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Slocan Mining Review Dec 26, 1907

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I ��� w
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*-.���:���*.....
T>voted to Advertising the
Mineral Resources and Large
Print growing Area in the
fertile Slocan Valley.
Slocati Mining Review.
Printed in New Denver, the
Beauty Spot of the Continent
and the Huh of the richest
Silver-Lead District on Earth.
No. 18   Vol. 2.
NEW DENVER, British Columbia, Thursday, Dec. 26, 1907.
Single Copies 5c.
When the curtain rolled up at the
OBiin Hull on Xmas Eve, a great wave
applause was spontaneously drawn
from the largo audience assembled to
witness tho performance of " The Four
Leaved Clover " by tbe children of New
Denver, The stage was a blaze of color
and tho mingling of the gorgeous costumes sfforded a preliminary spectacle
that lbs audience were unprepared for,
and the applause which followed only
subsided when Mr. T. T. Rankine raised
his baton for the opening chorus, and
then there burst forth eighty childish
voices in such exquisite melody that
the listener- sat spell-bound. It must
be recorded that the effort of Mr. and
Mrs. Rankine to arrange the music,
adapt the dialogue, create tbe costumes,
drill the company, and, in fact, bear the
burden of tbo whole production, was a
prodigious one, but they arose to the
great voluntary Etrain, and how tbey
scored a brilliant success will never be
forgotten by all privileged to be present.
The operetta hss a swing and go wilh
it that it ia indeed surprising that the
younger perlormers could so unerringly
take up their queues, and even if there
were any errors in this respect they
ware nnperceived by tbe audience.
The scene of the pretty plot ia laid in
Spain, and the various episodes and
eubsi-qutnt happy ending are woven
around tlie disappearance of the first
born daughter of Isabella, Countess of
Agullar, who when the Btorv opens has
blossomed iuto sweet maidenhood and
is queen of a band of gypsies. The
countess is blessed with another daughter, tho Lady Inez, who at this time
is also grown up and bc.tutiful enough
to attract many noble aspirants to her
fair hand, and Don Carlos *a Spanish
guest and Sir Ronald Graeme, a Scot-
is!) knight, arc the more favored���the
lady eventually choosing the former
amid great rejoicing. But scarse bas
the betrothal been announced, when
the castle is again plunged into grief
by . tbe mysterious disappearance of
Lady Inez and her maid. By this time
there arrived at tbe castle gates a
German deaf and dumb boy and his
sister Gretchen, seeking charity. These
are bearers of a potent charm, the four-
leaved clover, and these they dispense
to all in trouble. By the aid of the
charm a deadly feud begun by the rival
lovers is vanished, and together they
go forth in search of the lost lady.
Suspicion falls upon a roving band of
gypsies, who have been prowling around
the neighborhood, and proclamations
are read calling upon the peasants lo
arm themselves. Tlie army is mobilized
and all made ready for a midnight
raid upon the gypsies' encampment.
The audience is then  taken  to the
gypsies' camp,   where they are entcr-
** tained  with   some   pretty   songs  and
dances,   after which follows  the raid
and the reecuo of tho ladies.
Still the heart of the Countess yearns
for her first-born, thc Lndy Hinda, and
faring the preparation? for the postponed wedding festivities she. is approached
in the castle garden by Fedalmn, an old
gypsy hag, who relenting: imparts to
her the joyous message that the long
lust Lady Hinda is alive snd is thc
queen of the gypsy tribe who recently
also kidnapped her other daughter.
The reunion follows amid great rejoicing, and tho happy ending i. consummated with a dual wedding.
Special words of praise aro duo to
-��� ��� 'AgneB Ostby, wboBe portrayal of
Gretchen was cleverly enacted. She
has a voice of great range and promiso
which if properly tended will ono day
be worth a fortune. Her solos wore a
delight to the audience. As Hinda,
queen of the gypsies, Marie Murray yon
the hearts ef all. Her dances and songs
wore delightful. Ethel Burgess as the
Lady Inez was very good. Her acting
was free and well to the character.
Rusanna was well played by Miss Jessie
Cropp, nnd the Countess Isabella of
Atblyn Vallance was   pleasing.    Ter
haps the most difficult part to be pby
was that of Fedalma, tbe gipsy hag,
which was really cleverly undertaken
by Winifred McDougall..-Mildred Mohr
received great applause for her gracefa't
dancing. Of the male performers, the
character of Don Sebastian, as p'-syed
bv Earl Nelson, was exceptionally good,
as also were Dick Blumenaue and Frank
Lindsay as Don Carlos and Sir Ronald
Graham. Quite the funniest thing we
have ever seen performed by juveniles
was the Captain Murillo of Hubert
Mclnness and the Burgomaster of Arlie
Williams. The drilling of the regiment
by the former evoked roars of laughter,
and the alliterative pompous address
of the latter was extremely funny. Sergeant Alfonso was well played by Charlie Nelson, not " the " Charlie, but his
nephew. Great praise is due Percy
Ransom and Denver Shannon for the
capable manner in which Ihey handled
tbe'parts of Donald and Pedro, and to all
the soldiers, peasants, gipsies, aud
Japanese troupe. Little Ivan Brouse
as Gluck-Auf, the German sprite, was a
great success, he playing a most important part with credit. Mazetto and
Macaroni, two desperate robbers, were
portrayed very well by Ernie and Willie
Atherton, both their solos apparently
greatly pleased Ihe audience. When
the curtain was rung down on the last
act, a scene of wild enthusiasm prevailed witb tho audience. Calls for
" Rankine " and " btavos " were heard
from all parts of the bouse. It was a
gigantic, giorioUB success. Again and
again the curtain was raised, but still
the tumultous applause was unabating,
and at last Mr. Rankine, his face glowing with justifiable pride, advanced to
the front, baton in band, and rapped
for Willie Atherton to sing the last
verse of " Good bye, Hinda dear " once
again, whi.h was doue in a manner
that warmed the cocklai of Jay-Jay's
heart towards bis " devil," and amid
continued enthusiasm the curtain was
finally rung down.
A special word of praise is to be forthcoming for tlie costumes. They were
rich, magnificent, Buperb. Their manufacture casts tbe highest reflection
upon the ladies who worked under the
supervision of Mrs. Rankiue. The
scenes were also excellent, the gypsy
encampment being exceptionally so.
To Mr. anl Mrs. T. T. Rankine iB
due the most lavish congratulations
that the par-jnls snd citizens generally
can bestow upon them. For the past
two months they bave worked assiduously early and late to achieve the
ultimate triumph, and at the finish
almost to tho verge of collapse; indeed,
at the conclusion Mri. Rankine hart a
short fainting spell when the curtain
Dually dropped. This talented lady is
a Royal Academician, so those not privileged tj witness the operetta will
better understand that a genuine musical fesBt wss given. We would like tp
see this gorgeous production staged
again in the near future, and in this we
but echo the wish of the community.
It would give great pleasure to many
if the performance could be given in
Nelson or Revelstoke.
A happy New Year, kids!
A happy New Year, Mr. nnd Mrs.
Rankine I   New Denver is proud of you.
Slocan %%kci fvuit %m\b��
��� None   I
Better  I	
|�� For Full InforWlon write
S. M. BRIDGES
Imperial Bank Block f.   NELSON, B.C
None
So Fertile
i
Bvrtjoea. 3Blaftemore 8. Cameron,
"��� LTD.
A Communication.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Nakusp Dramatic Club will give
their minstrel show in New Denver on
Now Years eve. It is expected that a
crowd from Nakusp will go over with
the boys and a good time will be tho
password. So look out New Denver, we
will be out for a time.
A happy New Year I
19081   What bas it in store for tbe
Slocan ?
Our old friend the Kootenaian com-
Bosun Hall - 4 New Denver
Tuesday Next, December 31, 1907.
I " Nil ���s^iS���ii^i,,.^^^���W^���^���SIWW
I lit?
Dramatic.
Under the Direction* of Joe Melrose,
Cast:
Sassafras Jackson D. T. Bulger
Sleepy Snowball  R. Abbie
Rufus Johnson  J. Melrose
Slewfoot White .* J. Dougald
Interlocutor R. H. Baird
R. H. Clarke Baritone      D. Crosby Baritone
P. Routley  Tenor      A. D. Harris Basso
W. J. Williams Tenor      F. Swires   Tenor
Opening Chorus :
" Why Can't a Girl be a Soldier ? " Entire Circle
Comicalities Jackson and Johnson
"Noah "  D. Crosby
" Hard Drinks "    Sleepy Snowball
" Montana " F. Routley
" Troubles "  Slewfoot White
" How It Happened " Rufus Johnson
'' When the Rent Comes Round "  A. D. Harris
" Pipe Dreams " ' * Sassafras Jackson
" When the Fields are white with Daisies" F. Swires
" Bunch of Junk " Sleepy Snowball
" Its Up to You "  Sassafras Jackson
" If the Man in the Moon were a Coon " R. Clarke
"Incidentals"    Slewfoot White
'' Little Bit of Nonsense " Rufus Johnson
" Buts " Sassafras Jackson
Some of the women of Silverlon, who
have lived here a number of years, and
who have "held our peace" simply
through fear of harsh criticism and of
making enemies and doing no good,
and who would likely bave kept the
same course if a Minister of thc Gospel
had not been attacked, and in such a
manner as to represent us all as being I mented ,a8t WMk up(ja ^ ���,,
of the same opinion,) have talked the'-
matter over concerning ths present agitation, and have* advised witb some of
the men whose judgment we thought
could be depended upon, and we have
decided to ask those who will willingly
and can concientiously sign something
like the following statements to meet
at the Protestant Church at 2.S0 o'clock
to-morrow, (December 24th),
To the Editor of the Review:
We, the undersigned women of Silverton, although we hesitate to "rush
into print" with our  difficulties, yet,
for fear tbat has been printed will leave
an unjust Impression, wish to make it
known: that while  we greatly deplore
the conditions that have at times existed in our midst, and while we feel that
existing  conditions  nave  been somewhat unjustly represented, and that if
it were possible we would have liked to
have adjusted  matters   without such
publicity, yet we want it distinctly understood tbat the letter published in the
Nelson Daily News,  and signed by a
Mr. Pitt, iB NOT a fair representation of
the sentiment of the people of Silverton.
We feel that it remains to be seen
whether or not the Rev. Gifford is taking the course that will eveutually bring
about the desired results; but we also
feel assured that he is doing what he
deems to be right, and his duty, and
that if he has made any assertions that
cannot be corroborated, it is because he
has  been wrongly informed   and   by
someone whose statements he supposed
could be relied upon.
We consider that it is as little as we
can do to assist any one in their efforts
to aid us, if no better way, by at least
giving credit where credit is dne.
And we also wish to .make it known
above all else, that we are not without
men in our midst who are  in unison
witb us in this matter.
Signed by:
MRS. WM. HUNTER,
MRS. N. F. McNAUGHT,
MRS. T. H. WILSON,
MRS. HUGH BUCKLEY,
MKS. F. F. LIEBSCHER,
MRS. N. MACKINNON,
MRS. A. A. WEBB,
MRS. GEO. LONG,
'' OHIO ' '���Pickaninny Quartette Melrose, 1st base; Clarke, 2nd base; Routley, Srd base; Swires, short stop.
FARCE: ~ "Too Much Discipline"
SONG:...." Love Me and the World is Mine ".... R. H. Baird
SONG:...." Where the Morning Glory Twines " R. Clarke
FARCE: -V-* ������Dissection"
NOTES FROM NAKUSP.
Dance after Performan&e.    -   150 Laughs in 150 Minutes.
God Save the King - Prices, 2, 4* 6-
Scarce had tho spectators time to
settle themselves again, when the tooting of a horn on tlie etreet announced
tbe advent of Santa Clans, aud a moment later that gentleman entered thc
room to lho great edification of tlie
youngsters, and soon tho time-honored
custom of stripping the trees was in
progress. As usual there were two, and
every child in town received a present.
At Sandon the Christmas tree entertainment was held on Monday evening
and a largo crowd was present to give
children a good time.
At Slocan City the Children's Xmas
tree and entertainment was successfully
brought off on Christmas night at the
opera house before a large cro.vd. The
main feature of tho evenin*. was the successful production of a three-act play,
Cinderella, and a "Good Night" tableau by the little tote.
At last the " fleecy " baa arrived and
Slocan Land District���District of We received   a communication this
Weat Kootenay, week   in   wb!ch  we  were  accused  of  *e first putter made its appearance mi
Take notice tbat Martha Ann Smith " uncharilableness."      We    can  only
of New Denver, B.C., married woman, a(*d ��� Peop.. ,,. _,... hoa8M B,l0uld.nt
Xmas day.      Harry    Lowe   held  the
ribbons and ye editor's life in his bands.
intends to apply for permission to   purchase tlie   following    described  land:  throw stones.
Commencing at a   post planted on   the
noith  boundary   of  timber lease  435,     A    seasonable    poem   by  Missioner
near the Nakusp and Slocan Ry.,  Mar-  Baynes ���.*��� appoar hext weelCi
lha Ann Smith S.E. corner planted  on
the north boundary of  timber lease 435    ���-
and at the south west corner of timber
litnitwhich wna numbered 8678; thence       Slocan Land Distiict���District of
north 60 chain*', tlience west 10 cliains West Kootenay
more or It ss to  the east  boundary of
Notice*
Being holiday week our staff
has taken a rest, therefore we
go to press with this issue to fill
the requirements of the Act governing the publication of Land
[and Umber notices.
