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Similkameen Star 1912-04-10

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Princeton coal is almost smokeless and sootless. hp
Cheer Up!
The Kettle Valley Railway will build through Princeton this  summer—Many men will be employed In the mines, mills, woods,
railroad construction and in the building of wagon roads this year—In the meantime just watch Princeton's smoke
Vol. XIII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1912.
No. 15
KETTLE VALLEY LINE
Construction West from Trout
Creek to Princeton
Begins Soon.
Grading from East End will Also Start
and the Whole Line Complete
About 1914.
Actual work on construction of tne
Kettle Valley railway will begin at once
from Irgut cree^_to_^_-e^stu_-Uit °f l"e
divide between Summerland and Princeton. The ironwork for the big steel and
concrete bridge across Trout creek has
been ordered. The contract has been
signed with a construction company
The route has been inspected by President Warren and Chief Engineer Mb
Cullough. J. L. Logie, rightofway agent
for the Kettle Valley, has finished his
duties and arranged for transfer of lands
required.
A. S. Goodeve, M. P., has been appointed to the vacant railway commis
sionership caused by the death of the late
Hon. Thomas Greenway. Kootenay
electoral riding is thus thrown open for
by-election.
Grading will be started on the main
line of the Kettle Valley railway at mile
25 of the branch line from Merritt, the
work from both ends being pushed with
vigor. It is the intention of the company
to complete the line by the end of 1913.
FIVEMILE NOTES.
Orangeville. April 8 — Trapping has
been fairly successful here this season,
t e nice little sum of $L5oo being realized
from shipments. Beaver are quite plentiful but the fur is low priced.
C. V. Semerad is rushing the completion of his hotel and expects to have his
family moved from Princeton in about
two weeks.
The Inland Development company on
Siwash creek is doing considerable wotk
with very encouraging prospects.
The Kettle Valley railway is expected
to reach Tiere with the steel in about a
year f_om date.
Snow is about all gone and spring is in
evidence everywhere.
MEMBER ON TOUR
L. W. Shatford, M. P. P., arrived in
town Monday having motored from
Penticton on a brief visit through his
constituency. He was accompanied by
Road Superintendent H. A. Turner, who
is making preliminary estimates fcr appropriations in road building, etc., for
current year. The legislative vote of
money for the Similkameen was large
this year iu anticipation of extensive de
velopment work in the various mining
camps and also to assist the settler in
bringing his produce to market over improved roads Mr. Shatford takes .a
genuine interest in all that pertains to the
progress of the Similkameen and having
personally examined its requirements is
in position to make expenditures with
best possible adv_htage. Naturally
enough and with pardonable elation he
is perfectly satisfied with the victorious
outcome of the recent campaign in which
he was a leading factor. His own election
by acclamation is considered by him the
g:e«test compliment of his life and one
he will always retain in grateful remembrance. Mr. Shatford will return again
in about two weeks to visit some of the
mining camps. Work on the transprovincial trunk road will begin immediately.
HIGH GRADE POULTRY.
Westwood & Brooke are reaching out
to Washington and the Kootenay with
ttaei high class poultry orders for their
eggs tor sittings coming from Spokane,
Molson, Chesaw, Penticton and-Kaleden.
The output for the month of March from
forty Leghorn breeders in the respective
pens was 954 eggs or an average: of -over
75 per cent. All these eggs have been
sold for sittings and are already booked
up till April 30. Farmers wishing to improve their stock should consult the
above firm as several dozen of these Leghorn eggs recently weighed at O. H.
Carle's, who is handling the entire output for market, averaged 28 ounces per
dozen. The value to the consumer of
these eggs is evident when the product
of common stock poultry only weighs
some 22 ounces or less per dozen. West-
wood & Brooke will increase heir stock
to 1000 birds.
LOCAL AND GENERAL
Onemile Road will Save   15
Miles Between Nicola
and Princeton.
Princeton Will   Have   Race   Track
and Athletic Grounds if Project
Goes Through.
TEN YEARS AGO.
(From The Star 1902.)
Jack McDonald and Harry Swan returned from a prospecting trip through
Cariboo. They think the Similkameen
is the best yet.
Ben Baker leaves for Aspen Grove to
do assessment work on  Royal  Fraction.
Grand celebration of Dominion day.
Don't fail to come.
J. M. Hitchings and C. O French left
for Vernon on business of a private
nature.
Snowden Bros, are building a house on
their lot back of Hotel Tulameen.
