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Similkameen Star 1913-04-18

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Full Text

 I
Watch the Coal Industry Develop at Princeton
Fill the mind with good thoughts: They richly repay in deeds.
14th Year   No. 16
PRINCETON, B.C., FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 1913.
PER YEAR : $2 Cash
Single Copy, _s.
Don't hesitate over a sure thing, doubters arelosers=-Investnow
I
W&b
ANNUAL REPORT OF
j B.C. COPPER CO.
MAKES GOODf
Dividends Help 'Some.'
According to the annual report of
the acting manager of the B. C. Copper company, just submitted to the
directorate, the company's smelter at
Greenwood treated 740,589 tons of ore,
of which 443,022 were derived from
the company's properties, while the
balance was custom ore.
This amount of ore produced 11,146-
811 pounds of copper, 142,025.06 ounces of silver and 25,862 ounces of gold,
the whole giving an aggregate value
of $2,483,663.
The yield in copper, gold and silver
for the past year is less per ton than
for any year in the history of the
plant; the cost per ton for handling,
etc., are lower than for any year. On
account of the low yield the cost of
producing copper per pound is 12.85
cents, notwithstanding the very low
handling costs.
The net results- of- operations were <
$425,885.40, the largest in the history I
of the company, from which, during
the period covered by the reports, two
dividends, Nos. 4 and 5, were paid, aggregating $117,512.
Daring the fiscal year, the company
paid on account of new properties and
in their exploration and development
$229,489, because of the great importance'; of supplementing the ore reserves of the company, and in furth- j
erance of the policy adopted, options
through bonds were taken upon a I
number of properties, all of which are
situated in British Columbia, and may
be considered tributary to the smelter
in Greenwood.        -V'-V. ■
Buys In Voigt Camp.
The B. C. copper have also acquired
a half interest in the Frisco and thirteen other claims in Voigt camp on
Copper mountain and subsequently
acquired a mortgage covering the other half interest on these latter properties which are all embraced in the
Copper Mountain district.
Options were taken on the following
properties, and development work to
the amount of $57,918.39 was expended on the first nine, but the work in
question has proved so encouraging
that the company have decided to take
them over and consequently made payments on account to the extent of
$21,000:
Ada B. group, Silver Dollar claim,
Annie L. claim, Princess Maud claim,
Red Eagle claim. Triangle Fraction,
all'in Princess Camp, B. C; Eureka
group, Queen Victoria group, both
near Nelson; L. H. group, near Silver-
ton. Riverside group, on North Fork
Kettle river; Copper Mountain district, B. C, and Greyhound mine, at
Deadwood camp.
On the last two very extensive explorations were conducted, but further development was, for the time
being abandoned.
Indications are that in the Princess
camp the company will develop a copper mine of considerable extent and j
value, and the work still in progress |
is intended to establish the extent of
ore bodies and the method of their
treatment. It appears the products of
these mines can be successfully concentrated and, if so, profitably transported to be treated at the company
smelter. The exploration work under
way at the close of the fiscal year will
be continued.
The company during the year under
review, has added' to its holdings of
New Dominion securities—bonds of
the par value of $238,675, costing
$122,249.25.
At the Mother Lode mine the transverse stppe method of mining has
been followed throughout the year,
and has proved most successful in extracting the maximum quantity of ore
at a minimum of cost. The tonnage
shipped is the greatest for any one
year in the h__tory of the mine, and
the cost of crushed ore f. o. b. cars at
the mine has been the lowest, namely,
56.58 cents per ton. The drilling of
new ground has been kept well ahead
of requirements, there being at the
close of the yeir 5.000 holes, aggregating 65,000 lineal feet, in readiness
to blast.
The ore reserves have not been materially increased during the year, and
the average grade of the ore mined
has retrained below the normal grade
of former years.
--The mining plant has been maintained in good condition, and the large
tonnage has been extracted without
serious accidents of any sort to either
men or machinery.
Copper Mountain All Bight.
During' the year,; twenty-three
groups of mining claims in British
Columbia and in the adjacent parts of
the United States were examined by
our engineers.. This work resulted in
the bonding . of The Eureka Copper
Mining company's property, near Nelson, B. C, and of a group of mining
claims on Copper Mountain, near
Princeton, B. C, known collectively as
the Princess Group. On these two
properties exploration is being vigorously pushed by both hand work and
by diamond drilling, with generally
favorable results to date. Much exploration was also done in Voigt's
camp on Copper Mountain with fairly successful results. The bond on
this group was allowed to lapse, but
negotiations are now in progress for
renewal. Among the groups examined
?___-"T:hree' other of much promise,
which it is planned to explore during
the coming season. .-■
The ore developed in the Wellington
camp, the report says, was mined out
Continued on page 2
WEDDING BELLS.
The sacred state of tp^trimony was
entered upon by the unj/Jn of hearts and
hands in solemn ordinance, thus joining
Mr. Daniel McCaffrey, M. D., to Miss
Arietta Maud Fajflds at the Methodist
parsonage, Wedoesday, 16th in t., 3p.ru.,
Rev T. A. Ofeb^rne officiating. The ceremony was witnessed by a few intimate
friends, the bride looking happy and
charming in a pretty wedding gown.
The bridegroom is the resident physician
-for the town and district and has built
up a large medical practice. Both of the
principals are popular and well known
as was attested by the flattering serenade
given by men, women and children.
Star joins with a host of friends in wishing Dr. and Mrs. McCaffrey every happiness.
COQUIHALLA PASS IS
SOON TO HAVE
' LINE   M
Bailways 'Bury Hatchet-'
One railroad   track   in Coquihalla pass
built by the   Kettle Valley railway  company and extending 57 miles  from Hope
to Otter  summit; runniug  rights in per
petuitv for the V.,V. & E over that .mile
age at an annual rental based on percent
age of co.t  estimated   at $70 000 a mile ;
those are the terms  of agrtement signed
bvj. J    Warren   lor   t>ie   KV.'andL. C
Gilman forth   V., V. & E.    .
A contract for building ihe 57 miles
will be let inJtoirty davs.
The junorfon point of the two roads is
at mile 30 on the Me f Itt branch
For 25 miles east of Hope the grade is
2.2 per cent,.    . ,!l
The Kettle Valley will be finished by
the fall of 1914.
