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Similkameen Star 1912-04-03

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Princeton coal only requires stovepipes cleaned yearly
LRAMeb*
God is Love.
Manufacture of Portland Cement will begin this year in East Princeton—Smelter construction a necessity for Voigt camp, Copper'mountain,
Whipsaw and Friday creeks—Princeton has electric light, waterworks, school, churches, hospital, an Ideal climate and clean, healthy situation.
Vol. XIII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1912.
No. 14
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
Gordon Bros., trappers, report unusually light snow ia the mountains. They
saw many carcases of deer killed by
coyotes and cougars They have had an
excellent catch of fur.
August Thomas, vice president of the
Nel-_>n Brewing Co., has gone to Spokane with his family on a visit; from
there he will go to Tacoma; Wash., his
former home. Mr. Thomas has a firm
faith in the future of Princeton.^©
Peter S^__is^__^e_T7town  to Vancou-
.' . t_ _t _
ver last Thursday on a business trip
So far thei|i_>rting editor of Star has
not heard of any athletic sports or games
for the coming season. Have the boys
lost ambition-or is it just the lack of suitable grounds on which to practice? The
24th of May, Victoria day, will soon be
here and a challenge match of baseball
with Keremeos is mooted. Let citizens
shake off winter's slumber and put on a
lively sporting attitude.
Some talk of May and June weddings
will keep society in a feverish state in the
interim. Piobably leap year is causing
these unions of heart and hand.
L. W. Shatfotd arrived in Penticton
Monday night and is expected to visit
this district soon.
Thos. Graham, of. Victoria, and Thos.
Morgan of Njrnaimo, conl cnyne inspec
tors, wej_r yr Princeton uys week on
official busUless.
Tommy White, confined to the hospital
with a bruised leg, is improving nicely.
Farmers up the Tulameen are bothered
by stray cattle running over their fields.
The ground is thawing and these maver
icks are playing havoc with the fall
wheat and timothy fields. If the G. N
would fence their right of way it would
save the farmers considerable worry.
In the case of Terrabaskec vs. Edmond,
before Judge Brown at Keremeos last
week, defendant Edmond was accused of
appropriating a steer belonging to plain
tiff. Mr. Edmond was acquitted of the
charge, being defended by Attorney
K. C. Brown, of Princeton.
Thomas. Bros, have a large new stock
of bedsteads, mattresses, etc., which they
are selling at very reasonable prices. See
them."
C. McDonald, aged about 60, died at
the hospital Monday morning. He came
originally froth East Kootenay and lately
was a barber at Tulameen.
The farewell partv given by Mr. Craig
in the court house last Fiiday evening
was well attended. From Coalmont Mr.
and Mrs. Fraser, Miss Fraser, and Miss'
McQueen came, besides .Pri.ncetonians to
the number of 40 or 50.
B. A. Yandall, assistant tp P. W.
Gregory, P. I,. S., has arrived from Vancouver.
James Malone of the Hcftel Tulameen
has gone to the Arkan_asi£ot springs.
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RICHARD IN SADDLE
Firmly Seated, Premier Rides
on to Victorious Sweep
of Province.
Not a Liberal Left to Tell the Tale,
Honest John' and' Tombstone'
. Down, Ont.
The results of the provincial elections
in detail, f6und on page seven, a e not
materially changed by later returns. It
is doubtful if Parker Williams, socialist,
is elected, the figures being contradictory
in the dailies; but at the most two Soci
alists may form the opposition in the
next house
Thirteen Socialists and three Liberals
possibly six, lost their deposits. Seven
Independents shaied the same fate.
Liberals who lost deposits—Cowichan,
A Perdue (probably); Delta, John Oliver;
Kamloops, R F Leighton (probably);
New Westminster, G Kennedy; Saanich,
WNoble;Yale,JPMcConnell(probably.)
Socialists who lost deposits—Esquimau, G Oliver; Greenwood, G Heather-
ton; Nelson, A Harrod; Okanagan, G T
Stirling; Rossland, G Casey; Skeena, W
H Montgomery; Vancouver, W Bennett,
J  Reid,   W  A   Pridhard, J   P Lord, J A
SIXTEEN CENTCOPPER
Rising  Market for Red Metal
—B.C. Copper Co. Starts
New Work.
Placer Mining on Tulameen River-
Coal Market.will Widen
with Railway.
ParmPeUigigg e
Independents who ost deposits—Dewd
ney, A McNeice; Esquimalt, J J Jardine;
Islands, P Winch; Nelson, Harry Wright;
Skeena Dr Clayton; Vancouver, S Greer;
Victoria, B J Perry.
Elected by acclamation—Nine. .
Out of_-s^atsthe Conservatives have
safely won 40 and probably 41.
MISSIONARY DEPARTS
]. R. Craig, Presbyterian missionary,
said farewell to his congregation on Sunday night, preaching eloquently from II
Cor. 13:11: ' Finally, brethren, farewell.'
Mr. Craig returns to Westminster hall to
complete his divinity course, afterwards
entering upon t e larger sphere open to
ordained ministers. Through his energy
and that of coworkers he has built up
large congregations here and at Coalmont. It is too soon yet to estimate the
results of Mr. Craig's- labors, the usually
applied tests of success being manifest in
conversions, reformed lives, social better
ment and in uumbers added to the church
roll. He has made numerous friends
from whom he is grieved to part; all
wishing him every success in his high
calling. Mr. Craig leaves lor Vancouver
this week.
The band has rented the room nearest
the sky in the Star block anisoon the
|fiarm«of music will be£(wafH_. on the
evening air.   Let 'er waft.
The coroner's jury investigating the
Diamond Vale disaster at Merritt brought
in a verdict of accidental death. Two
riders were added: 'That there has been
manifested by the management gross
negligence through not providing efficient
equipment and the disposition to evade
the rules specified in the Coal Mines
Regulation act; that there has been laxity
upon the part of the inspector of mines
in not seeing that the forms of the said
act were strictly enforced.'
Copper is quoted at 15c. in Boston and
A. Lewisohn predicts 16c. copper soon.
Okanagan county, Washington, will
prove to be a good market for the Princeton and Coalmont coal product, as the
haul is a short one, and in the future coal
will be in heavy demand for fuel. The
branch to Wenatchee will open an extensive territory for coal consumption, and
the supply will be drawn from these new
Macdonald;   Victoria, V Midgley;  Ymir,        . nearby coa, fields.—Oroville Gazette
-'^YjT'O. Coulthard and J. O'Neil are putting in patent gravity tablts to save bedrock concentrates on their placer mining
claim 8 miles from Princeton up the Tulameen. The ground is rich in platinum,
gold and black sand. They expect to he
washing in three weeks/^nd have had
three men working steadily. The -ejaim
is a part of an old channel of Granite
creek which was worked in the early days
of gold mining, probably $100,000 in
gold being recovered then.
I George Aldous has charge of the work
for the B. C. Copper Co. on the _da B.
and Silver Dollar mineral claims, Copper
mountain. Eight men started on Monday on a shaft and the work will be continued until the company proves the ore
body, j
■J. E. Leckie of Cobalt, Ontario; will
make diamond drill tests of the coal and
ore deposits on the United Empire company's mineral properties at Onemile.
Four hundred thousand coal miners on
strike in United States. S__~~*  a<_h-. -
British coal miners returned^ to work
on Monday." '-- (i_<j^r__>4t
Five thousand railroad laborers from
Hope to Kamloops on C. N. R. construction are on strike.
Captain Scott's boat has returned without him. The captaiu is still looking for
the pole.
