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The Valley Sentinel Apr 16, 1921

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THE VALC
NTINEL
Incorporated with The Langley Journal, for Local Information and instructive Criticism.
No.
45
LANGLEY PRAIRIE, B.C., APRIL 16, 1921.
Vol. II.
12 MILLS ON DOLLAR
TAX RATE FOR 1921
New  Rate Increase of One
\   Mill Over Last Year— Reduction in Ordinary Source
of Revenue.
imperative by lack of office space to conveniently handle the ever increasing
business of the municipality.
Municipal Engineer Breckon submitted a report of road work carried out
in Langley, showing that it has been
r.vpeditiously and  economically done.
*ie four-horse grader is proving its
1 >rth. The following amounts were
t ient in the different wards during the
month of March: Ward 1, $254.90;
Ward 2, $277.60; Ward 3, $480 80;
Ward 4, $752.60; Ward 5, $443 90; Ward
6, $362.
At the meeting of the Langley Muni
cipal Council the tax rate for the year
was fixed at 12 mills, an increase of one
mill over last year. Appropriations for
the various district wards were allocated
as follows:
Ward I.—Alexander road, $500; Jericho road, $100;   McClarty road, $100;
Port Kella Town Line road, $209;   Station  road,  $100;   Scholes road,  $125;
Trunk road, $100; Chene road, $200.
Ward II— River road, $200; Spring-
brook road (east), $300; Sprirgbrook
road (west;, $350; Trunk road, $100;
East Langley school road, $200; Millar
road, (50.
Ward III.—Coghlanroad, $200; Coun
ty Line road, $200; Jackman road, $300;
Springbrook   road,  $300;   River road,
$400; Smith Town Line road, $200.
Ward IV,— Hunter road, $600; Pari
fie Highway (west) $150; Pacific Highway (east), $150; Town Line road, $300
Ward V.—Biggar road (north), $75;
Biggar road (south), ijSCO; Brown road
(north), $150; Brown road (south),
$250; American Boundary road, n600;
Livingston road (south), $600; Crozier
road, $150; Town Line (south), $300.
Ward VI.—Aldergrove district, $50;
American Boundary road, $750; Cogl
Ian road (north;, $150; Coghlan road
(south), $850; County Line (north),
$?£0; County Line (south), $700; Jack-
man road (north), $300; Jackman road
(south), $700; Otter road, $500; War-
hoop road, $400; NoTthcliffe road, $400.
Various causes have combined to make
it necessary to increase the rate this
year, among others being that much
land has been taken out of "the wild
land column, reducing the assessment
thereby $70,000. Another cutting off of
revenue to the tune of $800 will be felt
by the abolition of four near beer bar
licences, occasioned by the advent of the
Moderation Act. But on the other hand
considerable revenue should be derived
from the sale of Government liquor, the
amount of course being an unknown
quantity as yet.
Ths School Board have a programme
for new buildings and improvements
entailing the expenditure of $40,000,
which, if passed by the Council, will
necessitate the passing of a by-law authorizing the raising of the required
amount.
The Council is faced with need of enlargement of the Municipal Hall, made
The dance at Clayton on Wednesday
night was voted a success by all those
attending. The Langley Trio furnished
the much satisfactorily.
Mr. W. T. Eggin's new residence on
the Murray vile road is receiving the
finishing touches inside and out, Mr. D.
Hambley doing the artistic with the
paint brush.
The Young People's Club of Aider-
grove will hold a grand ball on the 29th
inst., in the public hall. Huen's orchestra from Bellingham has been engaged to furnish the music, and a good
time is assured.
CONDENSED NEWS
OF GENERAL INTEREST
Some  Interesting Figures
They ought to make you a Buyer of B. C. Products
,STATEMKNT OF ACCOUNT
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 1st, 1921
Mr. You & Company,
Citizens of B. C.
10 UNCLE   SAM DR
GENERAL MERCHANT
o   TERMS:   CASH
$
Goods purchased in TJ. S., 1920, by B.C. residents
Exchange only, on above	
Loss in Provincial taxes	
Loss in wageH in production of imports 	
Loss of population, dependents on  the  25,000
workers who produced imports—250,000 persons
Loss in Municipal taxes	
Loss in trade to wholesale, retail merchants...
Value of Goods
Monetary Loss to B. C.
$   63,825,000
9,950,000
2,000,000
31,000,000
2,500,000
50,000.000
The combined war lecture and gospel
meetings conducted by Mr. J. J. Simms
in the Langley-all this week, proved an
attraction for a large number of people
Mr. Simms is an able speaker who is
well versed in his subject and his earn-'
estneis was apparent. The lantern
slides shown helped greatly to make the
entertainments interesting, as did also
a well balanced male choir from Vancouver.
Langley Prairie will be the scene of
special evangelistic meetings, commencing on Monday, 18th inst., and continuing until the end of the month. The
meetings will be held in the S. S. building and will be conducted by the Rev.
Robt. Kennedy, the "converted cowboy," and the Rev. T. W. Wright. The
musical part of the programme will be
in the hands of Mrs. Kennedy and MrB.
H. Gardiner, a talented pianist of the
Terminal City.
Mr. P. F. Cagndcci has moved into
his new garage, where he is ready and
willing to tackle anything in his line
from a "road louse" to limousine. Pete
is right there when it comes to locating
and fixing up your auto troubles. He
intends to have an up-to-date show
room where several of the most popular
cars can be seen and bought. His premises are a credit to the town. The
electrical fixings are being put in by
Mr. H. P. Swain.
