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The Nugget Sep 16, 1904

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 THE NUGGET.
VOL. I.   NO. 42.
Poplar, b. a. September 16,1904.
$2.00 A Year.
10090099******************
I NEWS OF THE MINES. 5
\ppp0000000***************
Geo. Munroe and Jack   Chism   went
up Lake creek this week   to  do assess
ment
on some claims.
During the absence of C. T. Porter
in Spokane only one man is working
on the Broken Hill, Rapid creek.
las. A. Ferguson of Grand Forks
was in town this week on business connected with  his Cascade creek claims.
The tunnel on the Klondike group,
Tenderfoot creek, is in about 80 feet
on the small lead of gray copper. Six
men are working on the property.
Arthur G. Johnstone has completed
ihe year's assessment on the Maple
Leaf, Poplar creek. There is a 20-foot
lead of quartz, carrying arsenical iron
with gold values.
The tunnel on the Morning group,
Rapid cieek, is in 50 feet with 2% feet
of rich free-milling quartz in the face.
The owners intend making a trial shipment from this lead shortly.
J. A. Magee* manager of the Spyglass mine, left for Winnipeg Monday.
It is rumored that he has an option on
v)ne of the best groups on Rapid creek,
and will endeavor to form a company
lo take over and work the property.
The tunnel on the Mother Lode,
Poplar creek, is in 120 feet, the tracks
have been laid, and extra men will be
put to work Monday. The results of
development on this . property have
proved very satisfactory to the holders
of the bond, and there is now no doubt
that the pay.nents will be made
promptly.
Two pack trains with ore came
down from the Spyglass this week.
hwill take about three weeks or a
month ta bring down a carload. The
ore is very rich in silver, with gold
values as well. At the mine the cabins
are nearly completed, and work is being pushed on the upraise  from No. 2.
On the French group, north of Gold-
hill considerable development work has
heen done this season. Three shafts
have been sunk, 35, 20 and 15 feel.
A 28-foot tunnel and a 15-foot open cut
have been run. The lead is 12 feet
w«de, carrying peacock copper, bornile,
and values in gold. One assay gave
$18.40 gold to the ton.
W. Hall and Paul Greyerbiehl came
down from Goat mountain this week,
where they had been working on the
trail to the Mammoth group, which is
"early completed. At the Mammoth
development is progressing rapidly,
and the lead—galena and gray cop-
Per—is improving. Ore is being
s^ked and shipments will be made as
s°on as the trail is in a condition to
r»whide to the wagon road.
The tunnel on the Copper King,
Poplar creek, is in 40 feet. In another
15 feet  the  large  lead will be tapped.
Forest tires did considerable damage
on Swede hill during the past two
weeks. The blacksmith shop at the
Home Run was burned and part of the
timbering in the tunnel destroyed.
Walker& Olson's cabin, and the powder
house at the Swede group were both
burned, although the powder in the
latter was saved.
Business appears to be  improving in
all lines in   Poplar,  and  we  may yet
have a pretty lively fall and winter.
A few mining deals are now under way
that if completed will add greatly to
the prosperity of the camp by increasing the payroll. Negotiations for three
groups of properties on Rapid creek are
now under|way, and it is probable that
all three deals will go through. The
Lucky Jack litigation is likely to be
settled before the end of the month.
This will mean considerable to the
camp. The Spyglass and Mother Lode
will probably both put more men to
work next month. So the camp is not
in such bad shape after all.
SWEDE   GROUP
Following is Superintendent Morgan's report on work
on the Swede group since the Great Northern Mines, Ltd.,
became the owners. The group was located in June, 1903,
by Eric Strand, Henry Magnusson and Ben Lawson, and
is considered by experienced mining men who have examined it, the richest property in the camp, and, possibly,
in the province.    Mr. Morgan's report follows:
"As reguesled by you, I hand my report of development
done on Swede group—the Goldsmith and Gold Hill mineral
claims—by the Great Northern Mines, Ltd. The group is
situated between one and two miles above the outlet of
Poplar creek. The company commenced development work
in October, 1903. Our first work was to build about a mile
of trail to the claims at a cost of $125, after which] buildings for the accommodation of the men were erected.
