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The Valley Sentinel Apr 9, 1921

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VALLEY
"*PT
Incorporated with The Langley Journal, for Local Information and Constructive Criticism*
No. 44
LANGLEY PRAIRIE, B. C, APRIL 9, 1921.
Vol.. II.
LANGLEY BOARD
OF TRADE ORGANIZED
Under Most Auspicious Circumstances—W. T. Eggins
is President.
'       w-
II the unbounded enthusiasm and
good fellowship, which characterized
the organization meeting of the Langley
Board of Trade Tuesday evening, in the
S. S. buiLing, can be maintained for
the next twelve months, much good is;
sure to follow. And it is up to the
members to see that the Board is made
a credit to the municipality and tire instrument by which this favored locality
is kept in the foreground.
When the gathering was brought to
•order by Reeve Poppy, who was chosen
chairman, there was present about fifty
of the leading business men and farmers in the immediate vicinity, and a
more attentive and optomistic crowd of
men it would be hard to find. The occasion was honored by the presence of
three of Vancouver's most prominent
citizens, headed by Mr. J. P. D. Malkin,
president of the Board of Trade of that'
city, and with him were Vice-President
R. Ker-Houlgate and Secretary W. E.
Payne, and last, but by no means least,
Mr. B. A. McKelvie, the genial and
peppery manager of the "Made in B. C",
. campaign, which was launched by the:
manufacturers' bureau of the Vancou-
' Board of Trade. And Messrs. Kendall,
and Hugh came up from Cloverdale as'
representatives of the Surrey Board.
The gentlemen came to lend their assistance in setting in motion the machinery of the local Board, and words
fail to express the appreciation of those
present of the grand services rendered
by these gentlemen.
The chairman, after briefly explaining
• the purpose for which the meeting was
convened, asked Mr. Malkin to open
the proceedings", which he did in' a
.short, crispy talk, pointing out the
great benefits to be obtained through
a well functioning Board of Trade, and
specially emphasized the fact that cooperation and unselfishness must be the
keynote upon which the deliberations
of the Board would have to be conducted if any effective headway was to be
made. There was no room for personal
gain in the organization—it was built
on big and broad lines, and this
was a sine quo non of the whole idea.
As president of the Vancouver Board he
wanted' to tell those present that the
city organization stood ready at all times
to lend its good offices to the Langley
Board of Trade and would stand behind
it in its just claims. From the appearance of the audience he was dure a real
live organization would be born, and he
wished them every success. President
Malkin's remarks were listened to with
great attention and appreciation, the
speaker being given a hearty round of
applause on taking his seat
Mr. Houlgate, the next speaker, gave
a short resume of the good work accomplished in Vancouver by the Board's
activities, and corroborated the first
speaker's remarks about the necessity of
unselfish team work by all concerned.
He stood ready to nssist them in every
way possible. A Board of Trade was a
factor for good improperly conducted.
He felt sure Langley would be found to
the front in the future.
To Mr. W. E. Payne, Vancouver's
efficient secretary, fell the task of outlining the preliminary work in starting
the local Board off on its career, at the
same time giving an interesting account
of the operations of the various Boards
he had come in contact with in assisting
them to get started. At present there
were some forty affiliated Boards in the
province and more in sight. There was
every reason why Langley Prairie
should have a Board of Trade. It could
; do a power of good in this community
in advancing its interests, and be was
right in line with the former speakers
in promising every assistance now and
in the future. To-day more than ever
people were waking up to. a realization
of the fact that selfish and narrow:
guage methods must be relegated to
the ash heap. He advised the choice of
puplic spirited and energetic officers,
the secretary especially should be a man:
capable and willing to serve to the limit.
He advised an annual fee sufficient to
take care of ^necessary expenditures
covering publicity work, etc. It would
also be a good idea to hold occasional
luncheons and have out-of-town speakers present. It would keep up and
stimulate interest in the work. The
meeting loudly cheered the speaker on
concluding.
Mr. McKelvie, the daddy of the "made
in B. C." campaign, was announced
as the next speaker and he soon had
the crowd with him in bis humorous
and telling speech, showing the many
advantages of buying home made and
home produced articles of wear and
food. He showed in startling figures
where British Columbia was losing
millions every year by sending out of
her borders for articles that should and
could be produced here. He graphically
described what it would mean to every
man, woman and child in B. C. This
rotten state of affairs must be remedied
and it was this very thing that the
''made in B. C." campaign was pledged
to accomplish. The associated Boards
of Trade were a big factor in the fight,
and Langley could do its part. Mr.
McKelvie kept the house in roars of
laughter with his timely witticisms and
apt illustrations of how our otherwise
patriotic citizens deserted their colors
and went out of the province when it
came to buying.
Our slogan should be B. C. first, Canada second, Empire third. Let us keep
this in sight in future. The house
cheered the speaker to the echo when
he resumed his seat. Ifs a cinch McKelvie will be a welcome guest from
now on.
Mr Kendall, from the Surrey Board
of Trade, brought felicitations from his
organization.   He referred to the good
results obtained since the Surrey Board
came into existence, chief among which
was amendment to the Dominion act
regulating Boards of Trade, making it
possible for farmers to organize as such,
as formerly they were not permitted to
do so.   They were also able, with the
assistance of the Vancouver  Board, to
make the B. C. E. R. sit up and improve
the valley service,, and in various ways
the Board had more than  proved  its
right to existence.   He could promise
hearty co-operation with Langley, and
wished them the greatest success.   Mr.