���cnase Take notice that Henry Allen McMil"
thenco soutiToo,"chains to the north Ian, of Nelson B.C., occupation rancher,
boundary of timber lease 435, thence intends to apply for permission to pur-
East 10 chains more or less to the place cna the fonow\ng described lands.
of commencement and  containing  ou
...ui.   ur     ii..n   w     ....    ...
Bertha Wiagge application to purchase
"   ""  cha!--   '-   '*"*   ��������**
Mildred Mohr fell down stairs Friday
and injured Stege'a dining-room dour
jamb.
Twonty-three years in the printing
trade has not-changed tho opinion formed the fust year that starling work
after Cluistmas ��b not what it is cracked up to be.
Things are getting interesting in the
anti-booze arena.    The   ladies arc now
acres more or leas.
December 6th, 1907,
MARTHA ANN SMITH.
J. B. Smith, agent,
chase   the   following   described lands
Commencing at   a post on the  S.W.
corner of lot  lot 7868,   thence north 40 out, for scalps, and they claim they are
chains,  thonce west 20 chains, thence not play ing a lone hand
1
Kaslo Land District���District
West Kootenay.
Tnko notice that George Henderson,
of Slocnn, B.C., rancher, intends to apply for a special timber license over
the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted on Goat
creek about 2 miles easterly from tho
N E  corner of Lot 7101, thence enst 120
south 40 chains, thence enst 20 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
80 acres. v_
Nov. 28th, 1907,
18-12   HENRY ALLEN McMILLAN
Appreciation of services was expressively shown in New Denver on Saturday by a gang of young English workmen (mason crew from Alamo) calling
on their way to Bteamer for Nelson, to
visit Missionary Baynes, and inviting
him to dinner at the Newmarket hotel,
Slocan Land District���District of
West Kootenay. 	
Take notice that Clare Lilian Drewry, Before leaving they visited St. Stephen's
of Nelson, B.C. intends to apply  for c*lllrc*.. where a short seivice was held
                        permission to  purchase  tho   following com.1|K,illg  with lhe hymn, " Onward
chains,  Ihence south 80 chain,, thence descI.*bed   lands*     Commencing   at a an-���oldiers,���    A  photograph ot
west 40 chains thence  north 40 chains,   p09t panted at the S.W. cornerof   lot -unriSHan no       ��             i              e
Zee wet 80 chains, tbence north  40 8352, thence south   20   chains,  thence the paity was afterwards taken by one
Shall��to  be point of  commencement,   enst 40 chains, thence north 20 chains of the gang in  remembrance of the En-
S*i��ta��6��   acres more or  less,   thence west 20  chains, containing   VO gliBh Church Mission and their ��steem-
andt��       UKORGE HENDERSON,      ��*>_?���_   _____   ,������, ed friend in charge, who upon several
November 1-3, 1907.
acres.
Nov. 28th, 1907
18-13
Ith, 1907. -- -.*       .
CLARE LILIAN DREWRY      occasions hell .eivic.l In th'.ir camp.
The minstrel show given here by the
Nakusp Dramatic Club was one of the
greatest treats tbe people of Nakusp
have ever enjoyed. Not a dull moment
from the rise of tbe curtain until the
finish. The songs, jokes and farces all
went with a vim and the costumes wero
beautiful. In tbe circle the boys were
all dressed in white shirts, white duck
trousers with red Bashes and red ties,
Mr. Baird the interlocutor being in
evening dress. Tlie circle was composed
of Messrs. Clark, Oroisby, Dougall,
Swires, Harris and Routley. The end
men, Messrs. Bulger, Abbie, Jordan and
Melrose wero costumed in red and white
check suits. The success of the performance was due principally to Mr.
Melrose who was the life of tlie show.
He had his men trained to perfection,
and when the crowd ge to New Denver
on New Year's eve, all those who attend
will certainly got two hours of solid enjoyment.
Tlie Xmas trees held in tho Presbyterian Church on Monday evening, was
a great success. All the children taking part did very nicely and the tree
was loaded with preseuts for both old
and young,
On Xmas eve Mr. and Mrs. LnBrash
of the Grand Hotel, gave an enjoyable
dance.
Rev, M. Danby was at Burton on
Xmas eve and united in the bonds of
matrimony Mies Hogg and Mr. Clark
Marshall.
Rev. Mr. Johnston held a Christmas
service iu the church of England on
Xmas day which was well attended.
appearance of the past two
iBBues. It also comments unfeelingly upon the " stale telegraphic news " in the
issue of tho 12th, Now, if our 'steemed
cotems' editors paid more attention to
detail and lesa to making goo goo eyes
to the girls across the street tbey would
have noticed that the date of our paper
was tbe 12th and the despatches the
13th, and if tbat isn't swift enough,
show us. No other paper in the wont
can equal us in getting news twenty-
four hours before it happens. Compliments of the season, my gay young
slow-worms.
The Ball held on Thursday last
was voted by many to have been the
jolliest of tlie season.
We understand the Quadrille Club
is likely to hold a masquerade ball in
the near future.
Necdlesa to remark���White got a goat
off the Christmas tree,
" Enclosed find one dollar, for which
send along your dirty rag for another
Bix months," writes a Silverton subscriber this week. All right, Bob; no
kick coining. Wo got the mou. Hit us
again, somebody.
Miss McArdle, principal of Sandon
school, is spending Xmas with her parents at Vancouver,   She will return. *
Mrs. Williams wishes her patrons a
bright and prosperous New Year, and
begs to thank them for the patronage so
liberally extended during the past year.
P. J. and Mrs. Gallagher have returned from the east.
Mrs. Gordon and family left for Nelson on a holiday last Thursday.
-The Review staff acknowledges with
thanks the receipt of a case of specially
brewed beer from Messrs. Towgood and
Bruder, a box of choice cigars from C.
F. Nelson, a cut glass decanter from T.
H. Iloben, and a grip with ivory insertions from Bobs Jacobson,
All the merchants roport good Bales
during tbe holidays.
A large number of Silverton citizen!
came in Tuesday evening to witness the
children's performance.
One of the boys from the Standard
made that good old Xmas mistake of
lifting the wrong parcel at a Silverlon
store.   He retnrned to the mine with a
ladioB silk blouse.   The lady got	
but tbey were too long in the sleeves
for wearing in public. As we valne our
hide, we dare not ray more than that
the culprit Ib from codfish country and
bis name isn't McTcllum.
G. H. Aston who for some time wag
stationed here, came in from Midway
on Christmas day to renew old acquaintances.   He looks younger ' than ever.
Bert Hilton is in from the boundary
to f pend the holidays.
Some of the boys down from the
mines for a dnya frolic aro still wilh u��.
Strange they don't want their arrival
chronicled, ->'
It is highly probable that the New
Denver children will be taken to Sandon
on Friday evening next to give their
performance of the "Four Leaved Clover" at tbe Opera bouse. If satisfactory arrangements now ponding aro
made, we can sst-uio our many Sandon
friends that the performance will bo
well worth witnessing.
We object to tho girls coming into
our sanctum to apark Wilbe, Ever
since we put him in long pants our lifo
has been a misery.
Wi'l Jefft-ry is spending the holidays
at Spokane.
Arthur Hendt ickson has struck two
feet of high-grade oro at the Neepewn.
A man was Been taking a drink in
Silverton on Xmas Day. Where are the
police?
For the first lime in the history of the
camp, midnight mass was celebrated i
New Denver on Xmns Eve.
in
  At its conclusion a purse containing $f*0 wns
presented to Fr Jtani ot tc by liisfnci _'_, 1
THE  SLOCAN MINING REVIEW,  SANDON,  B.   0.
t*9tf9*%*9*9*9*m*%*9*%*9*9*9*99*9*9*9*9*i I
AIKENSIDE;;
��� ��� ���
BY MARY J. HOL/IES
Author of "Dora Deane," "The English Orphans/'
"Lena Rivers," "The Rector of St. Mark's,"
"Tempest and Sunshine," Etc
(Continued)
���*Jtiy. -una���:t_ ttocTov came closely
to him, whispering huskily, "you and
I are murderers in the first degree.
Yes; and both deserve to be hung. Do
you remember that Madeline -Clyde
whom you insulted with your logic
and Latin verbs? She'd set her heart
on that certificate. She wanted the
money, not for new gowns and fooleries, mind, but to help her old
grandfather pay his debts. His place
is mortgaged. I don't understand it;
but he asked some old hunks to lend
him the money, and the miserly rascal, whoever be was, refused. I wish
I had it. I'd give it to him out and
out. But that's nothing to do with
the girl���Maddy, they call her. The
disappointment killed her, and Bhe is
dying���is raving crazy���and keeps
talking of that confounded examination. I tell you, Guy, my inward parts
got terribly mixed up when I hear her
talk, and my heart thumps like a triphammer. That's the reason I have
not been up to Aikenside. I wouldn't
leave Maddy so long as there was
hope. I did not tell them thiB morning. I couldn't make that poor couple
feel worse than they are feeling; but
when I looked at her tossing from
side to side and picking at the bedclothes, I knew it would soon be over
���that when I snw her again the poor
little arms would be still enough and
the bright eyes shut forever. Guy, I
couldn't see het die���I don't like to
see anybody die, but her, Maddy, of
all others���and so I came away. If
you stay long enough, you'll hear the
bell toll, I reckon. There is none at
Honedale Church, which they attend.
They are Episcopalians, you see. and
so they'll come up here may be. I
hope I shall be deafer than an adder."
Here the doctor stopped, wholly out
of breath, while Guy for a moment sat
without speaking a single word. Jessie, in his hearing, had told her mother what the sick girl if the doctor's
office had said about b.ftg poor and
wanting the money for grandpa, while
Mrs, Noah had given him a rather exaggerated account of Mr. Markham's
visit; but he had not associated the
two together until now, when lie saw
the whole, and almost as much as the
doctor himself regretted the part he
had had in Maddy's illness and her
grandfather's distress.
"Doe," he said, laying his hand on
the doctor's arm, "1 am that old
hunks, the miserly rascal who refused
the money. I met the old man going
home that day, und he asked me for
help. You say the place must be sold.
It never shall, never. I'll see to that,
and you must save the girl."
"I can't, Guy. I've done all I can,
and now, if she lives, it will be wholly
owing to the prayers that old saint
of a grandfather says for her. I
never thought much of these things
until' I heard him pray; not that she
should live anyway, but that, if it were
right, Maddy might not die. Guy,
there'B something in such a prayer as
that. It's more powerful than all my
medicine swallowed at one grand
gulp."
Guy didn't know very much about
praying then, and so he did not respond, but he thought of Lucy Atherstone, whose life was one hymn of
prayer and praise and he wished she
could know of Maddy, and join her
petitions with those of the grandfather. Starting suddenly from his
chair, he exclaimed, "I am going
down there. It will look queerly, too,
to go alone. Ah, I have it I I'll drive
back to Aikenside for Jessie, who has
talked so much of the girl that her
lady mother, forgetting that she was
once a teacher, is disgusted. Yes, I'll
take Jessie with me, but you must
order it; you must say it is good for
her to ride, and, Hal, give me some
medicine for her, just to quiet AgneB,
no matter what, provided it's not
strychnine."
Contrary to Guy's expectations,
Agnes did not refuse to let Jessie go
for a ride, particularly as she had
no suspicion where he intended taking her, and the little girl was soon
seated by her brother's side, chatting
merrily of the different things they
passed upon the road But when Guy
told her where they were going, and
why they were going there, the tears
came at once into her eyes, and hiding her face in Guy's lap, she sobbed
bitterly.
"I did like her so much that day,"
she said, "and she looked so sorry,
too. It's terrible to die!"
Then-she plied Guy with questions
concerning Maddy's probable future.
"Would she'go lo heaven, sure?" and
when Guy answered at random,
"Yes," she asked, "How did he knowf
Had he beard that Maddy was that
kind of good which lets folks in heaven? Because, Brother Guy," and the
little preacher nestled olosely to the
young man, fingering his coat buttons
a3 she talked, "because, Brother Guy,
folks can be good���that is, not do
naughty things- and still God won't
love them unless they���I don't know
what, I wish I did."
Guy drew her nearer to him, but to
that childish yearning for knowledge
he could not respond, so he said:
"Who taught you all this, little
one?���not your mother, surely."
"No, not mamma, but Miriam, the
waiting-maid we left in Boston. She
told me about it, and taught me to
pray different from mamma. Do you
pray, Brother Guy?"
The question startled the young
man, who was glad his coachman
spoke to him just then, asking if he
should drive through Devonshire village, or go direct to Honedale by a
shorter route.
They would go to the village, Guy
said, hoping that thus the doctor
might be persuaded to accompany
them. This diverted Jessie's mind,
and she said no more of praying; but
the first tiny grain was sown, the
mustard seed, which should hereafter
spring up into a mighty tree, the indirect result of Maddy's disappointment and almost fatal illness. They
found the doctor nt home and willing
to go with them. Indeed, so unnerved
had he become listening for the first
stroke of the boll which was to herald
the death he deemed so sure, that he
was on the point of mounting his
horse and galloping off alone, when
Guy's invitation came. It was five
miles from Devonshire to Honedale,
and n'*jen they reached a hill which
lay half-way between, they stopped for
s few minutes to rest the tired horse?.
Suddenly,  as   t_; y  snj.    waU.ing,    s
snarp, r.-.iguig ram Terr on*mer?*eaTs,
and grasping Guy's knee, the doctor
said, "I told you so; Madeline Clyde
is dead."
Jt was the village bell, and its
twice three strokes betokened that it
tolled for somebody youthful, Bome-
body young, like Maddy Clyde. Jessie
wept silently, but there were no tears
in the eyes of the young men, as with
beating hearts they sat listening to
the slow, solemn sounds which came
echoing up the hill. There was a
pause; the sexton's dirgelike task was
done, and now it only remained for
him to strike the age, and tell how-
many years the departed one had
numbered.