This road will bring Princeton in touch
with the coast in 5 hours, now it tak _s 3
da\s to reach Vancouver.
If the line is open for traffic in 1914 it
will be abont 15 years since, the first
Coast - Siniilkameen Kootenay railway
charter was gran'ed—shameful waste of
valuable tin___ |«^^JrW
E. E. Coley has located the Kettle Valley line to a point about three miles from
toforh. He moves camp to near C. O
French-'.? ranch today and the distance
from Copper mountain to Princeton will
soo'ri be readv for graders.
MINES AND MINING.
The great congress of geologists at
Toronto in August will bear fruit in that
Princeton, Tulameen and Hedley will be
poiuts visited by these world famous savants The oligocene coal, platinum and
gold placers, and diamonds will be shown
at Princeton and Tulameen How will
Princeton best display her minerals for
their inspection on Aug. 23rd ?
O. Lachmund, smelter superintendent
and manager for the B.C. Copper Co. at
Greenwood, was in town Monday on his
way to Voigt camp and Copper mountain.
A. W. Davis, mining engineer and
geologist for the Trail Consolidated Co.,
was iu town Saturday. Silver lead ore
is trebled by this smelter.
Ross S. Craddock, mining expert of
New York, arrived on Monday and will
make, examination of t-hcTlJ-ited Empire
coal aud ore properties.
The Voigt camp deal is repotted from
reliable sources as completed. Details
are not ready for publication.
Fred Keffer, of the B. C. Copper Co.,
was in town Monday and went to Copper
mountain.
T. J. Corwin, well known placer min
ing man, arrived from Seattle, Wednesday and will begin prospecting on the
Similkameen river, extending five miles
up from Princeton. He will use an Em
pire drill driven by horses. The work
will be in charge of Mr. Watters, mining engineer.
J. B. Desrosiers of Greenwood is in
town. Future is so bright here that he
cannot keep away.
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
A. F. McKenzie, laipd. of Tiiiuhard,'
has a ferocious Jynx in captivity
which he will jjafieavor to time and
if possible ger a mate for it. Lynx
are valuable for their skins, their fur
being of fashionable quality and in
large demand. The 'iaird' will make
an effort to propagate these animals" .
or commercial purposes and. a lynx
colony is not improbable at Tulla-.
hard.
Peter Marquart, an oldtimer of
Nicola, but now of Victoria, was a
visitor to Princeton last wee... During his short stay he sold his two lots
aind blacksmith shop on Harold avenue to W. J. Kirkpatrick. Kr. Mar-
quart is associated with the large real
estate firm of W. J. Fraser & Co., 314
Central building, Victoria, B. C. He
reports good business in Victoria and
Vancouver island going ahead with
full steam on.
P. J. D. De Lantour, district engineer for the water rights branch of
the department of lands, was in town
last Saturday on official business. He
has many knotty problems to solve
where rights are disputed, but aiming
at absolute justice and fairness to all
there is no doubt he will bring order
out of a woefully chaotic condition.
Mr. Lantour resides at Nicola.
Once niore the everlasting hills are
putting on the mantle of verdant
spring, again the bobolink . nd .the
meadowlark sing paeans of joy; only
man in his impatient impetuosity is
sad because the Jimhilkameen is not
connected ■ by direct rail with the
.oast. The cry of the land is O, for
the steel rail, the clang of wheel and
brake and the down grade slide to
Hope, eternal hope.' Bill and Dan
are pushing the. C. N. What is the
matter with Jim and Tom?
Dr.   McCaffrey  is   having   a   pretty
fence erected around his premises on-
Fenchurch  avenue.     Bert   Irwin   has
the contract.
LACROSSE IS THE GAME.
A meeting of the Princeton Lacrosse club was held at Allen's billiard and pool hall on Saturday,
April 12 at 8:30 p. m. The ireeting
settled down to business on tin e and
G. G. Lyall was appointed chairman.
The election of officers was the first
matter taken up. Sam Gibson was
elected manager, H. H. Avery, jr.,
secretary-treasurer; K. C. Erown,
captain, and G. Lyall, vice captian.
The players agreed to turn out to
practise as soon as the days begin to
lengthen.
Tile meeting was unanimous on the
proposition to hold a dance on Friday, the 18th pf April, at 9 p. m. to
obtain funds for the purchase of suitable uniforms for the players. The
committee of the dance is composed
of Eric Anderson, S. Gibson, G. Lyall
and M. Osborne.
* Membership-tickets will be issued
to the public at 50 cents which will
give  anyone a vote  in  club matters.
Mr. Lyall, last year's secretary, reported an invitation from the Keremeos lacrosse club for a game' there
on the 24th of May. Among those
present were Sam Gibson, G. Lyall,
H. H. Avery, jr., Mr. Kirby, M. Osborne, M. Brooks, K. C. Brown, Arrin
Allen, Eric Anderson, M. Waddell,
Mr. Smith and others.
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
Aprii, 18, 1913
Im
B C. COPPER CO'S REPORT.
during the first seven months of the
fiscal year, and in June the mine was
closed for the time being. There is a
large area of unprospected territory
included within the company's holdings in that camp, but owing to extensive prospecting in other localities
it was thought best to postpone further operations at the Wellington until a later date.
The Lone Star and Washington Mine
was operated in June, July and August only, on account of the refractory
nati re of the ore, but little could be
sme_ted directly. Working tests on
large lots of the ore, using ordinary
water concentration method did not
prove sufficiently successful to warrant the erection of a concentration
plaLt. We are, however, making tests
on other lines, which so far have
proved satisfactory, and lead to the
expectation that the problem of successful concentration and elimination
of the refractory constituents of the
ore wll shortly be solved. The 300,-
000 tons of developed ore on this
property, comprised within less than
seven percent, of its area, together
with its comparatively high grade,
make the ultimate solution of the
problem a most important matter.
J. Desmond, hardware merchant of
Oroville, Wash., and daughters were
visitors here on Tuesday. A. LaRose
kindly acted as guide for them and
showed them the sights. Mr. Desmond
may engage in business here.
. .************************************************************************ •
*f* *4*****.**************.**.*****.***7\************?********************** fo
Gasoline
Benzine or
Carnations
Which do you prefer ?