"Actual development consists principally of prospect
work. The surface has been stripped for a distance of 300
feet in length and we have good ore the whole distanee. An
open cut has been run across the formation ror a distance of
1,000 feet. Over this area gold values are found running
from $5 up to thousands of dollars to the ton. Ore from a
16-foot shaft -7K tons—was sent to Camborne for a mill
test and gave returns of $37-50 in gold to the ton. Two
drift and one crosscut tunnels have been run.
"No. 1 drift is in 145 feet, and samples taken along this
distance give good values in free gold. This tunnel gives a
vertical depth of over 125 feet.
« No. 2 drift is in 96 feet and shows good ore most of the
distance. The crosscut tunnel is in 50 feet, with about 30
feet more to go to tap the lead. This is being driven to tap
what is known as the galena lead, and promises to be good
ore judging from surface indications. An additional 100
feet of tunneling will be required to crosscut another lead
about four feet in width, which  on  the   surface   shows   12
inches of arsenical iron of good values, some of it running
int0 thousands of dollars in gold to the ton. The cost of
development work to date is something over $5,000."
nt is the intention of the company to erect a strmp-mill
on Poplar creek next spring.-Eo.]
0*****00009999999999999999
I   LOCAL NEWS ITEMS.   |
00000000000000000000000000
Mrs. Wm. Schmock went to Nelson
Wednesday.
D. R. Munro and Con. O'Neill left
Wednesday for Cranbrook.
Frank Barber of Ferguson was in
town a couple of days this week.
Chas. Copp spent a few days in town
the past week.
Red fish are somewhat of a drug on
the market at present.
A. E. Goodenough of Kaslo paid a
busine^r visit to Poplar Wednesday.
ed   Fraser,  gold commissioner at
evelstoke, was in town this week.
George Hagerman of Kaslo was in
town this week taking orders for furniture.
Repairs are being made to the Poplar creek trail under the foremanship
of Phil Billings.
Jos. Pattinson and Mrs. Pattinson
left Monday for Nelson where they will
spend the winter.
W. J. Bowser fcof Vancouver passed
through Poplar today on his way from
Trout Lake to Kaslo:
Bruce Craddock left on Wednesday
to winter at Greenwood or some other
point in Boundary district.
John Keen, townsite agent, left Mon-
day on a business trip lo Kaslo, Nelson and Rossland. He will be back
next week.
Lost—In Poplar, a purse containing
valuable papers and $12 in cash. The
finder will be suitably rewarded on returning same to Henry Magnusson at
the Kaiser house.
E. E. Chipman, gold commissioner
and guvernment agent at Kaslo. was
in Poplar Wednesday and went on to
Trout Lake Thursday, returning to
Kaslo Friday.
Andrew Lamarre disappeared from
Gerrard about two weeks ago, and no
trace of him can be found. He was
last seen cutting wood one forenoon.
His cabin was left open, and it is feared
some accident has happened to him.
On Friday last Miss Dickinson, the
Poplar school readier, was called to
Vancouver by a telegram informing
her of the death of her father in that
city. Mrs. J. Simpson has charge of
the school during Miss Dickinson's
absence.
S. F. McKay, the lokal sawmill man,
was up at Trout Lake this week trying to recover a piece of money from
the big mill company of that place.
Il is probable that all the creditors of
the big company will be properly skinned, and it looks very much as if that
had been the original intention of the
promoters of the scheme.
Latest reports from Spokane are
thai the holders of the bond on the
Hecla, Rapid creek, are willing to pay
the whole amount now if allowed a
small discount, This is much better
than the previous offer. Poplar, B. C, September 16, 1904.
THE MTGGET.
THE NUGGET
•m
Is published every Friday at Poplar, B. C.
and i9 sent to any address for $2.00 a year.
Commercial adve;tising is $1.50 an inch for
four insertions. Reading notices 15 cents a
line each insertion. Legal advertising 10
cents a line first insertion, and 5 cents a line
each subsequent insertion. Certificate of
Improvement notices, $7; Delinquent co-
owner notices, $10. Address all letters to The
Nugget. Poplar, B. C.
R. T. LOWERY, Proprietor.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16,1904.
Poplar is now without a parson.
This may account for many of the
night noises that disturb our dreams.