Frank Bailey, < f townsite fame, hag'
located several thousand—acres of _qal/
Ian djie_4^_!___jet_D.
W. C. McDougall of Olalla returned
from New York, where he has been successful in forming a company to take
over the Ram's Horn group.
Miss E. H. MacQueen of Coalmont
spent the week end the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. Hugh Hunter.
Gardening is in full blast.
Spring housecleaning is on.
Clean up your back yards.
Hen fruit has taken a slump.
RrthSe. Ipy, t^^psnrrijting of Welldo.
was in Princeton the earlypart or the
week. He expects to make big shipments to the coast this summer.
J. Richmond Craig left yesterday for
Vancouver via Great Northern. Mr.
Craig has interests in this section and
will probably return about July 4.
Tom Marks Comedy company will be
in Princeton on April 22, 23, and 24.
Every Canadian has seen or heard of Tom
Marks. For past thirty years he has
amused the people from the Atlantic to
the Pacific.
Mr.  and  Mrs.  E. Waterman  are   ex
pected to return from Spokane tomorrow
S. L. Frazier, Great Northern agent
here, leaves today for Grant City, Mo.,
his old home. Mr. Frazier keeps a stud
of thoroughbred stallions, which he is
desirous of seeing during his vacation of
two months. G. C. Thurber will relieye
in the meantime.
G. M. Blackmunn and R. Wright;
electric wizards, are repairing the government hello system in and around
Princeton this "weekly!
Fred Stevens and A. C. Black went out
to Nicola on horseback on an Easter visit.
They are both delighted with their trip
but would have appreciated the shorter
route via Onemile, which-saves 15 miles
journey. It is about time the member
for Yale woke up to the necessity of completing the road through his constituency.
G. M. K. Macleod, manager of the
Royal bank, took a holiday trip south
over Easter.
! '.'Mrs. R. H.   Carmichael   will   shortly
leave on a visit to relatives in  Carbe:ry,
Manitoba.
i _^   >^
<Jm.***<. Bailey is in Princeton this week
soliciting space to be used for advertising
in the pamphlet he is compiling about
the Similkameen and Nicola J valleys.
Mr. Bailey is ominpntfy adapted fpr the
work he has in h_nd, being probably the
best in'ormedT_;rson on the resources of
the districts named. He is meetingwith
lencouraging patronage.
The sports committee of the Princeton
board of trade is soliciting names of citi-
B-__
zeus to take stock iffTthe purchase of a
race track and athletic grounds next the
bunch grass field. The necessity for such
grounds has long been apparent and a
solution of the problem is now at hand.
With the acquisition of this 40-acre tract
Princeton will be Uptodate in the line of
Sports. Everybody boost the project and
the investment will, no doubt, prove
profitable.
SCHOOL REPORT.
Following is the March report of the
first department of Princeton public
school, Miss E. M^Caffr^^,'teacher:
Senior IV—Doris Lyall, 57; Gladys
Coulthard, 55.
Junior IV—John Osborne, 62; Effie McLean, 50; Harold Campbell, 45.
Senior III—Fred Schisler, 69; Ada
Kirkpatrick, 68; Gerge Prest, 68; Victoria
Hunter, 67; Annie Cunningham. 53;
Bruce McLean, 45; Joe Lloyd, 40; Archie
Courtney, 37; Theodore Prest, 30; Lilian
Bolin and Ernest Coultharrt," absent.
Senior II—Mary Young, 82; Weniil
Semerad, 60; Kathleen Kirkpatrick, 58;
Margaret Norman, 48; Ruby Campbell,
4^rPowell Courtney, 40; Earl Jackson,
39; Bertney Osborne, 33; Jay Dillard, 30;
Jessie Hayes, 20.
COALMONT NEWS.
Coalmont, April 8.—L. W. Shatford,
M. P. P., was in Coalmonton Sunday.
J. T. Johnston of the Columbia Coal
and Coke company, returned to Coal-
mont from the coast on Sunday, coming
via automobile from Merritt.
The farewell visit to Granite creek of
Rev. J. Williams, who is about to leave
for the old country, was celebrated on
Tuesday by a dinner at the Granite Creek
hotel at the invitation of F. P. Cook,
merchant of this town and Granite, to
which about a round two dozen of both
sexes sat down. Bert's culinary department was in rare form and the free lunch
was done full justice to.