Kendall made a strong plea in support
of the movement to save the green timber on the Pacific Highway, contending
it was a valuable asset an attraction to
tourists and had already proved a great
advertisement.   It would be a nice idea
to preserve it as a memorial to our fallen
soldiers.   His pointed remarks were received with approbation.
Mr. Fabian Hugh, from Cloverdale,
brought greetings from the Surrey
Board.   He apologized for the absence
CONDENSED NEWS
OF GENERAL INTEREST
■■;-.'■.
of their president, Mr. Shannon, who
was unable to attend, but sent his best
wishes. He could corroborate his fellow townsman, Mr. Kendall, in what
the Board of Trade had done for them.
Langley was bound to be benefitted by
having such an organization. But they
would have to be up and doing all the
time, and not let their enthusiasm
flicker and die. He wished them every
success.   (Cheers.)
This wound up the speech making
and the meeting settled down to the
real work of organizing, in which Mr.
Payne, of Vancouver, acted as chief
counsel. It was decided to embrace the
whole municipality in the movement,
making it as strong and representative
as possible. The meeting got right
down to business and selected the following officers for the yean President,
W.T. Eggins; vice, H. J. de Canon-
ville; secretary-treasurer, Lynn Harvey;
executive council, Langley Prairie, B.
A. Harrison, A. C. McNab; Milner, Geo.
Hunter, W.'J, Mufford; Langley Fort,
Chas. E Hope, Dr.Marr; Murrayville,
P. Y. Porter; Aldergiove, Jas. Gregg;
Otter, Reeve Poppy; Glen Valley, Eric
Streatfield; Fern Bidge, Harry Eng-
lank; Sperling-Coghlau,  E. A. Keuter.
The annual fee waa placed at $5, and
during the signing up of those present
Messrs. Payne and Kendall brought
down the house in the telling of humorous yarns. Mr. Kendall told a couple
of Scotch ones, the last one particularly
savoring of real heather, Oh laddie,
it would 'a make ye sit up.
A few of the local lacrosse-enthusiasts
were out this week limbering up for
the opening of the season. Among the
bunch was Hugh Gifford, the famqu*$
Salmonbellie star, who is signed wpyifc
play again this season with hi*, Royal
City mates. Hugie is out to *play the
best game of his career this season.
Mr. A. Fitchet, who recently sold hit
chicken ranch at Hunter, has purchased
three acres on the Duffy road, between
the Yale and Provincial roads. The
land is favorably located, the new owner
declaring it to be the nicest spot in
Langley.   We add, or anywhere else.
Residents of Langley and vicinity will
have an opportunity of hearing one of
the country's foremost evangelists,
when Mr. J. Sims, of Vancouver, will
hold the boards at the Langley Theatre
from Monday, April 11, to Friday, 15th
inst. A special invitation is given to
all to hear his celebrated lecture, "The
Angels at Mons."
Although the Langley boys failed to
annex the Pakenham Cup at Mission
City last Saturday, losing out by a score
of 3 to 2, the local boys have nothing to
be ashamed of. They put up a good
game, and had it not been for the unsportsmanlike action of Mission ringing
in a crack professional from Vancouver,
there would have been a different tale
to tell. Better an honorable defeat than"
an dishonorable victory.
Mr. E. J. Timms rose to remark that
he was a great believer in boosting B.
C products and he would like to see
eyery member of the Board pledge himself to buy home made goods when possible. The idea took root and was suitably applauded.
The membership roll shows a total
near .the half century mark to start
with, and it is expected to bring it to
one hundred and fifty. Monthly meetings will be held, the exact time and
place not having been decided upon as
yet.
Mr. Malkin suggested that it would
be a good idea to have occasional luncheons, especially on the occasion of the
Board's initial meeting, when he and
other Vancouver men would bo pleased
to come out and help make it a go. He
knew his friend Mr. McKelvie could be
counted among those present on all
such occasions, as he had a most envious reputation as a feeder. But with
all that he was a real good fellow. And
the meeting acquiesced in this. They'll
take a chance with him any time.
Thus one of the most live and business like meetings ever held in this or
any other town came to a close with a
hearty vote of thanks to the visitors
who had so kindly come out and materially assisted in making the meeting the
success it was.
i  -■ —    ■    -■ ST'    . -.th ■-. ■ ^r^\-■ ■
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THE VALLEY SENTINEL
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The scenes of this picture, "The Jack-Knife Man," are
laid along the banks of the Mississippi River, embracing a
quait little hamlet and a colony of shanty boats. The
characters are said to' be the most unusual ones ever presented to screen followers and are guaranteed to be authentic
in every detail, as the author, Ellis Parker Butler, has
written of a class of people that he knows intimately.
" The Jack Knife Man " is a homely human interest story
dealing with the adventures of a kindly old soul who loves
his fellow men with a great love that knows no bounds. His
self-sacrifice and suffering in shielding little Buddy, a friendless and crippled orphan waif, furnish a world of humor and
pathos. Mr. Butler, from whose hovel the story of the
picture is taken, is a second Mark Twain.
., \ ■ "   ' .
Langley Theatre, Saturday, April 16
Cloverdale Opera House, Thursday, April 14 THE VALLEY SENTINEL
Charlie's day of pleasure is filled to the brim
With things that are fuuny but not for him.
When he gets home you can hear him say: •
"Thank Heavens!   The end of an imperfect day.
Langley Theatre, Saturday, April 16
Cloverdale Opera House, April 14
The Negatives Have It.
A very interesting and instructive debate took place in
Langley Prairie S. S. building
between the Milner and Langley Prairie locals of the United
Farmers. The subject of debate was "Resolved that the
farmer is a better business
man than the city man.' Milner took the affirmative, while
Langley upheld the negative,
After a real spirited debate,
the judges declared the negatives had carried their point.