"One, two, three, four, five, six,
seven, eight, nine, ten." Jessie counted it aloud, while Svery stroke fell
like a heavy blow upon the hearts of
the young men, who a few weeks ago
knew not that such as Maddy Clyde
had ever had existence.
How long it seemed before another
stroke, and Guy was beginning to
hope they'd heard the last, when
again the dull, muffled sound came
floating on the air, and Dr. Hol-
brook's black, bearded lip half quivered as he now counted aloud, "One,
two, three, four, five."
That was all; there it stopped; and
vain were all their listenings to catch
another note. Fifteen years, and only
fifteen had passed over the form now
forever still.
"She was fifteen," Guy whispered,
remembering distinctly to have heard
that number from Maddy herself.
"I thought they told me fourteen,
but of course it's she," the doctor
rejoined. "Poor ehild, I would have
given much to have saved her."
Jessie did not talk ,* only once, when
she asked Guy, if it was very far to
heaven, and if he supposed Maddy
had got there by this time.
"We'll go just the same," said Guy.
"I will do what I can for the old
man;" and so the carriage drove on,
down tho hill, across the meadow-
land, and past a low-roofed house
whose walh inclosed the stiffened
form of him for whom the bell had
tolled, the boy, fifteen years of age.
who had been the patient of anothet
than Dr. Holbrook.
Maddy was not dead, but the paroxysm of restlessness had passed,
and she lay now in a heavy sleep so
nearly resembling death that they who
watched, waited expectantly to see
the going out of her last breath. Never
before had a carriage like that from
Aikenside stopped at that humble
cottage, but the neighbors thought it
tame merely to bring the doctor,
whom they welcomed with a glad
smile, making a way for him to pass
to Maddy's bedside. Guy preferred
waiting in the carriage until such
time as Grandpa Markham could
speak with him, but Jessie went with
the doctor into the sick room, startling even the f 'andmother, and
causing her to wor .er who the richly
dressed child could be.
"Dying, doctor," said one of the
women affirmatively, not interrogatively; but the doctor shook his head,
and holding in one hand his watch,
he counted thc faint pulse beats as
with his eye he measured off the
minute.
"There are too many here," he said.
"She needs the air you are breathing," and in his singular, authoritative way, he cleared the crowded
room of the mistaken friends who
wore unwittingly breathing up Maddy's very life.
All but the grandparents and Jes-
���tie; these he suffered to remain, and
itting down by Maddy, watched till
the long sleep was ended. Silently and
tamestly the aged couple prayed for
heir darling, asking that, if possible,
ihe might be spared, and God heard
their prayers, li ting, at last, the
heavy fog from Maddy's brain, and
waiting her to life and partial consciousness. It was Jessie who first
caught the expression of the opening
eyes, and darting forward, Bhe exclaimed. "She's waked up, Dr. Holbrook. She will live."
Wonderingly Maddy looked at her,
and then as n confused recollection
of where they had met before crossed
her mind, Bhe smiled and said:
"Where am I now? Have I never
come home, nnd is this Dr. Hol-
brook's office?"
"No, no; it's home, your home, and
you are getting well," JesBie cried,
bending over the bewildered girl. "Dr.
Holbrook has cured you, and Guy is
here, and I, and "
"Hush, you disturb her," the doe-
tor said, gently pulling Jessie away,
and himself asking Maddy bow she
felt.
She did not recognize him. She only
had a vague idea that he might be
seme doctor, but not Dr. Holbrook,
sure; not the one who so puzzled and
tortured her on n day which seemed
now so far behind. From the white-
haired man kneeling by the bedside
there was a burst of thanksgiving for
the life restored, nnd then Grandpa
Markham tottered from the room, out
into the open air, which had never
fallen so refreshingly on his tired
frame as it fell now, when he first
knew that Maddy would live. He did
not care for his homestead; that
might go, and he still be happy with
Maddy left. But He who had marked that true disciple's every sigh,
had another good in store, willing it
so that both should come together,
even as the two disappointments had
come hand in hand.
From the soft cushions of his carriage, where he sat reclining, Guy
Remington saw the old man as he
came out, nnd alighting at once, he
accosted him pleasantly, and then
walked with him to the garden, where,
on a rustic bench, built for Maddy
beneath the cherry trees. Grandpa
Markham sat down to n-st. From
speaking of Madeline it was easy to
go back to the day when Guy had
first met grandpa, whose application
for money he had refused.
"I have thought better of it
since," he said, "and am sorry I did
not accede to your proposal. One object of my coming here to-day was to
say that my purse is at your disposal. You can have as much as you
wish, paying me whenever you like,
and the house will not be sold. Slocum, I understand, holds the mortgage. I will see him to-morrow and
stop the whole proceedings."
Guy Bpoke rapidly, determined to
make a clean b ,ist of ^ _bt'J grand*
pa unrrersTOOQ~ mm, _nia*MioW*.:t*r r*.s
white head upon his bosom, the big
tears dropped like rain upon the turf,
while his lips quivered, first with
thanks to the Providence who had
truly done all things well, and next
with thanks to his benefactor.
"Blessings on your head, young
man, for making me so happy. You
are worthy of your father, and he was
the best of men."
"My father���did you know him?"
Guy asked in some surprise, and then
the story came out, how, years before,,
when a city hotel was on fire, and
one of the guests in imminent dangei
from the locality of his room, and his
own nervous fear which made him
powerless to act, another guest braved
fearlessly the hissing flame, and
scaling the tottering wall, dragged out
to life and liberty one who, until that
hour, was to him an utter stranger.
Pushing back his snowy hair.
Grandfather Markham showed upou
his temple a long, white sear, obtained tbe night when he periled hi*?
own life to save that of another. There
was a doubly warm pressure now ol
the old man's hand, as Guy replied
"I've heard that story from fathet
himself, but the name of his preserv
er had escaped me. Why didn't yon
tell me who you were?'"
"I thought 'twould look too much
like demanding it as a right���too
much like begging, and I s'pose I felt
too proud. Pride is my besetting sin���
the one I pray most against."
#luy looked keenly now at the man
whose besetting sin was pride, and as
he marked the cheapness of his at
tire, his pantaloons faded and short,
his coat worn threadbare and shabby,
his shoes both patched at the toes, hiB
cotton shirt minus a bosom, and then
thought ol \he humble sottage, with
its tew rocky acres, he wondered of
what lie could be proud.
Meantime, for _>iaddy, Dr. Holbrook^
bad prescribed perfect quiet, bidding
them darken again the window from
which the shade had been removed,
and ordering all save the grandmother to leave the room and let the
patient sleep, if possible. Even Jessie was not permitted to stay, though
Maddy clung to her as to a dear
friend. In a few whispered words
Jessie had told her name, saying she
came from Aikenside, and that her
Bi other Guy was there, too, outdoors,
in the carriage. "He heard how sick
you were ut Devonshire, this morning, and drove right home for me to
come to see you. I told him of you
that day in the jflice, and that's why
he brought me. I guess. You'll like
Guy. I know all tlie girls do���he's
so good."
Sick and weary as she was, and
unable as yet to comprehend the entire meaning of all she heard, Maddy
was conscious of a thrill of pride in
knowing that Guy Remington, from
Aikenside. was interested in her, and
had brought his sister to see her.
Winding her feeble arms around Jessie's neck, she kissed the soft, warm
cheek, and said, "You'll come again,
I hope."
"Yes, every day, if mamma will
let me. I don't mind it a bit, if you
are poor."
"Tut, tut, little tattler!" and Dr.
Holbrook, who, unseen by the children had all the while been standing
near, took Jessie by the arm. "What
makes you think them poor?"
In the closely shaded room Maddy
could see nothing distinctly, but she
heard Jessie's reply: "Because the
plastering comes down so low, and
-Maddy's pillows are so teenty, not
much'bigger than my dolly's. But I
love her; don't you, doctor "
Through the darkness the doctor
caught the sudden flash of Maddy's
eyes, and something impelled him to
lay his cool, broad hand on her forehead, as he replied, "I love all_ my
patients"; then, taking Jessie's arm,
he led her out to where Guy was
waiting for her.
IS Be Continued.
COLLARS
The very finest linen,
properly shrunken and made
' specially for us, is used for the
facing of the "Aspen" ��� the
collar here illustrated. 20c. each,
3 for 50c. Sizes 14 to 18;
height* 1% and 2% inches.    13
TOOKE ���HOTHtAB. UMtTED, MONTREAL.
Not for Vacation Use
It seemed to Bobby that there was
no end to the advice and instructions
his mother gave h;m when he was
starting off with his father for a
week's  trip.
"Now I want to be sure- you have
everything you need," she said, "opening his bag in spite of ftis assurances that it held all a boy could possibly require. "Why, Bobby, where
is your hair brush? You were forgetting it!"
"No, mother, I wasn't forgetting
it," said Bobby, looking desperate.
"I thought you said I was going on a
vacation."���Youth's  Companion.
FLAGS OF  NEW  YORK.
Do Not Delay.���When, through debilitated digestive organs, poison finds
its way into the blood, the prime consideration is to get the poison out as
rapidly and as thoroughly as possible.
Delay may mean disaster. Parmelee's
Vegetable Pills will be found a most
valuable and effective medicine to assail the intruder with. They never
fail. They go at*once to the seat oi
the trouble and work a permanent
cure.
Cases have been known of men who
have permitted business to interfere
with golf, but they are rare, and certainly it would be extremely difficult
to find an individual bold enough to
incur the odium of his fellow-golfers
by admitting the impeachment.���Goif
Illustrated.
Minard's Liniment Cures Dandruft
De Quiz���Did the learned professor
explain the matter on whicli you were
in doubt?
De Witt���Yes, but he used such unfamiliar language that I'll have to go
around to-morrow and get him to explain his explanation. ��� Pittsburg
Leader.
SCIATICA CURED
THE  DAILY TASK.
Dreading a Duty Doniles the Task ol
Discharging  It
A small boy whose one task for the
day consists In bringing a pall of
spring water to the house 'jegan to
pine away, and bis anxious mamma
called In the family doctor. The boy
submitted listlessly to a thorough examination, the result of wlich puzzled
the man of medicine. "Does he eat
well?" be asked. "Fairly so," was .the
reply. "And sleep?" he queried. "Oh,
yes, but he drags through the day
without a symptom of interest," was
the mother's reply.
The tloctor looked long and hard at
the child and tbeu bad a bright
thought. "Wbat does he do ln the way
of work?" he asked. "Nothing but
bring a pall of water from the spring
every morning." "Cut out that water
carrying task for a week," said the
dot-tor, "and let me know the result."
The week worked a miracle ln WU
He's health. The boy had been
weighted down by tbe thought of a
dully task, und It was not because he
was lazy. He did other things wltb
tbe greatest willingness, but he so detested that one monotonous task tbat
It nflfected his bealth. There are many
grownups like Willie, Indulging a distaste for necessary duties to the extent
of clouding the s>-nsblne of life.
Dreading a duty doubled the task of
discharging It There are a few wise
persons In the world who resolutely attack disagreeable tusks and clear
them out of the wav before they get
troublesome. Watch a woman wbo
sits down to an unwelcome task of
darning hosiery. She looks over, tne
articles and spends her first strength
on tbe small rents, lenvln* the large
ones till she begins to get v��*et'*_*y. Beginning with the big ones, she would
I finish comparatively easy. This is the
usual feminine method of working
Men who Hmount to anything attack
the heavy work and clear the way to I
easier things, and when tbe decks are ,
clear they heave a sigh of satisfaction, something a woman never does.
Mrs. Chas. F. Haley Restored by Dr.
Williams'  Pink  Pills
"I was utterly helpless w'th sciatica. I could not move in bed without
aid. Doctors treated me, but I did
not improve. I used Dr. Williams'
Pink Pills and to-day am a well woman." This tribute to the merits of
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills is made by
Mrs. Chas. F. Haley of Yarmouth
N. S. Two years ago she suffered most
severely from an attack of sciatica,
and for a number of months was an
invalid confined to her bed. She further states: "It is impossible for me
to describe the pain from which I
suffered. I endeavored to continue
my profession ns a music teacher, but
was forced to give it up. The tloctor
said the Tfoub'e was sciatica, but his
treatment did not help me. I could
scarcely take a step without the most
acute pain shooting through my back
and c\own the limb. Finally I took
to my bed and lay there perfectly
helpless, and could not move without
aid. The pain was never absent.
I consulted another doctor, but
with no better results, and I began to
think I would always be a sufferer.
One day a friend who was in to see
me asked why I did not take Dr. Williams' Pink Pills, and on her advice
I decided to do so. The result was
beyond my most hopeful expectations.
All the pains and aches disappeared
and I have never since been troubled
with sciatica. I have no hesitation
in recommendng Dr. Williams' Pink
Pills for the trouble from which I
suffered."
When the blood is poor the nerves
are starved, then comes the agony ol
sciatica, neuralgia, or perhaps partial paralysis. ^ Dr. Williams' Pink
Pills actually make new, rich, red
blood,^hich feeds the starved nerves,
drives out pain and restores health.
It is because these pills actually
make new blood that they cure such
common ailments as rheumatism,
anaemia, backaches and headaches,
heart palpitation, indigestion and the
painful irregularities 6? growing girls
and women. You can get Dr. Williams' Pink Pills from any medicine
dealer or by mail at 50 cents a box
or six boxes for $2.50 from the Dr.
Williams' Medicine Co., Brockville
Ont.
National Emblerrs Under Which the
City Has Been Ruled.