This week we publish a report by
Superintendent Morgan of the development on the Swede group, one
of the richest properties in the W est.
A simple manner of testing ore for
cinnabar or mercury is by mixing it
with lime and placing if in a long-
stem clay pipe, covering the top ol
the pipe with wet clay. Place the
pipe in a fire and cover it with coals,
the stem dipping into a vessel of
water. If there is mercury in the
ore it will volatilize and condense in
the stem of the pipe and drop into the
water as metallic mercury. Carbonate ot soda is as good a mixeras lime.
EJKTi
interview tbe distinguished Jap.
The interpreter asked the question
and the distinguished visitor made
a reply. uHe says," the interpreter
translated, "that the Americans are
the greatest people he has seen in his
travels. Indeed, he declares they
may well be called the Japanese ot
the West."—Baltimore World.
Subscribe for The Nu
gfget.
| F. H. HAWKINS f
^ A8SAYEB
^ SANDON, B. C.
A nugget valued at $500 was recently tound near Holland, Oregon.
AN error occurred in the report on
the Spyglass in last week's issue.
Mr. Magee's figures for the final payment were $22,000, but in the paper
they were $2,200, a difference cf
$20,000. 	
Canada is gradually coming up
to the United States in enterprises
peculiar to the people south of us.
Last week a train was held up near
Vancouver. The whole country
along the Fraser is now being
searched for the bandits by ranchers
with pitchforks, provincial constables
with lanterns, and Pinkertons with
gatling guns. The bandits have been
surrounded half a dozen times, but
managed to escape. They have been
located and relocated as often as the
Lueky Jack mine, and are still look
ing lor locations farther south. If
any one in the Interior runs across
three men, one tall and the other two
not so tall, carrying rifles and $6,000
in gold dust, and when last seen
wearing masks, it would be advisable to detain them until the aforesaid
forks, lanterns and gats catch up
with the procession. There is $7,500
in the job.
The Cerro Rico de Potosi mining
district in Bolivia has produced up
to the present time no less than ti o
billion dollars in s'lver.
Montana now claims to stand first
of all the States in the production of
wool, first in the production of cooper, second in silver and fitih in gold.
Grab3haw—He has the inventive
faculty very highly developed.
Crawford—What has he invented?
Crab3haw-Nothing, so far as I know.
But when his wife goes out he can
think ot things to keep the baby
amused bv the hour.—Judjre.
The Spokane Fair.
More than ever before will the
growth of the stock business in the
Northwest be emphasized at the Spokane Interstate fair during the week
October 3 to 9, inclusive. Stock
breeding has fast become one of the
leading industries of the great Northwest Wondrous strides have been
made in the past few years and the
possibilities are yet unlimited.
The Interstate Fair management
has planned a novel parade tor the
benefit of the sightseers who take in
the big fruit iair this fall. After the
the premiums have been awarded by
the judges in the Live Stock Depart
ment a big liye stock parade will be
formed which will circle the face
track, passing before the big grand
stand. The winners will be given
their prize ribbons in front of the
grand stand, and as the special winners of note pass the judges' stand
they will be announced and pmse
for a moment for the inspection of the
seated multitude.
The stock parade as planned will
be one of the features of the busy
week, and will be of great interest to
breeders and stock-lovers generally.
Ask him what he thinks of the
Americans, said the reporter to the
interpreter who  was helping him to
" """ ■ ' "    ■■'!-■ ■■»■■   I II .-■■■l—.l        .!,.        I. ,   |Jb         ...-,
Nelson Fair
Second Annual Exhibition of the Nelson Agricultural and Industrial
Association.
September 28-29
New Buildings
Fine Grounds
Big Premium List
Novel Open Air Attractions
Write for Prize List
J. E. ANNABLE, SEC.
§
p*3»e*
¥
THE
Dominion Hotel
POPLAR
Has ample accommodation for a
large number of people. The table
is supplied with the best in the market. The bar contains the popular
brands of liquid tonics and cigars.
I
Hambly & Nelson.
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7
NELSON, B. G.
gbji_ii_i_aM
The Royal Hotel
r.v
1
POPLAR, B. C.