Mr. Jackson, of Vancouver,
gave a pointed address in
which he gave it as his opinion that the farmer got just as
good government and markets
as he deserved, and strongly
advised them to unite and put
more energy into their organization, and so be deserving of
better things.
In a free for. all discussion
at the close of the debate the
concensus of opinion seemed
to be that the farmer was raising excellent .material in his
sons and daughters, educating
them in a very primary degree
Watch Us Grow.
The weekly bank clearings
for Langley Prairie from April
i-jrth inclusive, were $13,449.-
56.
♦
Suicide. *
The body of Mr. Kampf
was found hanging from the
ceiling of his kitchen Thursday morning by Mr. Lundy.
There appears to be no cause
for Mr, Kampf to have taken
his life, as he was of a cheerful disposition and a w§ll respected resident of this district.    He was a batchelor.
Galbraith's mill at Lincoln,
which has been closed down for repairs, resumed operations on Monday with a full crew and a bright
outlook for a busy season.
Sunday school is held every
Sunday in the free-to-all school
at Langley Prairie at 2.30 p.
m. Evening service held at
/;3o. Mr. Aikenhead and the
Rev. Mr. Crabbe conduct the
service alternate Sundays,
DOMESTIC   POINTERS   FOR
FARMER'S WIFE.
Baked beans crushed or seasoned
with chopped pickle makes a good
aandwlch filling.
Oily fish are more nourishing, hut
.not quite so digestible as non-oily
kinds.
Desserts made with dates, raisins
and other sweet fruits require practically no sugar.
TO PUT STEAM TRACTOR IN SHED
Keep your lettuce in a glass Jar
sealed tight and placed in a cool
place. You need only to wash it and
it ts crisp and fresh,
To restore the original whiteness
to ivory articles which have turned
yellow rub with a flannel moistened
with turpentine.
tnem in a .very primary, degree Mr/A. F, Hale and family
and then, having to send them have moved to Langley Prairie
*~   fe*»^^»«^^^;ncouver.     Mr.  Hale
tQ   town
education, tended to
them away from the country
and make city men and women
of them. The ladies were very
good in supplying excellent
refreshments.
In frying cooked cornmeal add a
little flour to hold meal together and
a little sugar to make mush brown
more.qulckly.
. Grate the rind of a small lemon or
half an orange into, the bread pudding before baking.
When we built our machine shed
we did not like to make a door on
each side of 1 tto drive our steam tractor through; neither did we like to
run the risk of sparks flying out of
the chimney and catching the shed
afire. So we worked out a plan
whereby we can put the steam tractor in the shed very easily and without
any danger to the shed because we run
the tractor in without any fire In the
machine.
We simply drive the tractor up to
the door through which it is to be
taken, and stop it there until we have
taken all the coals out of the fire box.
Then we wind a long rope around the
belt wheel after tying one end of it to
one of the spokes. We hitch a team
to the other end of this long rope, and
as the team pulls, the belt wheel is
turned. This transfers the power to
the- drive wheels, and the tractor is
slowly moved into the shed. We take
it out in the same way. It isn't a
heavy pull for the team, and it is an
easy way to do the Job.
The same idea could be used to get
the tractor out of a tight place in case
of necessity. We do not use our steam
tractor for plowing, so we have never
had to use this device in the field, but
it gives so much extra power to the
drive wheels, that It would be easy to
get it out of almost any tight hole.
■*,»»
Mr. W. Petty, who was
foreman of the Timms Market
Garden Co. for several seasons, has purchased two acres
close to Mr. Jno; Rankin's
farm.
Mrs. Hugh Gifford and her
two little daughters have come
out from New Westmigster
to reside in Langley Prairie,
where Mr. Gifford has been
in business for some time.
They have a suite of rooms ir
the Yale Hotel.
Serious damage was done
by fire at the Clayton lumber
mill on Thursday afternoon.
About $20,000 was lost ir
stock, equipment and building, which was only partially
covered by insurance.
Six Government trucks arc
at work on the gravelling of
the Yale road from Langley
Prairie to the Latimer road, a
stretch of two and a half miles,
which sure needs it.
will conduct a general brokerage and auctioneer business
here.
Mr. A. D. Paterson, M. L.
L. A. for Delta, was in town
3n Thursday, and gave out
che information that the Government engineer would be
m hand shortly and go into
:he question, of the cost of
paving the Yale road from
Langley Prairie to Murrayville.
«»»       -
A FLY REPELLANT
In the summer flies attack cows,
•auslng much misery to them and
inancial loss to the owners. A con-
ented cow always produces more milk
han a discontented one.
There are many so-called fly repel-
ants on the market which are absolute-
y worthless. Good money is wasted
svery time these are produced. II is
lossible to obtain reliable repellents,
lowever, and some of them are very
heap. Here Is one recommended by
he Utah Agricultural College: One
>ound of common laundry soup, four
;allons of warm water, one gallon of
•rude petroleum and four ounces of
wwdered napthalin. Shave tine saon
nto the warm water,.and stir until it
s thoroughly dissolved. Put the nap-
halin In the crude petroleum, and stir
t likewise until it is dissolved. Then
/>our the soap and water in the pet-
.oleum and napthalin and mix thor-
;ughly.
■• mmmm
M
THE VALLEY SENTINEL
fi
IIf? Mlnj 9ttttbi*l
Published Weekly by
The   Valley  Sentinel Printing and
Publisning Company
AT
Langley Prairie, B. C.