The first European visitor to Manhattan Island was Henry Hudson, who
In 1G09 sailed up tbe river now bearing
his name. Tbe flag uuder which he
sailed was that of tbe Dutch Bast India company, which was the flag of
the United Provinces of tbe Netherlands, orange, white aud blue arranged
In three equal horizontal stripes, ln tbe
center of the white stripe being the
letters "A. O. C."���Algemeene Oost
Indlse compagnie (General East India
company).
From the time of tbe discovery no
visitor came Into these waters of
which there is record until 1012. when
Manhattan was settled under tbe East
India compuny, which continued iu
possession until 1022, when the government fell Into tbe hands of the West
India company. The flag of the Dutch
West India company was the same as
that of Its predecessor, save t>***t It
bore the letters "G. W. C."���Gooetro-
yeerde West Indlse compagnie (Privileged West India company).
This was the dominant flag till 1604,
when tbe island was surrendered to
tbo English, and the union Jack (crosses of England and Scotland) of Great
Britain supplanted the tricolor of Holland, and tbe mime of New Amsterdam was changed to New York. The
union jack at present Is derived from
the union of the three cvosses of St
George, St. Andrew and St. Patrick,
adopted lu 1801, when the act of uulon
with Ireland wus passed.
In the month of July, 1073, the
Dutch again took possession of lite
city, which they occupied until Nov.
10, 1074, when by virtue of a treaty
of peace between England and Holland the union jack again floated over
the city.
From tbis time there was no interruption in the supremacy of tbe English until the year 1089, when tbe
memorable rule of I-elsler. speedily
terminated by bis death, occurred. He
was a warm supporter of William and
Mary, and It Is possible that while he
held possession of the fort the flag of
William, not then proclaimed king of
England, might bnve floated over New
York.  But there Is no record of this.
Were It so. however, It could have
been but for a very brief period, and
tbe English flag waved undisputed until the era of the American Revolution.
At tbe beginning of the Revolution
here, as lu New England, the people,
although aggrieved, were loyal, and
upon the same day, June 23, 1775
New York witnessed the double entry
of George Washington, just elected bj
the provincial congress general In
chief of the American forces and on
his way to take command at Cam
bridge, and Tryon, tbe English gov
eruor, who had arrived the day before.
It was about this time that the first
raising of any but the English flag In
New York occurred. Before this. Indeed, liberty poles had beeu raised
and cut down again, but now, March.
1775, a Union fing. with a red field,
was hoisted In New York upon the
j liberty pole* on the common, bearing
the Inscription, "George Rex and the
liberties of America." and upou the
other side "No popery."
The British, under Governor Tryon
vacated New York in 1775, but there Is
no record wbicb gives any positive
date as to the rulsiug of tbe American
flag here. ���
The city was held by American
troops after this event until Sept. 13.
1770, when Washington retreated to
Harlem and afterward from the Island,
and tbe city was occupied by Sir Henry Clinton and from that time held by
tbe British until the close of the war
They evacuated the city Nov. 25, 1763.
Since then no flag but the stars and
stripes has waved over the city in
token of pewer and authority.
THE POISONS
MUST BE REMOVED
From the System���Both Kidneys and Bowels Are Restored To Action By
03. CHASE'S KIDNEY-LIVER PILLS
Thomas Walkner, a British soldier,
who recovered the Prince Imperial's
body in the Zulu campaign, is dead
at Springfield, Mass.
Case In Point.
Church���Have you ever been In s
position wheu you wanted to say some
thing and couldn't? .Gotham���Oh, yes:
I've often hud "central" tell me tbe
line was busy!���Yonkers Statesman.
Borrowing Trouble.
"Ever since his wife has brought
suit lor divorce he bus looked terrl
bly worried."
"He ougbn't to worry; she'll prob
ably get It."
It Pays.
"How do you find things out this
way?" asked the stranger.
"By advertising for 'era," was tht?
prompt reply of the natlv<*.���Detroit
Tree Tress,
Largest  Kansas Tree.
The largest known tree in Kansas
was felled a couple of weeks ago on
the Ben Wilson ranch near Williams-
town. It was a eottonwood and was
purchased from Mr. Wilson by the
Topeka barrel and box factory, and
four and one-half days were consumed by two men in cutting it down.
Sixteen strong horses were required
to draw each of the three sections,
which were twelve feet long, to the
railroad. It measured 23 feet 6 inches
in diameter. The body was sound,
and when sawed made 3,500 feet of
flrst-elass lumber and about tlie same
amount of second-class. Tlie machinery of the factory was inadequate to
handle such a monster and dynamite
was finally used as a last resort, and
it was torn in three pieces, when no
trouble was experienced in working it
up.���Kansas City Journal.
MODUS
fr, PILLS-;
'Cs    KiDNl'.Y ,
** -> jftsj?. ?'M'C
Fame In Certain Qtuvters.
Edwin Markham was one of the
guests of honor at a reception given by
a wealthy New York woman. During
a conversation she said:
"My dear Mr. Markham, I've wanted
for years) to meet you and v tell you
bow I just love tbat adorable picture
of yours���tbe one witb the man hoe-
iug, you know���and he ls taking off
his cap, and that poor wife of his���at
least I suppose It's his wife���bowing
ber bead, aud they both look so tired,
poor things! I have a copy of it tn
my own den, nnd the children have
another ln tbelr playroom, and it's���It's
���simply exquisite!"
"'The Angel us,' I presume you
mean?" replied the poet gravely.
"Yes," doubtfully, "but we always
call It 'The Hoe Man!'"
"I am glad you like It, madam," said
Mr. Markham. And he took an early
opportunity of escaping from his sincere but mistaken admirer.���Success
Magazine.
Windmills.
The windmill Is not yet superseded
ns an engine driven by the power of
"uubought wind." ln Holland thej
nre used for sawing tlmlier, euttlu.
tobacco, grinding truss aud drslniu.
the polders, noi land has lO.ono wlud
mills, each of which Is said to dmli
310 acres of land, at au average cos
of 1 shilliug ou acre a yeur. In Nor
"oik they have been of lnestlmabl.
service for works of drainage on tht
marsh lands. A fifteen horsopowei
windmill erected at Enversbam raise.
In ten months 21.d00.000 gallons of wa
ter from n depth of 100 feet, Riivlng 10.
tons of coal. In the United Stater
Iron skeleton windmills were employe*:
to pump water for domestic purpose!
long before they were applied to trrl
gallon work. Powerful mills have
given farmers living on the plains a
cheap source of power for various
purposes, among other things to tat**o-
duf.e town luxuries luto their home*.���
Manchester Guardian.
There are three ways, and three
only, by which the system can be rid
of poisonous waste matter, the bowels,
the kidneys and  the skin.
Tlie bowels are named first, because
on them falls the greater part of this
work, and so long as tbey do their
duty there is seldom trouble with the
kidneys or skin as excretory organs.
When the bowels fail, however, and
become sluggish und constipated there
is work tin own on the kidneys which
they have no business to do, and
whicli they cannot do for any length
of time without becoming deranged.
Now there is only one medical treatment whicli recognizes the condition
of affairs, and inut is Dr. Chase b
Kidney-Liver Pills. This is, so far
as we know, tlie only kidney medicine which regulates the bowels, as
well as the kidneys, and thereby removes the cause of trouble und cures
the  most  complicated  cases.
You can scarcely find a case ol
kidney disease which did not begin
with liver and bowel troubles, and
which could not therefore have been
prevented by the use of Dr. Chase's
Kidney-Liver  Pills.
Thousands of people are ready to
testify to tlie superiority ot Dr.
Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills as a cure
for kidney troubles. The reason of
their efficiency is found in their notion on the liver and bowels, as well
as the kidneys.
Mr.  R.  B.  Dixon,  McGillivray,   B.
C, writes:���"I have found Dr. Chase's
Kidney-Liver Pills to be exactly
what I needed. Since 1897 I have
been   on  the    construction    of    tne
! Crow's Nest Pass branch of the C.
P. R., employed in all capacities and
exposed  to  all  kinds  of  weather.    I
: contracted a severe cold, then pain
acroos  the   back,   and   owing  to   the
: hard fare we sometimes had to live
on, the liver got sluggish and out of
I working order. Dr. Chase's Kidney-
Liver   Pills   seemed   to   be   the   very
���treatment   I   needed   and   they   have
1 made me well again. I also used Dr.
Chase's Ointment for Eczema last
summer.    It cost only sixty cents a
'box, but wus worth $60. The cure
was complete."
Mr. Ja.nes J. Jenson, Olds, Alta.,
writes:���"I. have been troubled considerably with lame back, which I
suppose came from derangements of
the kidneys, and, I have never been
able to find a treatment that was so
prompt and efieclive in curing tins
ailment as Dr. Chase's Kidne.,-Liver
Pills. At two different times in lay
life this preparation has entirely
ed me of this trouble, and of
years I have found it unnecessary1
use any medicine whatever. I feel H_
my duty to add this statement to tlue
many others which 1 see in recommendation of this excellent medicine."
Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills, one
pill 11 dose. 25 cents a box, at all dealers, or Edmanson, Bates & Co., Toronto.
W.   N.   U.   No.   660
Protoplasm.
Trotoplasm Is 11 living, transparent,
viscid substance of proteid character,
containing 70 per cent of water. It
coagulates with heat at 130 degrees
and dies when the body ls raised to
this temperature. As ouly dead protoplasm cnu be subjected to chemical
analysis It ls difficult to determine Its
chemical nature. Its nearest utiles are
to be found In the albuminoids, ~ot
which 1he white of nu egg ls a good
example. Of the real nature of proto*
plnom there Is, of course, absolutely I
nothing known.
Foreign Languages in Japan
Public examinations in Japan show
a preference for the study of English
by all those who intend to take up
mercantile pursuits, while German is
especially popular with students intended for the learned professions.
Chinese and Corean are much studied
by our allies, who also devote much
time to Russian, French and Spanish;
altogether, the modern Japanese student shows signs of becoming a first-
qlass polyglot, many, indeed, adding
Esperanto to the sum total of their
linguistic achievements. ��� Pall Mall
Gazette.
As the Oil Rubs in, the Pain Rubs
Out���Applied to the seat of a pain in
any part of the body the skin absorbs
the soothing liniment under brisk
friction and the patient obtains almost instant relief. The results of the
use of Dr. Thomas' Eclectric Oil have
surprised many who were unacquaint-.
ed with its qualities, and once known
it will not be rejected.   Try it.
"Speaking of myself," suid tlie elig
ible bachelor, "I do not believe in
early marriages."
"Nor do I," replied the fair maid.
"High noon is the correct time."���
Chicago News.
Minard's Liniment Relieves Neuralgia
The Fortuneteller���Madam, beware
of a man with black eyes.
"Huh, he ain't dangerous I That's
my husband; I gave him them eyes
last night."���Houston Post.
STAND BY CANADA
Remedy Canadian Money Market and
Build Up Home Industries
There is no use of denying that
there is a scarcity oi money in Canada. The enormous development
everywhere manifest in the Dominion
is calling for more money than the
banks can supply.
All over Canada a general sentiment is springing up which, if encouraged, will tend largely to remedy
the situation. Canadians should favor Canalian-made goods. This will
not only result in keeping our money
at home, hut will at the same time
ouild up home manufacturing and
hasten the day when Canada, like
the United States, can boast of being,'
if necessary, entirely independent of
all other countries. Our governments as well as our people should
think seriously on this subject before
placing contracts for either material,
manufactured goods or labor.
As a Rule
Those who het for gain
Upon some hunch
Next day do not disdain
The gratis lunch.
���Louisville Courier-Journal.
Motor Omnibuses  in  London
The motor omnibuses in operation
in London have not proved a financial
success, according to the report of
the auditor of the company, who says:
���"The company has never made any
profits; nothing but a considerable
loss from the first; * * * the actual loss on running has been over
$60,000. It has cost over Is 6d (36
cents) per car mile to earn lid (22
cents), and every car mile run in the
recent period of working has made n
dead hjss of 7d (14 cents)." Efforts
are being made to come to come general agreement for increasing tlie fares
and inventors are endeavoring to produce some appliance whicli will be
productive of more steady running
and will lessen the heavy repair bills
which confront the owners of motor ]
omnibuses.
How the  Ameer Amuses  Himself
The Ameer of Afghanistan finds his
chief amusement in cooking, and is
said to be a better chef than those in
his palace kitchens. He is fond of
JaiUlis and cricket, takes a great interest in the magic lantern, and has
a good knowledge of mecbjnfcal work,
gained from the Cabul factories, where
between four ani five thousand men
are employed in the manufacture ot
arms, cartridges, harness, soap, furniture, etc.
Some persons have periodical attacks of Canadian cholera, and have
to use great precautions to avoid the
disease. Change of water, cooking,
and green fruit, is sure to bring on
the attacks. To such persons we
would recommend Dr. J. D. Kel-
logg's Dysentry Cordial as being tlie
best medicine in the market for all
summer complaints. If a few drops
are taken in water when the symptoms ure noticed no further trouble
will  be  experienced.
"I suppose," remarked the dear girl,
"that you do not believe in love at
first sight?"
"Oh, yes, I do," rejoined the old
bachelor. "If men were gifted with
second sight they would never fall in
love."���London Opinion.
Minard's  Liniment  for sale  everywhere.
A plan for the construction of a
tramway line at Peking, elaborated
by a Japanese, has been presented to
the Bureau of Foreign Affairs by tlie
Japanese Miniate1" of Peking. He demands a monopoly ol ten years, after
which the concern may be bought by
China.
The native women of Ecuador are
so used to strong heat and light that
they even do their spinning out of
doors in the blazing sun.