Nice to have people sniffing
>!♦ gasoline or benzine when you ♦!♦
_> _.. H •_>
X come near them
.!     Gasoline and
9
win 5:
benzine
<§» clean soiled clothing, gloves, •$>
etc., but it will also explode X
and is most inflammable. X
NYAI/S KLE-NEM will do J
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE f|j
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD JOHN AIRD
General Manager Assistant General Manager
•♦♦ all that Gasoline or Benzine *\*
will do in the way of cleaning *%
but it will neither burn nor %
explode. *j*
TOWN AND  DISTBICT.
H. T. Rainbow left Monday to accept a position on the big bridge being built from the western boundary
of Welldo across the Tulameen river.
Messrs. Boeing & Brass have the contract _or erection of the bridge.
Neil McFadden, bridge builder, has
a gang of men at work constructing
the new bridge across Onemile creek
on the trunk road. This bridge is
alongside of the old one.
E. Pringle, of Budd & Pringle,
liverynen, Coalmont, arrived back
from a visit to the old country last
week.
The member for Similkameen is expected to arrive today at Penticton
and will visit his constituents for the
next two weeks accompanied by road
superintendent Turner. Both will inspect the roads and allocate appropriations. Similkameen has the reputation of being provided with excellent roads, due largely to the personal interest of its members and a
painstaking superintendent.
T. C. Brooke received the sad news
that his father had died on the 26th
March at Ross, Herefordshire. Eng.,
the suddenness of his removal being
a severe blow, in which he will have
the sympathy of many friends.
The basket ball club held a meeting
Wednesday night at the home of Miss
E. Lyall and an active season of
games will result.
Mrs. Conn, of Aberdeen, Scotland,
"•rites tliat she and her sister are
coming to B. C. Her husband is living at Mission city.
Large Miidiences testif)* to the  increas
ing popiil.rity   of   the   moving   picture
show  given   by  Dignan  Bros.    The pic
tares  are  wonderfully c ear and distinct
and free from odious scenes.
It also leaves a  dainty  odor -**
I
:.
Y •*■•»   ui__*   j\.«.v.j   c__       \janii_j        uuvi      Y
X of carnations. X
y .nyoue who ever used Kle-Neui V
X will never go back to the old fash ,£
»*♦ ioned way. ♦*•
y Kle Nem is only a quarter a y
I bottle. I
X Princeton Drug and Book Store X
X      GEO. O. LYALL, Manager      X
^Before You
Let Contracts for PAINTING
Get My Prices
Estimates Cheerfully
Furnished
JUST, the Painter
Leave word or phone King & Gibson.
CAPITAL, $15,000,000 REST, $12,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS     |
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account Small accounts
are welcomed.    Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons,
withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. ai
J. D. ANDRAS,  Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
Incorporated in 1869
Head Office—Montreal, Que.
CAPITAL   PAID   UP—$11,500,000.
Reserved 12,500,000 Total Assets-$ J 75,000,000
A General Banking: Business Transacted Savings Departments
in Connection.   Accounts of Out of Town Customers
Receive Careful Attention.
J. C. ROBERTSON, Manager Princeton Branch
0__>i
.- NOTICE is hereby given that meetings of the
Provincial Labor Commission will be held at the
following places:—
Penticton—Tuesday, May 6th, lo a.m.
Hedley—Wednesday, May 7th, 2 p.m.
Prinoeton— Thursday. May 8th, 8 p.m.
Greenwood—Saturday, May 10th, 2 p.m.
Phoenix—Tuesday, May l_th, 2 pm.
Graud Froks—Thursday. May 15th, 8 p.m.
Other meetings will be announced later.
The Commission will haar evidence on all matters affecting labor conditions in the Province.
All persons interested are invited to be present.
H. G. PARSON,
_ C ha'rman.
F. R. McNamara,
Secretary. m' 2C
I AstooSi Townsite
Come and make your choice now.
Lots selling from $25.00 to $100.00
if I    ~  |Sr
3,1
m
i
I
3n
P. Burns & Co. Ltd*.
High Grade Meats of all
Kinds, Always on hand.
Fish, Eggs and Poul-
try.
Try Our Home-Made Sausage
The Best in the World
P. Burns & Co. Ltd.
Fire,   Life  and  Accident
Insurance
McLean & Russell
Real Estate
Pinceton
&WWWWW 1 ^Wf^WWW^WWWWifW wwww^*
SPRING
GOODS
We have just opened up our Spring Stock of LINOLEUM and now have a
fine range of entirely new patterns. The designs are altogether different from
anything we have had before and are strictly the latest on the market.
If you are contemplating a purchase of the above goods it will certainly
be to your advantage to see our stock before placing your order.
A. 1 White's Furniture Store
STAR, QUICK PRINTERY
m
April 18, 1913
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
*\ ^^^^^K^^^^^^^^^^^^§ *x**i**t*<>*?
I BANK Of MONTREAL |
*_.♦ '   W..TA_T.TST.RT. 1817—HEAD OFFICE. MONTREAL t
*i*
R. B. ANGUS, Esq., President     	
H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., General Manager
►_.♦
♦♦♦_U. Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal G. C. M. G., G.C.V.O, Hon. Pres- 1
J_ffe__        K  '■ • **W
I
1
1
I
1
1
Capital - - -       $16,000,000.00
Reserve and Undivided Profits   -  $.6,000,000,00
SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTflENT
Deposits received from $i upwards.   Ranching and Mining Business
given every attention
BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits may be made and withdrawn by mail.   Out of town accounts
receive every attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted
PRINCETON BRANCH
B. L SMITH, Manager
** ***+**<**+*************^
House Cleaning Time
YOU WANT ROOMS PAPERED AND PAINTED ?
Call and Examine our New Stock of
Artistic Wall Papers, Burlaps, Etc
tl
ii
i
CHURCH'S   ALABASTINE
The only Permanent Wall Finish
The most complete line of Paints, Oils,
Brushes and  Painting Supplies in the Simil=
kameen.     Estimates Furnished.
max s. Wilson, Decorator
The poor man's   w~y y5 T""} 1"""^   The rich man's
beverage _*» jt    [j I _y I _^ JPC   tonic  & ' j*
Nourishing,    Satisfying,     Strengthening
The NELSON BREWING Co., ""•
Families supplied.      Hotel orders promptly delivered
Patronize home make-
B.C. PORTLAND CEMENT
CO'S REPORT.