BUILDING NOTES
J. Knudson, contractor and builder,
has the large new store (or the A. E.
Howse company nearly completed. The
building is two stories; the ground floor
being designed for a' bank or office
quarters. 25x50, the remaining 75 feet
frontage beingo_cngj_rfl with store. The
building \sr heated with hot water
throughout. i_3. R. Boucher is the
architect and the building will be a
notable improvement to the town. Mr.
Knudson makes cement blocks for building purposes and may expect a large
business when cement is produced in
East Princeton. 6
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.'.- Kirkpatrick &' Malone of the Tulameen
hotel are putting a stone foundation under the main building and later will build
an annex to accommodate increasing
trade.
J. W.  Kansky has built a carpenter •
shop on Halliford avenue.
J. Johnson has a house nearly completed on the north side of the Tulameen
river.
Orrin Allen has purchased the lot and
barber shop owned by^E; O. DeLong and
will erect a large bu__litj{fto be used as
a pool hall.    Aw_JlIp_.n has the contract.
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
Miss Rose Williams of Riverside,
Washington, is visiting her sister, Mrs.
Neil Thompson.
H. B. Wells, soninlaw of Mr. and Mrs.
Hagerman, has arrived with his family
from Falls City, Oregon.
Paddy Murray, prospector, left last
Wednesday for the Granite creek placer
diggings.
Constable George Sproule of Hedley
was in Princeton Thursday on official
business.
J. N. Nelson and family left last Wednesday for Spokane where they will visit
relatives, subsequently going to Edmonton, Alberta. Mr. Nelson is loth to leave
Priuceton now, but owing to parental
considerations he is enjoined to go.
The grand ball to be given by the
Modern Woodmen of America on Friday
evening will, no doubt, prove enjoyable
to all. Nothing will be spared to make
the occasion the best of the season. Come
and trip the light fantastic. Professor
Knignt's orchestra. Admission $1.50,
ladies free. C
• All members of Rebekah lodge No. 24
are requested to be present at the I.O.O.F.
hall on Thursday evening at 8:30, April
4, to meet he president of the Rebekah
assembly of British Columbia, Mrs. E.
Evans, of Rossland.
O. H. Carle reports garden seeding and'
spriug farm work nearly finished at
Keremeos Prospects -of a big crop of
fruit this year are bright. Weather is
warm and favorable, the thermometer
registeering about 80 degrees of heat.
 ff
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April 3, 1912,
HOTEL  ARRIVALS.
At the Tulameen—G S Jermyn, J T
Ryan, Ed Clark, Coalmont; Wes Jones,
John D McDonald, D_n Coutney, Five-
mile; George Sproule; Hedley; G W
Hodgson, Merritt; Thos Graham, - Victoria; Thos Morgan, Nanaimo; H E Hall,
Frank Barber, C Bird, Tnlameen; Mts N
Thompson, Miss Rose Williams, Riverside; C J Rowbotham, G W Mabey, Vancouver; H Dingee, Nelson; Jas Lacey,
Princeton.
At the Similkameen—J Shagwoh, Carl
Hairsine, _?E McClelland, jQ^rince, B
A YandalffS Ball, Chas Wrigley, Van
couver; W E Brooks, R Carew, Edgar
Wood, K V R survey; Thos Graham, H
Marboeuf, Victoria; Thomas Morgan,
Nanaimo; D E Fobo, P C Brooke, Chas
Cottrell, city; J A Price, Coalmont; A T
Hall, Nelson; D W Hutchinson, Calgary.
FOR PALE—Old newspapers, 25 cents
per bundle of loo. Suitable for underlying carpets.    Star office.
Blue print maps by F. W. G roves
P.LS., showing mineral claims on Copper and Kennedy mountains and Voigt
camp.    Price $2.    Apply at Star office.
A lot of local aud other matier is
crowded Out of this issue.
•■ Rfev. T- Williams will shortly leave for
[England on a visit extending over some
six months. It is hinted the reverend
gentleman will not come back alone.
SIMILKAMEEN GUIDE"=M.inin* lfS£ou£
istsand Sportsmen.
PacK horses provided. Apply C. M SNOWDEN,
P O. Box r7, Princeton, B. C
FOR SALE
TWO and one-half  acres   suitable   for
garden, in good state of cultivation;
cellar; house; on Similkameen river
Price, $200 cash.   Apply to
WONG SING.
TO RENT
A well equipped and stocked farm,
situated eight miles from the town of
Princeton, B C. Good house and farm
buildings. A married man with family
preferred. For further particulars in
quire of S. R. GIBSON,
Princeton, B. C.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Anglican church services at Princeton
holy week and Easter day: Thursday
next special service 8 p.m. Good Friday,
the Crucifixion of Christ; services 8 p.m.;
special vocal and instrumental music
Easter day, Granite Creek, holy communion, etc., at 11 a.m. Princeton,
Easter service, 7:30 p m.; offerings for incumbent. Easter annual meeting on
Tuesday, April 9th.
Rev. J. Williams is holding special
services at outside points the early part of
this week.
Presbyterian church services —Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service' in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
service, 11 a.m.
Methodist church service, Sunday,
April 7. In Oddfellows' hall, at 7:30
p.m. ; cement works at 11 a.m.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject for Sunday next: 'Unreality.' O
earth, earth, earth, hear the word of the
Lord.—Jeremiah 22:29.
SPECIALS.
FOR SALE—Stallion, five years old
Clydesdale, weight 1600 pounds. Apply
to August Carlson, Princeton, B. C.
A fine opportunity to secure a good
musical nstrument—a drawing for an
organ in good repair will be held on
Easter Monday. Tickets for sale by Rev.
J. Williams.
For Sale—A dandy 'batching' outfit.
Ask the operator Great Northern station.
Get a view of your ranch, house or
mining claim from Priest with his new
8x10 camera.
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♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
Real Estate, Mines
==flnance==
Do you want to Invest
Ground floor price?
Double your money inside of one year
TWO LOTS !§f|
ing on Bridge street, corner of
Tapton avenue, and the other
facing Tapton avenue. House,
woodshed and cellar. House
rents for $7 per month.
PRICE $1000!
Half cash,- balance equal instalments 6 and 12 months
Location   suitable   for  Store,
Boarding House, etc.
J. M. WKIttBT-:-]
Real Estate, Finance and Mines
PRINCETON, B. C.
'^^^^^^^^vgy^^^**^*,^,^^,^,^,^ b*^**^**^**
Royal Bank ol Canada
CAPITAL   ^>   -    ^j|    -       -       $6,990,000
RESERVE UNDIVIDED PROFITS,   $8,275,000
A General Banking Business Transacted
Interest allowed on savings accounts at higest current
rates.    Drafts and money orders sold on all  points.
PRINCETON BRANCH       G. M. K. MACLEOD, Manager
• .*vv*^^^/^^^A'**VVv,*AA*VVVVVVVV>rfN* A#^«^_^^^%_iVV««^ri^^MW^^MVWV^^VVS^^#S^%_^VVS«VVS«V«<
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., L.L.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000"
 ,___         REST» "   $8.000»000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The CS'nadlan Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in tjfe following countries witn&ut delay :
Africa Crete
Arabia Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
Australia
' l-syp*
Austria-Hungary
Faroe Islands
Belgium
Finland
Brazil 'i
Formosa
Bulgaria
France 3
Cevlon
Fr'ch Cochin Chi
CW.;\7
Germany
China
Great Britain
. i
ma a.