Mr. A, Payne, Municipal Clerk, who
has been ill, is well on the way to recovery and is expected to be around
again in a few days.
$159,275,000
63,825,000
$95,450,000
Sports and Pastimes.
The Fraser Valley Baseball League
was formed at a representative meeting
of fans held in the G, W. V. A. rooms
in Abbotsford on Wednesday night,
when the following centres agreed to
enter teams: Cloverdale, Murrayville,
Clayburn, Gifford, Chilliwack, and Mission. It is expected two or three more
teams will join before the season gets
started. The season's schedule of
games will be drawn up next week, and
a set of rules drafted.
At the same meeting it was decided
to form a Lacrosse League, with Langley Prairie, Chilliwack, Matsqui, Mt.
Lehman in the running. It is hoped to
make these leagues a success and with
a good brand of sport dished up the public are certain to give the necessary
cupport.
There was marked enthusiasm shown
at the meeting held in the S. S. building on Thursday evening to form an
Athletic Association in Langley Prairie.
After the meeting got down to business
the following officers were elected for
the year: President, "Doc" Turner;
vice, H. Gifford j sec.-treas., Mr. Barrett; chairman central committee,
"Doc" Woods.
After considerable discussion the
fee was fixed at $2, with the liability of
being called upon for an additional $3.
A special fee of $1 per member for ladies
was decided upon, they too being liable
for an additional $2.
Memorial Day.
"Memorial Day" will be celebrated in
Langley, Sunday, April 24th, when appropriate services will be held in honor
of the gallant soldiers from Langley
who sacrificed their lives in the great
war for home and country.
The first service will be held at Murrayville at 10 o'clock a. m., where Rev.
(Copt.) J. H. Wright will officiate and
the famous 47th Battalion band will
he in attendance. A mound will be constructed around the base of tha memorial and otherwise improve the site before the ceremony. The arrangements
for the day are in the capable hands of
a representative memorial committee.
In the afternoon a similar service will
be held at Fort Langley with Bishop de
Pencier officiating. Offerings will be
taken up at both services for the purpose of assisting in beautifying the
grounds around the memorials.
Church services throughout Langley
have been withdrawn both morning and
afternoon, to allow everybody to attend.
•   ■ •■■■ ■:'-■ - __
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THE VALLEY SENTINEL
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Langley Prairie General Store
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes
h Hardware.
A.  C. McNABx Proprietor.
Everybody knows where. Phone Milner 4.
■i n|i
VALLEY MEAT MARKET
Langley Prairie, B. C.
ALL MEATS ARE LOCALLY KILLED.
NO STORAGE MEAT HANDLED.
Try our Home-Made Sausages—they are fine.
W. S. McLEAN
Carries complete stocks of
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes,
Notions, Gents' Furnishings, etc,
The Goods are of the Best Quality. A trial will convince you.
Langley Prairie. B. C.
A. P. SLADE & COMPANY
WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND
Ship in your Produce—Prompt Returns
FRUIT, BUTTER, EGGS, CHEESE AND POULTRY
Victoria.
155 Water St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.     Prince Rupert.
JOOl
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IOBOI
0
Job Printing
IOBC
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jIlIlllllllilHEN you need Printing, for any purpose,
1 m I You can &et exact^y wnat y°ur proposition
f^ | calls for right here at Langley Prairie
liilllijljiMilllll if vVe have, a very complete equipment,
ill       and are in a position to give you Service
Y       and Quality of the best, and at prices that
will compare favorably with those of the cities.
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©he HalUu (tatttol. pa. & Pub. (Ha.
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Rear of the Theatre, LANGLEY PRAIRIE.
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Langley - Murrayville
Auto Service
Connects with all  B. C. E. Ry. trains
Go anywhere, any time
Robt. McLeod
Phone 48 Murrayville, B. C.
H. P. SWAIN
Practical
Electrician
All class of Electrical Work
done. Satisfaction assured
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Phone 28M
GOOD-BYE   MR.   ROOSTER.
The rooster is a very necessary part
of the flock during the hatching sea's
son, but as soon as the last setting
has been made his usefulness is ended, and it is time to bid him good-bye.
Roosters eat considerable feed during
the summer and lay no eggs. This
puts theni in the same class as the
cull hens, and they should be given
the same treatment.
Not only is the rooster a non-layer
during the summer, but he is an actual
destroyer of valuable property. He is
responsible for a large percentage of
the eggs which go bad during hot
weather. A large precent, of this loss
would be prevented if all roosters were
separated from the laying flocks by
May 15.
At least 99 per cent, of the roosters
should be either sold or eaten as soon
as the breeding season has passed, and
all others should be carefully penned
away from the hens. Dealers are glad
to buy discarded males and often pay
a good premium in order to get them
out of the country. Most farmers are
not very enthusiastic about eating
roosters, but if properly cooked they
make a fine dish. The steam pressure
cooker will make even the oldest
rooster quite tender.
Only the exceptional rooster is
worth saving for next year's breeding
pen. Yearling males are more active
and give better fertility than older
birds, and are to be preferred except
by the man who is practicing line
breeding. If. a rooster is to be saved
for next year's breeding, then he
should by all means be penned during
the summer to keep him away from
the laying hens. The infertile egg is
the only quality egg in summer, and
to produce Infertile eggs all mature
males must be kept away from the
laying flock.
THE horse is a faithful animal. He
has to work and he deserves to x
be made as comfortable as possible. Besides that, horses cost money, and it pays well in dollars and
cents to give them the best possible
care.'