Subscription for Star $2 a Year
[Continued from last week.]
Easily Increase Capacity.
The capacity of the plant will be
from 500 to 700 barrels per day on
the installation of the first unit. The
buildings are sufficiently large to accommodate two. additional units.
When the plant is fully completed it
would then have a capacity of approximately 2,100 barrels per day. They
csittrsecure this output by an additional expenditure of approximately
$100,000.00. The total expenditure
would then not exceed more than
$400,000.00 for plant and machinery.
The buildings are all being constructed of limestone taken from the
quarry which will furnish the carbonate of lime for the manufacture
of cement. The main building is
60x434 feet, the engine and boiler
house is 60x118 feet, the coal drying
house is 35x65 feet, .the stock house
is 60x200 feet. All these are completed at the present date. The office
and laboratory are also completed,
but the machine shop yet remains to
be built.
The   rail-way   spur   which  has  just I
been  completed to  connect the  cem-i
ent works and the coal mine of the 1
United Empire Co. with the main line
of   the   Great   Northern   railway   is!
about   one   and   one-half   miles   long,
which had to be built to accommodate
the  works.    A  large  bridge  to  span
the  Similkameen  river,  at a cost  of
about   $25,000.00 -is   now   completed.
The total cost of" the spur and bridge
will be in the neighborhood of $60,-
000.00.     The   railway   company   furnished the  rails  laid  same  and  surfaced the track.    The United Empire
company   is   paying   one-half  of   the
cost of the spur and bridge.
Two Bail ways to Ship Cement.
In addition to the Great Northern
railway, they will have the services
of the Kettle Valley railway, which
is the southern branch of the C. P. R.
system. This will be built into the
Similkameen valley during the coming
summer and will cross their G. N.
spur. This will give them two valuable means of transportation, and
permit them to enter all of the markets of the interior, of British Columbia, the state of Washington and
the very important market of Van-*]
couver. Contracts for the construction of the Kettle Valley have been
let, so that their line will be within
15' miles of the works at the present
"time.
The employees of the cement works
will reside on the new townsite of
East Princeton which is only distant
about ten minutes walk. Homes are
being provided for them there by the
owners of the townsite and they will
be supplied with all the conveniences
of a modern city.
Mr. Wl J. Budd, one of the directors,
•was engaged for the sum of $10,000.00
to build the cement factory having a
capacity of 500 to 700 barrels. The
cost of the plant will not exceed $200,-
000.00. Buildings are to be large
enough so that the capacity could be
increased at any time to 1,500 or
2,000 barrels. The machinery selected is to be the latest pattern and the
best that can be purchased in the
market. The machinery of the entire
plant is to be driven by individual
motors. A power plant sufficient to
furnish power for the works and a
lighting system for the new town of
East Princeton is to be included in
the cost of the plant.
For the purpose of seeing the latest
machinery that is being used in cem
ent plants, Mr. Budd was sent east
to inspect various plants in eastern
parts of the United States and Canada.
Up to the present time the company
has spent over -$230,Q00.00 in constructing the buildings, railway spur
and general expenses. The cost of
machinery alone delivered to Prince
ton will be $125,000.00. The installation of same is almost completed
and from the' present prospects the
plant should be ready for operation
in about 60 days.
Mention is made of the fact that a
plant  is   being  installed  here   which
Continued on page 6.
Princeton
Picture Show
Dignan Bros.
Complete change of program Monday,   Wednesday,   Friday.    Good,
.Clean Entertainment.   Nothing to
offend.
If onr show pleases you, tell others; If not, quietly tell us.
Cor. Bridge and Angela Street.
Prices:
Children 15c. Adults 25c"
WHITE LEGHORNS OF
OJJALITY-Thekindi
that Lay and Pay
Investigate Winter Egg Production in Princeton. They send an
order for a 'Setting of Eggs' or
some 'Baby Chicks.' Try them
yourself. Our pens are now mated
for best results, and we can supply
you with Eggs or Chicks in any
quantity, just when you want them.
No. 1 Pen, Per Setting $3, Baby
Chicks, 40 cents each.
No. 2 Pen, per Setting, $2, Baby
Chicks, 30 cents each.
No. . Pen, per Setting, $1.50,
Baby Chicks, 25 cents each
We allow 20 per cent, off these
prices for lots of 100 or over in eggs
or chicks. Order early and ensure
good winter layers. A few choice
Cockerels for sale, $2.50, up.
Address T. C. BROOKE.
:^-*s-w**-«**-^-vv>>/vvw.¥VWs>*f
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
KNUDSON   &  CO., Proprietors
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc*
General Blacksmithing'.
Carriage Building and  Repairs
All Work Neatly & Promptly
Phone 28. Executed.
NEW BARBER SHOP
MRS. GERSING
Located    Between   the   Court
House and Post Office
• FIRST-CLASS   WORK   GUARANTEED
DOMINION HOTEL
D. McRAE, Proprietor
TULAMEEN,  B.C.
LIVERY IN CONNECTION
Miners',  Prospectors'   and Travelers' Home
RATES : $1 to $2.50 per Day
THE GATEWAY TO THE
Tulameen Gold and Platinum Mines.
Try a Star Special.
:
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. n. WRIOHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire. One Year, Afi^ $5.00
Foreign, One Year    -     -    - " $2.50
Payable in Advance.
ADVERTISING RATES :
Land Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notice's, 20 cents per line each insertion
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
8 cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 per in. per month
Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Wednesday.
THE RAILWAY SITUATION.
• At last there is a rift in the dismal cloud hanging over the railway
situation. Once more the dwellers
'of Princeton and of Similkameen,
Boundary and Kootenay districts,
are informed that railroad construction to the coast will be 'pushed,'
'rushed'   and    'dirt   will   fly"   as it! sPector could do much to uplift and
prosperity.
A few wheelbar'rbws and a donkey
or two make very slow railway construction. Yet the penny wise
habit of parsimonious railway presidents so limits contractors that it is
impossible for them to make good
progress. Low wages, excessive
commissary prices and poor food
have eliminated the reliable and
capable navvy from railway work.