Greece
Holland
Iceland
India
Ireland
Italy
'apan
__va~
lalta
Manchuria
Mexico
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Philippine Islands
Portugal
Roumania
Russia
Servia
Siam
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlement*
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey -
United States
Uruguay
West Indies, etc.
The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling*, francs, marks, lire, kronen,wflorins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. A233
J. D^JVNDRAS,   Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
*'A
mm Of MONTREAL
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ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD.OFFICE, MONTREAL
R. B. ANGUS, Esq., President
Sir EDWARD CLOUSTON, Bart , Vice-President
H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., Generai, Manager
Capital - - -       $14,887,570.00
Reserve and Undivided Profits   -   $16,855,185.36
SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTHENT
Deposits received from $i upwards.    Ranching and  Mining Business
given every attention
BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits may he made and withdrawn hy mail.    Out of town accounts
^receiye-eveiy attention.    A General Banking Business Transacted
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PRINCETON BRANCH B. L SMITH, Manager
P. BURNS & Co.
FLESHERS   AND %
FISH    DEALERS     ff
Prime Beef, Pork,  Mutton.   Salmon,   Halibut,
flackerel, Herring.   Eggs, Butter, Lard
Largest Dealers in the West
PRINCETON, B. C.
Kitchen Utensils f
A substantial shipment of Kitchen Utensils has just
reached us from the Bast, and we are now in first-class
shape to supply your needs at right prices. Better look
through your stock and see if there isn't something
you require.
A. L. WHITE'S Furniture Store
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar  Shingles  $3.50 per M
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERIC^
Meetings, third Mondays,  in the Odd
fellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. "W\A.DDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL, Clerk.
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April 3, 1912
THE SIMILKAMEEN INDIANS
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
+
[Continued from last weekj
In pursuing deer, sheep or goats the
Similkameen used a species of dog crossed
with the wolf or coyote "(the wolflfiaking
the best cross, the result being a braver,
finer animal, while those crossed with the
coyote had more of the  cowardly,  slinking nature of that  creature);   these  were
fleet and  strong and  highly  prized by
their owners.    In early times the women
were nearly as good hunters- as the men,
'but since they have grown  civilizecTtney
have givenit up. lest ttjeTWhite settlers
shotffir*I_u_h at them for they are highty |
sensitive to ridicule.
Before guns were plentiful among the
Indians birds were*gnared in slip nooses
set in the trees they frequented. The
fool bird (a specres of grouse quite deserving its name) was caught with a loop
tied to the end of a long pole; the loop
was thrown over the bird's head, and it
was just "yanked" off the tree or bush
on which it sat.
Fish were caught in  the Similkameen
and its tributaries in basket traps and by
horse   hair lines with  thorn_jir_cactus
_hooks   attached.     The   fish   were   also
caught in  nets' placed  across a stream;
these nets were formed  of twine made
from a  natiyehemp whi_S~T_ewomen
gather, beaming out the fibre witb  stones
and forming a twisted  thread   or  twine
by rolling it with  their hands on  their
bare thighs.    It is rather a comical sight
to see a group of women  manufacturing
twine.   This twine is strong and  is used
for many purposes.
Before matches found their way to
these Indians fire was produced by in.
sertiug a piece of hard wood-Jjito a punk,
stump oY Tog, aad twirling it round be-
tween'the h_ri_s until the fiction induced
Ombustion. The inconvenience of
kindling fires in this manner made the
Indians chary of allowing their fires to
be extinguished.
I cannot learn that t  ere was  any pa
ticular    significance   attached    to    fire,
though it wasthejoedjum through which
offerings ,w.ereMI made. ^the^deaclT but
they have some  tradition  of anu___r-rH
grounds-re.I   have   been   told by an
Okallagan and a  Similkameen Indian of
a river that is said to exist somewhere in i
the mountains,  that after  a  rather  turbulent course, leaps over a high precipice
and sinks into a deep hole that goes down
into the earth till it   reaches  kee kee-lee
fire   (tnid erg round   fire),   and steam   ori
smoke, asffiey call it, ascends  from-the
hole—.theriver  is here lost.   Neither of
the Indians who told^ me   the  story  had
seen the place himself, but both said.that
their fathers had seen it.   Thej' were both
old men, and as far as I could learn were
not acquainted—both, however,   told exactly the same story.    The other Indians
knew nothing of this river, but said the
old men had heard  about it  from  their
fathers.    This, therefore, may have  been
a tradition brought with them from their
old home or it may have been a  lie manufactured for -the   amusement   of  their
friends. . ,
As I have before remarked the Indian
of today and the Indian of former years
are   altogether   different   beings;    their
food today is the same as ours, or  rather
they live more luxuriously than any poor
white'^eulerwduTd think of ~_c_ng; tfiey
Jwill  not do  wTfuout tea, coffee,  sugar,
■flour,   sago,  rice, jams,   jellies,   canned
fruit, and in fact all that is good.    Form-
. erlv   their food   consisted of fresh and
dried   venison   and   game   of all  kind
Beaver   tails   and  bear paws were    es-
teemed a dainty;   The seeds of the sun-i
flower pounded furnished a sort of flour I
that was made into   cakes.    The root of'
Continued on page 5.
THOMAS BROS.? *
WONHR ST0M W MM _I<_ 1
Westwood & Brooke
POULTRY FARM
PRINCETON, - British Columbia
_Ȥ
QUR STOCK is replete in
Groceries, Hardware, and
Clothing.   See our Men's
Furnishings.    Hats by the
best   makers   and   latest
styles.  See our Dry Goods
and  Ladies' Wear.    Bar=
gains for Buyers.   See the
Goods and be convinced of
the  quality   bf our stock
: SPOKESMAN '
THOMAS BROS.   J
Ye  Olde   Firm   of   Princeton
This White Leghorn male bird won 2nd prize
Spokane Poultrv Show, 1911. -_lso* headed 2nd
prize pen at same show. He lSjSirtrd fc*y ist priz^
winner at Spokane -PouUrj Show, 1911, which
also won shape and color specialsjat same show.
Also was ist prize winner at Seattie*iri 1910
We are now booking" orders for Kgg Stt_ii>£«,
and forward same when required by customeis
Pk_c No. 1—Our selected prize winning stock,
$5 per setting of 15 eggs.
Pen No. 2—A choice pen that will produce
winners and layers. $3 per setting of 15 eggs.
Pen No. 3—a sp endid utility pen for egg production. $1 50 per setting of 15 egg;-.
Book your orders earl v. Terms cashwith order.
Address:   PRl"NC_3TON, B. C.
J. KNUDSON
Contractor
and    Builder
PinsoMng and Heating, Sheer Metal
work, Tinsmithhu)
Shop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St., in Tvlurdock's blacksn .tb sfiop
j I DIGNAN & ATKIN S
PRACTICAL WORKMEN—PROPRIETORS
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
Estimates Furnished-Cement, Wood
Fibrfe Plaster and Lumber.
^^^^^^i^^g!l^^^^^^P^_^^^^^^^^^p__^^B_^
CARLE
•<*vww wwvwwwv www
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   L.  CUMMINGS,  Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc.
General Blacksmithing.
Carriage Building and  Repairs
.   Ali, Work Neatly & Promptly
c Phone 28. Executed
_l
I Headquarters for Groceries, Vege=
% tables and Provisions
t Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Cranberries
[ ORDERS   PROflPTLY   ATTENDED
^ O.    H.    CARLE,    THE   GRQCERYMAN
Read  the advertisements carefully then make  your
purchases==No reason now to send away.