We are now in the season of extremely hoi weather, and as haying
and harvesting impose very hard work
on farm teams a few words may Well
be said in regard to their care during
the hot weather. Fatalities from sunstroke and heat exhaustion are not so
very uncommon, but, besides this, a
great deal of suffering is inflicted by
careless drivers that might be escaped i
if more care were taken.
As a rule it will be found that the
horse which most qquickly becomes a
victim of heat exhaustion is one that
has not been receiving proper care. A
debilitated, bloodless condition as a result of poor nutrition and the surrounding incident to a badly ventilated
stable, or else he is one that through
overfeeding and a lack of proper regular work is in a state of obesity,
with flabby muscles, impaired circulation and excretory organs wnich are
not sufficiently active.
To begin with, a horse, in order to
withstand the effects of hot weather,
should be kept in a stable always clean
and with good ventilation. His drinking water should be pure and cool and
be should be allowed to drink at frequent intervals. The feed should be nutritious and of a cooling nature and
his skin should be kept healthy and
the pores open by being well groomed.
A nice bran mash twice a week will
assist in keeping the system cool. If
the horse is over-fat one drachm of
pulverized salt-petre may be added to
the mash.
In extremely hot weather allow the
work-team two hours instead of one
for dinner, and do not feed them until
they cool off somewhat. It will pay
to take the harness off while dinner is
eaten. When the horses are working
hard in hot weather feed very lightly
hay at noon and avoid feeding grass
that has been cut and allowed to sweat
in the heaps.
The harness should be fitted with
care, especially the collars, for collars
that fit too tightly are an aggravating
cause of heat exhaustion. A sunshade
for the poll or crown of the head will
add to the horse's comfort immensely
if it can be arranged so that the air
will circulate beneath it. A sponge
fastened on the poll is positively injurious unless it can be kept wet and
cool, which is practically impossible.
These suggestions followed fairly
close will lessen the danger of heat exhaustion, but in extremely- hot weather, when the work is pressing, a case
may occur, and every driver should
know what to do under such circumstances. When a horse begins to lag,
droops his head, pants hard or ceases
to perspire, stop working him at once,
for if he is kept going he will surely
go down, perhaps drop dead.
As soon as the horse shows himself
to be suffering from heat exhaustion
unhitch him and remove the harness.
Spray him along the back with ice-cold
water and apply it freely to the poll
Continued on Page Three
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■W 'SJ.-HtJ'-^ ■
THE VALLEY SENTINEL
Pembertson (2& Son
FARM   LANDS
Insurance
Conveyancers
. Bonds
Notaries
Cloverdale, B. C.
|llll!tllllllllllllltllllllllltlill!lllll(lllll!ll(llllll[|lll[||||[U
I CLOVERDALE NEWS I
McLean & McKay Lumber Co.
One mile South of CLOVER DALE on Pacific Highway
FIR AND CEDAR LUMBER
We deliver in Langley District
Now is the time to buy.   Prices are low.   Our quality is right—
ask your neighbors who have bought from us
LET US  HAVE YOUR BILLS TO FIGURE ON
CLOVERDALE HOTEL
Cloverdale,  B. C.
MAKE THIS YOUR HOME
AWAY   FROM   HOME
Modern throughout.   Bar in connection.   Our meals are just
.    like those '"Mother used to cook/'
Cor. Provincial and Paoilic Highways.
Phone 39
Hill's
Drug
Stores
Prescription Service
our Specialty
Cloverdale and
New We&tmhister
Both Phones 66
Try Us for Service
W. Winslade
CLOVERDALE
DRY GOODS
STORE
We specialize in Ladies* Wear
.miiimilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
Surrey Mnnicipal  Cnuncil  Meeting.
The Municipal Council met in regular
session on Saturday last and disposed
of considerable business. Approval was
given to the G. W. V. A. plan for holding a dedication serviceof Surrey's War
Memorial on Friday, May 22.
In discussing the recent vote on the
school by-law, the opinion was expressed that its defeat was due to the proposal to build a High School at Surrey
Centre. A by-law was passed authorizing ten additional street lights at
White Rock. A contract was let to W.
Rickard, at $1102, for grubbing, clearing
and grading White Rock and Ocean
Park to North Bluff road, and a portion
of the latter. A bridge over the Nico-
mekl River on the Kensington and Mud
Bay road will be built by A. Cathro, at
a cost of $1650. Appropriations for the
following road work were passed t Halls
Prairie, (800; Campbell River road,
$500; Coast Meridian, $800; Buena Vista, $300; McGinnes, $100; Brantford,
1150.
*  <,	
School Matters.
A public meeting will be held in
the Municipal Hall this evening to discuss school matters, which are in a
very unsatisfactory state of affairs.
The recent defeat of the by-law to raise
money to make repairs and build new
schools was a severe blow to the programme mapped out by the School
Board, and unless relief is forthcoming
from Borne quarter, a heavy handicap
will be placed on the educational facilities of Surrey. Representatives from
every part of the municipality are expected to attend.
Mr. Fred. Palmer's residence on the
Johnston road, near Sullivan station,
was burned to the ground on Sunday
last. The fire is thought to have originated in the kitchen chimney. With
the assistance of neighbors part of the
household effects were saved.
FULL STOCK of WHITEWEAR   in
SiLK KNITTED and COTTON GOODS
Toys, Glassware & Useful Presents
Ladies* Rest Room
CAkRCROSS & HUGH
NOTARIES
LICEN SKD
CONVEYANCERS
INSURANCE      REAL ESTATE
CLOVERDALE, B. C.