EASTER SERVICES
Easter day a high festival in the Angli:
can church was duly celebrated with appropriate services. , Morning service
with communion was held at Granite
creek .when, all the flock attended and a
hearty service was held. Rev. J. Williams
conducted the service and -preached an
appropriate sermon on the Resurrection
and bade farewell at this his last service
bere.    Mrs. Nelson presided at the organ.
In the eyening a full congregation at-:
tended in the Princeton church, which
was beautifully adorned with lilies and
carnations, the gift of the Women's
auxiliary. The hymns were heartily
sung and the service was again conducted-
by the incumbent, who preached on the
Easter message, 'Peace be unto you.'
He announced next Sunday as his final
Sunday before leaving for England.
tg___________________aiM
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April  io, 1912,
TBE WEEKLY CRIST
W. Garrison is erecting a (building on
Angela avenue which will be used for a
commercial sample room.
Hugh McRae left on Wednesday for
Kennedy mountain where he has mining
interests.
R. G. Stewart, Presbyterian missionary
student, preached last Sunday night in
the court house, having succeeded j. R.
Craig on the Princeton field. Mr. Stew
art is a Hielander, a student of the Manitoba college, and was formerly stationed
at Bridesville.
Ed. N. Clark, editor, printer and manager of Coalmont's new paper, was in
' Princeton" last Saturday. He reports
that his typographical triumph will be
issued-the firstofMay. Mr. Clark is not
only a journalist but a walker, having
hiked from Halifax to Vancouver in the
interest of Pearson's Magazine.
Mr. and Mrs. W. V. Tukey, John P.
Tukey and Mr. and Mrs. D. J Garrison
arrived in Princeton from Pateros, Washington, in _aeir-_tian4spmej3ZliU_4»-_,ire
car last Saturday evening. It took about
fifteen hours to make the trip. They
report the roads in fairly good shape, but
Mr. Tuckey says the Canucks have better
roads than they have in Washington.
Mrs. Garrison is a daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Dill lard otTFivemite, and she spent
Sunday with her parents.
That famous horseman, 'Yorky,' drove
a party of miners out to Kennedy mountain last Sunday. In returning the
horses saw the green grass around Ashnola, became frightened and got beyond
control of the driver, with the result that
'Yorky'jumped out the rig and walked
home. The' horses got free from the
vehicle and reached their stables none
the worse for the canter. The only damage was a broken pole on the rig.
Duncan McRae left Sunday to develop
his mineral properties on Kennedy
mountain. '"-''•.;.
Dick Fitzgerald, who has been trapping
on Granite creek, returned to town this
week. Although unfortunate in having
his traps and supplies stolen the early
part of the season, his winter's work
amounts to $600.
Princeton lawn tennis club is putting
ou its summer garb and the grounds w.U
be.pi^t in shape for an early'game. .
W.M Dean of Spokane arrived Monday on a business visit.
Rev T. A. Otb.rns conducted the
funeral services for the burial of C. Mc-
Dona d last week, the remains being removed from French's . undertaking
parlors.
Last Sunday came in looking bad fcr
•Id Sol pushed the clouds back and tbe
d ly was fine In the afternoon the ladies
displayed their Easter bonnets, and they
_.re certainly the finest creations of the
millinery art ever seen in this neck of
the woods.
C M. Snowden has gone on a short
visit to relatives in Montana.
The Modern Woodmen ball last Friday
night was asocial success About twenty
couples attended.
SPECIALS.
Black Knights smoker has been post
poned to May 3rd, instead of April 17 as
already announced.
Remember the auction sale by Avery
& Avery next Saturday at 2 p.m., at the
residence of Rev. J Williams, Kenley
avenue.
FOR SALE—Stallion, five years old
Clydesdale, weight 1600 pounds. Apply
to August Carlson, Princeton, B. C.
FOR SALE—Old newspapers, 25 cents
per bundle of 100. Suitable for underlying carpets.   Star office.
Aj?*********************~************************************»**************
•******.**.**.**.**.**.**************.*****.*****.**.**.**.**.**********'*  *
Real Estate, Mines
=flnance=
Do you want to Invest
Ground floor price?
Double your money inside of one year
I TWO LOTS
Adjoining,
one fronting on Bridge street, corner of
1
>\* Tapton avenue, and the other
♦j» facing Tapton avenue. House,
♦!♦ woodshed and cellar. House
rents for $7 per month.