Nearly a million dollars was spent
for internal Improvements in Cuba
during the month of August.
Cholera is rampart in  Kiev, Russia.
Lord Cromer was so industrious ini
Egppt that he rar^y found time tc.
accept an invitation * to dinner.
The Chinese Imperial   government
will loan  Manchuria $25,000,000.
Nearly all the vessels in the Cen- j
tral Amen can fruit trade will, it is '
said,   replace  their  Norwegian   crews
with Chinamen in the next few weeks.
���8.00
"THE plain Bangle Bracelet
will be worn more this
season than ever before.
QUR $5.00 Bracelet is made
of solid gold, and can be
supplied either in the oval or
round shape.
IT is quite heavy and the finish
and  workmanship  is  the
finest possible.
\A/E enclose it in & fine velvet
lined case for (5.00.
*
���and for our Oatale_.ua.
Ryrie Bros.,
Limited
134-138 Yonfte St.
(TORONTO
MR. GROCER - - -
It is a waste of hard earned money to buy paper bags, even a\
ridiculous discounts, if they are not serviceable.
SELF-OPENING GROCERY BAGS
Are manufactured from strong manilla paper and
WILL NOT TEAR OR BURST
Ask your dealer for them and accept no otrherB.
initial "E."
Each bag has the
TEES & PERSSE LIMITED, Agents,
CALGARY WINNIPEG EDMONTON
"Always���Everywhere In Canada���Use   Eddy's   Matches." M
JS** ***���    ..      _���  _.-t....i. ���..;-���.*-*���"
^rMr. AlfredPleau, an expert machinist, JJ3 St. John St., Quebec City, Can.,
writes a letter to the Peruna Drug Mfg.
Co., given below .**
THE. SLOCAN MINING REVIEW,  SANDON, B.  C.
No Beer for Consumption.
"One of the first cases I had when
I was prosecuting attorney," remarked Judge Strimple, of the Common
Pleas Court, in a reminiscent mood
the other day, "was that against a
number of young men who had broken into anil robbed a saloon belonging
to an Irish woman here in town.
"She was, of course, the prosecuting
witness, and the attorneys for tlie defendants on cross-examination sought
in some way to discredit her testimony. .
"That beer that was stolen was
there for Sunday consumption, wasn't
I it?" he asked her.
"'Beer for consumption? ' she repeated contemptuously. 'Why. you
ought to know people never take beet-
tor consumption. Tney take whiskey
for consumption, but never beer���
bah !"���Cleveland Plain Dealer.
* THE ENTIRE SYSTEM.
"Two years ago, an accident necessi
tated my confinement for several
weeks. Tlie-good health I had enjoy
_ed was slipping awuy and there developed a complication of diseases. M>
physician said my case wus one o.
general debll ty.
"Among tile many ailments whic!
���developed was a serious attack of ca
tarrh tich annoyed me considerabi,
���and kept me uwuke whole nights.
"I decided to give Peruna a tria
and soon found it acting as a wonder
ful tonic to my system. Tbe catarrh
grew less severe and shortly afterward
���disappeared, as did also tlie various
���other maladies.
"I attribute my prompt relief and
ultimate cure entirely to the use of
Peruna and gladly recommend it."
The  Reason
Why is it that it is so easy to gathei
���an inquisitive crowd in *tlie street? Is
it because people haven't anything
���else to do?"
"No, it is because they'd rather not
���do  it."���Lippincott's.
Dinks���Say,    old    man,    you're  a
wreck!    What's the trouble?
Winks���Fall opening.
Dinks���What?    Shopping    with    a
mob of women?
Winks���No;  coal  hole.���  Brooklyi
Eagle.
"Jenkins," said the city editor tt
the new reporter, "go out and see
what you cun get on this. The people
are important and it ought to make
a good Btory."
The new reporter was given a slip
that bore the lollowing title of a suit
in Ihe Circuit Court tlie day before.
"J. H. Hanford vs. George Lemont;
.ill to remove cloud."
Jenkins left the office and was gone
two hours or more. He returned finally with a hesitating step antl report-
id:    "Nothin' to it."
"Where ditl you go?" tiie city editor
asked,
"I went up to the weather office and
,he man there said_ the cloud I was
'ooking for was over the court-house.
I think he wu.i trying to kid me."���
Iccord-Herald.
Family   of   Blind   Musicians
A concert as patheic as it was interesting took place lately at Hamburg.
The concert givers were a sister and
two brothers, all blind; a fourth brother, who is studying compositicn at
tlie Berlin Acadamy of Music, and
whose works have already been very
favorably commented on, being similarity afflicted. The sister possesses a
fine and well trained soprano voice of
considerable compass, while one
brother who on this occasion acted as
her accompanist, holds an appointment at Muhiheim-an-der-Ruhr as
organist. The third brother is a 'cellist of considerable talent. The family are natives of Muhiheim.���Pall
Mall Gazette.
Attack Anti-clerical JPocketbooks
The announcement that the Pope
has forbidden this year's pilgrimages
to Rome will cause a good deal ol
vexation among pious Catholics. It
appears that tlie reason for this step
is due to tlie maimer in which the
shopkeepers of the capital have been
assisting of late the anti-clerica,
movement By way of bringing thi*
class to ���ieir senses, therefore, the
Pope has decided to touch their poc
kets.���London Globe.
Sir Robert Ball had delivered a lee
ture on "Sun Spots and Solar Chemistry." A young lady who met him ex
pressed her' regret at having missed
the lecture. "Well," he said," "1
don't know as you'd have been par
ticularly interested. It was all about
sun spots."
"Why\" she remarked, "it would
have interested me exceedingly. 1
have been a martyr to freckles all
my life."���Bellman.
Every cottage woman of Finland
knows how to spin and weave. These
accomplishments are matters of national pride, because the woman oi
Kalevala, the great national epic,
wove and spun, and as well, indeed,
embroidered, and worked in silver and
bronze.
DEAFNESS OANNOT BE OURED
by local applications, as they cannot
reach the diseased portion of tha ear.
There is only one way to cure deafness,
and that ia by constitutional remedies.
Deafness is caused by an inflamed condition of the mucous lining of the Eustachian Tube. When this tube is inflamed you
have a rumbling sound or imperfect hearing, and when It ls entirely closed, Deafness is the result, and unless the inflammation can be taken out and this tube
restored to its normal condition, hearing
will be destroyed forever; nine cases out
of ten are caused by Catarrh, whiob is
nothing but an inflamed condition of the
mucous surfaces.
We will give One Hundred Dollars for
any case of Deafness (caused by Oatarrh)
that cannot be cured by Halls Oatarrh
Cure.   Send for circulars, /free.
F. J. OHRNEY A CO.. Toledo, 0.
Sold  by  Druggists, 75c.
Take Hall's Family Pills for oonstlpa-
tion. ,
"Life," observed the philosophical
boarder, "is merely a pi me of chess*
on a largo scale."
"Nothing of the sort," protested the
newly-marHed boarder. "It's exactly
the contrary. The game of life doesn't
really begin until you mate."���Chicago Tribune.
.New York  Chinese have  formed  a
chop suey trust.
Our New
Hair Vigor
Ayer's Hair Vigor was good,
the best that was made. But
Ayer's Hair Vigor, new improved formula, is better. It
is the one great specific for falling hair. A new preparation in
every way. New bottle. New
contents. Ask your druggist to
show it to you, "the new kind."
Poet noi change Ihe color of the hair.
A
���Pemul* with each bottle
f
yers
���how It to 7oar
��ootor
Ask Hits (bout it,
thou do ma ho eoje
A teacher in a tenement district
hurried from the school to find the
mother ot a pupil who had been taken
nuite ill.
"Can you show me where Mrs. An-
gelo Scandale 1-ves?" she inquired ot
a cherub transplanted from the sunny
south to a dark, sunless alley.
"Yes, teach', 1 show you," and a
willing, sticky hand dragged her on
with such speed as to make her stumble over an Italian dame seated on the
threshold.
After the teacher's breathless flight
toward the clouds the little hand stopped tugging.
"There where Mees Scandale live,"
indicated the horizontal arm and finger, "but she down stair sitting on
the step," finished the smiling lips.
���Harper's Magazine.
A young doctor, who had recently
bought the practice in a certain small
town, received a visit from a man one
afternoon.
"I have called to see whether you
would be willing to renew the contract
that I had with your predecessor. I
gave him a fixed commission on all
clients whom he sent to me."
"Ah, you are the chemist, I suppose?" said the doctor.
"No, sir, the undertaker."��� Bon
Vivant.
BEST TIME TO TAKE IT
DIRECTIONS   TO   PREPARE   SIMPLE HOME MADE MIXTURE
Tells You How to Overcomo Rheumatism With Simple  Recipe, Which
Is Easily Mixed.
A well-known authority on Bheu-
matism gives the readers of a large
Montreal daily paper tlie following
valuable, yet simple and harmless
prescription, which any one can easily prepare at home.
Fluid Extract Dandelion, one-half
ounce; Compound Kargon, one ounce;
Compound Syrup Sarsaparilla, three
ounces.
Mix by shaking well in a bottle, and
take a teaspoonful after each meal
and  at bedtime.
He states that the ingredients can
be obtained from any good prescription pharmacy at small cost, and, being a vegetable extraction, are barm-
less to take.
This pleasant mixture, if taken regularly for a few days, is said to over
come almost any case of rheumatism.
The pain and swelling, if any, diminishes with each dose, until permanent
results are obtained, and without injuring the stomach. While there are
many so called Rheumatism remedies,
patent medicines, etc., some of which
do give relief, few really give permanent results, and the above will, no
doubt, be greatly appreciated by many
sufferers here at this time.
Inquiry at the drug stores of this
neighborhood elicits the information
that these drugs are harmless and can
be Ubught separately, or the druggists
here will mix the prescription for our
readers if asked to.
The Nile of 1907
Writing from Cairo, Consul-General
L. M. Iddings states that the letting
of Nile water on the lands in previous
years took place on Aug. 27, but that
it will be a "poor Nile" this year,
owing to lighter rains in Abyssinia
and the upper Nile country. It is not
expected that this will make much
difference with Egyptian crops, however, owing to the storage of water at
Assouan and by the Esneh, the Delta,
and th* Zible barrage. The area of
land in upper Egypt, which will get
no water (called Sharaki) and will
therefore pay no tax will be considerable and slightly cut down the
c revenue of the State. There will also
J be extra trouble and expense in handling the basin water.���Daily Consular
and  Trade  Reports.
Auldsport���Why so gloomy, old
chap? Last night you were having
the finest time I ever saw a man have.
Gayman���Well, doesn't that explain it, you chump?���Chicago Tribune.
Undermined   London
Few have any conception of the vast
network of pipes and cables there is
beneath the streets of London. In the
city alone, the engineer to tlie corpor-
ation'reports the tota' length of the
mains and conducts in the subways
extends to 13 miles 837 yards. The
gas mains total 2 miles 693 yards, the
water mains 1 mile 1,638 yards, the
electric light cables 2 miles 1,442
yards; hydraulic power mains 1,656
yards, the pneumatic tubes of the
General Post-office 1 mile 1,353 yards,
and the telegraph and telephone wires
2 miles 1,145 yards.���Pall Mall Gazette.
Qoosebone Prophets Differ
The goosebone prophets are beginning to get in their work. One of them
has doped it out that this coming winter will be similar to that of two years
ago when there wasn't any snow until
well along into Springtime. Another
man'just as learned as the other says
it is going to be a regular old-timer,
witli a big storm Oct. 31, and six or
eight falls of snow every week until
the middle of next April.���Bangor
News.
Mary Knew All About It.
Little Mary's father had been teaching her to walk properly. "Walk bIow-
ly and turn out your toes," he admonished her.
While she waB undergoing this
teaching Bhe attended Sunday school
one day. The golden text was, "Teach
me to walk honestly." After reciting it
several times the teacher asked:
"Who knows what that means?"
"I do," replied little Mary. "Walk
slowly and turn out your toes."
Observations
Easy to drift to uie sea of doubt,
Easy to hurt what we cannot heal,
Easy to rouse what we cannot soothe,
Easy to speak what we do not feel.
Easy to show what we ought to conceal,
Easy to think that fancy is fate,
Andi 0, the wisdom that comes too
late.
���Oliver Huckel.
Mighty Good
You can't have the world as you want
it���
1    Joy doesn't come at your call.
But this is to say���every night���every
day:
!    "Mighty good land, after all!"
; Atlanta Constitution.
As we now make our new Hair Vigor it
does not have the slightest effect upon
the color of the hair. You may use it
freely and for any length of time without fear of changing the color. Stops
(ailing hair.  Cures dandruff.
.tjtAai.O.Ajat0a.,I^w%ii,ttiee
China's Pernicious Tax System
Pekin is now quite safe for foreigners to go freely ih all parts of the
city, except in the Forbidden City,
where the Emperor'B palace is situated. The Chinese are developing slowly along the road towards Western
civilization, but so far tbey have not
attained any great speed. ,
Men who have spent their lives in
the East and know the country thoroughly declare that China will not develop materially until she has a good
Government. The present system of
collecting taxes, which has been in
vogue for centuries, is the mother of
all graft, the incubus under which the
nation is suffering, and will keep the
country back until the system has
been completely wiped out.
Signals of Danger.���Have you lost
your appetite? Have you an unpleasant taste in the mouth? Does your
head ache and have you dizziness? Ii
so, your stomach is out. of order and
you need medicine. But you do not
like medicine. He that prefers sickness to medicine muBt suffer, but' un-'
ness to medicine must suffer, but under tlie circumstances the wise man
would precure a box of Parmelee's
Vegetable Pills and speedily get himself in health, and strive to keep so.