The Horse—from page two
with a hose or a sponge. Let him
stand out of doors in a shady place,
and with such treatment a recovery
will usually come quickly.
If the exhaustion has become more
pronounced and the horse's eyes are
blood-shot, and his nostrils fiery-red
and his pulse is bounding strong and
fast, give him in addition to the treatment mentioned four ounces of good
whisky in a pint of water, or an ounce
of aromatic spirits of ammonia and
two ounces of spirits of nitrous ether
in one quart of water, repeating the
dose hourly until the pulse becomes
normal and the horse holds his head
up and stops panting.
Local Notes.
A special service will be held in the
Presbyterian Church to-morrow at 2.45
p.m., under the auspices of the local
branch of Oddfellows.
The regular community whist drive
was held in the Municipal Hall on last
Tuesday night. There were about fifty
present. The first ladies' prize was won
by Mrs. Mitchell and the consolation
by Mrs. Sharp. The fortunate gentleman was Mr. Pees, with Mr. Abbott in
second place.
Miss Dixon is in Vancouver visiting
her sister, Mrs. Douglas.
"Happy" Harsard is spending a well
earned rest in Vancouver.
Mrs. CarncroBS is confined to her bed
with an attack of pleurisy. The Sentinel wishes her a speedy recovery.
The Ladies' Aid of the Presbyterian
Church are holding a special meeting at
the home of Mrs. Mclntyre on Thursday, April 21st. A large attendance is
wished.
Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
The Baseball Club here has got away
with a flying start. The following officers have been elected for the ensuing
year: President. H. V. Parr; vice, D.
Armstrong; sec.-treas., G. Curwen. The
suits have arrived, the grounds are in
shape and the merchants are "comfng
through."   Play ball!
While blasting on H. Boae's farm a
Chinaman was killed on Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Rurrows received »
visit from the stork on Thursday morning.   He left a fine son.
Mr. Winslow has been laid up for the
past month, due to an injury received
by a falling tree. He hopes to be back
at work again next week.
The latest real estate deal put through
by Mr. A. McDonald, of Pemberton <fe
Son, is the sale of 45 acres, one and a
half miles south of Cloverdale, to Mr.
Flintoff of Murrayville.
Mrs. and Miss Milton, are visiting
Mrs. Campbell.
The directors of the Bee Association of B. C. listened to an interesting address recently by Mr. P.
W. L. Sladen, Dominion Apiarist.
The meeting was arranged by Mr..
Hugh, of Cloverdale, president of
the association.   Mr. Sladen held
it was not  necessary  to destroy
frames or  appliances which   had
been in contact  with   European
foul brood infected stock.   He advised the introduction of Italian
queens, and the maintaining of the
strength of colonies.   Experiments
in disease control work was left to
the Province to handle.  European
foul brood would clear oat the beekeeper who did not take care of his
bees, but the good beekeeper need
not be unduly alarmed about the
disease, provided he conducted his
apiary on modern  lines.   Queen
rearing was being  conducted  on
Duck Island, Ontario* so that stock
could be improved.   After a conference on the subject of educational work, Mr. Hubbard  offered   a
silver challenge cup for  the  best
two-story observation hive; Mr. K.
W. Prankew a prize of $5 for the
best frame of honey in Jumbo size,
and a further prize of   $5 for  tho
best section honey; Mr. J. Brooks,
secretary, a  silver  medal  for   a
special in the extracted honey section, and Mr. Wm. Hugh a silver
medal for the best hive suitable for
the man on a small holding, provided it contained   the standard
frames.   It is expected these prizes
will stimulate efforts on the lines,
indicated this season.   The cost oj
inspection work was criticiled. ■P"^"^"^"
■^^
^WW^W!^
THE VALLEY SENTINEL
ulije lalbg ftttitht?I
Published Weekly by
The   Valley  Sentinel  Printing and
Publisning Company
AT
Langley Prairie, B. C.
B. STONE KENNEDY, Editor-Manager
Advertising rates on application.   Discount on yearly contracts.
Subscription Rates—Canada, $1.50 pei'
year.   Other countries, $2.00.
SATURDAY, April 16, 1921.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
The B. C. Electric Railway Co.
will receive $400,000 from the Provincial treasury to assist in the
cost of changing their car service
to conform to the "rule of the
right." It is to be hoped these
changes are few and far between.
•*•        V        •**
British Columbia jams, jellies
and canned fruits are equal to any
produced in the world—yet hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth
of these commodities are annually
imported. The next time you order this class insist on the "made
in B. -C." article.
*    *    *
Success has at last crowned the
efforts of the long fight to have
British Columbia rail freight rates
to eastern points equalized with
those of p Jnts in the State south
of the line. Much credit is due
the Associated Boards of Trade for
the part they played. More power
to them.
9p       qp        «p
On paper, the personnel of the
board of commissioners appointed
by the Provincial Government to
handle the liquor traffic under the
Moderation Act, looks a fairly good
one, but time alone will tell just
how they will measure up to the
great responsibility placed upon
their shoulders. They may all be
able men in their chosen walks of
life, and still fall down under
the strain of the temptations that
will beset them on every side in
their official capacity. The men
selected by the commissioners to
handle the liquor in the different
ptores to be opened up should be of
the highest moral character, men
of strictly sober and decent habits.
And the general public have a duty
to perform in conforming to the
law and not letting their bibulous
proclivities get from under control
At the best it will be a difficult
matter to keep within the bounds
of moderation when it concerns
drinking. If the privileges' offered
under the new act are abused, the
next move will be for a bone dry
country.   So be good.
r
Langley Service Garage
Storage.       LANGLEY PRAIRIE     Service Car
CARS FOR HIRE DAY AND NIGHT.