He will not stay on the job longer
than necessary to procure the price
of transportation and so there are
two gangs, going and coming, the
third at work. Good progress cannot be made under such conditions.
The treatment accorded some of the
unfortunate railway laborers is a
blot on civilization. He is an easy
prey for vultnres and is not always free from intemperate habits,
probably formed while despondent
at his downtrodden condition. A
properly qualified   government   in-
never flejv before. Coquihalla oass,
the piece de resistance of the Kettle Valley (C.P.R.) railway and t! e
V,.V. & E. (G.N.R.), has been an
abysmal gulch separating the contentious presidents and holding up
progress of the country for several
years. This gulch is now bridged
and there is some ground for the
hope that dirt, rock and smoke will
really fly this summer in the Coquihalla and along the whole line of
remaining gap from Osprey lake to
Otter Summit. It is not necessary
to harrpw the minds of readers with
a detailed recital .of the long and
wearisome wait for direct rail connection with the coast, sufficient to
simply .state that history does not
afford a parallel in the most strenuous siege where greater fortitude,
endurance and patience were shown
than by the beleagured people of
the Similkameen—actually caught
like rats in a trap. Men and women have grown white andgr.y
haired and humpbacked keeping
vigil for the faintest glimmer of the
promised, procrastinated and predestinated railway which would
give an outlet to seaports 150 miles
distant.
True, the Similkameen has connection with the coast over the
Great Northern, but it is like going
around the world to get there.
Eight hundred miles of circumvolution to reach a point one-fifth that
distance away. By this route oue
is dumped into the beautiful town
of Oroville over night, contrary to
all law regarding continuous travel
The expense, delay, and inconvenience caused on this- line places tbe
struggling communities of the Similkameen at a crushing disadvantage
and disparity. Foiled at every attempt to obtain fair treatment from
the railways in regard to both operation and construction, is it any
wonder that people lose heart wait
ing for the dawn of better days and
better the condition  of the railway
laborer.
Handsomely subsidized by the
people to build railways for the development of the country the moral
obligation to carry out the terms
of their charters is doubly binding
on the companies holding them.
How littTe heed is given to the essential condition relating to time.
Extension after extension is asked
to which the governments usually
comply. And the heartbroken investor, settler, merchant or mine
owner gets scant consideration, if
any. Exasperated with the concessions and delays granted the two
railway companies now building it
remains to be seen whether the
people will be further tortured and
another spring and summer frittered
away in deathly inaction. -From
Osprey lake to Princoton should be
under construction in a month and
from Princeton to Coalmont a thousand men should be at work by
June 1 if the K.V. intends to 'push
and live up to promise officially
made to complete the line to Hope
station by the fall of 1914.
The official statement given to
the Vanconver Province makes it
clear that running rights over a
competing line are only granted
in the narrow Coquihalla. There
is plenty of room for both roads in
Otter and Tulameen valleys along
which the K.V. line is now located
to about four miles wes^of Princeton and is ready for contractors.
This line was located in accordance
with an official statement that it
was the route preferred although
somewhat longer.
B.C. Portland cement co.
United Empire Coal Mining CO.
These Companies will Shortly
Operate on Extensive Scale and
Establish    Permanent   Payrollf!
»K~KKK~MK<K~X~X<
:♦♦>
EAST   PRINCETON
The manufacture of cement will begin in a few
weeks. A permanent payroll and a growing town
with electric light system, waterworks and cement
paved streets, will result from the industries now in
formative stages. According to the history of progress in this province in vestments made now in East
Princeton real estate must double and treble in a
short space of time. This is the experience in other
towns, why not the same in East Princeton. ? Two
railways will serve transportation.
The Vancouver World announces
it will be independent politically in
future. Its editorials have always
been moderate and exceptionally
able. There is room for-it. But
an independent newspaper will be
a curiosity. There was one in the
Similkameen years ago but it is now
petrified Tory and jumping jingo.
+***X*+**+****************^^
Information as to prices of Lots and
Terms given by CR. Briggs/Gen.
Agent, 615, Hastings St, W. Vancouver/ or apply D. G* McCurdy,
East Princeton,    lllll
April 18, 1913
THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
:JmL
tjl* e£*
A large  consignment  of Garden and
Field Seeds Just Arrived
RENNIE'S and STEELE BRIGGS'
Secure Your Seeds Early f§
Don't leave it till it is tool late
THOMAS BROS.
LACROSSE.
(Prom the Winnipeg Free Press.)
You may talk as you like about hockey;
While rugby's the sport for the fall;
But  the   game   which   is   best,   more
speed.than the rest,
Is the game of the 'crosse and the
ball.
You may talk about football and cricket; P||
You may T>oast of your strokes and
your drives;
But still just the same, it's lacrosse
that's the game
When good old April arrives.
Then   doff   the   shin   pads   and   the
sweater;
Hang your shillelah up. on the wall;
Take down the queer stick with nets
a,nd a crick-
Change the puck for the soft rubber
ball;
And don your shorts and your jerseys,
Come out on the field with a run,
And handle your, stick with a twirl
and a trick
In the heat of the hot summer's sun.
Lacrosse is a game that makes manly
men—
A game which all men should play.
It has taken a hand in making this
land
The great nation it is today.
Then three-times three for the game
of lacrosse,
The manliest sport of all;
Hurrah to once more have a 'crosse in
your hand
And to handle the small bounding
ball!
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
iV*V_V»t__V_*__.t__*____^
North west Home &
Loon Company
CAPITAL       -      -      $100,000.00
Head Office, Winnipeg, Matt.
LOANS FROM $500 to $10,000 TO
BUY OR BUILD A HOME
Do you own a  home?    If no , consider our plan and STOP RENT
Money   Loaned   at    5   p.c.   yearly
Interest.     Write or consult0
j. f. WADDELL, Agent, Princeton, B.C.
Plumbing and Heating, Sheet Metal
J§§ % work, Tinsmithing ,
Shop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St., in '-Murdock's black&mith shop'
T. DIGNAN jf-j
PRACTICAL WORKMAN—PROPRIETOR
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Similkameen Hotel
si__-R$ « mmi
PROPRIETORS
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
Quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communion.
Monsstrictlyooufldentlal. HANDBOOK on Patent"
•ent free. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patent, taken through Munn & Co. receive
special noiice, without charge, in the
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest clr.