The Princeton
ilvenjsFeed
staDtes
N. HUSTON, PropT
General Livery business carried on
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
J
 PIP
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
Aprii, 3, 1912,
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. n. WRIdHT)
PUBLISHED BVE5RY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -  - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advauce.
ADVERTISING RATES :
_,and Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $$ each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
" 8 cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 per in. per month.
: Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Monday.
THE ELECTIONS.
The cyclonic character of the
victory gained by the McBride administration on Thursday last,
March 28, may be observed in the
complete annihiiation of the Liberal
party and the bare return of one
Socialist in opposition to the government. The new house will be
composed of 41 Conservatives and
1 Socialist. No premier could ask
for a more flattering endorsation of
his policy than that accorded to
Mr. McBride. In fact it is phenomenal in the history of Canada
for a great political party to be
wholly effaced. Such an overwhelming victory is a compliment
to the generalship of the premier
and whole hearted approval of the
railway policy begun in  1909 and
now continued in the campaign
just ended. Many thousands of
Liberals had the good sense to support a policy which has produced
such beneficial results—such good
times. It is to these Liberals with
the courage of their convictions,
imbued with the spirit of independence and progress, that the province
as a whole will recognize with'
gratitude. Electors have confix
dence in the ability and integrity
of Premier McBride, his responsibility is great and he has produced abundant evidence of sincerity
of purpose to serve the people
faithfully and well.
could not digest the railway policy
of the premier in the time allowed
should not have a vote.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
An analysis of the great sweep of
victory on Thursday last proves
that electors are less fettered with
ipartyism than in olden days when
men voted as their fathers or party
demagogues told them. The terse
philosophic truism: 'Wise men
change their opinions, but fools,
never,' is again verified in the
changed and wiser political opinions
of a vast majority in this province.
Really, it is the voter who has the
courage of his convictions, breaks
away from party, that safeguards
his country from dry rot and corruption, and institutes progress and
reform.
: The recent campaign was short
and to the point.    Any person who
Nine government candidates returned by acclamation is eloquent
praise of the electors and their
nominee. Mr. Shatford has proven
to be worthy of implicit confidence.
May he long represent the Similkameen.
The Rev. Principal of Westminster Hall lecturing at Penticton
recently is reported as follows in the
Press of March 23: 'Christian
Science came in for severe criticism
by the lecturer and was described
as nothing less than a recrudescence
of the great central thought of
Buddhism.' What the 'great central thought' of Buddhism is the
lecturer did not say, but to connect
Christian Science in any way with
Buddhism is equivalent to likening
Christianity to heathenism. Christian Science stands for the 'worship
of one God and for utter reliance
upon Him, obedience to his perfect
and satisfying law of good. It
stands for salvation from all evil,
through the divine Christ—his
teachings and his deeds. It stands
for one universal Deity, one universal Christ, one universal Christianity, one theology, one religion,
and for the unity of mankind in one
Christian brotherhood. It stands
for the power of good over evil, for
the extermination of sin and disease, devil and hell, and for the
legal right of man to overcome
temptation and damnation. It
stands for the highest education,
for the obliteration of war and conflict and for an equitable social and
governmental reform. It stands
for a new hope which answers the
deepest human need and is giving
greater peace to a suffering world.
It stands for your own welfare,
prosperity, health, happiness and
an increased capacity for every
righteous achievement.' It stands
for purity of life, trusts not in
tobacco, strong drink or any
material pleasure or remedy, knows
that disease or ill health is the concomitant of sin and literally believes
the scripture that Divine power
will enable one now as in primitive
Christianity to heal the sick and do
the works of Jesus the Christ, who
said 'the works that I do shall ye
do also, and greater.' The
central thought of Christian Science
is God, omnipotent, omnipresent,
omniscient, Life, Truth and Love.
Can the foregoing be said of
Buddhism ? Can the learned principal truthfully show any similiarity
of worship between Buddhism and
Christian Science ? If not, he owes
Christian Science an apology.
Golfers and gophers are out in Hedley.
Next will be crickets and cricketers.
»jM^t^*^^*^Hj.<^jM^^4^_K_>.
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$H ^XK^ZK^Z^Z^ *Z**Z**Z**Z* >X**Z**Z**Z**Z*:Z**Z**Z^Z**Z^^^
THE MAN WHO CAN FORESEE
THE TOMORROW OF   .
EAST PRINCETON
WILL MAKE MONEY BY INVESTING THERE
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
A nODEL CITY
Water system.
Electric light.
Cement walks.
Natural parks.
Nicely wooded.
Fine garden soil.
Athletic grounds.
Excellent drainage.
No danger from overflow.
Can have fine sewer system.
Wide streets and lanes.
Local and long distance phone system.
A PAYROLL CITY NOW
Furnished by the B C. Portland Cement
Co.: Cement, Lime, Bricks.
United Empire Co. : Coal and Copper.  ■
Princeton Coal & Land Co. : Coal.
Princeton Lumber Mills Co. ; Sawmill.
B.C. Copper Co. : Copper.
The Platinum-Gold Fields Co.: Placer
Mining.
One thousand men will be employed
inside of year.
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CENTER   ♦?♦
The Kettle Valley railroad, which will  *b*
soon be the main line of the C.P.R. sys-  *-
A RAILROAD
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Winnipeg, passes through the townsite.   ****
tem, brings Vancouver 300 miles nearer  *^*
Final survey is now being made.
The Great Northern has tracks on  two
sides of the townsite and  will soon be
finished to Vancouver.   These two roads
give transportation in all directions from   4-'^
East Princeton. Jk
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Natural centre, ranching country,   fruit growing.    Huge^ deposits ot copper,   gold, silver, platinum and other minerals.    Has
♦;♦
big water power development.    Lots in such towns as Grand Forks,   Kamloops,  Blairmore, Alta., Baker, Wash.," are worth 5 times Y
what is  being  asked at East Princeton and the payroll is not as large.  „^^_^^__
FREE CEMENT walks with each lot sold—cleared streets.    Water main to be laid in streets this summer.
BUSINESS LOTS $450 up : Terms 10 p.c. cash, 5 p.c. per mo.      Residence lots, $200 up :   Terms, 10 p.c. cash,
7 p.c. on annual balances.    (j_( of all lots are to be reserved) for future sale.    Get full particulars at once.
C. R. BRIGGS, Gen. Agent, 6I5 Hastings W., Vancouver,
>io  per mo.
D. G. McCURDY, Resident Agent, East Princeton, B.C.
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♦♦^♦^♦♦♦^♦.♦♦.^.-►♦^
*****Z**Z**Z**:'
^♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦J
»
April 3, 1912
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
f
>fc
THE SIMILKAMEEN INDIANS
From 3rd page.  .
the speetlum  (a plant resembling P°i*-j
tulacA)"w_5 dug in  the spring and eaten
either boiled with the bark of the service
berry, which imparts an  almoncfflavor,
"ofdried; when dried it madean excellent
snbg\ittftP,Jr>r.  bread.      The    cactus    or
prickley pear, was roasted and eaten with
meat. The sthome (sort of wild potato),
, a root growing abundantly najjretfiind,
was gathered in its season. Various
edible fungi growing in the earth or in
the woods were much used. The long
blackllchens on which the deer fed were
gathered and soaked for a long time in
$be river; a pit was then dug and lined,
first with a laye£of hot stones, over these
a layer of green branches was placed,
the wet lichens were then put in ihe pit
and covered with another layer of green
branches and more hot stones and weeds,
the whole was then earthed over. When
the pit was opened some days later the
lichen was found run into a substance re-
^- semblihg india rahj^gx in taste and
tenacity; this was cut into cakes and
eaten. It is not much wonder that this
delicacy was soon given up.