L
Repairing by Expert Mechanic—Satisfaction guaranteed.
PHONE 55 B. P- F. CAGNACCI, Proprietor.    "
1F==H==1E
HUGH GIFFORD
Plumber
Tinsmith
Heating
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Phone, Milner 54 X.
Mary Pickford
-IN	
"Heart O' the Hills"
Langley  Theatre,  April   23
Cloverdale, Thursday, April 21
Chautaugua,   Langley  Prairie, May
23-28 inclusive.
Moving Pictures Stop Crime.
While some persons are
taking exception to moving
picture shows on the ground
that they encourage crime,
quite a different attitude is
taken by the authorities of an
English town. The recorder
of Newcastle-under-Lyme, in
stating that there were no prisoners for trial, mentioned that,
from enquiries made by the
police, it was found that the
cinema theatre was in no small
measure responsible for the
change. Insteading of resorting tr a public house a man
could now spend a quiet two
hours with his wife and children at the pictures, to the bene-
fit of all concerned. In this
alone, to say nothing of the
good influence of the film on
home life, the picture theatre
is of great value. And providing the present high standard of films is maintained,
ihere is little fear that the
minds of our children and
young folk may become tainted by what they see at the
"movies." The gentleman
who commented on the decrease of crime in his district
and paid such a tribute to the
cinema, was incidentally pre-
sen ted with a pair of white
gloves. An old custom authorizes such a present when
thete are no criminals to be
tried at a session.
"You are charged with selling adulterated milk." said the
judge. "Your honor, I plead
not guilty."
"But the testimouy shows
that it is 25 per cent, water."
"Then it must be high grade
milk," returned the defendant.
"If your honor will look up
the word 'milk in your dictionary you will find that it
contains from 80 to 90 per
cent, water. I should have
sold it for cream !"
Chautaugua,  Langley Prairie,   May
23-28 inclusive.
—■'- THE VALLEY SENTINE
5
*.-
OPENING this week on the Yale road in Langley
Prairie, an office for the handling of all classes of
Farm Land and Acreage through Langley.
Also a special organization for the handling of
sales of Live Stock, Implements, etc., by Public Auction.
A. F. HALE
GENERAL BROKER AND AUCTIONEER
Yale Koad,  Langley Prairie
^
fj     1/^ 414 SE
SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER. B. C.
— ■  II      M
——|.
PHONE 65 L
Brace Up!
By taking our COMPOUND SYRUP
HYPOPHOSPHITES.   A stimulating
nerve force builder.     $1.00 per bottle.
A. M. PLEWES, DRUGGIST
LANGLEY PBAIBIE
LANGLEY BAKERY
LANGLEY PRAIRIE, B. C.
PHONE 36 X
Bread Wholesale and Retail.   Cakes and Pastry
fresh daily.
A. WARMAN, Proprietor.
r
I
3r^=it
1
I
YALE HOTEL
YALE ROAD
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Now open for business.   Modern and up to date \
throughout.
WE ARE PLEASED TO SERVE AND SERVE TO PLEASE
PHONE 56 L .
s=iu iia^ll II II II II     I
Electrical  Supplies,  Wiring,   Poultry  Appliances,   Drinking
Fountains, Oat Sprouters
Phones 55L GIBSON Aftcr 6> 34F
LANGLEY PRAIRIE,  B. C.
Langley
Hardware
W. T. EGGINS, Proprietor
-Full lines of Builders' Supplies. Paints, Oils and Stains,  Roofing
Materials, etc.
Farm Implements, Garden Tools, Kitchen and Dairy Utensils,
Cutlery, etc.
Phone. Milner 57 STOVES AND HEATERS.
► 4
Windsor I
Hotel
NEW WESTMINSTER
The hotel that caters to the
country trade. Here's where you
meet  your friends.
Rates Reasonable
Prompt Service
E. G. McBRIDE
D. A. MURRAY
Proprietors
Classified Advertisements.
WANTED-Horse and Cattle Manure. State
price delivered. Timms Market Garden Co.,
Ltd., Langley Prairie, m26-t4
Chautaugua,  Langley  Prairie, May
23-28 inclusivo.
Mary Pickford.
How a girl recruited the sturdy
Kentucky night-riders is shown in
"Heart 0' the Hills," adapted from
the story by John Fox, jr., in which
Mary Pickford will be seen at the
Langley Prairie Theatre on Saturday, April 23, and at the Cloverdale House on Thursday, April 21.
The story hinges about the efforts of Mavis Hawn (Mary Pickford) a mountain girl, to avenge
the death of her father. Despite
the scores of dramatic incidents in
the picture there is ample opportunity for Miss Pickford to weave
in humorous comedy situations in
a most interesting and timely manner. And of course a love tale is
interwoven in the plot about a
mountain feud of long standing.
This picture is one of Mary's big
triumphs, and you don't want  to
miss it.
 »
The Skipper's Narrow Escape.
There is joy in the heart of
Toonerville, from the family of
Tomboy Taylor, to the buxom
Aunt Eppie Hogg, and not on this
A SNAP—2 brand new Autot, on easy term*
for quiok sale. Apply Milner Store. Phone
7L. ap2t4
FOR SALE Purebred White Pekin Duck
Hatohlnff Eggs. Apply E- J. Wilson. Telephone 28Y. ap2U
FOR SALE-Sutton's Improved Seed Potatoes
$1.00 per sack. Come and get 'em. Apply H.