J. M. WRIGHT
Real Estate, Finance and Mines |
X
PRINCETON, B. C. Y
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the fair sex of Princeton, but before noon 5 .jw^^X^^^KKK^J^XK^XKK^K^X^M*
PRICE $1000!
Half cash,  balance equal instalments 6 and 12 months
Location   suitable   for  Store,
Boarding House, etc.
llVVMWM^^#k^^/«^%M^¥^r>AA^^^A/VW^M^%MMMV
eoyal Bank ot Canada
CAPITAL      -      -
RESERVE UNDIVIDED PROFITS,
),990,000
.,275,000
A General Banking Business Transacted
Interest allowed on savings accounts at higest current
-rates.    Drafts and money orders sold on all  points.
\     PRINCETON BRANCH       G. M. K. MACLEOD, Manager
t.
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, -   $8,OQ0,OOG
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
Greece
Holland
Iceland
India
Ireland
Italy
Japan
Java
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlement*
Africa Crete
. Arabia Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
Australia Egypt
Austria-Hungary    Faroe Islands
Belgium 4 Finland
Brazil B Formosa
Bulgaria France lav
Ceylon Fr'ch Cochin China Malta
Chili Germany^   5 Manchuria
China Great Britain Mexico
The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable; that is they are drawn in sterling", francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. A233
J. D. ANDRAS,  Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
Philippine Islands Sweden
Portugal Switzerland ;-
Roumania Turkey
Russia United States
Servia Uruguay
Siam West Indies, etc
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BANK Or MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL
R. B. ANGUS, Esq., President
Sir EDWARD CLOUSTON, Bart , Vice-President
H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., Generai, Manager
Capital - - -       $14,887,570.00
Reserve and Undivided Profits   -  $16,855,185.36
SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTHENT
Deposits received from $i upwards.   Ranching and Mining Business
given every attention
BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits may be made and withdrawn by mail.    Out of town accounts
receive every attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted
PRINCETON BRANCH B. L SMITH, Manager
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P. BURNS & Co.
FLESHERS   AND |
FISjj   DEALERS ■■ §§| .
Prime Beef, Pork,  Mutton.   Salmon,   Halibut,
flackerel, Herring.   Eggs, Butter, Lard
Largest Dealers in the West
PRINCETON, B. C.
Kitchen Utensils ,:^^^p
A substantial shipment of Kitchen Utensils has just
reached us from the East, and we are now in first-class
shape to supply your needs at right prices. Better look
through your stock and see if there isn't something
you require.
A. L. WHITE'S Furniture Store
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar Shingles $3.50 per M
ttflODERN WOODMEN
1V1 OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays, in the Odd
fellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL, Clerk.
V
3
A.
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Aprii, io, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
PRINCETON TENNIS CLTJB.
At the annual general meeting of the
Princeton tennis club the following officers were elected for the current season:
President, E Waterman; vice-president.
B. L. Smith; secretary, J. H. Morrison;
committee, E. B. Hall, M. Freeman, T.
Charles Brooke, G. M. K. Macleod. The
club begins the season in flourishing condition, having some thirty members and
new ground for a court. It is hopStr—tQ
engage in tournaments with neighboring
clubs during the summer.
Similkameen Hotel
SUMMERS * WARBLE
PROPRIETORS
HOTEL   ARRIVALS.
At the Similkameen: Stanley Pratt,
W J Bartley, A McKenzie, Vancouver; C
Hendiickson, John ~Wilks, Ole Berg,
Merritt; A Bau_igartner. Grand Forks; A
D Worgan, Coalmont; J Delich, L Wal
enice, Hedlev; E D Mitchell, W Morrison, Nelson; C Taft, E Palmberg, C
Champlin, F Wildman, W M Dean,
Spokane; R G Steward, Bridesville; W A
Shaw and wife, E W Partson, Champion,
Alta; F McLean, Keremeos; I H Jackson,
Tulameen; C Williams, O S Anderson,
A Stritzel, city.
At the Tulameen: J Lindgien, Chas
Hendrickson, John Wilks, G M Black
inunn, G W Hodgson, R Wright, Mer
fitt; J Crowley, John Benson John Jack
son, I Budd, E N Clark, Coalmont;. Mrs
McCrae, Grand Fork; Archie McLean,
Loomis, Wash; Evan Thomas, Fiyemile,
Mr and Mrs D J Garrison, Mr and Mrs
W V Tukey, John Philip Tukey, Pateros,
Wash; D Fitzgerald, Granite; A Stritzel,
Wallace, Idaho; Frank Bailey, Merritt;
J W Mcintosh, Victoria; E W Rawson,
Vancouver; E Witton, Nelson.