The berry of the quilshe^tlernftn. or
'nic 'nic, was called 'Ik;,' and when
dried and pounded was used as sweeten^
ing, and nodoubt it tasted sweet to people
nacqualnied with sugar.
The 'nic 'nic, or kinnickinic, is an
evergreen creeping plant with a brilliant
red berry. Though the berry .is no
longer used for sugar the leaves are
still dried and smoked when tobacco or
money to purchase it is scarce.
The wild onion is dug and cor ked in
pits in the same manner the lichens were
cooked. There are numerous edible
roots. The bulb of Hip; li.**1" •••y am>
yellow snowdrop are much used, also a
kin _""«_f"ce 1 ery. Lebrew is made from
the soao berrv. which is beaten with the
hand in water till it forms a stiff froth,
resembling soapsuds. This is really very
nice. There^js-a-tea that they drink said
lo possess many virtues, which the Hudson's Bay company tiied to introduce
inio England under tbe name QfLabrador
tea.
The service berry was the staple food of
the Similkameen J__3i_hsl When the
berries were ripe mats were laid under
the bushes and the berries \ ere beaten
off on to the mats; these were then dried
in the sun; a portion was then reserved
for home consumption, the rest were put
in sacks made of rushes strung together
by threads of wild hemp, an4i£__*_»with
either the Hope or the Okanagan Indians
for dried salmon or watertight baskets,
in the manufacture of whicTT 'the Hope
Indians excelled. /|C
These-oaskets were used fotj^oiling
water or meat. The baskets were filled
with water and hot stones thrown in till
the water boiled or the .jheat thoroughly
cooked. To roast, the meat was transfixed with sticks, which were driven into
the ground, in front of camp fires. The
Hope Flat Heads wove durable mats of
ce_af~b___, aWfTthese mats the Similkameen Indians greatly preferred to those
ihat they themselves made with tule or
rushes, threaded on twine, also'their own
manufacture, asjhey were stronger and
did not harbor vermin. The Siuiilka-
tneen's summer dwellings were made of
^Jiege mats, thrown over a circular frame
■I of poles; whiletheir winter houses were
I simply p___du- in theground and roofed
I with poles and dirt. A _,__*- &T the top
I afforded ingress and egress to the dwellers
(a notched pole serving as a ladder or
stairway);"this orifice was also the sole
chimney^ J?hese houses were known as
ke-ke-teel (chinook expression) and were
veTy-dirty^.iin'whokaQmedens, harboring
every kind of dirt anodlsease. After the
last visitation of smallpox, however, the
Indians were persuaded to give  up using
them.   It is now about thirty years since
/they built their first log cabin at the vil
lage   5f   Chechewa.   Jbis   village   now
boasts oi a cnurch and  many good waim
houses.
[To be continued.]
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
Water Bights in   the Railway Belt
YALE WATER DISTRICT
NOTICE is herebj' given that any person,
partnetship, company, or municipality
having any claim to water rights in the Railway
Belt may file with the Chief Water Commissioner
at the Parliament Buildings,, Victoria, a statement of claim to water privileges on a printed
form (No. 50), which can be obtained front, the
Wat r Commissioners ai New Westminster, Yale,
Ashcroft, Kamloops, Revelstoke and Golden, or
from the Chief Water Ccmmissioner.
Kvidence will be heard at local points as soon
as the claims have been examined and tabulated,
and notices will be published in "the British Col
umbia Gazette aud lo:al papers of the place and
date when each stream will be dealt with. Objections may be filed with the Chief Water Commissiouer. The following strea::.s are supposed
to be wholly or partially within the Railway Belt
in the Yale Water District:
American creek
Anderson river.
«,nderson creek.
Boston Bar creek.
Black Canon.
Beaver lake.
Butter creek.
Boothroyds flat.
Coquihalla river.
Carry creek
Chilliwack river.
Chilliwack lake.
China Bar creek.
Cisco creek.
Dewdney creek.
Emory Bar creek.
Eagle creek
Kmoty creek.
Four-mile creek.
Five-mile creek.
Fraser river.
Fort Dallas creek.
Gordon creek.
Garnet creek.
Gcose lake.
Harrison like.
Hunter creek.
Hanan creek.
Isobelle creek.
Jones lake.
July creek.
Jackass Mountain creek.
Kelly creek.
Kawkwa lake.
Kanaka Bar creek.
Lyttou creek.
Lauder ere. k.
Mineral lake.
Murray lake.
Muddy lake.
Murderers i_ar creek.
Nahie creek. _lt^__
Nohomeen creek.
Nahatlatch lake.
Nahatlatch river.
Niger creek.
Nicolum river,
Nesaquack cieek.
Nikaia creek.
Pierre cieek.
Quoieek creek.
Ruby creek.
Rodick creek.
Railroad creek.
River creek.
Rocky gulch.
Stryen creek-
Salmon river.
Spuzzum creek.
Sawmill creek.
Silver creek,
Skuppa creek.
■Siwash creek.
Siwash creek  north fork
Siwash creek, south fork-
Sleese creek.
Samallow river.
Skagit river.
Schkam. creek.
Seven-mile creek.
Spring creek.
Sucker creek.
Sorrell Springs
Siska creek
Sk-issy river.
Tammy creek.
Tulameen river.
Tulameen river, west fork.
:  Tulameen river, south fork.
Texas creek.
Trafalgar Bar creek.
Uz-vi-hoos river
Unknown creek.
Waleach creek.
Yale creek-
Stream rising two miles west of Keefers.
•  Small stream at Spuzzum
Stream through station yard. North Bend.
Stream at Camp 16, N.W. #, Sec. 34, Tp. q.
Stream through SE J^. Sec 30, Tp. 1-2 R. 26.
Stream half a  mile west of C.P.R station at
Yale.
Stream west of C. P. R. coal bunker's at North
Bend.
Springs in Tp. 14, R. 27, on east side of Cariboo
Road.
■ Statements of claims may also be filed to water
in any unnamed spring, stream, creek, pond,
gulch, lake, or other source of water supply, in
the vicinity of any of the said creeks, etc.
Dated February 14th, iq_2.
W. R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
TERFECTIOlsllf
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is tbe name of the make of the
MEN'S CLOTHING^
we have just received—and it is all that the name implies.
It is perfect in workmanship; perfect in style; perfect in fit.
Besides, it is reasonable in price.
$8.50 TO $25 PER SUIT
Between these two price extremes we show the choicest
effects in Fancy Tweeds, Worsteds, Diagonals and Serges.
The colorings include stylish Greys, Browns, Tans, Navy
Blues and Blacks, in a great variety of patterns.
It is no longer necessary for the men who count, nor the
men who care, nor those who have a just pride in their appearance, to pay tbe excessive prices usually demanded for
made-to-measure clothing, for our " Perfection Brand"
Clothing is just as smart and distinctive as the best custom
tailor can fashion, and embodies many original style touches
found in no other line of clothing in the market.
And we can fit the man who tips the scales at 250 pounds
as well as the one who weighs only 125 pounds! Why not
you?     Indeed—Why Not.
Get the Habit of buying your clothes at Howse's—it
will save you money.
The A. E. HOWSE CO, Ltd
PRINCETON, B. C.