OUlation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 £
year; four months, *>1* Sold byall newsdealers.
MM & CQ.361Broadwa*' New York
Branch Office. 625 F SU Washington, D. C
I,a*rge and New building, well Fur-
•  nished and Plastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample  Rooms, spacious, in hotel.
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
VIENNA BOARDING HOUSE.
Room? and firstclass board by the day,
week or month. Street in rear of court
house. Miss Schotzko.
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
All kinds of Coffins and Caskets on band
Vermilion Av. op. Similkmeen Hotel
LOCAL AND GENEBAL.
One ofthe earlv reports regarding the
Alberta elections was Liberals, 32: conservatives, 17.
C* H. Whitworth, representing the
McLellan, McFeely Hardware Co. is in
town.
The wedding season is fairly' on and
there are more to follow.
The resignation of Rev. J. Williams has
been accepted by the bishop consequently
he will not be returning here.—Com.
Don't forget the lacrosse dance tonight
The club welcomes you  and a good time
is guaranteed.
Membership tickets for the lacrosse
club may be procured from Manager
Gibson. Be a member and help the
grand game along.    Tickets 50c.
The Princeton brass band has been reorganized with Prof. Gibson as leader.
New musical taleat has been discovered
in old players. Any musician welcome
to membership. -
The Ladies Auxiliary invites you to
Tea at 3 p.m. next Friday, 28th, at the
hotel Princeton, Harold av. entrance.
Receipts in aid of hospital.
J. P. Watson, agent for Robin Hood
flour, was in town Monday.
Tim Gellatly brought up fifty head of
prime beeves from Keremeos for his firm,
the P. Burns Co., L'd, and will kill them
as required. Keremeos alfalfa and Prince
ton bunch grass make the finest steak in
the world and the Burns people know
what they are dr ing.
N. Huston is visiting in Washington
and a host of friends here are anxious to
welcome and congratulate.
Constable Rogers is very ill at the hospital and friends have little hope of his
recovery.
L. W. Patten of Hedley was in town
this week.
K<K"i~KK~MK~M~i~X~XKKKK~X«><»
D. Q. McCURDY
REAL ESTATE
Pire  and   Life   Insurance
Specialty	
EAST PRINCETON LOTS
EAST PRINCETON
B.C.
WOOD FOR SALE.
Dry or green wood  in  cord or carload
lots.   Orders left at Len Huston's.
• ■ Perkins & Ai/uson.
PRINCETON   LODdE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
Regular meetings. 8 p
m., Th-ursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.     Hall situate in
Hows* Blags cor. Bridge St. and Vermilion Ave.
C. Willarson. d. G. McCurdy,
Noble Grand Secretary.
PERCY W. GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,    -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that thirty days
after date I intend to apply to the Minister of Lands for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands situate in the Similkameen land division of Yale district:
Commencing at a post planted at the
Morthwest corner of lot 1041, being also
the northeast corner of lot for coal license
number 6568, thence east 80 chains, south
80 chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres.
Dated March 25, 1913.
_W. HOMER McLEAN, Locator.
|§|S.I_. D Russell,'Agent.
NOTICE.
Yale land district, districtof Yale.
Take notice.that Alfred Thomas Colhs
of Rossland, B. C, occupation, printer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 281, thence north 60
chaius, east 40 chains, south 60 chains,
west 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 240 acres.
ALFRED THOMAS COLLIS.
H. C. A. Cornish, agent.
February 12, 1913.
Try a Star Special.
 Mineral Act, 1896—Form F.
Certificate of Improvements.
Hawk mineral claim Situate In tbe
SimilkHtneen miuing division of Vale
district Where located ' In Pollock
camp. .
Take notice thatl, F. W. Groves, holding special Free Miner's Certificate No.
5967 intend sixty days from date hereof
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
certificate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the
above claim.
And further take notice that action
under section 37 must be commenced
before the issuance of such certificate of
improvements.
Dated this nth day of Februar>, 1913
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations.
COAL mining rights of the Dominion, in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta the Yukon
Territory, the North-west.Territories and in a
portion ofthe Province of British.Columbia, may
be leased for a term of twenty-one years at an
annual rental of $r. an acre. Not more than
2,56o acres will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by the
applitcant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent
ofthe district in which the rights applied for
are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal sub-division of
sections,nnd in unsurveyed territory the tract
applied for shall be staked out by the applicant
himself
IJach application must be accompanied by b
tee of $5 which wtll be refuuded if the rights
applied foi are not available, but not otherwise.
A royal.y shall be paid on the merchantabfe
output of ;he mineat the rate of five per cent per
ton
The person operating the mint shall furnish
the Agem with sworn rerurns accounting for
the full quanity of merchantabl e coal mined
aud pay the royalty thereon. If the coal
mining rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least once a
year.
The lease will include  the coal mining rights
. onlv,  but  the lease may be permitted tn purchase whatever available   surface   lights   may
be considered necessary for the working of the
mine at the rate of jito oo an acre.
For full information application should be
made to the Secrstary of the' Departmeut of
the Interior, Ottawa, of to any Agent or Sub-
Agent of Dominion Lands
W. W. CORY
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication of this ad
vertisment will not be paid fo-
NOTICE.
Argentine Fraction mineral claim:
situate in the Similkameen mining division of Yale district. Where located ,
Voigt mountain.
Take'notice that I, George W. Aldous,
Free Miner's Certificate, No. 60892B, intend, sixty days from date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate of improvements for the purpose of
obtaining a crown grant of the above
claim. And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be com
menced 1 .fore tU_-_-_a__e of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 20th day of March, 1913.
COUNTY   COURT==YALE
a sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Wednesday
23rd day of April,'1013 at the hour of 2 o'clock in
the afternoon.   By command.
HUGH  HUNTER,
Registrar County Court.
FREE
TO FUR SHIPPERS
The most accurate, reliable and only Market Report
and Price List of its kind published.
"Wip* isMfubjrt 'S'lj.ptter"
Mailed FREE   to those interested in  Raw Furs
SEND US YOUR NAME ON A POSTAL—TODAY
It's not a Trapper's Guide, but a publication issued
every two weeks, which gives you reports of what is
doing in all the Markets of the World in American
Raw Furs.. This information is worth hundreds of
dollars to you.