Large and New buildin?, well Furnished aud Plastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
Great Northern
—Hotel—
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
PRINCETON,
B.C.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Presbyterian church services —Sunday
school, 11 am. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
seivice, 11 a.m.
Subject for next Sunday: 'The only
way.'
Methodist church service, Sunday,
April 14 In Oddtellows' hall, at 7:30
p m. ; cement works at 11 a.m.
Anglican church services for next Sunday, April 14: 11 a.m., holy baptism and
Easter communion. 7:30 p m.. evensong
and sermon. Easter festival continued
and final services of Rev. J. Williams.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject for Sunday next: 'Are sin, disease
and death real ? There shall be no more
death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neifher
shall there be any more pain; for the
former things are passed away.—Revelation 21:4.
SIMILKAMEEN GUIDE===M.itlin? B|Tour"
istsana Sportsmen.
PacK horses provided. Apply C M. SNOWDEN,
P O. Box 17, Princeton, B. C-
FOR SALE
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIETORS"
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH  ROOiTS, ETC.
Commercial.* Sampled Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
TWO and one-half  acres   suitable   for
garden, in good state of cultivation;
cellar; house; on Similkameen river.
Price, $200 cash.    Apply to
WONG SING.
The Princeton
Livery n Feed
stables
N. HUSTON. Prop'.
General Livery business carried on
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
KARL H. MORSE
Ladies and Gents' Tailoring
CLEANING and PRESSING
F. P. COOK
General Merchant
Miners' Outline.
Princeton,   Granite Creek
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given co  all
Mail   Orders.
PICTURE
Post Cards
also a new'
line of . . .
COMICS $
at the"
PRINCETON
Drug and
Bookstore
GEO. G. WALL, Manager
TO  CANADIAN   ARCHITECTS
Competition for New  University Buildings to
Be Erected at Point Grey, Near Vancouver, British Columbia
The Government of British Columbia invite
Competitive Plans for the general scheme and
design for the proposed new University, together
with more detailed Plans for.ihe buildings to be
erected first at an estimated cost of $t .500,000.
Prizes of $10,000 will be given for the most
successful Designs submitted.
Particulars of the competition and plan of site
may be obtained on request from the undersigned.
The designs to be sent in by July'31st, 1912,
addressed to
THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia. :
D. M. FRENCH.
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
Vermilion Ave. opp. Similkameen Hotel,
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
Regular meetings. 8 p
m., Thursdays',
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate  in
Thomas Block.   •' Oddfellows Hall."
Jas. Gellatly. P. Russell,
Noble Grand. Secretary .
PERCY Wt GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
T. CLARK KING
Architect
Graduate of the Art and Science Department
Kensingtop, London, Eng.
Member of the Alberta Architectural Association.
Plans and  Specifications  of Buildings  furnished  at reasonable rates.
Office : KING & GIBSON
Vermilion Av. Princeton, B.C., Phone 18
D. R. BOUCHER
ARCHITECT
Coalmont, B.C.
X
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   :    B.C.
...    BRITTON BLOCK
I   ...Hotel... Pi
osicp|nai|
\\ TULAMEEN, B.C. \\
X Good Fishing, Boating >*
•t* Mining Centre •'••
I Mrs. L J. Henderson |
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"MODEL"
LIVERY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts .
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs—Good  Roadsters—
-  Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
Notice to Delinquent Co-owner.
To T, C. REVEI^—Take notice tfiat unless
you do pay, within 9* days from the date hereof,
the Sum'of $231.95, being your proportion of the
expenditure required for the years 1003-4-5-6-7-8-0
10-11 by Section 24 of the Mineral Act, upon the
Transvaal Fraction Mineral claim situated on
Copper Mountain in the Similkameeu Mining
Division, together with interest and all costs of
this notice, to the undersigned your co-paitnefi*
in the said claim, your interest in the said claim
shall become vested in the undersigned who has
made the required expenditure.
A. E. HOWSE.
Dated this 29th day of January, 1912.
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
Scavengers
JOHNSON & REHN
Work promptly attended to. Town
health regulations complied with ; lawful
sanitary conditions in force. Orders may
be left at C. Willarson & Co's.
iriiffV" ■    : -
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April  io, 19121
u>
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. H. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing CO.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advauce,
ADVERTISING RATES :
Land Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each Insertion.