P. Swain.  Phone 28M. ap8t4
score will the Terrible Tempered
Mr. Bang have excuse for his horrible outbursts—for the Toonerville
Trolley is to continue dishing out
its own particular brand of service
under the guidance of its intrepid
Skipper at the same old price of
admission. Langley Theatre on
Saturday, April 23. Cloverdale
Opera House, Thursday, April 21.
■c* »
Anxious to Please.
F. Pollard, tinsmith and sheet metal
worker, has in stock the following:
Large and small drinking fountain?,
brooder pipes and caps, roof plates, feed
hoppers, electric brooders. It will pay
you to call and inspect his stock before
buying elsewhere. His shop is right
across from the station. He is anxious
to please. ap9t2
An- extensive drainage scheme is
being carried out by Mr. Lynn Harvey
on his property here. He is asing cement tile made locally by Mr. E. S.
Harris.
The Delta Council on Saturday last
fixed their tax rate at 14 mills for the
current year.
English Church Services.
The following services will be held
during April and May: April 17, at
Milner, 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m. At Fort
Langley, same date, 7.30 p.m. May 1,
8, 14. 22, Langley Prairie at 11 a.m.
Fort Langley at 7.30, except on the 29th,
when the hour pill be 11 a.m. Milner
will have a service at 2.30 on the 8th.
Board of Trade luncheon.
At a meeting of the executive
committee of the Langley Board
of Trade last night, it was decided
to have the inaugural banquet on
May 31st, at Milner. Further particulars later.
is:// mm
aiv-S* fH^^.^fff
wms.
^^^^
THE VALLEY SENTINEL
QUEEN BROODER BURNS LESS COAL
1. The fire pot is all in one piece.
2. Extra heavy castings, best grade grey iron.
3. Collapsible Hoover that may be easily stored afteHhe
season
4. Two-piece shaker grate: Chickens easily removed.
5. AUTOMATIC DRAFT   AND  CHECK  CONTROL.
This is worked by the double wafer thermostat and
regulates the amount of coal burned by cutting off
the draft and opening the check. No other brooder
hap this feature. After burning all nigbt you will
find the Queen hot in the morning.
600 Size $27.50.    1200 Size $36.00
See us now, as Stock is going fast
THE BRACKMAN-KER MILLING CO., Ltd.
Phone 30
Langley Prairie, B. C.
—PHONE 694	
J. H. Todd's Music House
(Next City Hall)
PIANOS. VICTROLAS, EDISON DIAMOND AMBEROLAS,
SHEET MUSIC & RECORDS-EVERYTHING IN MUSIC
New Home Sewing Machines    *
Wholesale and Retail
521 Columbia St,  NEW WESTMINSTER, B, C.
WESTMINSTER IRON WORKS, LTD.
Machinists, Engineers and Blacksmiths.   Manufacturers of Ornamental and Structural Iron Work
SMOKE STACKS FIRE ESCAPES       TANKS       ELEVATORS
PLATE WORK ELEVATOR ENCLOSURES PATTERNS
GASOLINE LOCOMOTIVES     GASOLINE DONKEYS     FORGINGS
SILO RODS       MOLE PLOWS
Phones 53-633 Office and Works, 66 10th Street P.O. Box 933
NEW  WESTMINSTER, B. C.
1
SHINGLES
All Grades from
$1.75 per lOOO up
MILLS BROS.
Langley Prairie
Phone 36 M after 6 p.m. only
INSPECTION  INVITED
PUBLICATIONS FOR  FARMERS
The new list of publications of the
Department of Agriculture at Ottawa
contains titles of nearly three hundred
and fifty bulletins, circulars, and other
pamphlets that deal with agricultural
practices. These cover the whole
range of agricultural and horticultural pursuits, including dairying, field
crops, live stock, orchard and garden
crops, poultry, insects and plant disease, farm building construction, farm
machinery and many other topics. The
subjects are arranged alphabetically
under general titles. Not only are the
lists themselves available from the
Publications Branch of the Department, Ottawa, but any of the publications thesein mentioned may be had on
request.
LANGLEY TRANSFER
General Trucking
Contracts  taken
W.   BRAN DOW
Phone 36Y
Dr. J. G. Jervis
VETERINARY SURGEON
Residence:
Medd Road
MILNER, B. C.
Phone 22L
LACK    OF    fODINE    CAUSES
GQITERED CALVES.
jiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuitiriiniiitiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiniiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiik
Subscribe to
The Valley Sentinel
$1.00 to Dec. 31
Boost your Home Town
MiuuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirtiiiiiiiiuiuuiur
And now cornea report of calves being born with enlarged necks, in other
words goiter.    Sometimes they live
and the goiter gradually disappears.
This condition is no doubt closely related to what is known as hairless
pigs.   According to a bulletin issued
by the University of Montana the loss
in pigs from this cause is fully $100,001)
annually.   Pigs when born are about
normal in size but there is a total
absence of hair.   The thyroid glands
(goiter)   are   greatly   enlarged,   the
head and neck are apparently larger
than normal and the skin from the
shoulders   forward    is    thick    and
wrinkled.   Dr. Glover, veterinarian at
the Agricultural College, states that
it has been found that while the glands
are enlarged the iodine content of the
glands is abnormally low.   It seems
that this condition may in a measure
at least be controlled by giving a
proper ration in which a least twenty*
five per cent, is bulk material.   They
should not be given a concentrated
ration containing a high percentage of
protein.   Further, it may be prevented
by administering iodine mixed with
the feed in a form of potassium iodine,
Calves born with hair, but with goiter,
are probably in the same category.