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KING & GIBSON ■
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
bA**BB*BB*BB>*A******B****4***Ab*44*B***
4+^^^^^gZ^^fBfB^BBfB+BBfB-f
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
AlvA**B**BB*B**B**4**4*4*B*****t**l^4B*4»*4^4**BB*BA --#.        _>_•_._._.._._._._.       .-_
COALMONT
The Town of opportunity  §
The rails have been  laid  into  the town and Coalmont is now the new
terminus,   the  base  of operations for  the next  forty miles of railway
building.
Before six months have passed there should be a payroll in Coalmont of
between   350  and  400  men : This  means population, which naturally
means good business. **£;
IF YOU ARE WISE YOU will  invest in a little Coalmont real estate
now while the'ehoice is still good.
Don't let this opportnnily slip  along with  the  others  which have got
past you.    Write for our circular and  price list ; a post caHfosvill bring
it to you.    There are still some 50-foot lots left
Two blocks from the centre of town at only
$225, $55 cash, bal. in 18 months to suit.
Williamson  & Turner
AGENTS, COALflONT,  B.C.
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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS
WATER BRANCH
In the matter of the Board of Investigation created by Part III. of the "Water
Act"   for   the   determination   of   water
rights existing on the i_lh day of March,
1909; and in the matter of the following
creeks in the Similkameen Water District:
Alder creek.
Alkali lake.
Apex creek.
Ashnola river.
Atwood creek.
A-che-ghip-Flat creek.
A-tsi-Klak creek.
Asquatic creek.
Armstrong creek.
Bnckhorn creek.
Bench stream.
Bromley creek.
Baker creek.
Bear creek.
Bear lake. 1
Beaver creek. i
Beaver lake.
Bitter creek.
Blue Joint creek.
Blue lake.
Boswell creek.
Boulder creek.
Boundary creek.
Brodbagen creek.
Bunch Grass Field spring.
Big Rock creek.
Blind creek.
Brown creek.
Buchanan creek.
Bull creek.
Boomerang creek.
* Blythe creek.
Causten creek.
Camp creek.
Canyon creek.
Canyon lake.
Carmi cr ek.  -
Cedar creek.
Cedar lake.
Christina lake.
Christina creek.
Clearwater lake.
Clearwater creek.
Clark creek.
Colchester creek.
Cold creek.
Conkle creek.
Copper creek.
Cougar creek.
Cyclops creek.
Cawaher creek.
Coldstream creek.
Coldwater creek.
Chain lakes.
Coteay creek.
China creek.
Chinpatlin creek.
Cranberry creek.
Cranberry creek; south fork of.
Curry creek.
Conklin creek.
Canon creek.
CoJys creek.
Chandler creek.
Croscut brook.
Dauphin lake.
Deadeye creek.
Deadwood creek.
Deadman gulch.
Deadman lake.
Deep creek.
Deer creek. ■
Daly gulch.
Douglas creek.
Dominion creek.
Dog lake.
Duck lake.
Damfino creek.
Eholt creek.
Eighteen-mile creek.
Eighteen-mile creek, branch of.
Elkhorn creek.
Eleven-mile creek.
Frena creek.
Fair creek.
I a Birleigh lake.
Fifteen mile creek.
Fisherman creek.
Fisherman creek, west branch.
Five-mile creek.
Fons Perenius spring.
Fourthsjuly creek.
Fourth July  creek,   unnamed  tribu
tary of.
Fraser creek.
"    Flatt creek.
Franklin creek.
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
Fish lake.
French creek.
Farrel creek.
Gerald creek.
Goat creek.
Little Goat creek.
Gold creek.
Gold Hill creek.
Green lake.
Gibbs creek.
Gloucester creek.
Gilpin creek.
Graveyaid creek.
Glover creek.
Granite creek.
Gregoire creek.
Gold Drop creek.
Harrison creek.
Haussener creek.
Hardy creek.
Horse creek.
Havnes creek.
Hester creek.
Hamilton creek.
Hell creek.
Henderson Sawmill creek.
Henry creek.
Hewlitt creek.
Hornet creek.
Hughes creek.
Hulme creek.
Hydraulic creek.
Ingram creek.
Ingram creek, east fork.
Incameep creek.
Irrigation creek.
Italy creek.
Inglam creek.
Iron creek.
Joshua creek.
James creek.
■ J°lly Jack creek.
Jim creek.
Keogan creek.
Kepler creek.
Keremeos creek.
Keremeos creek, south fork.
- Keremeos creek, west fork.
Kilpoola lake.
Kuslas Kein-skasken creek.
Kelly creek.
Kettle river.
■' Kettle river, north fork.
Kettle river, east branch of north fork
Kettle river, west branch of north fork
Kettle river, west fork.
Kettle river, east fork of west fork.
I Kingston creek.
Knappen creek.
Kearns creek.
Lime Kiln lake.
Lind creek.
Little Volcanic creek.
Lost Horse creek.
Lime creek.
Line creek.
Lynch creek.
Loon lake.
Lome lake.
Long Joe creek.
Long lake.
Lost creek.
Little creek.
Little chief creek.
Marama creek.
Manuel creek.
Marks creek.
Marron creek.
Marron lake.
May creek.
Meadow creek.
Milligan creek.
Mollie Pritchard creek.
Moody creek.
Mother Lode creek.   '
Murphy creek.
Myers creek.
Myers creek, tributary of.
Meyers creek.
Maloan creek.
McCraie creek.
McCarren creek.
McConnell creek. .
Mclntyre creek.
Mill creek.
Mulligan creek.
Maida creek.
Murray creek.
Murray gulch.
McRae creek.
Munroe creek.
McCuddy creek.
Mica creek.
Mohr creek.
Mud creek.   .
McFarlane creek.
Nogi creek.
Nine-mile creek.
Nicholson creek.
Napoleon creek.
N'Kam-ri-no creek.
N'Kam a-hi-nat-no creek.
N'Katn-eep river ! .'££;*
Norwegian creek
Namless creek.
Okanagan river.
' lOlalla river.
Oro Fino creek
Omellette creek
Old Tom creek
Osoyoos lake
Overton creek
Ontario creek
Park rill
Pass creek
Pass creek, south fork
Porter creek
Prather creek
Parker creek
Prairie creek
Pathfinder creek
Prior creek
Providence creek
Quillette creek
Quartz creek
Rat lake
Reed creek
Rice creek
Riddle creek
Rock creek
Rock creek, south fork
Round lake
Ruby creek
Ruckle creek
Richter creek
Rocky creek
Rattler creek
Sand Bank creek
St. Anne creek
Sand creek
Sandner creek
Savage creek
Sawmill creek
Sawmill lake
Sheep creek
Sheep creek, west fork
Schwartz creek.
Sicond creek
Schillings creek
Shingle creek
Schutnaker creek
Shuttleworth creek
Shuttleworth creek, lake at head of
Stray Horse creek
Smuggler spring
Similkameen river
Similkameen river, south fork
Six-mile creek
Sixteen-mile creek
Sken-Kam Ske-Noo-Ske-Tan creek
Skibbington cre< k
Slate cieek
Smith ere* k
Stray Horse lake
Sultan cretk
Sunset creek
Susap c eek
Susap ct eek, north fork
Sutherland ci eek
Spnng gu'.ch
Spiing creek
smelter lake
Stirling cieek .
Strawberry creek
Split cretk
Summit lake
Summit creek
Snowball creek
Stashla-Valentka creek
Stewart cretk
Sn wshoe cre< k
Snehumption creek
Stevenson creek
Scot McRae creek
Snit Hse-tse-pas. Kan creek
Snit-t. e-Naie-Tan creek
. emple creek
Sixteen-mile creek
Stuart creek.