Write for it—NOW—IT'S FREE
A.  B. SHUBERT
The Largest House in the World dealing exclusively In
American Raw Furs
25-27 W. Michigan St., Dept. 44 CHICAGO, ILL., U.S.A.
J. W. KANSKY
carpenter and Builder,
Jobbing and Shop worK.
Store Fronts, Doors, Windows,
Furniture  repaired and made,
Upholstering Work.
Bridge St. & Halliford av.
SIMILKAMEEN    DIVISION. —YALE
DISTRICT
Take notice that we the Princeton
Collieries, Limited, of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply for a licence to prospect for
coal and petroleum under the following
described lands' near Princeton- B. C.
Commencing at a post planted at the
Southeast corner c*~ Lot 3531 and running
East 80 chains, thence North 4 chains,
thence West 80 chains, thence South 4
chains to the point of commencement,
containing 32 acres more or less.
Dated loth March, 1913.
PRINCETON COLLIERIES, LIMITED
P. W. Gregory, agent.
SIMILKAMEEN     DIVISION.
DISTRICT
■YALE
- Take notice that we the Princeton Collieries, Limited, of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply for a licence to prospect for
coal and petroleum uuder the following
described lands near Princeton B. C,
Commencing at a post planted at the
Southeast corner of Lot 3531 and running
west 80 chains, thence North 4 chains,
thence East 80 chains, thence South 4
chains to point of commencement, containing"^ acres more or less.
Dated 10th March, 1913.
PRINCETON COLLIERIES, LIMITED
P   W. Gregory, agent.
when completed will produce 2,000
barrels of cement per day for a total
cost of about $400,000.00. There is
no other plant in the west or northwest of like capacity that has not cost
all the way from a million to two
millions and .a. half to produce 2,000
barrels per day. This shows the conservative methods being used in the
organization and operations of this
company and there are three or tpur
reasons why those other plants have
cost so much more than this. First,
this company has given no bonus nor
big block of stock for organization or
placing their bonds on the market.
Second, they paid only a nominal sum
for superintendence during the construction of the plant, while all other
companies have paid big engineering
Arms a large percent, on the total cost
of the plant, and these necessarily find
it to their -advantage to add every
dollar to the cost of the labor and
machinery in order to increase their
returns. Third, on account of the natural situation of the plant they are
put to very little expense in conveying
machinery.
But the most important feature
which spells success for the future of
the company is the low capitalization
compared with other companies and
the cheapness with which they can operate owing to having all their raw
material right at their works with no
freight charges to assemble them.
What that will all mean to shareholders when the dividend period is
reached can easily be computed by
those who will take the trouble to institute a few comparisons in the cost
of production.s
While most of their bonds have already been placed they have a small
part yet to be subscribed to realize
all the capital they will require before
the plant is paying its own way. These
iionds they are placing at par and
bearing 7 per cent, interest and while
no stock is being sold a bonus of stock
equalling fifty per cent, the amount
of the honds is being given to purchasers of the bonds. These bonds are" to
be redeemed in 1921 by a sinking fund
jset aside out of the profits of each year
and when the bonds are redeemed the
investors in them will have their
money all back with good interest and
have the stock which cost them nothing, remaining, upon which they will
be collecting good dividends each
year.
As a short statement of the present position of the company as regards the outlay to date, the funds on
hand, the plans for providing the
amount - required to complete and
place the industry on a dividend paying basis, will he appreciated in addition to the financial statement in the
form that these documents go to the
general meeting, we give the following:
Stock Issue—Authorized capital
$500,000.00: .shares Par value $100)
all comrqpn stock: amount issued for
land containing limestone deposit, and
right of way, $190,000.00; (no cash
paid for land): total to be issued with
[To be continued.]
Livery s Fee<
siabies |j
■ iv. HUSTON, Prop'r
General Livery business carried on
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
The Place to Meet
The Man You Know
AT
I
LEN HUSTON'S
Cigar & News Stand
TOBACCOS, CIGARS   PIPES
Agent for Nelson Club and Kusko-
nook Cigars, made by
NELSON CLUB CIGAR CO.
Ice Cream, Sodas, Confectionery
IRWIN BLOCK
> J. L. HUSTON,   -    =    Prop.
HE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
Department Store
Anything, from the prettiest flower
to the light running freight wagon.
Everything for the life and comfort
of man, his dear wife and children.
Our show windows reflect some of
the myriad things in stock, and you
will profit by an inspection—Look
in our street mirror and rearrange
your tie or hat, smile, think of us.
The A. E. HOWSE Co. Limited,
._ »A^^*A**,u+<__5__..__5____^
X*^4***4***B**4>**4>**4>*****4^44*M
Iking &Igibson
9
9 DEALERS IN
A
J      Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
t Hardware, Paints & Oils
9
9
*** k«:«k^:-x<^^k«>.'><>-»
I ESTIMATES  FURNISHED   TO   BUILDERS
9
***
*i* OFFICE: Bridge Street, Near Bank Commerce
9
X PRINCETON, B.C.
9
J.**********************S**********J*****************************S
yfvvvvvvvvvvvvv%w*w«w^fvvvvvvy» * ■*■ .>•■ .7**********.******************?*********************
B
NOTICE.
MiNEfiAi, Act 1896—Form F.
Certificate of Improvements.
W.G. fractional mineral claim. Situate in the Similkameen mining division
of Yale district. Where located : On
Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves, holding Free Miner's Certificate No. 5967.,
intend sixty days from date hereof to
apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate of improvements for the purpose
of obtaining a crown grant of the above
claims
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such certificate of
improvements.
Dated this nth day of February, 1913.
F. P. COOK
General Merchant
Miners' Oulflller
Princeton, Granite Creek,
Coalmont
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
NOTICE.
Try a Star Special.
Yale-land district, district of Yale.
Take notice that Thomas Henry Browr.
of Rossland, B C, occupation, banker,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 281, thence south 40
chains, east 40 chains, north 40 chains,
west 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres.
THOMAS HENRY BROWN,
H C. A. Cornish, agent.
February 12, 1913.
NOTICE.
Yale land district, district of Yale.