It  would   seem  that this  condition
represents a disturbance of the complex metabolism of the fetal body be-
1 cause of a lack of available iodine in
the ration of the mother.
F. POLLARD
PLUMBER
TINSMITH
AND
SHEET METAL WORKER
Estimates furnished.   All work
High Class.
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Opposite the B..C. E. Railway
Station,
SHEEP AND SWINE
INDUSTRIES  ILLUSTRATED
One of the features on the Western
Fair Circuit this year is the Sheep and
Swine Exhibit shown by the Live
Stock Branch, Dominion Department
of Agriculture, Ottawa. Tnis exhibit
Is presented under the supervision of
Mr. H. S. Arkell, Live Stock Commis<
sioner for Canada.
Visitors to the Provincial Fair*
should make it a point to spend a few
minutes at this exhibit, where they will
find the story of two of the most important industries of the Dominion
graphically told by word and object.,
Part of the Exhibit shows realistic
models of carcasses and the various
commercial cuts of lamb and mutton,
while those who are interested in the
production of high-class bacon will be
interested in the lifelike models
showing the true Wiltshire side type,
through the excellence of which Canada has been able to build up a $40,-
000,000 trade with Great Britain.
Wool producers will be attracted by
the display of the standard grades of
wool and the various kinds of fabrics
that are manufactured therefrom.
MM THE VALLEY SENTINEL
WHEN A PIGGIE NEEDS A FRIEND
It's a glorious time we pigs have—not
In the summer time when it's dusty
and hot,
All shut up in our dinky, dirt pens,
Where we eat with the cows, young
chickens, old hens.
We live in low houses, smelly and
small,
With two by 'four doors in, no windows at all,
There are, too, other dwellers, 'tis
needles to ay,
That crawl all 'round by night and
by day.
Some un is Old Sol on a warm summer day,
With no shelter or trees around by our
way,
No wallow to roll in, no green grass to
graze in,
No water to drink in, except of days
standin*.
Then, what can expect the farmer and
breeder
Of the hungry old sow, with nothing
to feed her
But what she can find from her own
meagre pickin',
Some grass here and there, now and
then an old chicken.
That's for the past: Now's the time
to reform—
Turn over the leaf and do something
for 'em.
Wake up right away.   Go clean up the
pens,
Put windows and doors in: chase away
the old hens,
Then's the time when- your piggie and
you will be friends
—Frank S. Easter.
Regulations  Covering the Granting
af Stumping Powder to Farmers .
and Settlers.
The following conditions shall govern the
distribution of the $800,000 voted by the Legislature for rebates where the powder is pwr
chased for land-clearing purposes:
Applicants shall be bona fide owners of
lessees of lands in rtspect to which applications are made and clearing operations shall
have been carried on for agricultural purposes
only.
Grants will be paid on a basis of not more
than ten oases of powder to each applicant- and
not more than five cases for each acre prepared
for production thereby.
Applicants shall sign declarations upon
forms supplied by the department of agricuture,
setting forth the legal description of the land
upon which the powder has been used, the
number of oases of explosives actually used in
the clearing operations and the number of acres
of land upon which tne work has been oarried
on
Applications shall be signed in the presence
of, and witnessed by one of the following
persons:
The secretary of a farmers' institute, the
secretary of any'association or society incorporated under any act of the Legislature
oarrying on work of substantially the same
character as that carried on by farmers' institutes: any official of the Provincial Government
of British Columbia.
Upon receipt at the department of agriculture
of such declaration and application form, with
invoiee of powder purchased, rebate will be
made upon a basis of $3.50 per case to the extent
set out in clause three of these regulations-
In all cases where there is to be an application for a rebate a declaration must be made
setting out the full particulars of the land,
the amount of powder used and invoice carrying its purchase.
E. D. BARROW,
Minister of Agrioulture.
Victoria, B. C, April 10, Mil. aplS
Alberta is 750 miles long and 400
miles wide at the widest part. The
area is 253,540 square miles, or twice
that of the British Isles. It is estimated
that 90,000,000 acres can be cultivated,
of which at present between 10 and 15
per cent, is being tilled.
Watch Us Grow.
Bank clearings for this week, $10,-
353,96.
The Langley Restaurant has moved
into the new and commodious premises
in the Yale Hotel. Although in a different location their service remains
pre-eminent
The last ball of the season is being
given by the Langley United Football
Club on Friday, April 22nd, in the
Langley Theatre. Huen's orchestra
will be on hand to "tickle your toes."
The usual good time is assured.
Premier Oliver has written the Langley Municipal Council intimating the
possibility of holding a session of
the Legislature this Fall, when special
attention will be paid to legislation affecting municipalities..
Chautaugua, Langley Prairie, May
23 28 inclusive. i
Social and Personal.
Miss Grace Winteraute^ of New Westminster, was the guest of her sister,
Mrs. Hugh Gifford, last Sunday.
Mrs.-J. Edward Insley had as visitors
last Sunday her aunt, Mrs. W. A. Mac-
donald, and her uncle, Mr. T. R. Draper,
both of Vancouver. Also Mrs. Prudence Kerr, Miss Emily Kerr, Mr. and
Mrs. F. Kerr and son, and Master Jim
Gilespie, all of New Westminster.
Mr. W. S. pollister, one of New Westminster's leading business men, paid a
visit to Langley Prairie last week, and
inspected the extensive improvements
being made on the forty acres he recently purchased, known as the Twigg
place.