B. STONE KENNEDY, Editor-Manager
Advertising rates on application.   Discount on yearly contracts.
Subscription Rates—Canada, $1.50 per
year.   Other countries, $2,00.
8ATP.frBAY, April 9,1921.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
*
The inaugural meeting of the
Board of Trade on Tuesday evening was, all that could be desired
from point of attendance and enthusiasm and augurs well for its
success. The choice of officials was
a happy one, and in President
Eggins and Secretary Harvey the
Board has two men who can be
counted on to keep the wheelsmov-
iug. But don't leave it all to them.
Every man with get up and go in
him should be a member and a
working one at that. Get behind
the movement with a will and results will follow.
*    *    *
The daylight saving- bug is once
again in the air and threatens to
play tricks with the clock and
things. It may be a tip top idea
for chaps that play at work, but
the real-to-goodness country son of
toil wants none of it. And he is
the boy that counts.
The members of the Provincial
Legislature, just before prorogation
last week, decided they were underpaid and helped themselves to a
little more mustard, so to speak.
We've had the same complaint for
some time, but worse luck, we do
not possess the power to go and get
it. Gee, but it must be great to be
a law maker.
»j»        «j»        •)(•
The Allies have demanded from
Germany, as indemnity, the sum
of 55 billion gold marks. The
Gorman empire has a population
of 70,000,000 persons. They have
forty years in which to pay the indemnity. This means that the per
capita payment is $5 per annum.
The per capita payment of the people of this country to the United
States in exchange alone last year
■was U7.25. The only way to reduce our exchange is to buy at
lomei
The case of the two Langley boys
charged with theft, came up before
Judge Howay in New Westminster
last week and they were sentenced
to two lashes apiece and admonished to keep away from moving
picture shows for six monihs. The
counsel for the defence asked for
leniency on the ground that the
lads had been led astray primarily
through the movies, stating that
"Tarzan of the Apes" was the one
that prompted the breaking of His
Majesty's laws, because the boys
wanted to outfit themselves and go
into the Tarzan business. This is
rich. From what we know of this
picture, we can't see anything in
it to prompt wrong doing. To us
it appeared as the embodiment of
clean living with feats of strength
and manliness which should fire a
boy to emulate his example. As we
remember it, about all the equipment needed for such a career was
a breech cloth and a superabundance of red blood and courage to
do heroic deeds in a fair way.
Nothing small or sneaking about
Tarzan. If parents would exercise
a little more control over their
children, i£ fathers would take their
boy3 more into their confidence
and become one of them, thereby
keeping in touch with their
thoughts and actions,, and make
home a place they could be proud
of, there should be little necessity
for judge and jury to take a hand.
Don't fool yourselves by laying the
blame for their misconduct at
some one else's door.
Langley Theatre,
LANGLEY PRAIRIE.
Every Saturday
Entertainment is as necessary to
health and happiness as is food
and clothing.
Come and see the joys, sorrows
and predicament of others and you
will realize that your lot is not so
bad after all.
The Best Cure for
Grouch and Wrinkles
CLOVERDALE
OPERA HOUSE
Every Thursday
The pick of the Big Photo Plays.
The same that are patronised by
millionaires in the big cities arc to
be seen here at popular prices.,
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Langley Service Garage
Storage.        LANGLEY PRAIRIE     Service Car
CARS FOR HIRE DAT AND NIGHT.
Repairing by Expert Mechanics-Satisfaction guaranteed.
g    PHONE 55 R. '        P.- F. CAGNACCI, Proprietor.
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=n=^i=n=ii==]r=ir=ir.
J
HUGH GIFFORD
Plumber
Tinsmith
Heating
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Phone* Milner 54 X.
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3F=1F=1E
=11=11
^
Langley Prairie Hotel
Now open for business
Your patronage is cordially invited.
J. S. DONNELLY
L
RIGHT AT THE B. C. E. R'Y STATION.
MILNER  GARAGE
C. D. WOODWARD, Prop.
Repairs, Storage,, Gas- Oils.   Agency for Grey Dort,
Studebaker Cars
Avery Tractors and Implements
Dominion and Goodyear Tires
All Sizes
The public auction sale held at Bran-
clow's barn on Tuesday by the S. S. B.
was in many respects a success. The
implements, etc., fetched very satisfactory prices, as did the horses, but the
cattle being in such poor condition the
prcea were correspondingly low. It
seems strange why cattle should be allowed to get in such poor condition and
then put under the hammer in the hope
to get anything like a fair price. Mr.
Devine was the auctioneer.
Mr. H. X. de Canonville, the 'popular
manager of the Royal Bank of Canada,
left to-day for Vancouver on a well
earned vacation. During his absence
Mr. Lockart, of the Terminal City, will
take charge. Mr. de Canonville will,
visit Vancouver Island and Sound cities
during his holiday.
It is said that a good man never
stands still. This surely applies to Mr.
Watman, Langley Prairie's progressive
baker. Mr. Warman has just installed
a new oven with double the capacity of
his old one, to take care of his ever increasing business.
Mr. G. H. Mitchell has just bought a
10-acre ranch on the old McLellan road,
just east of the Latimer road. Mr.
Mitchell is no stranger in these parts,,
as he was at one time a neighbor of thee
Hon. Jno..Oliver in the Delta..
■a «t**»«*ji|JlPW' «^,j(jjjSlri.*t.r**.. ',j^Fn-tif^tf^*
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I
I
THE VALLEY SENTINEL
jT
HAPPENINGS IN
SURREY MUNICIPALITY
Cloverdale—What is,likely to be
the last of a successful^ series of
community whist, drives, will be
held in the Munieipal-.Hall next
Tuesday evening. A good turnout
is looked for.
