing their insurance.
We have the BEST and CHEAPEST fire insurance for the
farmer.
J. D. SKINNER, Limited
Bank of Nova Scotia, Vancouver Langley Prairie
BBBB3B9BBE3BBI
■IN»||ttl«»ll»i||- M       II 1     l|i      Um
Strawberry Jam
To all bringing this ad. during week ending  9th inst.,
we will sell
4-Ib. Tin for $1.00
DesBRISAY JOBBING CO.
Langley Prairie
Advertise in the
Valley Sentinel >VP«^HMI
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THE VALLEY SENTINEL
Church Notices.
Church of England services will be
held in the following places Sunday,
April 3: Langley Prairie, 11 a.m.;
Otter, 2.30 p.m.; Fort Langley, 7.30
p. m. Rev. Mr. Allen, of North Vancouver, will conduct the services.
Successful Whist Drive.
The extensive preparations to
which the ladies of the local Institute went were more than justified
by the large turnout to their military whist drive and dance held
Thursday evening in the Langley
Auditorium. Upwards of seventy
participated, whilst Italy were the
victors, their traditions being upheld by Mesdames Woods and
Deadmarst (who received leather
photo frames as prizes) and Messrs.
Browne and C. Winget. The gentlemen were presented with arm
bands. Denmark finished second
best. Misses K. Johnston and E.
M. Brown were among the also
rans, and should be able to do considerably better sampling with the
aid of the booby toothpicks. Batch-
elor buttons were passed to Messrs.
DesBfisay and Clarke. To Mr.
Clarke we say "nobly fought, nobly
died!"
Mrs. E. I. Johnson, Mrs. Wise
and Mrs. Barnes, who composed
the committee in charge of the arrangements, are to be highly congratulated on the success of the
evening. Of course the dance
which followed was greatly enjoyed by all who danced or listened
to the music provided by the
"Langley Trio."
Something out of the ordinary
and not on the bill of fare was
staged during the card gj= mes when
the accountant from the Royal
Bank catipulted himself through
the door registering rainbow hues
ifljl over his profile and in staccato
tones announced that the lights
had suddenly failed in the bank
and that he had left the teller and
remainder of the staff in the dark
armed to the teeth groping for the
supposed thugs responsible for this
shock to their dignity. Mr. Swain
was conscripted to give expert assistance, when it was found that
one of the plugs was loose. Too
bad fellows, Plug and thug sound
much alike; but there is nothing
like being prepared.
F. POLLARD
PLUMBER
TINSMITH
AMD
SHEET METAL WORKER
Estimates furnished.   All work
High Class.
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Opposite the B. C. E. Railway
Station.
-*
Public Auction
Under authority of
Soldier Settlement Board
of Canada
There will be offered for sale at Mr.
Brandow's barn
Langley Prairie
TUESDAY, April 5, 1921
the following
Stock and Equipment:
Some  12   Cattle,   including Holstein
Grade and Jersey Grade.
Several Horses and Harness, Wagons,
Ploughs, Incubator, Mower, numerous Implements, etc.
Soldier settlers may purchase on requisition with authority of their local
Field Supervisor.
Sale to commence at 1 p.m.
TERMS-CASH.
All Cattle T. B. tested previous  to
sale. m26t'2
DOMESTIC    POINTERS   FOR
FARMER'S WIFE.
Mr. Cyril G. Firth, grandson of Mr.
and Mrs. G. Y. Timms, of Langley
Prairie, accompanied by his bride, extended their honeymoon trip here for a
few days this week, before settling
down to every day life in their home at
NanajmQ.
(Bread crumbs will give body to an
omelet.
Salt fish is much less   digestible
than fresh.
WJhen   washing   kid
some soap on them.
gloves  leave
Raisins kept in a covered or other
dish with a small cup of water in the
centre will keep moist and fresh.
Soup meat may be highly seasoned
and used for made-over meat dishes,
but it is not nourishing.
Soap should never be applied directly to paint. Wash with a light
suds and use a scouring powder for
any spots.
Do not have the oven too hot when
cakes are to be baked. Allow the
cake to rise in moderate oven, the?
make the oven hot to brown it.
Bread griddle cakes are a economical way of using up stale bread.