Grapes are still trodden with the
bare feet in many of the vineyards of
Spain and Italy.
"Judge, will you do me a great
favor?" asked the lady who was about
to be put upon the stand as a witness.
"Certainly, miss; what is it?"
"Will you please ask nie my age before I take the oath?"���Yonkers
Statesman.
There can be a difference of opinion
on most subjects, but there is only
one opinion as to tlie reliability of
Mother Graves' Worm Exterminator.
It is safe, sure and effectual.
Orleans House, Twickenham, which
will be put up for sale this month,
was built in the reign of Queen Anne
by Secretary Johnstone. It latei oe-
came much frequented by Queen Caroline. In 1800 the Duke of Orleans took
up liis residence there, and later the
house was occupied by Don Carlos,
another royal exile.
Minard's Liniment Cures Burns, etc.
She was even more afraid of cows
than most girls, so when Bhe spied a
placid animal recumbent under a tree
peaceful' y chewing itB cud ,sbe at urst
refused to go through the pasture at
all. Her husband calmed her fears to
some extent, and they started by,
when the cow slowly commenced to
get up, hind legs first, St. they always do. At this the little lady
shrieked with terror, and said:
"Oh, Bob, hurry, hurry; he is getting ready to spring at us."���Harper's
Drawer.
ACCIDENT TO A TORONTO
BUILDER
John Felstead, a builder, of 312 Wilton Avenue, Toronto, was working on
a temporary scaffold, the plank broke
and he fell through. He received several severe cuts on the leg, a bruised
knee, and a thorough shaking. Zam-
Buk, the herbal balm, was applied to
the cuts and gave him great relief.
He says:
"Zam-Buk was so effective that although my leg was badly cut, I was
able to go on without a day's break
from work. Zam-Buk takes the soreness out of a wound at once and then
it commences to heal. It is without
doubt a wonderful balm for skin injuries, and I am glad to make this
virtue known."
Zam-Buk is a sure and speedy cure
for cuts, bruises, and all skin diseases. At all stores and druggists,
50c. box, or The Zam-Buk Co., Toronto, 3 boxes  for $1.25.
Itch, Mange, Prairie Scratches and
every form of contagious itch on human or animals cured in 30 minutes
by Wolford's Sanitary Lotion.
A popular instrument in Madagascar is the bamboo guitar, made from
a bamboo cane six feet long. The
cavity serves as the sounding board.
Strings are cut out between the joints
and arc stretched hy bridges.
Until recently Beloochistan, outside
of Quetta, wns practically closed to
missionaries, but the British Government has now permitted the Medical
Mission to enter Kelat State, a country nearly as -large as England, inhabited by several hundred thousand
Beloochas, Brahuis, Kurds and Pathans.
BABY'S HEALTH
Baby's health and happiness depends upon its little stomach and
bowels performing their work regularly. If these are out of order
Baby's Own Tablets will cure the
trouble quicker than any other medicine, and the mother has the guarantee of a government analyst that thia
medicine is perfectly safe. Mrs.
Frank Neil', Marksville, Ont., says:
"I have used Baby's Own Tablets for
stomach and bowel troubles, breaking up colds and destroying worms,
and always with the best success."
Sold by all medicine dealers or by
mail at 25 cents a box from the Dr.
Williams' Medic:ne Co., Brockville,
Ont.
Caddie (to golfer who had been lifting the turf all tho way round the
course)���You'll be a stranger to theae
parts, I suppose.
Golfer���Well, not exactly a stranger.
I was horn here, and all my folks are
buried hereabout.
Caddie (as the golfer lifts another
piece of turf with h:s driver)���I (loot
you'll no get deep enough with your
driver; you'd better tak' your iron ���
Tit-Bits.
The University of Chicago will have
a vegetarian football team this year.
We eats.
We eats,
Cabbage and beets,
Raw, raw, raw.
Members of the team will sleep on
wire mattresses, lest they Bhould mistake the ordinary mattress for their
breakfast and eat enough of it to slow
them down in practice.���Chicago American.
The French War Department is engaged in making out lists of motor
vehicles which may be regarded as
available in cas; of war. The automobiles are divided into three classes,
The census includes the public-service vehicles.
ENGLISH 8PAVIN LINIMENT removes
all hard, sott or calloused lumps and
blemishes from horses, blood spavin,
curbs, splints, ringbone, aweeney. stiflea,
sprains, Bore and swollen throat, ooughs,
etc. Save $50 by use of one bottle, war*
ranted the most wonderful Blemish Oure
ever known.
Jimmy (outside a football ground)���
Crickey!   I wish I was an inventor.
Mickey���Wot for?
Jiimmy���I'd invent a knothole what
yer could carry round wid yer an'
stick in the fence anywhere yer
pleased.���Ally Sloper.
Brig.-General Edward Settle Godfrey, one of the most noted of the Indian fighters and- frontier scouts in
the U. S. army, has been placed on
the retired list at the age of 64.
A WELL-KNOWN   MAN
Minard's  Liniment Co.,   Limited.
Dear Sirs,���I can recommend your
MINARTJ'S LINIMENT for Rheumatism and Sprains, as I have used it
for both with exceellent results.
Yours truly,
T. B. LAVERS,
St..  John.
DON'T GET ON IN CANADA.
English  Too   Bumptious  Says  Secretary Manchester Y. M. C. A.
"The bumptiousness of the English-
nan is making him undesirable as a
jolonist."
That is the indictment which
Beecher Smith, secretary of the emigration department of tne Manchester
"tToung Men's Christian Association,
made against tlie British colonists on
his return alter a tour in Canada.
As showing how deeply the department which he administers is affect-
id, it may be pointed out that during
the last half-year as many as 354
young men went to Canada on his
advice. Altogether nearly 1,000 colon-
-sts, mostly young men, have been
lent out.
Of the English colonist generally
tie speaks severely. "The greatest
lifficuUy," he declared, "is that the
young Englishman is too conceited to
rver make a good colonist. I went
jut with an agent wbo bud placed
>ver 2,000 men on the Canadian railways, and he told me plainly that
he would take either Scottish or Irish
vorkers before  Englishmen.
"The Englishman invariably went
.tut and told the Canadians that the
best work was done in England by
Englishmen; they generally know so
much that the Canadian could tell
tbem nething. Tliey let the people
'nderstand that they can do everything better than the Canadians, ami
ao Canadian will stand that.
"I have soen notices in eastern cities in connection with advertisements
ior men that 'no Englishmen nee.1
ipply.' That is not b cause the Eng
lishman cannot do the work, for testimony from east and west is that ii
he will only 'peg away' and do bis-
best, he really makes a better and
sturdier worker in the end than the
Canadian. But he cannot adapt him
self to the new circumstances. I could
give hundreds of cases of this sort.
"Farmers havt the same story tc
tell. The railway agent, before referred to, would not accept any more
Englishmen, and opened offices in
Hasgow. because oi this unbearable
���oneeit."
Referring to another class of emi-
rrant, Mr. Smith instanced the case
of two young men who were of n
number he accompanied out. These
spent two days in Montreal, and while
one of them enquired after 25 or 30
places and got the choice of four, the
other sat in the Y. M. C. A. rooms
for the whole two days, waiting for
Mr.  Smith to get him a situation.
"I do not find any but Englishmen
who will do that," commented Mr.
Smith.
Another case of the same sort was
that of a young assistant to the
wholesale grocery trade, who, after
spending two weeks in Montreal, went
to one of the railway offices to take
his ticket home, because Montreal
was no good. On being questioned, he
admitted that he simply waited for
work to come to him.
"It is generally that class of man
who comes back to England and
blackguards Canada," was Mr.
Smith's verdict.
He had never seen so many ��� men
returning from Canada as on this occasion, and he found on enquiry that
it was not the fault of the country,
but of the men  themselves.
Judging from Mr. Smith's experiences, if the Englishwoman was not
so essentially a "stay-at-home" the
thousands of girls for whom England
cannot find husbands would soon be
happily mated in Canada.
CANINE OPIUM SMUGGLERS.
Dogs Sent Over Canadian Border With
Laden Pack Saddles.
Customs officers have recently unearthed one of the most clever methods of smuggling opium and silks into
the United States from across the international boundary line yet discovered, says The Chicago Inter-Ocean.
The smugglers, who were headed by
Thomas Smith, now in custody, used
trained dogs to carry on their business.
The first inkling that came to the
officers that the dogs were being used
to carry contraband goods from Canada was when Officer Lane of the Bell-
ingham station shot a dog which he
saw running through thick timber near
Blaine, Wash. The dog was loaded
down with an enormous leather saddle in which ware found three pounds
of opium and a package of rich silk.
Three days later customs officers
trailed three other paok saddle dogs
to Smith's shack near the town of
Blaine. Smith was found at the shack
and was arrested.
The first lightning conductor was
invented hy an obBcure Bohemian
monk in 1754.
Italy owns the world's three largest
churches, St. Peter's, Rome; the Du-
omo, Milan, and__St. Paul's, at Rome.
Insist
on having
Not a Home Hero
Ajax had just defied the lightning.
"Fine!" cried his wife, "but why do
you always stick your head under the
bedclothes at home?"
' Thus we learn again that a prophet
is without honor in his own house.���
New York  Sun.
Windsor
Salt
It is the famous Canadian Salt, knows
all over Canada for its absolute parity.
There's no comparison between
Windsor Salt, and the cheap, inferior
salts that are being sold throughout
��   the west.
^L     Windsor Salt costs no more
^k than these imported salts
^L*t the present prices.
j^Injiat  on  having
^k Windsor Salt.
Bk        'tea
The largest steel milk in the world
are being constructed at Gary, Ind.,
by the U. S. Steel corporation, and
artificial gas will be used in operating
all the machinery.
Soup and pie, although denounced
by Dr. Osier, continue to play daily
to standing room only.
Number of Chinese Abroad
According to the latest Chinese official investigation the total number
of Chinese in other countries is as follows, not including the students:���Japan, 16,673; Russian Asia, 37,000;
Hong Kong, 314,301; Siam, 2,755,600;
Burmah, 134,560;. Europe 1,760; Korea
11,200; Formosa, 74,506; Philippines,
83,785; Africa, 8,200; America, 272,820.
Total, 6,703,829.���Shanghai Mercury.
Kite Flying
The Japanese and Chinese love kite
fights. In a kite fight the kite strings
are coated with a preparation of
powdered glass that giveB tbem all
along their length tiny saw teeth, and
the object is for one string to fall
sawlike over another so as to cut it.
Great skill is displayed in these fights
Young men handle their kites wonderfully, steering them here and there in
a way unheard of outside the Orient.
A kite, aB if alive, suddenly darts
down ond to the left, it crosses the
track of another kite, tne two stringB
come together with a humming sound,
and in a jiffy the under kite, its cord (
broken, falls like a shot bird to the
ground. A Japanese or Chinese expert thinks nothing of sending up a
kite so that for hours it shall fly
direotly above his head.���-New Orleans Times-Democrat.
JAPAN TEA DRINKERS
II
YOU   REALLY  MUST TRY
a
SALADA1
UitEEN TEA
Same flavor as Japan, only porteotly free from adulterations of any kind. It Is to tha Japan tea drinker
what "SALADA'' Blaok is to the black tea drinker.
LEAD PACKETS ONLY.   40c, 60c and  60c  Per  Lb.
WELCOME  NEWS
Sewer Problem For Hull.
' Aylmer, a town of between 2,00*0 and
3(000 inhabitants, some ten miles cr
so above Ottawa and Hull, on the Ottawa river, is about to adopt a system of sewerage emptying into the
river, to the danger of the lives of
more than 90,000 people. Besides Aylmer there are already on the banks
of the Ottawa on either side Britannia
a rapidly-growing summering suburb,
and several large villages. The capital
and the transpontine city of Hull are
combining to induce Aylmer to treat
its sewage in purifying tanks before
it is sent into the river, and this probably will be agreed to. There arc
long stretches of rapids between Ayl-
men and Ottawa and it always has
been contended that no sewage from
up the river can reach the intake
pipe for the water supply of the capital. In the meantime, the inquiry
into the Aylnfer sewerage scheme has
developed tlie fact that just about
the Ottawa intake rafting grounds exist, where about a hundred raftsmen
usually are accommodated during the
rafting season, and the question arises,
where the sewage from this quarter
goes to if not into the drinking water
of the people of Ottawa. Below Ottawa there is a large population on
both sides of the river all the waj
dowa to Grbnville rapids, those nearest to the capital getting their full
share of the city sewage, as well a**
any residue that escapes the intake
pipe from the rafting grounds and
Aylmer and comes over the Chaudiere
falls.
"Canada Leads the World"
It is generally understood that the
telephone is a Canadian invention,
but it will be no less of a pleasure
than a surprise to many of our readers to learn that Canada leads the
world   in   telephone   invention.
The invention of the telephone is
almost universally credited to Prof.
Alexander Graham Bell at the time
when he was living at Brantford,
Ontario, and that city ia now raising
funds with which to erect a monument to his memory.
By a strange coincidence the Lorimer Automatic Telephone, commonly
called Canadian Machine Telephone,
was also invented in Brantford, by
the Lorimer Brothers, who, like Bell,
are Canadians  by  birth.
The Bell Telephone Company, which
lor years has enjoyed a practical
monopoly of the telephone business
in Canada, and as a result has grown
rich and indifferently arrogant toward
the people, has long maintained an
old style telephone exchange in
Brantford. Last year the city granted
a franchise to an Independent Company to instal the Lorimer Automatic Telephone System. The Bell
Company immediately changed its
stiff-necked policy and proceeded to
build a modern central office building and put its wires underground
and installed a new and improved
multiple switchboard. The Independent Telephone Company has purchased a fine lot and is erecting a
modern telephone building.