Has cocktails for the uervous, |
beer for the delicate,  whiskey
for the hardy mountainer, and   |
cigars tor those who prefer nar- |!
cotic to alcoholic stimulants.
h
iv:
I
W.   E.   MORAND
PROPRIETOR.
v:J.V<torE'?;.;!^^^^ v
COMMERCIAL HOTEL
VKOHMKHi.Y   ttQTKL  INN.)
j Chas. Hanson, Proprietor.
First-class in every department.     Wines  Liquors and  Citfars the   M
hnest   procurable.    The   Menu   has no equal  in the
Lerdeau.    Call and  be convinced  that
THE   COMMERCIAL IS   THE   BEST
KEEP YOUR OPTICS ON
It is the coming City at the Second Crossing. THE   PROSPECTOR.
THE NUGGET.
To the prospector for gold and silver the United States owes the rapid
development of the West. The tremendous travel induced by the dis
coveries ot gold and silver in California, Nevada, Utah, Montana, Idaho
and Colorado undoubtedly caused the
building: of a transcontinental railroad
at Isast twenty years sooner tlnn
otherwise would have been the case.
It would be incredible if the men who
dared the terrors of what was then
the Great American Desert and the
hostile Sioux and Apaches were for
gotten. Yet it is a fact that the names
of Comstock, Gregory, O'Reilly,
McLaughlin and scores of others are
almost as completely forgotten as if
their work had been that of obscure
factory hand. Surely these men's
names should be remembered and
honored by the western common-
wealth. Before it is to late, and
while men yet live who knew them,
the facts as to t use forgotten heroes
should b.' collected and preserved tor
future generations.
Too generally an impression prevails th;.t these old prospectors were
not "nicc"men. The fact best known
concerning Gregory, the first discoverer of quartz gold in Colorado, is his
picturesque blasphemy when he
made his epochal discovery at Black
Hawk. What finally became of
Gregory and what kind of a man he
really was, the school children ol Col
onido are not informed. So far as we
can find out it is not known with certainty, even, where he died.
i Recently, while digging out some
\ figures Irom old goverment reports,
which also are not appreciated as
they should be. we came on an account ot the last days ot tlenn Coin-
stock, alter whom was named the
great Comstock lode of Nevada. The
old man was living at Butte. Montana,
in 1867, and in 18G8 we find'in the
"Mineral Resources of the United
States" this pathetic account ot a
raagnificlent character:
"Although a man of the strictest
temperance, using no stimulant
stronger than tea or coffee, and not
even tobacco, years and the hardships
and excitements incident to a frontier
life are telling painfully on his faculties. In a conversation with him he
referred to his past career, especially
his connection with the lode that
bears his name. His intellect appears
to wander, although his hand still retains its cunning. He is a skilful
prospector, but his fading recollections
carry cloudy images to his darkened
understanding He imagines he
ownes the whole Comstock lode, and
the cities of Gold Hilland Virginia;
hut as he has no immediate use for
them, he allows others to liverin his
houses. The people are poor, and it
would be hard to -urn them out, especially in the winter. This feeling
of benevolence In the old man is gen-
uine. and one that he habitually practices. He has a sma'l claim that,
Pays little more than wages. If a
P°°r miner comes along without
"leans, he gfves him an opportunity
to work in the claim until the suf-
te,,'ng stranger has the means to go
°» his journey,
Recently an emigrant came along '
who was sick and could work but
MMle. Comstock and he worked toother in the claim, the old man doing the most laborious part until the
emigrant concluded to leave. Corn-
stock then divided what was taken
out, and seeing it was too small for
a man to travel on, said: "Now we
will divide my half again; You will
need it."
Should brave, generous and
simple characters such as this be tor-
gotten ?
Nor was Comsiock an isolated man
of this class. We can recall many
such prospectors in our travels through
the Western mountains.-Mining Reporter.
Poplar, B. C, September 16, 1904.
A London inventor named James
Downing is said to have invented a
lining, for tin cans, of paper. The
substance is so prepared as to be wet
proof and absolutely to prevent the
absorption of poisons from the tin or
iron, besides being cleaner and
ueater in appearance.
»<
 — — — — — — ~B
The Canadian Bank of Commerce \
With which is Amalgamated
The Bank of British Columbia.
HEAD OFFICE-TORONTQ.