4««   »   ii   ii   ■■   ii   ii
-II      M      II      II       II       II       II      II      II      II      II       II      '■       11 I
Langley Prairie General Store
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes
Hardware.
A. C. McNAB, Proprietor.
Everybody knows where. Phone Milner 4.
■ M- ill i   II      II      ■              'II" ' I      "      "fr
A. P. SLADE & COMPANY
WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND
Ship in your  Produce-Prompt Returns
FRUITY BUTTER,  EGGS, CHEESE  AND  POULTRY
Victoria.
155 Water St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.     Prince Rupert.
w. s. Mclean
Carries complete stocks of
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes,
Notions, Gents1 Furnishings, etc,
The Goods are of the Best Quality. A trial will convince you.
Langley Prairie. B. C.
valley meat market
Langley Prairie, B. C.
ALL MEATS ARE LOCALLY KILLED.
NO STORAGE MEAT HANDLED.
Try our Home-Made Sausages—they are fine.
0E301
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Job Printing
I0E3O
D
o   |iiiiiiii|HEN you need Printing, for any purpose,   fl
0   | lift I you can get exactly what your proposition   o
~\  ^^ | calls for right here at Langley Prairie
IlBillllI 1 We have a very complete equipment,
ill       and are in a position to give you Service
Y        and Quality of the best, and at prices that   5
D
will compare favorably with those of the cities.
®lp> KaUnj fttttttol fig. Sc ftsb. flfo.
Rear of the Theatre, LANGLEY PRAIRIE.
o
I
OBOE
IOE30E
loeaQi— iQsaoc
D
I -    -    - THE VALLEY SENTINEL
Brace Up!
PHONE 65 L
By taking our COMPOUND SYRUP
HYPOPHOSPHITES. A stimulating
nerve force builder.     $1.00 per bottle.
A. M. PLEWES, DRUGGIST
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
31 IE
3F=1E
31 II
1
LANGLEY BAKERY
Langley Prairie, B. C.
PHONE 36 X
Bread Wholesale and Retail.   Cakes and Pastry
fresh daily.
A. WARMAN, Proprietor.
[fal==gS»l=S»l=====IISS=B=nl==SSS===ll H        " .11 II I
Langley Prairie Hardware
W. T. EGGINS, Proprietor
Full lines of Builders' Supplies. Paints, Oils and Stains,  Roofing
Materials, etc.
Farm Implements, Garden Tools, Kitchen and Dairy Utensils,
Cutlery, etc.
Phone. Milner 57 STOVES AND HEATERS
r
£IF=ir==lF==1E^^=IF=ir£Z=lE
3F=1E
L
YALE HOTEL
. YALE ROAD
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Now open for business.   Modern and up to date
throughout.
WE  ARE  PLEASED TO SERVE AND SERVE TO PLEASE.
PHONE 50 L
J
CARNCROSS & HUGH
NOTARIES
LICENSED
CONVEYANCERS
INSURANCE      REAL ESTATE
CLOVERDALE, B. C.
When you want anything Electrical
Call and See
Phone 55L
After 8 p,m.S4Y
GIBSON
ELECTRICIAN
THEATRE BLOCK, LANGLEY PRAIRIE.
Do it Electrically. We'll tell you why.
Milner Notes.
The Seymour Boy Scout basketball
team paid a visit to Milner Saturday to
play the local Scouts. The game,
which was witnessed by a big crowd,
resulted in a win for the home team by
a score of 21-11. Immediately after
Milner and Fort Langley Seniors had a
closely contested match, resulting in a
win for the former, the score standing
•21-18. The Milner Scouts were represented byi L. Smith, A. Wright, A.
Towle, F. Huggins, J. Hoglin. Fort
Langley trotted out the following huskies in the senior game: G. Towle, S.
Hogbin, S. Bodaly, C. T. Taylor, L.
Rrown.
Miss Oakes, of Vancouver, is spending a few days at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Worrell.
"Miss Grace Crabbe is visiting friends
in Vancouver.
Mrs. Rae and daughter left for New
Westminster Thursday morning for a
Windsor!
Hotel
NEW WESTMINSTER
The hotel that caters to the
country trade. Here's where you
meet   your friends.
Rates Reasonable
Prompt Service
Classified Advertisements.