Armstrong '& White, the local
' butchers,, are about to make several
changes to their market. The chief
improvement will be the installation of a 12-foot, sanitary refrigerator counter. The present partition
will be torn down to make more
room to accommodate their ever
increasing business.. When finished this will be the most up-to-date
meat market in the Valley, and
equal to most in the cities.
At the regular meeting of the
G. W. V. A. held in the Municipal
Hall last Monday, it was decided
to write the Council and ask that
the date for unveiling the memorial in the Municipal grounds be
changed from May 24th to May 22.
This date falling as it does on a
Sunday, it was thought to be a better day, when a full memorial service would be held, at which ministers from the entire municipality
eould be present and   take   part
Mr. J. Tyson, recently arrived
from Mission, has purchased ten
acres near here. Before coming to
British Columbia Mr. Tyson lived
at Calgary. The prairies may be
all right, and the Mission district
may be good, but this district has
them all beat.
On Saturday last the ratepayers
defeated the by-law to borrow $50,-
000 for school purposes, including
a High School at Surrey Centre,
two new one-room schools, additional rooms on certain of the existing schools and equipment. The
smallness of the vote polled showed
a woeful lack of public interest.
Tne serving of milk to school
• "hildren was the main topic of discussion at the regular meeting of
the Parent Teacher? held in the
Municipal Hall on Wednesday
evening. After the discussion tea
was served, and the amount left
over reminded one of the feeding
of the five thousand. It was too
bad the baseball boys lacked sufficient courage to get in en the surplus.
The boy scout movement is mak-
irjg great headway here. At the
last meeting the following were
elected officers for the ensuing
year: Mr. Kendall, president; Dr.
Sinclair, 1st vice; Mr. Lemax, 2nd
vice; Mr. Thrift, of White Reck,
honorary president; W.. Hassard,
secretary-treasurer. Outfits have
been ordered and a good time is
looked forward to by all. Mr. W.
Rowechapple will be Scout master
! F. POLLARD
PLUMBER
TINSMITH
AND
SHEET METAL WORKER
IJM    H      It       II       II       II
Estimates furnished.   All work
High Class.
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Opposite the B. C. E. Railway
Station.
Langley - Murrayville
Auto Service
Connects with all B. 0. E. Ry. trains
Go anywhere, anytime
Robt. McLeod
Phone 48
Murrayville, B. C,
H. P. SWAIN
Practical
Electrician
iA.lt class of Electrical Work
done. Satisfaction assured
Dr. J. G, Jervis
VETERINARY SURGEON
Residence r
Medd Road
MILNER, B. C.
Phone 22L
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Phone 28M
LANGLEY TRANSFER
General Trucking
Contracts  taken
W.
Phone 36Y
and under his efficient direction
good results are assured. The
Sentinel wishes this worthy movement every (success^
4"       —       ■■ ■    H.     Ml     ■■       II      M      Mi     M       ■■       II       II       Mi     ■■      II       II      ■■       H—II*—■!■—m~»IM—»M^M—.11|
Langley Prairie General Store
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes
Hardware.
A. C. McNABr Proprietor,
Everybody knows where.
Phone Milner 4. f
I  >«—II               MUM       II       HUH       M   - —II—<l       H       «'       M—H—mfr
A. P. SLADE & COMPANY
WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND
Ship in your Produce-Prompt Returns
FRUIT, BUTTED,  EGGS, CHEESE  AND POULTRY
Victoria,
155 Water St:
VANCOUVER, B. C.     Prince Rupert.
W. S. HI CLEAN
Carries, complete stocks, of
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes,
Notions, Gents1 Furnishings, etc,
The Goods are of the Best Quality. A trial will convince you.
Langley Prairie. B. C.
VALLEY MEAT MARKET
Langley Prairie, B. C
ALL MEATS ARE LOCALLY KILLED.
NO STORAGE MEAT HANDLED.
Try our Hbme-Made Sausages—they are fine.
0B01
IOBOI
IOBOI
IOBOI
D
Job Printing
IOBO
D
r
IHEN you need Printing, for any purpose,   2
| Jjljt 1 you can get exactly what your proposition   o
I  **^ I calls for right here at Langley Prairie
liilliiiijffliii I We have a very complete equipment,
111       and are in a position to give you Service
o Y       and Quality of the best, and at prices that   ©
a   will compare favorably with those of the cities.
3tjr Valbg &n\tmtl ftg. & fuh. Gfo.
o
n
OBOI
Rear of the Theatre, LANGLEY PRAIRIE.
loaor—noHOi iobqes
0
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MMMaal ■■
THE VALLEY SENTINEL
1
See about Seed Oats
 —Now——
Last Fall was very poor for-the harvesting of a good quality
of Seed Oats. Ma>iy were lo*t, and those harvested are very
liable to be low in germination.
B. & K. Victory and Garton Seed Oats
Were harvested before the rains, grown in the Fraser Valley,
and are bright, plump, free from weed seeds, high in germination.   They mature early and are heavy yielders.
Place your Orders Early as Supplies are Limited
THE BRACKMAN-KER MILLING CO., Ltd.
Phone 30
Langley Prairie, B. C«
 PHONE 694	
J. H. Todd's Music House
(Next City Hall)
PIAN08. VICTROLA8, EDISON DIAMOND AMBEROLAS,
SHEET MUSIC & RECORDS-EVERYTHING IN MUSIC
New Home Sewing Machines
Wholesale and Retail
521 Columbia St.,  NEW WESTMINSTER, B, C
WESTMINSTER IRON WORKS, LTD.