Paid up Capital, 18,700,000.   Reserve Fund, $3,000,000.     I
Aggregate Resources, Exceeding $83,000,000. •
HON. GEO. A. COX, President. B. E WALKER, General Manager I
Saoings Bank Department,    Doposirs received and Interest AHoved J
Nelson Branch. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. •
IMPERIAL BANK OF CANADA.
(arbuncle is the name given to
fine transparent red or purple garnets— pyrope and almanite. They
are cut with rounded convex surface,
and make beautiful gems. Siam
produces most of these stones.
The famous Paradise silver mines.
Humboldt county, Nevada produced
over $2,000,000 during the Seventies.
Capital authorized, $4,000,000
Capital [paid up] • 3,000,000
Rest    -   .   .   .   .  2,850,000
Head Office:
 , TORONTO,  ONTARIO.
Branches in the Northwest Teiritories,  Provinces of British Columbia,
Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec.
T. R. MERRIIT, President.        ;      D. R. WILKIE, VicePres. and Gen. Man.
E. HAY, Assistant Gen. Manager.       W. MOFFAT, Chief Inspector.
Trout Lake, B. C, Branch: A General Banking Business Transacted
Savings Department—Deposits received and interest allowed..
Drafts  sold available in all parts of Canada and the United States.    Special
attention given to Collections, Mining  Bonds and business transacted by
Mail.
E. K. BOULTBEE, Manager.
THE
Exchange Hotel
THE
IN KASLO
Keeps a line of Nerve Bracers
that are not surpassed in the
Golden West, and there is
not a Ci^ar in the house that
needs a windy day to smoke
it. Furnished Rooms always ready for the needy.
Poplar prospectors always
welcome and given the best.
JOHN KEEN
Notary  and  Commissioner
POPLAR AND KASLO.    .
EDWARD BAILLIE . A. N. VARS
Baillie, Vara & Go.
REAL ESTATE, MINING AND INSURANCE ACTS
POPLAR, B. C.
STRATHCONA
Hotel in Nelson has
no superior in West
Kootenay. Always
plenty of room for
Poplar millionaires.
B.   TOMKINS,  HANAOER. J (ALLEN    &   PALMER
Starkey & Co., ffiS-fc
Fruit Eggs, Bacon and other Provisions.
Nki.son, B. C.
A. R. Heyland, SffirlK.
veyor, Kaslo.
E.   Ferguson   & Co.
».,   1     .     . Nelson, B. C.
Wholesale dealers in  Wines,  Liquor*
and Cigars.    Agents for Pabst beer.
ii
LIKE THE OLD FRUIT FAIRS
ELEVENTH ANNUAL
JJ
GUST - ALMGREN
SPOKANE INTERSTATE FAIR
Spokane, October 3 to 9
With Large Displays in all Departments.
$2,000 Offered for Fruit and Fruit Exhibits.
More than $30,000 in Premiums and Prizes.
Five or More Exciting Races Each Day ; $12,000 in Purses.
Down Town Carnival Each Night.
Fifth Regiment British Artillery Band.
Free High Class Vaudeville Attractions Daily.
Fine Mineral Display, Dog Show, Art Exhibit, Etc.
Remember-Low Rates and Special Excursions on all Railroads.
•   , Privileges for Sale. Write for Premium List and Race Progrt
Concession rnvw^s*
ROBT. H. COSGROVE, SECRETARY AND MANAGER.
am
Has leased the dining room
of the KAISER HOUSE in
Poplar   and   serves    regular
meals at popular  prices.    A
trial will convince  the public
that the man behind the range
understands his business.
The Kaiser House
First Street, Poplar.
I J". H. LOVE
NELSON    EMPLOYMENT    AGENCY   I
;| Help   of  All   Kinds   Furnished
ON SHORT NOTICE p^^^ Poplar, B. C, September 16, 1904.
THE NUGGET.
w
Nelson Fair
Second Annual Exhibition of the Nelson Agricultural and Industrial
Association.
September 28-29
New Building-s
Fine Grounds
Big Premium List
Novel Open Air Attractions
Write for Prize List
J. E. ANNABLE, SEC.
NELSON, B. 0.