Fort Langley News.
On Wednesday evening, April 20, the
local Women's Institute plan holding a
social evening in the Town Hall. The
Reeve and Council have been invited,
a s well as other organizations, and general matters of a community interest
will be discussed. A special feature of
the occasion will be an address by Mrs.
MacGill, judge of the Juvenile Court at
Vancouver.
There is a movement on foot to secure
the establishment of a fruit cannery
here on a : co-operative basis, and a
meeting of those interested will be held
shortly to further discuss the project.
That this place has its attractions as
a residential as well as an agricultural
section is evidenced by the large numbers that have settled here in the past
twelve months. A large number of the
new comers are from the Northwest
provinces, who find the salubriousness
of our climate much to their liking.
Home  Furnishers!
To the Home Folk of the
Fertile Fraser Valley
Out of the High R6nt district.   You can't beat our
Prices.    1500 feet floor space.   $40,000 stock
1
Reliable Furniture Co.
"The Store you can depend upon"
Cor. Sixth and Carnarvon Sts.    Where the Car turns
NEW WESTMINSTER
FORD CARS AND FORDSON TRACTORS
RIDLEY»KENNEDY
Exclusive Ford Dealers
ON EASY PAYMENTS. NO FINANCING FEES
Columbia Street, near City Market
NEW WESTMINSTER,
B. C.
Change in Business
We have taken over the Real Estate and Insurance business
of Messrs. Tugaw & DeWalt, and we will carry on the busi-
, ness under the management of Gordon E. Herbert. A. M.
Tugaw will continue with the new firm. With our office in
Vancouver we are in a position to give the best possible service in connection with land sales, loans, life or fire insurance. Farmers would do well to get particulars of our FIRE
INSURANCE before placing or renewing their insurance.
We have the BEST .and CHEAPEST fire. insurance for the
farmer.
J. D. SKINNER, Limited
Bank of Nova Scotia, Vancouver Langley Prairie
IIS
■ ' ■    n    m    ..
WHEAT
No.  2 Wheat in Sack   lots,  while it lasts
$3.35 per lOO-Ib. Sack
DesBRISAY JOBBING CO.
Langley Prairie
11    11    ii    ■   i«    11    n    11    11 1 ■    m    ii    11    	
Advertise in the
Valley Sentinel
fei.
— 1 ;■-!-?—'■"'«!' '  .^.   i
*'■■" '      '"   '.'.' '      J-11      I       Ull
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^•^^^^^^^^^PW^PKT^J^^W^^W"
&ry \~-~~ -Hy <***.'■•
"*l<"v<!+  •.—"■ .■■.:.■• v-.^V.f(S^i
THE VALLEY SENTINEL
MERCHANTS   Limited
NEW   WESTMINSTER
Fraser Valley Big Department Store
--OUR
Anniversary   Celebration!
Now in Full Swing, offering some Exceptional Values  in   Household  Needs,
and all kinds of Wearables  for the Whole Family
These are a few of the Bargains,   Hundreds are on our Five Floors
Extra Special
Over  2,000 Yards Double Width Novelty Voiles
Your choice of a splendid range of figurtd Voiles in the
latest designs on dark or light grounds; 38 inches wide;
values to $1.50 a yard
59 cents
Ladies' Silk Hose
Regular $1.50 Values, Anniversary
Special, per pair
79c.
These are first grade quality Hose,
with double garter tops, full fashioned and in a big variety of shades
including black, white, gold, dely-
sia, brown, green, grey, etc.
Men's "Bull Dog" Rib Overalls
$1.95
Men's heavy weight Overalls," Bull Dog" brand. Full
fitting with strong suspenders; blue and white'stripe ;
black and plain blue ; made with all necessary pockets ; regular $2.50.
Ladies' Serge and Gabardine
DRESSES
Regular Values to $27.50, for each
$16.95
Embroidered and beaded trimmings ; various sizes and an exceptional assortment of styles suitable
for Misses. Colors of browns,
navys, greys, black, etc. (Get an
early choice from this lot).
Window Draperies
36 inches wide ; a fine quality curtain scrim in white, cream and
ecru, with attractive drawn thread
border design and broad tape edge.
Regular 35c and 40c per yard.
Anniversary Celebration
19 cents
Gamp Cots
$3.95
Our $6.00 Cots—heavy frames,
link springs, folding frames. A
real genuine saving—Buy all you
need NOW.
New Gioohams
Good quality Novelty Plaids,
Stripes, and Checks, fast dyes, 45c
value.    Yard
29 cents
Full Size Sheets
$2.95
You*" will find this value hard to
duplicate anywhere. Made from
good quality bleached sheeting of
close even weave ; size 70x90.
It will pay you to visit this Anniversary
mJA. "! '
THE  VALLEY SENTINEL
as
GREAT SONG SERVICE
IN
The Sunday School Building
LANGLEY PRAIRIE, B. C.
LED BY
Robt. J. Kennedy
THE
Converted Cowboy,
AND HIS WIFE
PAULINE
Daughter of the famous
Song Composer,
Mr. F. H. Lehman.
Mrs. H. GARDINER, famous Pianist, of Vancouver, will
preside at the piano.
" REV. J. W. WRIGHT
Late of Los Angeles and formerly
an international Detective,
Will Preach each Evening.
Everybody Welcome.
Seats Free.
»
Come and bring your
friends.
Services begin Monday, April 18th
and continue to the end of the month.
EVERY EVENING AT 8 O'CLOCK.
___

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