Brantford now styles itself "The
Telephone City" and Canada is likewise entitled to the credit of "Leading
the World in Telephone Invention."
A strong company, known as Canadian Independent Telephone Co.,
Ltd., with; head offices at Toronto,
has been organized and will manufacture a fullTtne of telephone apparatus in Canada, both automatic and
manual, and it is confidently expected that our country will soon
produce all ot its own telephones,
thus enabling us to keep in Canada
the hundreds of thousands of dollars
which otherwise would go to outside
manufacturers. In these times of
tight money this will be welcome
news.
Traveled Hands
In the course of our lives, says thc
stat'stican, although we write many
letters, we have not the remotest idea
of the distance our hand covers while
travelling over the paper.
According to him the average man
or woman writes about th:rty words
a minute which, with the up and
down strokes and curves, represent
something like five yards, or 300 yards
an hour. A person therefore using his
pen for, say, two hours a day, can
boast that his right hand has journeyed a distance of 120 miles.
And this, it should be remembered,
refers only to those who write, comparatively speaking, little . When we
come to the professional element,
journalists, clerks, etc., who work
six, or seven hours a day, the figures
become startling.���Gentlewoman.
Motor  Boats  in  Java
Replying to a New York enquiry
regarding the use of motor boats in
Java. CounBul B. S. Rairden, of Ba-
tavia, states that very few of these
boatB are used at the present time
not more than ten throughout the
island. The Government purchased
two for use in the harbor at Tand-
jong-Priok not long ago, but for some
reason they have not oeen found serviceable, continually breaking down.
These boats were purchased from the
United States through an agent in
Holland. In the near future, the
Consul says, thore will be a demand
for such boats.
Signs of a Hard Winter
When the steamer Cassiar arrived
recently she brought down from the
north a number of Toba Inlet Indians
who are distinguished above all other
Indians for their wisdom in weather
lore. One of the red men, in conversation with another passenger said
the Indians up coast expected a very
severe winter, and had already begun
to make preparations to secure themselves against cold. Forest animals,
particularly the common wolf, they
say, are growing longer hair than
usual. This fact may reasonably
enough be construbd as pointing to a
severe winter, but in the estimation
of the Indians the testimony of wild
animals is us nothing compared with
the signs antl warnings vouchsafed _
by the moon.���Vancouver World.
Are you a sufferer of corns? If you
are, get a bottle of Holloway's Corn
Cure. It has never been known to
fail.
A substitute is never as good as the
original���therefore, insist on getting
what you ask for. A dealer who is
always wanting to sell you something
just as good is not working for your
interests, but for tlie extra profit he
hopes to make.
WANTED���Ladies to do plain .and
light sewing at home, whole or spare
time; good pay; work sent any distance; charges paid. Send stamp
for full particulars, National Manufacturing Co., Montreal.
Busy People.
'Mongst human beings you will see
Alarm clockB���'tis no nature fake-
Whose only use appears to be
la keeping other folks awake.
Humor of Animals.
Even a toad laughs when he baa
���wallowed a large beetle and It begins
to walk about inside. It does tickle sot
Ducks laugh most when tbey come
out of water. The ground feels so
funny under their feet that tbey cannot
help themselves. But they have much
more humor tban fowls at any time.
A duck is born with a twinkle In hla
eye and a smile at tbe end of bis taU.
Tragedy does not suit bim bo well���
e"_e cannot be very tragic or very dig- ���
nlfied wltb a waddle for a walk.���London Captain. ���
The Santa Fe Railway company haa
been found guilty at Los Angeles of
rebating.
Trying to Be Happy In a Hurry
The strenuous life in America is not
confined to a business or money-making career; it appears in our pleasures. Americans do not seem to be
able to enjoy themselves, even, without hurrying up. At our pleasure
resorts we see men hurrying and hustling, as though they were late for a
train or right in the rush of business.
We become so fitted, so accustomed
to the American pace that we cannot
slow down even when we quit work.
We do not seem to know how to do
anything in a leisurely way. The
same high pressure that we put into
our business and professions is evident in our play. W* get bo used to
"stepping lively," hurrying for an
appointment or for trains, rushing our
business, that we cannot go slow and
take things easy when we have leisure.
Not long ago I was trying to convince a London merchant of the superiority of the American way of doing
things, and was telling him how much
more progressive, enterprising and
pushing wo are. He simply smiled
and said: "What of it! We Englsh-
men do not envy you. We believe in
living, in enjoying as we go along.
The lunch-counter is not popular in
London. We believe in taking our
time. What if Americana do make
more money? They drop down with
some disease, are stricken with apoplexy, or die of paresis in the prime of
life. We do not call that success.
That is foolishness. They lack that
contentment, that poise, which marks
Europeans."
The American youth hurries to the
man, hurries his education, hurries
his meals, hurries his work, hurries
everything relating to his career, hurries his life, and he cannot understand
why he cannot hurry his happiness.
He arranges his pleasures by a set
programme, just as he does his business, and he runs his vacation on a
business plan. Social life, exercise
and recreation are all on a strenuous
plan, with little opportunity for rest
or reflection.���O. B. Marden in Success Magazine.
fits
perfectly
because
each garment
is made to fit a
individual type
figure.
After it is finished and
goes to the laundry for
its final washing, each
garment is tested on
models ranging from 22
to 50 inch bust measurement. Thus the size is
determined accurately.
And the size as marked
is exact, and stays so,
because Stanfield's Underwear can't shrink nor
stretch.
Your dealer will likely have all
sizes and weights. If not, he can
get them for you. 13g
STJUOTELDS UHTTO
T1-.UI0. N.S.
Nurses' & Mothers' Treasure
���most reliable medicine for baby.
Used over 50 yean. First compounded
by Dr. P. E. Pic.uk in 1855.
I
Makes Baby Strong
Restores the little organs to perfect
health.   Gives sound sleep, without
resort to opium or other injurious drugs.
At-Jru__ists'.2'c.6t��til..$1.25.
N��tion��IDru��(VCliemic.lCo. Ud.,Moo*li��al
���rjormtKWt ****s*********|
For Business Building's
The only dflar-ly, th* only fire-proot
ojtlini.��� tha ceiriag that siys tho last -.old
in dosorativo beauty,���lhe offline, that snows
ao seam, -that will outlast th* buiUnna UssK
��� PEDLAR ���
AKT STEEL CEILINGS
���mmm CetH no mon than the
common toil, but look thri��
���iSat. Ov_rr AOOOdriiani.toiuitSByitort
er stractim. Srae-walli Io match. 5m
���Ut Riw-Ml dnsR-ini���noihini like them ID
CuuaV either in be*uly or vinely.
Roqueit the free book that shows the whole
cdhai ��t*��ry.   Send for it to- day. aio
The PEDLAR People ffi.
Otbaw*
TorcotD
MBt.-s.-__
London
(1M1..
Ottawa
Wionlpsg
WILSON'S
FLY
PADS
On* packet
haul actually
killed a bushel
of -Mas*.
 ���OI.D ��Y	
MUCOISTS, CROCERS AND CENUAI. STORES
10a por paQkat, er 8 pukata far SBe.
will laat a whala stason.
W.   N.   U.   No.   660 J33_��l��e8C-. �� S_(.et.��Q<
i��a��taiii(l��t-oe*ie-��.*��*oi��ti
s
8
3
o
Ban^ of cMonireal,
CAPITAL ALL PAID UP. 514,400,000.      -      -      REST. 511,000,000
UNDIVIDED PBOFITS, 3432,089.08
President���Loud Ptkathcoka amd Mount Uotai,.
Vice-President���Hon. Geoboe A. Dkiimmumd.
General Manager���E. B. Cloubtoh.
Branches In All The Principal Cltlea In Canada
LONDON, -KING., NEW YORK, CHICAGO, SPOKANE.
A General Banking Business Transacted.
NEW DENVER BRANCH, - II. \ FISHER, Manager.
inter Wear For
The Children*
No  need  for parents in any  part of
the Slocnn to sen-l ca��t for tlieir
Children's wear.
r***A**A *****.e^-:-^.-'>***.**********.r***fi****r******<*.4
r+%*-)n********'iv**************4A***W************%2
HELLO!!
THE GOODS ARE HERE
Antl at prices that will suit you.
If ynu live in New Denver, call and
inspect my stock'. If yon live at Slocan,
Silverton, Rosebery, Nakusp, Three
Forks or Saudon, drop nie a line, we
can certainly do business together,
LADIES'  nnd CHILDREN'S  WEAK.
Slocan flMntng "Kcvtew,
Palnia Angrignon
���     ii iHJMiniu-j.-
NEW DENVER, B.C.
Did you see the swell line of XMAS PRESENTS
at Nelson's store ?
If not come and see them.   Every one is a beauty.    Here
are a few :
Toilet and Maj-iicure sets in sterling silver.
Jewel Boxes, Inkstands, etc., in ormolu gold.
Caudle sticks,   mokers' sets aud Paper weights.
Hand painted Calendars and Pictures, 50c to $1.25
.    ewiu*' sets and Writing Cases,
ilver Tableware,
Swastika ping ant) Brooches - The Lucky Charm
Come aud see the best stock ever shown
in the district.
PUBLISHED   EVERY   THURSDAY
AT  NEW DENVER, B.C.
General Freighting
and Transfer.
W?
Subscription .2.00 per annum, ttricUy   NCW   DeflVCF,   B.C.
in advance.   No pay, no paper.
AnvEirrtsixu Hatha :
Notices to Delinquent Owners - .13.00
"    for Crown Grants    -   -    7.50
"     " Purchase of Land   -    7.r.o
"      " License to Out Timber 5.00
All locals will be charged lor at the rate
ol 10c. per line eacli issue.
Transient rates made known on application.    No room fur Quacks.
Address all Communications and make
Cheques payable to
JNO.   J.   ATHERTON,
Editor and Publisher.
Make yourself familiar with the
above rates and Save Trouble.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.
Virglnea mineral claim,   sUuate in the
Arrow Lakes Milling Division of West
Kootenay  District.     Where  located :
"""On Koosknnox crock   about 8 miles
from 1I3 mputll.
Take notico that I, Samuel Walker,
of Burton City, Free Miner's Certificate
No. B.P5235, intend sixty days from
the date Iier.of, to ipply to the Mining
Recorder for a Cerlificato of Improvements for the purpose ol obtaining a
Crown Gftiit of the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under section 87, must be commenced
before the issuanco of such Certificate
of Improvements,
Dated thin 26th day of Nov. A.D. 1(107
Slocan Land District���District o(
Blocan;
Take notice that Sidney Yates Brockman, of New  Denver,  accountant,   in-
tends to apply for permission tu purchase the   foliotviu**    described   land.
Commencing at n potit planted 'at  ihe
N.E. corner oflot 810r,   thence rsil 80
chains; (hence south40 chains; Ihenc
���west80 chains; tlieree north 40 chains
to poi'it of commencement aud contain-
ng 820 acnes, more or lees.
Sept. 24th 1907
SIDNEY YATES BROCKMAN.
Attention To Miners and
loggers.
We have bought for spot rash sixty
pairs of hi|_h cut Hlucier black kip
shoes, hand made, exteiihion poles and
heels, which we are going to Bell at $0.00
a pair; regular shoemakers  pi ice $0.00.
Will ship to any address on receipt of
price.
For this wt"*k will sell 2 big packages
Pearline for 25cte.
Watch* out for our big cut in priceB
not issue. 20 per cent less than you
are paying.
J. F. DELANEY
SLOGAN LAND DISTRICT.
Diitrict of West Koolenay.
Tnko notico that Andrew Wallace,
acting as agent for thu Silverton Lumber and Power Company, of Silverton
B.C., Contractor, lutends_to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land: Commencing at a post
planted on the enst shore ol Slocan lake
about one mile south of Rosebery, and
marked A, W.'s south-west corner,
Ihence eaBt [about one chain fib the right
of way of the Nakusp and Slocan railway
thence north 20 clmins, along the railway to the shore of the hike, thence
southerly along tho lake shore to point
ol commencement, containing five acres
moro or less,
November 12th, 1807.
1219 ANDREW WALLACE.
New Denver
Meat Market
8!
le HW MARK
Situate at New Denver, B.C., the most beautiful place in
British Columbia, this modern and picturesque Hotel offers to
Tourists and the traveling public all the attractions and
creature' comforts that heart of man desires. -Facing the
glorious Slocan Lake, where boating and angling may be indulged in all the year round, an uninterrupted view of the
famous Glacier and snow clad peaks may be witnessed at all
times from the veranda. Rooms, single or en suite, reserved
by wire.   Gasoline launch at disposal of Tourists.    Apply to
HENRY STEGE
PROPRIETOR
fo***********************************************
������������s____s__wi ������na*.
Always a good supply of
home-fed Beef, Mutton
and  Pork ou band.
Poultry, Game and
Fish iu season.
COLD   STORAGE
Hermann Clever
Proprietor.
Jw elierand
Watchmaker
laStP
Late with J. O. Patenaude, Nelson.
My stock of CANNED GOODS
is always Fresh, and every cus-
toirier receives  honest value for
money spent,
Have you seen mv lino of La-lies Blouses
and the assortment of faucy goods
X am now displaying 7
Pay nie a visit.
son,
NEW   DENVER.
LAND ACT.
Slocan Land District���District of
West  Koonenay.