WANTED-Horse and Cattle Manure. State
price delivered. Timms Market Garden Co.,
Ltd., Langley prairie, m2«-M
FOR SALE-Slightly used Columbia Grafono-
la. Also 5»-piece Dinner Set. Apply Mr. H.
Skuee. this office. ffl26t3
FOR SALE-Seed Potatoes. Sutton's 94, $1.25
per sack. Apply Finch's Shoe Shop, Lane-
ley Prairie. ap2tl
A SNAP—To brand new Autos, on easy terms
for quiok sale. Apply Milner Store. Phone
7L. ap2ti
E. G. McBRIDE
D. A. MURRAY
Proprietors
short visit.
Mufford Bros, are busy getting their
Spring ploughing done with the aid of
a Ford son tractor. Nothing like getting
the tractor habit.
Services will be held in the Methodist
Church on Sunday, April 10th, at 7 30
p. m., and on Sunday, April 18, at 2.30
p.m. Sunday School is held every Sunday at 1.30 n m.    Rev. Crabbe, pastor.
A "birthday" social was held in the
Methodist Church on Wednesday evening, a capacity audience turning out.
The admission charges ranged from lc
to 75c, according to age, at the rate of
one cent per year of age. Games were
indulged in, also musical, selections, and
everyone had a "whale of a time."
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hal-
lick was the acene of a very pretty wedding last Friday, when Mr. Bob Wilkinson and Mrs. Clara Hallick took the
pledge that makes them partners in the
battles of life on the sea of matrimony.
They will reside at County line.
FOR SALE Purebred White Pekin Duok
Hatohlntr Efts. Apply E. J. Wilson. Telephone 28Y. ap3U
66th Anniversary.
Just sixty-six years ago to-day, Mr.
G. Y. Timms, the well known local exponent of the art of printing, appren-
tiaed himself to the firm of Hall & Son,
leading printers of the university city
of Oxford, Eng. Apprenticeships in
those days were something quite different from that prevailing to-day. You
were hedged about with hard and fast
rules in and out of shop that would take
all the seeming joy out of the present day
youth's young life. And Mr. Timms received for his first day's work one whole
shilling, with a raise of one shilling a
year for seven years, in lieu of paying
£100 premium. But at the end of his
term he knew his business. One of this
grand old champion of the art preservative's most cherished possessions is the
parchment containing his articles of
agreement to serve his master faithfully
and well in all things
Langley Theatre,,
The young folks of the Sunday School
invited their parents and friends to a
social Wednesday night. There were
games, songs, and sandwiches, coffee
and cake, all of which were eagerly
relished by the jovial crowd.
Board of Trade Meeting.
There is to be a meeting in the S. S.
building next Tuesday night at 8 p. m.
of those interested in the formation of a
local Board of Trade. Delegations are
coming from Vancouver and Surrey organizations to assist in getting the home
Board off to a good start. It behooves
the well wishers of Langley Prairie to
show by their presence they appreciate
the advantages of having a progressive Board of Trade in their midst.
Get behind the movement and help
make it a go.
^»L
ENID MARKET *N ,
"TARZANm*     *     -*T
April 9th
j~.. ^^^mmmtmmmmmS
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mfv  .i   ■ ■ •*<m-m:v+4pl. jj^. . i|^ ■■■   . ■ ■■ ■ -Jj,''•;.Jf4-'^^"'f-ftUj^MlW mv" mm"m"9lf^f
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rsss.
7
"The ROMANCE of
TARZAN."
The concluding chapter of "Tarzan of the Apes," from the book by
Edgar Rice Burroughs.
The Cataclysmic Romance of Primeval Man and
Modern  Maid  Midst Jungle Wilds and Palaces.
Twenty Million People have
Read Tarzan Books—The Picture is Realistic and Pulsating
Filled with Scenes of Weird Power that will haunt you for days
You will see Tarzan lured to the apartments of a beautiful adventuress who both loves him and seeks his ruin.
You will see his raging fight for life with her accomplice?. You will see Tarzan's repudiation by his former jungle
companions when he returns to his old haunts.    You will see the beautiful ending—which is best of all
Langley Theatre,
Saturday, April 9th
Cloverdale Opera House
Thursday, April 7th
'■* ---^—■   ■■*■■>     —
mmmmm

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