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
S cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 per in. per month.
Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Mon_ay.
TOO MUCH GUN PLAY
There seems to be an epidemic of
shooting affrays in this province,
scarcely a daily newspaper failing,
to chronicle some murder or foul
deed committed with the ever ready
revolver. It is evident from- the
frequency of these deadly shooting
occurences that a more rigid enforcement of the law in regard to
carrying firearms should be put in
operation. Just recently a Vancouver policeman was killed by a
man crazed with grog, and a similar-attempt ou the lives of inmates
in a. house of illfame in Princeton
forcibly call for drastic measures to
ejfd this menace to life. Light
sentences of punishment will not
deter bad men from using a weapon
ou^the slightest or no   provocation.
The full penalty of the law for any
infraction of its provisions re firearms should be administered. There-
is no occasion for anyone to carry
concealed weapons in this eountry,
the days of the highwayman and
bad 'Injun' being about ended.
Let the law be rigorously enforced
by those responsible for its effectiveness and there will be less gun play.
IMPROVE BREED OF HORSES
The Dominion Department of
Agriculture, Hon. Martin Burrell,
minister, will aid the owners of
thoroughbred stallions, upon certain conditions, to the extent of
$250 at the close of each season
The object of such aid is to encour
age breeding of a superior class of
animal for saddle and driving purposes. The infusion of good blood
in the horse stock of the Similkameen is really needed and it will be
too bad if horse raisers do not take
advantage of the generous offer of
the government to aid and encourage improvement in tbe class of
horses indicated. As was pointed
out in the Princeton board of trade
some years back, the breeding of
scrub"hor_es has well nigh reduced
saddle and driving animals to such
low grade that there is littie demand!
for them. With splendid grazing,:
good water, bracing atmosphere and
_r 11 climbing there is no doubt the
Similkameen    could   produce   fine
chargers and swift racehorses if
proper sires and select mares were
bred. The board of trade could do
good service to horsemen in taking
up this question. All necessary information will be furnished on application to the Veterinary Director
General, Department of Agriculture,
Ottawa.
THE NOM DE PLUME
. The publication of articles addressed 'To the Editor' over an
assumed or fictitious name having
been criticized by a correspondent
it may interest readers to know why
this universal custom is based on
good and sufficient reasons and permitted by the 'best' newspapers
throughout the world. The importance aud worth of a communication depends on the subject matter, its truth and manner of presentment, not upon the signature
attached. Some persons are more
concerned about the writer than the
subject, hence the threadbare and
silly accusation that a writer is
ashamed of his identity when an
assumed name is used. Many of the
greatest writers and authors use a
pen name and contributors to newspapers, notably the 'Letters of
Junius,' have performed great public service in exposing political
wrongs and graft in high places.
An employee of the government of
any country   or  civic  corporation,
or railway and other companies,
may render a great public service
by turning on the light upon some
grave wrong, using a pseudonym
for .the purpose. Two classes of
writer known to newspapermen,
the one reticent and sensitive of his
personal publicity and tbe other full
of vanity is never more pleased than
when he sees his name and occupation in the newspapers, it may be
appended to an article of which he
is very proud. The 'best' newspapers in Canada encourage writing
over a nom de plume, among these
may be mentioned the Vancouver
World, Province; Victoria Times;
Toronto Mail and Empire, World,
Globe, Star, Orange Sentinel, etc.
Iu fact, out of about 2000 newspapers pri.nted in Canada the only
newspapers refusing articles written
over fictitious names are the Vancouver News-Advertiser and the
Victoria Colonist. The London
Times and all the leading newspapers in Britain are not averse to
the nom de plume, and, but for the
correspondent leaving his subject
matter to jibe Star no one would
have suspected any newspaper,
much less the two mentioned, of
denying publication to any article
with a fictitious signature.
John Wanatnaker, the millionaire merchant, says: 'I would as soon think of
doing business without clerks as without
advertising.'
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THE MAN WHO CAN FORESEE
THE TOMORROW OF
EAST
WILL MAKE MONEY BY INVESTING THERE
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY ¥
A flODEL CITY
Water system.
Electric light.
Cement walks.
Natural parks.
Nicely wooded.
Fine garden soil.
Athletic grounds.
Excellent drainage.   -
No danger from overflow.
Can have fine sewer system.
Wide streets and lanes. -
Local aud long distance phone system.