Take notice that George Howard Owen
of Rossland, B.C., occupation, banker,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the tollowing described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 281, thence south 20
chains, west 40 chains, north 20 chains
more or less to the Tulameen river,
easterly along the Tulameen river to
point of commencement, containing 80
acres more or less
GEORGE HOWARD OWEN.
H. C. A. Cornish, agent.
February 12, 1913.
COUNTY   COURT-=YALE
A sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Wednesday
23rd day of April, 1.13 at the hour of 2 o'clock in
the afternoon.   By command.
HUGH HUNTER,
Registrar County Court.
SPECIALS.
Anyone requiring tents, awnings and
camping goods leave orders at Max Wilson's.
For house cleaning look over King &
Gibson's stock of Senours Paints, Varnishes and Calotints.   Prices right.
FOR SALE—Team of gray mares.
Weight about 1000 lbs. each. Well
broken, gentle, clean limbed. Age 6
and 7 years. Also second hand harness
and double seated democrat in good con
dition. Will sell cheap. Good seed
potatoes, _XC- per lb. Apply B. R.
Barlow, Box 7, Keremeos, B. C .
FOR SALE—A reading or music lamp,
adjustable. Price, $1.50. Apply Star
office.
FOR SALE.—Tulameen property, Two
lots with 100 feet frontage on Otter Avenue, almost opposite Britton's new block,
$250 each, cash. Apply Star office; Prin-
cetdti, B. C.
BREAD—Good homemade bread
supplied at J. Knudson's, Tapton avenue,
fry it and be convinced.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Union service will be conducted in the
courthouse Sunday next at 7:30 p.m. by
Rev. T. A. Osborne.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject next Sunday : ' Doctrine of Atonement.' Blessed are the pure in heart; for
they shall see God.—Matthew 5:8.
East Princeton service will be held
in the Methodist church at 3 p: m. by
Rev. T. A. Osborne.
Anglican services will be held on Sunday   at  11 am. and 7:30 p.m.    Commu
nion service at 8 a m.
ny^l^y^^lT.
...Hotel..
oner If
CHIR0PRACTIC=NEUR0-
PATItY IDEA
Chiropractic-Neuropathy, unlike other
methods of healing, does not treat symptoms or manifestations of disease, but removes the cause, permitting nature 10
exercise her powers and functions unimpaired. As a Science C-N is based
and founded upon a correct understanding of the nervous system.
It is an Anatomical tact that the brain,
the great dynamo of the human anatomy,
controls all functions of the body. The
spinal cord is a great bundle of nerves
that pas.es downward from the brain
through a canal in the spine which is
made- up of twenty-four small movable
segments called vertebrae.
There are small openings called foram
ina between all of these twenty-four vertebrae. Through these foramina pass
branches of the great spinal cord. These
branches are spinal nerves. They communicate indirectly with the sympathetic
system, thus connecting with the entire
nervous system by this arrangement and
connects all tissues and organs of the
body, showing that if any of these nerves
[supplying any tissue or organ] being impaired would in turn cause malnutrition,
[disease].
Thus, C-N. maintains that were the
nerves unrestricted all organs of the body
would fnnctionate properly and all tissue
would be in a [healthy state].
To the Skeptics :
Be fair to yourself and broad minded
enough to investigate,for in these modern
days one cannot doubt anything, at least,
when it has a good foundation.
If you should become interested ask or
write for literature, and I will gladly supply you with the same.
A C-N. successfully treats Constipation,
Costiveness, Deafness, Female Troubles
of all kinds, also Children's Disorders,
Heart Trouble, Neuralgia, Paralysis,
Rheumatism, Scarlet Fever, Sciatica,
Spinal Disorders, Headaches, Catarih,
Diabetes, Goitre, Asthma, and etc
We do not use Drugs, Knives, Electricity, Osteopathy, Massage, or Bake ovens,
but strictly a scientific method of our own.
[Results are what talks].
Thanking you for your attention,
I am for you as a Chiropractor Neuropathy,
THOS. P. IAVAUEV, WM
& TULAMEEN, B.C. &
X Good Fishing, Boating •;*
♦}♦ Mining Center ♦{•
I Mrs. t J. Henderson f
9 V
y PRORIETOR y
***. *t*
*J*****************j********************************************S**********»**
**^**.**m*****.**************.*************************7*.7*****. »  -7**7**7**7
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIETORS
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOHS, ETC.
Commercial _* Sample *M Rccm
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
Hotel Princeton
P. SWANSON, Pr< p.
Now completed   on  site of ihe old
Great   Northern.    Only I rick
hotel in Similkameen. A
first class house.
First Class room and board
PRINCETON,
Wines, Liquors, Cig .rs
B.C.
**   *f4**4**4*?BB*B*****B**B**B**B4?B4pBB*B**4**B**BB*B**B*?BB*4*S _*«
>,   •+^+**^^f**^t**^S*S\**+**+**^^+*\**4^ »-.
! COALMONT HOTEL
COALMONT, B.C.
First-class accommodation
for all guests
Hotel is new and well furni. hed.
Near station
Ex ellent cuisine and bar suppiei
with the best
The Coalmont  Hotel  Co., ltd.
i
.
I
i
I
i
y
"MODEL"
mm\ STASIS:
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety  of  Rigs—Good   Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
BROOMflELD fi GARRISON
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
All kinds of Coffins and Caskets on hand
Vermilion Av. op. Similkmeen Hotel
Try a Star Special
 8
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April 18, 1913
**s
m iffT
Princeton Coal i Land Co.
Five Reasons, For You To Inwest In Princeton
w
Because Princeton is the
Center of a Coal, Ore and
Placer Mining District.
.<_£«£
Beciuse There are Splendid
Opportunities for Manufact=
uring Industries.
Because the Surrounding Country is Adapted For Cattle, Horse,
and Sheep Raising. Farm, Garden and Poultry Products Find a
Ready Market at High Prices, at Princeton. Climate and Water are
Excellent. School and Church Facilities are the Best in the Similka=
meen Valley.
Unlimited Water Power,
Rivers and Creeks Afford
Millions of Horse Power,
Now Running Waste.
llll
Two Railroads Building to
Coast. Great Transprovincial
Trunk road-Rivers and Roads
converge here.
Write or Consult, Em Waterman, Resident Mgr.
PRINCETON   COAL & LAND CO.
Ii-.
f
M

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