Tayior creek
Ta> lor lake
Testalinda creek
Texas t reek
Three Spring creek
Tinhorn creek
Togo creek
Tom creek
Tom Tit creek
Trout creek
Trout lake
Twenty-mile creeK
Twenty-two-mile crek
Twenty-two mile creek, east fork f
Twin creek
Twin creek, east fork of
Twiu creek lakes ]      '.
Twin creek, creek running into
Tea river
Troy creek
Trapper creek
Trail creek
Ten-mile creek
Thirty two-mile creek
Twilight creek
Tug-ul-nuit lake
Upper Clear lake
Upper Keremeos creek
Victoria creek
Volcanic creek
Vaseaux lake
Verde creek
Wallace creek
Wallace lake
Ward lake
Whites creek
Wild West creek
Williamson creek
Wilson <reek
Wiseman creek
Woodworth lake
Wolf creek
Wol flake
White lake
iWhite lake creek
.[Wilkinson creek
Waddel creek
Wolverine creek
Williams creek
Wartman lake
Wood creek
West Fork lake
Yellow lake
Young creek
April 3, 1912,
Unnamed Springs and Streams
Lake situate one mile north of Fairview wagon
road about nine miles from Keremeos.
Lake on scuth line of sub-lot 7, lot 2710.
Spring on lot 667 (S)
Small creek on the Florence mineral claim
Creek on sub lot 16 of lot 2613
Small  creek  about  fourteen   miles  west  of
Penticton
Spring three-quarters of a mile northwest of
south boundary of lot 538, group 1. township 72.
Small unnamed lake'on lot 973 (S)
Spring on lot 2138
Small creek running from west ove.* southwest
portion Stem Winder mineral claim
Spring on Smuggler mineral claim
Small  unnamed  creek  one  mile and a half
south of Tinhorn cretk
Small unnamed creek about one mile and a
half uorth from Golden Gate Hotel, Fairview
Spring rising on the Eureka mineral claim
Spring on lot 2456
Unnamed stream rising lot 1297 (S)
Unnamed stream flowing through lot 1738
Small stream on the Fairview townsite
Spring on Pre-emption record 2517
Small stream near south end of Pre-emption
record 2944
Small creek on northeast corner of lot 351.
Spring on section 31, township 49 .
Spring  near west boundary  of Pre-emption
record 125 (S)
Spring near northeast corner oflot 282, group z
Spring on lot 454 (S)
Small stream on Blue Diamond mineral claim
Strtam coming down mouutaln in front of Lawe
homestsad
Spring   rising  in  northwest   }•£,  section   24,
township 28
Small spring on southwest portion oflot 513
Spring on I ittle Frank mineral claim.
Stream flowing through No. 3 mineral claim.
Underground creek on Victoria mineral claim
Spring  creek  about  the  center of the Grey
Eagle mineral claim.
Small spring on lot 2531
Small unnamed creek rising on Pre-emption
record 4613
Spring rising on Pre-emption record 76 (S)
Small spring ou wagon road between Boundary
'alls and second bridge below Anaconda.
Small spring situated on lot 515, township 67.
Small lake on Pre-emption record 238 (S)
Small stream and spring situate on lot 27 (S)
Small unnamed creek on the northeast 5^ tectum 28, township 47
Spring on lot 177
Spring on lot 261, section 33, township 55
Spring near easterly end of New York mineral
claim
Small creek running in< o Myers flat and rising
on Oro Fino mountain
Stream rising on Barnes & Ironsides mineral
claim in Greenwood camp
Stream rising on Apex mineral claim
Three  small la_es situated  on eact  side  of
Okanagan lake and twelve miles below Mission
creek
Spring on Comet mineral claim
Unname 1 stream running alongside road that
borders lot qoo
Spring and unnamed creek on lot 191. group 1
Spiing or ereek on lots 28^4 and 280, township
8<3
Small creek running  southeast   from Maple
I.eaf mine
Small spring on St. Maurice mineral claim
Unnamed   stream running  through  Missing
Link No. 2 mineral claim
Springs on lots 337 and 374 (S)
Unnamed spring on Pre-emption record 628
Small stream half a mile southwest of southwest corner oflot 3334
Spring about 42 chains north oflot 3205, group 1
Spring situate near centre of thi northwest J£
section 13, township 28
Spring near south line of lot 907
Unnamed spring on or near Pre-emption record
4037
Small spring or stream on lot  _|9
Spring on Pre-emption record 4774
Unnamed small stream flowing from spring on
lot 380
Spring on lot 471
Spring sit. ated about the centre of north line
of lot 668 (S)
Small lake near southeast corner of Pre-emption
67 (S)
Small creek on Pre-emption record 2986
Small lake situated on Pre-emption record 2773
Small unnamed lake or slough near east line tf
lot 500, Osoyoos
Unnamed slough near lots 494 and 493, group 1,
Osoyoos
Spring on lot 334
SpritfgfoB-Ot 1359
Springs near northeast corner oflot 365
Springs on lot 2394
Spring near centre of lot 380
Stream running out of Loon lake
Spring on lot 3009, group 1, Osoyoos
Small creek flowing into Kettle river, five miles
south of Grand Forks
Small stream about six miles and a half south
of Eholt
Creek or springs on lot 494
Spring on Colville reservation
Spring on reserve
Spring into Norwegian creek
Creek on lot 908
Stream running through sub lot 3203 of lot
2710
And all named springs, streams, creeks, ponds,
gulches and lakes tributary to or in the vicinity
of the above named streams
Take notice that each and every person, partnership, company or municipality who, on the
said 12th day of March, 1909, had water rights on
any of the above mentioned creeKS, is directed
to forward on or before the 19th day of .pril,
1912, to the Chief Water Commissioner at the
Parliament Buildings at Victoria, a memorandum
of clafm in writing as required by section 28 of
the said act as amended. Printed forms for such
memorandum (form No. 19) can be obtained
from any of the Water Commissioners in the
province;
And ta_e notice that the said board of investigation intends to pre reed to tabulate such claims
on or about the 31st day of May, 1912.
After the claims have been tabulated by the
board, notice will be given of the places and days
on which evidence and argument will be heard
at local points.
Dated at Victoria this 28th day of February,
1912.
J. F. ARMSTRONG.
Chairman.
Advertise and Prosper
e£s
"5
V
April 3, 1912
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
>
A
ELECTION RETURNS.]
Atlin—Dr.   H.  Esson   Young,   Cons,
(acclamation.)
Alberni—J. G. C. Woods, Cons , (acclamation )
Cariboo (2)—Mr. Callihan, Cons ; Maj.
Fraser, Cons.; John Holt, Lib.; both Con
servatives elected. .
Chilliwack—S A Cawley, Con (acclam-
ation.)
Columbia—H G Parsons, Con.; Harold
Forster, Con-Ind., elected.
Comox—M Manson, Con., elected; W
W Lefeaux, Lib.
Cowichan—H Hayward, Con , elected;
A Herd, Lib.
Cranbrook—Thos Caven Con. (acclamation.)
Delta—F J Mackenzie, Con., 525; John
Oliver, Lib., 176.
Dewdney—W J Manson, Cons , elected;
Mr. McNeice, Ind Cons.
Esquimau—R H Pooley, Con , 498;
John Jardine, Con., 96; H D Helmcken,
Con., 188; M B Jackson, Lib., 156; G
Oliver, Soc, 24.
Fernie—Hon W R Ross, Con , elected;
W Davidson, Soc.