0. P. R. Officials Here.
On Saturday last Poplar was visited
by officials of the C, P. R., who came
up In a special train and stayed for
about fifteen minutes, but the town
was advised of their coming and some
samples of ore were brought down for
their inspection. The first pack train
of ore from the Spyglass had been unloaded at the depot about an hour before the arrival of the party and a number of Sacks were opened tor their inspection.
The party consisted of Robert Kerr,
passenger traffic manager. Montreal;
W. R. Maclnnes, freight traffic manager, Montreal; H. E. Macclonnell, general freight agent, Nelson; F, W.
Peters, assistant traffic manager, Winnipeg; E. J. Coyie, assistant passenger
agent, Vancouver; and J. S. Carter,
assistant passenger agent, Nelson.
The gentlemen were very much interested in the exhibit of ores presented
to them for inspection, and asked very
many questions as to the scope of the
territory covered by the mineral zones
in the camp, and were surprised at the
answers they received, and expressed
the hope thnt the prospectors would
soon be in a position to realize on their
properties, and that the present apparently dull times in the Lardo valley would soon pass away.
Another   thing   which   pleased   the
party was the variety of ores found in
the camp, including asbestos, thus
showing that its success depended not
only on one thing but many varieties
of ore, and now that the transportation
was ahead of the mines that this would
help them to reaPze sooner than otherwise would be the case.
The railway wanted tonnage and the
prospectors wanted profits. The one
would surely give the other to the
mutual advantage of both.
It was a pity that there was not time
to visit the prospects, but the party saw
sufficient lo give them great encouragement as to the future of the camp.
Road Superintendent Moore came in
on Wednesday's train and spent two
days looking over the needs of the
district in the way of roads  and   trails.
A Few Firsts.
The first census of Canada was taken
in 1665.
The first brewery in Canada was
built by Talon in Quebec in 1668.
First apples grown in Canada in
Nova Scotia in  1633.
The first steamship to cross the Atlantic was a Canadian built craft—the
Royal William—in 1833.
First steam railvvav built in Canada
in 1836.
Manitoba first settled in 1811 by 12b
Scotch settlers brought out by Lord
Selkirk.
First Canadian bank—the Bank of
Montreal—started in 1817.
First newspaper started in British
North America was the Halifax Gazette, March 23, 1752.
Few people can boast of a labor
record like that of Thomas Ross, a
Sunderland shipwright. He is 86
years of age and, with the exception of
a few weeks, owing to a strike, he has
worked continuously at Laing's shipyard for 72 years.
Nell—Jack is always   talking to  me
about the depth  of his  love.    Belle—
The   depth   wouldn't   interest
mucft as the length.
Talk about a rut all you please,
some people are never any ffood out
of one.
+099999999099999999999999*
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The
Grand
Hotel
POPLAR
Best Menu ia the City
Bed Rooms Large and
Comfortable"
We Sell Liquors
Just as Theij
Come from the
Wholesalers.
Jacobson & Anderson,
5
!
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ft
3
ft
I
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
McKinnon A
Sutherland
Carry the largest stock in
the Lardeau, including
Miners' and
Prospectors'
Suoplies,
Hardware,
Groceries,
Furnishings.
FERGUSON, B. C.
+0************00000000000+
SADDLE and PACK
ANIMALS
Supplies delivered to any • j
part  of   the   district   at
reasonable  rates.    Prospectors outfits moved and
Saddle Horses furnished.
The
Kaslo Hotel
Kaslo, B. C. I
Is a pleasant halting place ▼
for pilgrims on their way
to Poplar.
Cookie A Papwotrth
GEORGE    CHATAWAY
POPLAR, B. C.
E.HARROI
me   so
Lumber  and  Builders' Material,   Hftrdware   Granite-
ware, Stoves, Lamps. Tents,
 —— j       Paints Oils, Ktc , Etc.
Kootenay Railway and j ™)NT STREE1\ P0PLAR B c
Dost thou love life ? Then do nol
squander time, for that is the stuff life
is made of.
No man need hope to pass through
the pearly gates on the strength of the
epitaph on his tombstone.
34 MEN'S SUITS
AT COST FOR CASH
Naoigation Co. Ltd.