Machinists, Engineers and Blacksmiths.   Manufacturers of Ornamental and Structural Iron Work
SMOKE STACKS        FIRE ESCAPES       TANKS       ELEVATORS
PLATE WORK ELEVATOR ENCLOSURES PATTERNS
GASOLINE LOCOMOTIVES     GASOLINE DONKEYS     FORGINGS
SILO RODS       MOLE PLOWS
Phones 53-653 Office and Works, 66 10th Street \      P.O. Box 933
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
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Subscribe to
The Valley Sentinel
$1.00 to Dec. 31
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Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir
The Busy Little Bee;
Some Valuable
Information
SWARMING is the bees' natural
method of increase, and the instinct to swarm is particularly
strong under the extremely favorable
conditions for bee   activity of   the
Canadian spring and summer.
The uncertainty of swarming, the
loss of honey following the division
of the working force of the colony,
the possibility of swarms escaping,
and the difficulty in preventing
swarming in many parts of Canada
without considerable labor, all make
the control of swarming quite the
greatest problem in bee management.
, To encourage work in the hive and
to discourage the desire to swarm,
plenty of room, both in the brood
chamber and in the super, and large
entrances should be given to all colonies as soon as conditions are favorable, but these measures will not
always be enough to prevent swarming in many places, especially in the
north.
If the apiary can be watched all
day, it is a good plan to clip the
queen's wings at fruit bloom time.
When the colony swarms, remove the
hive to a new stand, place on the old
stand an empty hive, to which the
swarm will return, the queen having
been meanwhile picked up and placed
in a cage in the new hive. The field
bees will Join the swarm and the parent colony will be so much weakened
by their loss that it is not likely to
swarm again.
Where the apiary cannot be watched, the plan of preventing swarming
by examining every brood comb in
every colony every week, and destroying all the queen cells is very
laborious and not always effective.
A simpler plan is to remove the queen
at the beginning of the clover honey
flow, and eight or nine days later,
destroy all the queen cells except
one, or destroy all and give a ripe
cell of select parentage. In this way
a young queen is obtained which will
not swarm and, besides, will be more
prolific in the fall and next year than
the old queen, and will be less likely
to swarm next year. This plan, however, causes a certain amount of loafing until the. new queen starts laying.
This loafing can be much reduced by
introducing a ripe queen cell at the
time the queen is removed, and if
this is done early enough before any
preparations for swarming have been
started, the bees are unlikely to build
further queen cells. Where, however,
one prefers to use the surer method,
only those colonies that are actually
preparing to swarm should be treated,
and some means for. quickly ascertaining if a colong is building queen-
cells in preparation for swarming
should be employed. One of the best
of these is to have the brood nest occupy two chambejs, and then by prying up the upper chamber, one can
see at a glance if the queen cells are
being built along the lower edge of
the combs in this chamber.
In many parts of southern Ontario,
southern Quebec and similar regions
the desire to swarm is strong only
during the first two or,three weeks
of the honey flow from clover, and
the separation of queen and brood by
a queen excluder, the queen being
put into a lower chamber containing
only empty combs and foundation,
may be enough to tide the colony
over this period. Another good plan
that may be enough to prevent swarming in this region is to use two brood
chambers and confine the queen to the
lower one early in the honey flow, at
which time the combs in this chamber
usually contain a large number of
empty cells.—Experimental Farms
Note.
BEEKEEPING    AND   THE   SUGAR
SITUATION.
With sugar over 20 cents a pound,
and the outlook of a possibly higher
price and uncertainty of supply, beekeepers will find it atvisable to pay
more attention than usual to the saving of wholesome honey for wintering
the bees safely.
Bach colony should have not less
than 40 pounds of stores for winter.
The honey gathered in June and July
from alsike and white clover is per
fectly wholesome and makes the finest
winter stores. Most of the honeys
gathered from other abundant sources
in June and July are also wholesome,
but honey gathered from mixed
sources in August and September is.
as a rule, less so, and is therefore
liable to cause dysentery which
will weaken or kill the colony before
spring. Some kinds of fall honey are
very Injurious. However, buckwheat
honey and the honey from certain
Bpecies of goldenrod and aster that
grow abundantly in dry situations, if
it ripens before cold weather, are
wholesome. *»
It would therefore be wise to save
combs of clover honey in order that
several of them may be placed in
the hive about the centre. These
combs should be given early enough in
the fall, that is to say, about the
middle of September, to allow the bees
time to empty a few cells to make a
place for the winter cluster to occupy. Care should be taken that, these
combs of honey are taken from colonies that are entirely free from American foul-brood. It will be advisable also to save extra combs of honey;,
sufficient to give each colony one mora-
comb in spring, but the honey given in
spring need not be of the best quality.
A strong colony of Italian, bees
containing a prolific young queen
often has very little honey in the
brood chamber when the supers are
removed in the fall. A simple way to
supply such a colony with suitable
stores for the winter is to give or ~
leave it a super full of clover honey.
F. W. L. Sladen, Apiarist. mmm™*mmm***mm^mmmi^mmmmi
mmvmm.. ■ . .
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THE VALLEY SENTINEL
I
Hog Market is Juggled
by the "In-and-Outer"
to Its Detriment
f.-.
" a N obvious moral may be drawn
jr\ from tne present market prospects for hogs. It is that the
"in-and-outer" in breeding and feeding
is usually the man who fails. Look
at the facts a little.