Take notice that A. Owens of New
Denver,   mill operator,   intends to r.p-
ply for permission to purchase the following described land:���   Commencing
at a post planted on the vest shore of
Slocan Lake about one  half mile in  a
southerly  direction from  Mill  creek;
commencing at a post  marked A. O. 's
S.E. corner post, tlience 20 chains west
thence 40 chains north, thenco 20 chains
east,  thence 40 chains  south to place
of commencement, containing 80 acres
more or less.
Dated at New Denver, Oct. Blstl 907.
ALBERT OWENS.
Blocan Land   District���District of
West  Kootenay.
Take notice that Henri Kohl. Jorand,
cf Slocan, barrister, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described Ian*'.   Commencing ul a r->st
planted at lhe north-east corner of Lot
882, thence r.iuth 40 chains; tbence
east 20 ohalni: Un nee north 40 chains;
I her ce wee t 2(1 11 an 8 to point ol Onr,-
mencement and containing 80 ucres
more or less.
HENRI HOBERT JORAND
November 111, 1007.
Zhc Slocan l3otel
Gbree forha, .
B.C.
Headquarters for Mining Men
wheu visiting this famous Silver-
Lead Miuing Camp. Every
comfort foi the Traveling Public.
A Well-Stocked Bar aad Kxee!
lent Pool Table.
Hugh Niven, Proprietor
local Salesman Wanted for
New Denver
And Adjoining District to represent
Canada's Greatest Nurseries
Trees of right site and sge for British
Columbia planting, t'roxn on limestone soil; hardier and loi'ter lived than
const liuia.
Kootenay Hotel
Sandon, B.C.
McLEOD -ii WALMSLEY,  Props.
Slocan Land Distiict���District of
We.t Kootenay.
Take notice thai Charles Clarltson
Rhodes, ol Nelson, II.O., bonk keeper,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described laiul:
Commencing at a pent planted on tho
east boundary of lot '182, tit a point 40
chains smith ol the north-east corner
of Bditl lot, thenco south 80 chains;
thence east 20 chains; tlience norlh 80
chains, thence \vett20 chains to point
of commencement, antl containing 100
acres, moro or less.
CHARLES OLABKSON KIIODEB
November 16, 1007. 10-25
A permanent situation, Territory reserved ; Pay   weekly ; Free outfit.
Write for partici_.l_.rs.
Stone & Wellington
FOHTHILL NURSERIES
(Lieonsed hy B.O. Government.)
TORONTO       -      - '      ONT.
�� ***************. *.** , * , H
VICTORIA
HOTEL ^
$ttverton, 25.(3.
tjb'l   .
Recognised by the Travelling
Public, Miners aud Mining
Meu to be the Best Hotel in
the Slocan. The bar is stocked with the choicest quenchers.
AD Spencer ���* prop
Slocan Lan-' District���Distri
West Kootenay.
it Of
Take, notice that the Oninrio-Mncan
Lumber Co., Ltd., of Slocnn, H.C,
Lumbermen, intend to apply for a special limber license over the fillowing
(ieserile.l land*: Commencing at a
p st planted tliree'ly ODputlto tlie 17
mile board of the N. AS, Railway and
on tlie souih side of Bonanza creek and
marked "Ontario-Slocan Lumber Co.,
Ltd., N.E. coiner," thenci south 40
chains, tlience west 180 chains, thenco
noith 40 chains, thenco east 1(10 chains,
to point of commencement and containing 100 acres more or less and covering
tho BUme ground   formerly   covered  hy
Timber license No. 10218.
December 4th, 1907.
ONTARIO-SLOGAN LUMI.KRCo. Ltd.
Per D. S', Denis, Agent.
I Lucerne
li Shaving Parlor.
The only Public Baths
in tbo Hlocnn.
'- * Agent for the Kootenay Steam
Laundry.
���j  J. E. ANGRIGNON  - PROP.
f> **************** ********
[,_LAND ACT-KOOTENAY LAND *T
DISTRICT.
District of West Kootenay.
Take notice that I, John D. Reid, of
Slocin City, B.C., prospector, intends
tosyply for permission to purchase the
follow ing described laud:
Commencim* at a poat near Ten Mile
Creek, Lot 8428, about 400 feet south
of pont mark id "J. O.K." running souih
20 chains, erst 20 chains, nortli SO
chains, west 20 chains to point of commencement.
Dated S-.pt. 30th, 1007.
J. D. REID.
O30 7
innbevtaMno
parlor,
Funeral! conducted on Bbort
notico ut any point ln tho ..If.
trlct.   (.hells el ways in stuck.
fi> fDcXean, mm*-**.
CONTRACTOR AND MILDER.
Repairs to Brooches, Pino, etc. in Gold
or Lead Solder.
All work guaranteed.      Special -attention to mail orders.
REVIEW BLOCK  -  NEW DENVER.
*���? NEW DENVER. B.C.
__t
Ji+*'**+>}**-.+*+*+*4H*. <*������*+
*********************************i**:*****+********
.professional <2aros.
WOOD, VALLANCE
HARDWARE Co.,
Ltd.
Shelf   and   Heavy   Hardware,   Mine
Smelter and Mill Supplies.
NELSON,   B.C.
���A..   O.  OotToy
MINES and MINING
REAL ESTATE
Correspondence Invited
Madonna Block   :    New Denver, B.C.
     P. O. Box 87.	
NEW OFFICE
I-iO^v�� c5c I-le.ll
MUTING PROMOTERS
Capitalization .20,000
FBUIT LANDS AND REAL ESTATE
New Denver
General Merchant   -
New Denver
provincial Hssa^er
anb Cbemtst
Sandon -Assay Office
Late F. H, HAWKINS.
Ordinary Tariff:
Gold, Silver, Lead, Copper, Iron, Silica,
$1.00 each.
Silrer with Copper or Lead, Ma rig-muse,
Lime, $1.60 etch.
ZIne, Antimonv,    Sulphur,   Gold aud
Silver, $3.00.
Gold, 8il.er, with Lead or Copper, Zino
and Silver, $2.50.
Silver, Zinc and I,e��d  $8 00
Gold, SilTar, Zinc, Lead and Iron, $t.00
fipocial Hates for Mine and Mill Work.
9
GO
Has got in a  large and excellent supply of  Groceries i >
and Christmas Goods.    He docs not import tea
by the half ton,   but has a   fine assortment of
Teas,    Some of the varieties are
IRabob. (Soloswortb. Xlptons, IRamlal,
Blue (Ribbon, Ikotalenne
And tho_Coltimhia Choicest Sun Drietl JAPAN TEAvx **KfT-1
���J**-M**<H"*-**-*'+**^
:-������*:���
Si
������ *."-;l
'1��".
��t����m��i������mm>o_��,��>,*)nommmmmi_ttltt
F^si,il-w-e_3r
St lames' Hotels
Firat-clp.sa Rooms; First-class Meals; First-class Bar; Special
attention to Tourists. Luxury and comfort when visiting this
favorite summer resort absolutely euarantced. Guides furnished for Hunting* and Mountain Climbing* Parties. Gasoline
launch in connection. Incomparable Scenery and Climate.
Facing lake and glacier this hotel offers all that is required
to make your visit a memorable one.     Write or wire to���
ft
..i il
_A. Jacobson. Prop., New^Denver.'B.C.
mm
338 !
'F>llt***-
��� s��o*e-)*��oaos>ocoe.coe����e*oecae��a������e*��'.c_��e��e9cooe**��a
Christmas
Excursions East.
ouns
To MONTREAL,
TORONTO and all points
west thereof
In Ontario nnd Quebec. Quebec,
���St John, Halifax, and othar
MarilitiMt Province Cities.
Rates on application.
Tickets ou sale elui'y December 1
to December 31.
Round trip  First Cla-s, three
months' limit.
OLD COUNTRY RATES:
Halifax, St. John, or Portland and return
Fresh Milk delivered to any
part of the town.
Outside points supplied regularly.
H. S. NELSON
Proprietor.
Put up in Pint Bottles for Family and Hotel Trad*.
We guarantee its Strength and Purity.
MADE   BY   TUB
$93 -35
Return Ocean Fares: Sateen,
$10*1.50; Second, $70; Steerage
$55 nnd np according to steamer.
For detailed ih formation, Bailings
ocean steamers, lirat class or
tourist sleeper reservations, apply
to local agents or
E, J. Covli, A.G.P.A.
Vnnc*uver,
John Mot, D.P.A., Nelson.
FUNCKEB Prop.       NEW DENVER
Ladies' Dress 10c
"      Silk Blouie or Ball  .
Gown.... 60c
Towels, handerchiefs, petticoats, socks, etc 60s do*.
Workin-t men waahin_; 10c pee.
Collars 3c. Shirts 16c.
Special attention to shipping order*.
EXCHANGE Hotel
SANDONj
THOMPSON BROS. Props.
Warm Cosy Rooms.       Restaurant in
connection.   Excellent Pool Table.
Ear well Stocked.
New York Brewery
The Leading Hotel of the Silvery Slocan
The Reco
Sandon, B. C.
Bieabquartere for flDtnino anb travelling flDen
Meals First Class. Bar, The Bes|Sl
"Rooms Xaroe, Clean'anb doet.
f*
Should your business or pleasure take
you to Sandon at any time, call at
the   Kootenay   and let Ed. or
George mix you the famous
San '.on Cocktail or your
own favorita lotion.
No frost here. Two shifts always.
The lei taer I^iimk Co. ��* wuiiam Bennett si
4
Manufacturers of Pine Lumber, Shiplap, a**d
Finishing Fir and Tamarac, Dimension, Etc.
Mill oa Slocan Lake
A. OWENS, Manager
P.Oi Box 20.
SLOCAN  ASSESSMENT DISTRICT.
ASSAYING.
Colin J. CampbelK
Assayer
Notary Public
Conveyancing
PHONE 2.
COURT OF REVISION AND APPEAL
under the provisions of the Assessment Act, respecting the Assessment
Rolls for the year 1908 for the Slocan
Assessment Dislrict, will be held aa
followB:
In the Government Office, Knslo, B.O,
10th December, 1907, at 10 a.m.
In   the    Mining    Keoorder's   Olllee,
Slocan City, llth December, 1007, at
the hour of 2 p.m.
In the Government Office, New Denver, B.C., )2th December, 11107, at 2
p.m.
In the Koco Hutol, Sandon, B.C.,
13th December, 1907, at 10 a.m.
II. It. JOKAND,
Judge of Court of RevlllOQ
and A'ipeul.
Kaslo, B.C.,
22nd November, 1.-07.
57m. Mfbbowson
PROVINCIAL ASSAYER nnd
METALLURGICAL CHEMIST.
Gold, Silver, C ipp��r orL-f.d, each, $1.0*0
Gold-Silver..$1.50 Bilvtr-Lrad..$l.50
Zinc. .$2.00 Gold Silver with Copper or
Lead.. 2.50.
Prompt attention given to all samples.
25 par eent. discount upon (Ire samples
BAKER ST,, NELSON.
P.O. Drawer, 1108 Phone A67
<***Brtr*"*-i'"'Aj____ a .    *T." J-' ���S^S��gBMs____535-S8S5H-.J
Slocan Land Dislrict���District of
West Kootenay.
Tike notice that I, Mi.rion  MfTnn.s.
Angus McIntlSB, agent, of New Denver,
spinster, intend to apply lor permi-slon
puroiiaso   the   followldg   deseiihod
ml:    Commenelng at a post planted
at the north-west  corner  ol   lot 2,508
(I.I., Kootenay rji'trict, tlience west 20
chains, thence south  20 chains,  thence
east.20 chains, thence nprth 20 chains
to the place "f commencement containing 40 acres more or less."
PIPE and FITTINGS
��� ALWAYS KEPT IN STOCK ���
i-i-inch to v/i inch, also j^-iuch
Galvanized Pipe.
}S,  }{,  and  y^   Brass Pipe and
Fittings for Launches.
:S5
A HAPPY NEW
YEAR.
Herbert Cue, New Denver Bakery,
Box 44
JS.
Rubber Packing Always Kept,
Pipe cut to auy length.
Sinks, Lead traps, etc., etc.
Denver Waterworks
Company, Ltd.
II. J. G. ANtiELL
Manager,
r.o. box io
Dated November 88r.1, 1S07.
NEW DENVER
MARION M.INNES,
A. Mclnnes, Agent.
Slocan Land District���District ol
\Yo.*t   Koolenny.
Take notice that I, Amlrew Jacobson,
agent for J. E. Brouse, of New Denver,
physician, "intends to apply for permis-
lion to purchase the following described
land: Commencing at a post whero
l.t 8(390 intersects v, ith lot *1*'5 snd
ma**ked J.K.ll.'s N.E. corner pos'
thenoe couth 15 thains, thence ea't 40
chains, ihence ��*jnlli 20 chains, thence
wist ?0 clmiiio thenco north ��r> chains
inorn or loss lp the boundary **f lot SUHO
G.I., thence o��':t 110 chains ..lore or Icon
to lbs cornerof lot 800*0, thence norlh
10 chainB, thence east 10 chains to tho
point of commencement, containing 200
acres more or less. The land is eituate
about % of a mile from the head of Slocnn lulu*.
Dated November 22:.d, 1007.
JACOB EDWIN BROUSE,
J. 80. Andrew Jiu*oh_t*i, Agent
Po     &*&���&*
SILVERTON, B.C.
HIGH-CLA88 TAILOR
>M*��<*��fM������o����*a..e��M>*y_,i
Qo to Wilson's for
���Heavy Goods,
Flour,   Hay,    Oats,
, Steel, etc.
T. H. WILSON
SiLVERTON, B.C,
| t**V*Q*$t&*9*Wt*Mr*<$*>t>**frW'$ $&$***** 9Mr&&*&*>t>*&&* $
.^.

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