OPERATING
International Navigation and
Trading Company, Limited,
Kaslo and Slocan Railway
Ar. 4:2:, p, m
JLv. 2:00 p. m
Ar. 11:00 a. m
i.v.  8:00 a. m
Tickets sold to all par.softhe United
Slates and Canada via Great North
and O. R. & N. Company's lines.
For  further  particulars  call
address
K
& S. ItY.
Lv.
Ar.
8tfQ a
10:45 a
. m
. m
•
Sandon
Kas^o          j
*
STEAMER KASLO.
Lv,
Ar.
1:30 p.
4:80 p.
m.
m.
Kaslo
Nel.son
Notice of Forfeiture.
em
on   or
Come early and
We have only 34 of those fine suits hft.
Get your choice.   I	
We Have just received a large consignment of the well-known
Ames Holden Shoes.
We have everything that is wanted in the Mining Camp in
fhe way of Dynamite, Fuse, Caps, Picks, Drill Steel,
Shovels, and Groceries and Provisions.
Hats,  Caps, Overalls, Boots Shoes, etc., etc.
E. L. MASTERSON  -   POPLAR. B. C.
ROBERT IRVING,
Manager, Kaslo.
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
a went
No.
Certificate No. BWim ii.tenHi    •' .    .   Mi»«r,>
the date hereof^cam v t  ' ? xtK{aY" ''<»'
cpnlerforaCefcScK of L^ M,nil,« **
the niirnnuo nt „k*" ,_*V. 0|  ""lavements, fm
the purpose of obtaining a (
the above claims "
vements, for
•own Grant for
TO WILLIAM SCHNELL. GEORGE IIAOER-
M AN. or to any person or penons to whom
they may have transferred their interest
in the Cornell mineral claim, situate on
Hie noith-We»t side of .Rapid creek, in the
Hour   Lake  Mining    Division   of   West
Kootenay Dint riot.
You-ure hereby notified that I have expend-
edth-sum  of rlOO.QO in assessment  work on
tbe above claim, together with-:.'.">ii for recording the same, such work being required
ami necessary to the said olaim for tbe year*
1008-4, ending August nth. i!H>4, under the provisions  of  tbe Mineral Act and Amending
Acts; and if at the expiration of ninety day*
from the date of tbe first   publication of this
notice in  Tbe Nugget,  vou fail  or refuse to
contribute your portion of suoh expenditure.
namely tftl.afi, together with nil costs pf Advertising, your interest in said mineral olaiM
■ball beoome vested in me, (yoiu co-owner)
"Ixmi tiling in the proper office in that behalf
the urlidavit required i>v section 4 ol the
Mineral Act Assessment Act, 1800.
hater! Ibis laffch day of August, A. !>• WOt
HENRY MAGNUSSON.
Kaiser House, Poplar. JB. C,
Attorney in fact for Minnie Munz.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
vo
pei
hit
And further take noting Hi,,+ .   Ai
section 87,muHtboVomrn«,w    i i ttPtlo"i "»>der
ance of such fJertffifof1?^ £«'<>« the torn-
Dated this 4th , ay of Anl ,TrrVrme,,ts'
VICTOR  ROMAN, or to any person or
>ersoiis to whom he may have transrerrea
lis interest in the Klondike mineral olaUn
situate on Tenderfoot creek, in the I',,)1U
hake Mining Division of West Kootanaj
District
You are hereby notified that we have expended the sum of j-200 in assessment werKon
the above- claim, to. ether with tfi.00 for recording tbe same, such  work being require"
and necessary to ihe said claim for the years
lUOMand 1WW-4, ending September tod, J ' ,'
under the provisions of tbo Mineral Act ana
Amending Acts; and if at the expiniM<>n°
ninety days from the expiration of the BW'
puMmationofth s notice in The Nugget, ,yo
hill or refuse to contribute your portioi <j
siyb   expenditure, namely, W&*U  *oge* ?,
with all costs of advertising your interest
raid mineral claim shall become veste«i  »'
usi (your co-owners) upon filing in the j>ro|*>
office in that behalf tbe affidavits required DJ
section 4 of the Mineral Act Assessment au<
1000. ,
Dated this Snd day of September, A. uJP'
HKNHYMAGNlbs^W'
HEN LAVVSON.
Eric Strand.

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