Last fall prices for hogs dropped rapidly. Two of the'causes for this were
the condition of export markets and
the high prices of feed grains. So
much American bacon had been purchased by the British Government under war contracts that, in the few
months after the armistice, there was
an unprecedented glut in Great Britain. In addition, the British people,
being relieved of the stern necessity
of eating a class of bacon to which
they had never before been accustomed, refused longer to buy it!<   :
The reduction of hogs undoubtedly
was accelerated by the unprecedented
rise in the domestic prices for feeds.
Hundreds of hog raisers concluded it
would be better to sell at any price
rather than to carry over the winter.
The combination of conditions resulted in a rush of hogs to the market.
Prices went down naturally, because,
while farmers were selling widely, buyers- were temporarily embarrassed
with the stocks they had on. hand.
To-day, however, things have swung
back.. Prices have, considerably recovered. There is a scarcity of breeding sows throughout the Dominion.
Young pigs,are selling at high prices.
Meanwhile the man who dropped
out because he saw no immediate profit in sight must today pay high prices
for renewing his breeding stocks. Had
he only had a longer faith, last fall,
he would have "stayed in the game."
He would not so readily have sold his
breeding animals. He would have
made a little temporary sacrifice to
keep these over the winter/and have
been in a position to take full advantage of a rising market.
" "We find our farmers going into certain lines of production for a year or
two and then getting out of them in
a hurry, leaving the market short,"
said the Minister of Agriculture in the
House of Commons on May 14th. He
added: "An excellent illustration of
this is the hog industry, which requires
stabilization to a certain extent. Hogs
have been brought from Winnipeg to
the Pacific Coast merely to meet local requirements.
In addition, hundreds of cascases
haye been imported from the American side. This should not be. It is
hugely'due to lack of faith on the
part of farmers in tne present market
conditions."
The quick change in hog prospects
is only another proof of the shrewd
stock who "stays In the game" in the
observation that the producer of live
stock who "stay in the game" in the
unfavorable'season, will be best able
to recoup his losses and make good
average profits when the inevitable
turn in the market comes.
But the reaU tragedy caused by the
"in-and-outer" is the way he destroys
the markets. During a period of high
production the packer extends his
markets. He establishes a demand for
the product of the farmer's animals.
If during a period of temporary depression breeding stock is heavily disposed of, it causes great fluctuations
in supply. This destroys the. customer's confidence., If he cannot secure
steady supplies from one source, he
must abandon that source and look
elsewhere. Thus the "in-and-outer"
not only loses money himself, but he
becomes a seriously disturbing factor
throughout the whole industry.
There is both virtue and profit in
reasoned patience, especially in the
livestock industry.
TO CONTROL AND ERADICATE
DISEASE IF POSSIBLE.
Further steps toward -insuring
Canada of as large an output of livestock and livestock products are to be
taken right away by the federal
department of agriculture. A dominion-wide campaign in an effort to con
trol and ultimately to eradicate tuberculosis among Canadian livestock is
outlined in an announcement by Dr.
Tolmie, minister of agriculture. During the past ten years this trouble
has been increasing, both in cattle
and in hogs at a more or less uniform rate, according to the minister.
Tuberculosis of swine, which is closely related to tuberculosis of cattle, has
increased from an average of 10 per
cent, to slightly over 20 per cent, during that period. ■-.
Although the measures taken by the
department of agriculture through the
government meat regulations rigidly
enforced at packing plants reduce to
a minimum the danger of tuberculosis meat being offered for human food,
the disease may be, and in hundreds
of cases is transmitted to human beings, especially young children,
through the medium of milk-infected
cows, and until this disease can be
stamped out from amongst bur dairy
herds, this source of infection will
always be present, to say,nothing of
the enormous waste of meat products
suffered every year by reason of the
necessity of condemning as unfit for
human food animals suffering from
tuberculosis.
DAIRY INDUSTRY IN CANADA
The number of dairy factories in operation in Canada in 1919 was 3,343,
comprising 1,043 creameries, 1,834
cheese factories, 442 combined butter
and cheese factories and 23 condensed milk factories. The number of
cheese factories was less in 1919 than
in 1918, while the numbers of creameries, combined factories and condensed milk factories increased.
Services will be held in the Methodist
Church on Sunday, April 10th, at 7.30
p. m., and on Sunday, April 18, at 2.30
p.m. Sunday School is held every Sunday at 1.30 n.m.    Rev. Crabbe, {astor.
ers!
To the Home Folk of the
FertiIe Fraser Valley
Out of the High Rent district.   You can't beat our
Prices,    1500 feet floor space.   $40,000 stock
Reliable Furniture Co.
"The Store you can depend upon"
Cor. Sixth and Carnarvon Sts.    Where the Car turns
NEW WESTMINSTER
FORD CARS AND FORDSON TRACTORS
RIDLEY-KENNEDY
Exclusive Ford Dealers
ON EASY PAYMENTS. NO FINANCING FEES
Columbia Street, near City Market
NEW WESTMINSTER, -       B. C.
Change in Business
We have taken over the Real Estate and Insurance business
of Messrs. Tugaw & DeWalt, and we will carry on the business under the management of Gordon E. Herbert. A. M.
Tugaw will continue with the new firm. With our office in
Vancouver we are in a position to give the best possible service in connection with land sales, loans, life or fire insurance. Farmers would do well to get particulars of our FIRE
INSURANCE before placing or renewing their insurance.
We have the BEST and CHEAPEST fire insurance for the
farmer..
J. D. SKINNER, Limited
Bank of Nova Scotia, Vancouver Langley Prairie
WHEAT
No.   2  Wheat in  Sack   lots,  while  it  lasts
$3.35 per lOO-lb. Sack
DesBRISAY JOBBING €0.