Greenwood—J R Jackson, Con, 363; G
Heatherton, Soc , 103.
Grand Forks—Ernest Miller, Con ,
(acclamation.)
Islands—A E McPhillips, Con., elected;
P Winch, Ind.
Kamloops—J P Shaw, Con. elected; R
F. Leighton, Lib.
Kaslo—Neil F. Mackay, Con. acclarn-
tion.)
Lillooet—Mark Eagleson, Con., el
ected; Stuart Henderson, Lib.
Nelson—W R Maclean,  Con,  528;  H
Wright, Ind., 190.; A Harrod,  Soc,   177
Jf_naimo—A E Planta, Con., 578; H
^Shepherd, Lib., 375; J Place, Soc, 621 7
'Newcastle—R   B   Dier,   Con.,  393; P
liams, Soc, 389. ■__*
New Westmi_STer — Thoma? Gifford
Con., 1010; Geo Kennedy. Lib., 385.
Okanagan—Hon Price Ellison, Con.,
elected; G F Stirling, Soc.
Revelstoke—Hon Thomas Taylor, Con ,
(acclamation.)
Richmond—F L Carter-Cotton, Con.
(acclamation.)-
Rossland—L A Campbell, Con., 336;
L D Taylor, Lib., 168; G  B   Casey,  Soc,
95-
Saanich—Hon D M Eberts, Con., 392
W Noble, Lib., 176.
; Similkameen—L   W  Shatford,   Con.,
^acclamation.)
Skeena—W   Manson,    Con.,    elected;
W H Montgomery,  Lab ; Alex   Manson
Lib.; Dr Clayton, Ind.
Slocan—William Hunter, Con., 283; A
Shilland, Soc, 159
Vancouver (5)—G A McGuire, Con.,
5088; Hon W J Bowser, Con., 5077; C E
Tisdall, Cons ,5052; A H B Macgowan,
Con., 5018; H H Watson, Con , 4999;
Ralph Smith, Lib., 3248; Aid Enright, J
Lib., 2928; Maxwell Smith, Lib., 2745;
Aid Cameron, Lib., 2727; J N Ellis. Lib ,
2425; J Reid, Soc, 1153; W Bennett, Soc,
1135; J PLord.Soc, 1033; W A Pritchard,
Soc, 1085; J McDonald, Soc, 1270; Sam
Greer, Ind., 916.
Victoria (4)—Hon. R. McBride, Con.,
3228; H B Thompson, Con., 2547; Fred
Davey, Con., 2475; H F Behnson, Con.,
2375; H C Brewster, Lib., 2043; R T
Eliot, Lib., 1998; V Midgeley Soc, 662;
B J Perry, Ind., 620.
Yale—A Lucas, Con , 445; I P McCon
nell,   Lib.,   22^.    McConnell   J ves    his
/deposit.
/ Ymir—J HSchofield, Con., 559; Parm
Pettipiece, SocT?
Similkameen Hotel
SUMMERS « VKARDIE
PROPRIETORS
Large and New buildin?, well Furnished aud Plastered ; Com-
- w>rta_le ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
Great Northern
—Hotel—
P. SWANSON, Prop.
F. P. COOK
General Merchant
Miners' Outfitter |
Princeton,   Granite Creek
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigar
<rs__i
PRINCETON,
B.C.
HOTEL TULAMEEN \ Post Cards I
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIETOkS
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOHS, ETC.
Commercial _* Sample _* Room s
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
Constable Aston died last Thursday
from the effects of a shot fired by robber
desperadoes.
Next Friday is a public holiday.
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given to  all
Mail  Orders.
EASTER
also a new
line of . . .
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
T. CLARK KING
Architect
Graduate of the Art and Science Department
Kensington, London, Eng.
Member of the Alberta Architectural Association.
Plans and  Specifications  of Buildings  furnished at reasonable rates.
Office : KING & GIBSON
Vermilion Av. Princeton, B.C., Phone 18-
D. R. BOUCHER
ARCHITECT
Coalmont, B.C.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
rh^^'^^_M_?_^t^K^^^:^_^
COMICS
at the
PRINCETON
Drug and
Bookstore
GEO. G. LYALL, Manager.
_
I
I
.
•^_JK_»
TO  CANADIAN   ARCHITECTS
KARL H. MORSE
Ladles and Gents' Tailoring
CLEANING and PRESSING
Vermilion Ave. opp. Similkameen Hotel, j
Competition for New  University Buildings to
Be Erected at Point Grey, Near Vancouver, British Columbia
■ The Government of British Columbia invite
Competitive Plans for the general scheme and
design for the proposed new University, together
with more detailed Plans for the buildings to be
erected first at an estimated cost of $1,500,000.
Prizes of $10 000 will be given for the most
successful Designs submitted.
Particulars of the competition and plan of site
may be obtained on request from the undersigned.
The designs to be sent in by July 31st, 1912,
addressed to
THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
f
I
1
I
4
I
*********4**B**BB**J'
**_."***_."_**_**_*"_l
... Hotel...
Oder Fin
TULAMEEN, B.C.
Good Fisjiing, Boating
Mining Centre
Mrs. L J. Henderson
PRORIETOR:
I
Y
X
Y
Y
1
I
4
:
!
Y
?
4**B*4***A**4r*****B**B**4*AA**B**4>AB*4**4VB*BB*B^^
"MODEL"
LIVEHY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs—Good   Roadsters-
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
BROOMFIELD & GARRISON
Notice to Delinquent coOwner.
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
PRINCETON    LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 53.
Regular meetings. 8 p
m., Thursdays, „
Sojourning brethren welcome. Hall situate in
Thomas Block.   •'Oddfellows Hall."
-♦IAS. Gellatly. P. Russell,
Noble Grand. Secretary
ToT, C. REVEI.Y—Take notice-that unless;
you do pay, within 91 days from the date hereof,'
the sum of $231.95, being your proportion of the
expenditure required for the years i903-4-5-_-7_-q
10-11 by Section 24 of the Mineral Act, upon the
Transvaal Fraction Mineral claim situated on
Copper Mountain in 'the Similkameen Mining
Division, together with interest and all costs of
this notice, to the undersigned your co-partner
in the said claim, your interest in the said claim
shall become vested in the undersigned who has
made the required expenditure.
A. E. HOWSE.
Dated this 29th day of January, 1912.
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
Scavengers
JOHNSON &REHN
Work   promptly   attended   to.     Town
health regulations complied with ; lawful
sanitary conditions in force.   Orders may,
be left at C. Willarson & Co's.
 ——
'#
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
Aprii, 3, 1912,
IJI___§_f
PRINC
_«r____-
-__)-
TON
________
According to the laws of industrial progress and the experience of founders of western towns,
there must be a tangible, genuine basis on which to establish the future city. No amount of
coaxing can bring blood out of a stone, nor can the greatest scientist extract sunbeams from a
cucumber. Every man makes his own destiny=-his own fortune=-nothing comes by so-called
good luck.   The door is wide ajar for all who have pluck and a little capital.   Investigate Now!
*
*
Princeton
*.
With lis Unequalled Mineral Resources
Its Healthful Climate and Pretty Site
^
Is destined to be the Largest City in the Interior of British Columbia.
Five hours' run to Vancouver when the V., V. _s E. is finished.
.?
Your Opportunity Is NOW!
CHOICE I LOTS FORiSALE
And to Suit All Requirements
Enquire of | ERNEST    WATERMAN 1 Manager for
Princeton coil I una co
jfc£
X
i
,i

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