Langley Prairie.
rl
:y
Advertise in the
Valley Sentinel
.. -■. ■-*«£■**>. .•*.. «-■■•-...  .-: ;■'.
'■ "-■•'•' ■    :
kariHUMfaia^l^ .-'V- A-   .. ':. ■..5W.7"^T7r  "'
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rj«SS5F*
8
THE VALLEY SENTINEL
OPENING this week on the Yale road in Langley
Prairie, an office for the handling of all classes of
Farm Land and Acreage through Langley.
Also a special organization for tne handling of
sales of Live Stock, Implements, etc, by Fublic Auction,
A. F. HALE
GENERAL BROKER AND AUCTIONEER
Yale Koad.  Langley Prairie
414 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER, B.
Langley Prairie Hardware
W. T. EGGINS, Proprietor
Full lines of Builders' Supplies. Paints, Oils and Stains, Rocfing
Materials, etc.
Farm Implements, Garden Tools, Kitchen and Dairy Utensils,
Cutlery, etc.
Phone. Milner 57 STOVES AND HEATERS
CARNCROSS & HUGH
NOTARIES
LICENSED
CONVEYANCERS
INSURANCE      REAL ESTATE
CLOVERDALE, B. C.
Classified Advertisements.
WANTED - Horse and Cattle Manure. Stat*
price delivered. Timms Market Garden Co.,
Ltd., Langley Prairie, m26-t4
A SNAP—2 brand new Autoi, on easy terms
lor quick sale. Apply Milner Store. Pnone
7L. ap2t4
-*
Brace Up
PHONE 55 L
By taking our COMPOUND SYRUP
HYPOPHOSPHITES. A stimulating
nerve force builder.     $1.00 per bottle.
A. M. PLEWES, DRUGGIST
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Windsor i
Hotel
LANGLEY BAKERY
LANGLEY PRAIRIE, B. C.
PHONE 30 X
Bread Wholesale and Retail.   Cakes and Pastry
!E1
S
L
fresh daily.
A. WARMAN, Proprietor.
315
J
=IE
YALE HOTEL   I
YALE ROAD
LANGLEY PRAIRIE
Now open for business.   Modern and up to date
throughout.
WE ARE PLEASED TO SERVE AND SERVE TO PLEASE.
PHONE 56 L
'1
I   n    -ii ii      ir^^p^ii
3F=1[
^J
NEW WESTMINSTER
FOE SALE Purebred White Pekin Duck
Hatch 1 n b E fgs. Apply E.J. WUsoa. Telephone 28Y. ap3t4
FOR SALE-Team Heavy Horses, 1500 lbs,
each. 7 and s years respectively. Apply
F. H. Hepper, Anderson station apJtl
FOR SALE—Sutton'* Improved Seed Potatoes
$1.00 per sack. Come and get'em. Apply H.
P.Swain.  Phone 28M. apflU
The hotel that caters to the
country trade. Here's where you
meet   your friends.
Rates Reasonable
Prompt Service   ;
E. a McBRIDE
D. A. MURRAY
Proprietors
took part; Mesdames Wise, Matheson,
Mrs. Johnson, Misses M. Blacklock,
Wilkey and Swartman, all of whom
played their parts well.
The committee in charge of the arrangements were Mr*. B. A. Harrison,
Mrs. Cameron, Mrs. Morris, Miss M.
Blacklock. The ladies wish, through
the Sentinel, to thank all those who
helped to make the evening so successful, particularly the members of the
Football Club who so willingly lent their
talents, and also to the management of
the auditorium. A handsome sum wag
realized.
«i>
Electrical  Supplies,  Wiring,   Poultry  Appliances,  Drinking
Fountains, Oat Sprouters
Phones 55 L GIBSON
LANGLEY PRAIRIE,  B. C.
After 6, 34F
Whist Drive.
The Langley Auditorium was well
filled on Wednesday evening on the occasion of the whist drive and concert
given by the Ladies' Guild of the Church
of England. The one hundred odd people present had a most enjoyable time
and the affair was voted a big success
in the military whist drive Scotland
won first place, through the good work
of Mrs. McLeod, Mrs. A. Watholm and
Messrs. Cambridge and Crank. Ireland
finished second best, Mrs. Abbott, Miss
Vaughan, Mr. Woods and Mr. Abbott
trying hard to avert defeat.
After cards came supper and it was
surely a feast. The concert part of the
entertainment was contributed to by
Mesdames Cambridge, Cameron and
Gibson, and Messrs. Brown, Crank,
Skuce and Woods. The comic sketch
put on by the ladies, entitled "The
Beauty Shop," was a bit of all right and
much appreciated. The following ladies
Anxious to Please.
F. Pollard, tinsmith and sheet metal
worker, has in stock the following:
Large and small di inking fountain?,
brojder pipes and caps, roof plates, feed
hoppers, electric brooders. It will pay
you to calf and inspect his stock before'
buying elsewhere. His shop is righfc
across from the station. He is anxious
to please. ap9t2
«»»
Milner Notes.
Due to the increasing need of a
more adequate delivery system,
Mufford Bros., proprietors of the
general store, have purchased a 1-
ton Ford truck to take care of their
many satisfied customers' wants.
In a few days work will commence on a new residence for Mr.
W. S. Udy, who has come here
from Lulu Island, where he farmed
for many years.
Angus Smith has about finished
work on his new chicken house
which will accommodate some 350
chickens. It will be equipped with
all the latest labor saving devices,
also electric lighting throughout.

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