Natural centre, ranching country, fruit growing. Huge deposits ot copper, gold, silver, platinum and other minerals^ Has
big water power development. Lots in such towns as Grand Forks, Kamloops, Blairmore, Alta., Baker, Wash., are worth 5 times
what is  being   asked at East Princeton and the payroll is not as large.
FREE CEMENT walks with each lot sold—cleared streets.    Water main to be laid in streets this summer.
BUSINESS LOTS $450 up : Terms 10 p.c. cash, 5 p.c. per mo. Residence lots, $_0T5 up : Terms, 10 p.c. cash, $10 per mo.
7 p.c. on annual balances.    {.% of all lots are to be reserved) for future sale.     Get full particulars at once.
C. R. BRIGGS, Gen. Agent, 6I5 Hastings W., Vancouver. D. G. McCURDY, Resident Agent, East Princeton, B.C.
A PAYROLL CITY NOW
Furnished by the B C. Portland Cement
Co.: Cement, Lime, Bricks.
United Empire Co. : Coal and Copper.
Princeton Coal & Land Co. : Coal.
Princeton Lumber Mills Co. ; Sawmill.
B.C. Copper Co. : Copper.
The Platinum-Gold Fields Co.: Placer
Mining.
One thousand men will be employed
inside of year.
A RAILROAD CENTER
The Kettle Valley railroad, which will
soon be the main line of the C.P.R. system, briugs Vancouver 300 miles nearer
Winnipeg, passes through the townsite.
Final survey is now being made.
The Great Northern has tracks on two
sides of the townsite and will soon be
finished to Vancouver. These two roads
give transportation in all directions from
East Princeton.
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April 3, 1912
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
THOMAS BROS.
PIONEER STORE OF PRINCETON
QUR STOCK is replete in
Groceries, Hardware, and
Clothing. See our Men's
Furnishings. Hats by the
best makers and latest
styles. See our Dry Goods
and Ladies' Wear. Bar-
gains for Buyers. See the
Goods and be convinced of
the  quality  of our stock
Vj
THOMAS BROS.
Ye  Olde   Firm   of   Princeton
Plumbing and Heating, Sheet Metal
p   work, Tinsmiihing
Shop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St., in 'Ivlurdock's blacksmith shop'
DIGNAN & ATKIN
PRACTICAL WORKMEN—PROPRIETORS
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
__%_____!l__5__5__9__5__5__5__f__5__5__5^^
^J^^^**^^^********^************^^*****^ ^VVfWVV
Y
CARLE
__
|: Headquarters for Groceries, Vege=
I tables and Provisions
Y
%
4 Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Cranberries
X
:. ORDERS   PROflPTLY   ATTENDED
.t, _____________________________________________
I O.   H.    CARLE,    THE   GROCERYMAN
K**i**i<**i*<'<K**i**i**t**i*<<<*^^^
Read  the advertisements carefully then make  your
purchases«No reason now to send away.
THE SIMILKAMEEN INDIANS
BY MRS. S. In ALLISON.
[Continued from last week.]
The Similkameens today are Catholics,
having been won over to that faith by
the patience and long-suffering of the
Oblate Fathers. Their old religion, as
far as I can ascertain, was very simple.
They believed in an Almighty Spirit, the
Creator of all things, and master of all—
Him they adored as the Father. There
wen_other spirits—the woods, the mountains, the water, ana even nre, were full
<_f them—but they were suBbrdinale
spirits entirely under the control of the
Father. Some, of these subordinate
spirits were ^ood and some evil. The
spirits, called the Souieappoos, were not
altogether as bad as their name indicates
(devils), most of them seem to be neutral.
"The ul_ chief, Quan-is-coe, used to' tell
me of one he met with on Mount Chip-
paco (also on Mount Baker) where he
was hunting across the boundary line.
This Souieappoo is described by Quan-
is-coe as being in form like a huge black
man covered with lo. fr "ilk,,-i"iy""ttn
strong that when once ca___tt asleep
liy Quatl .¥ coe and his followers and 1 y
them bound to the ground  with strong
Ireatas, on waking he merely stretched
himself and rose up with ease, snapping
the thongs like threads and shaking off
the hunters, who clung to him to hold
him down, as if they had been mosquitoes
but doing them no >"rtillprjn. '-"' though
his »• _rn_il-lQ_yfrtPr as he eluded Quan
is-coe must have been provoking. I have
heard the Indians  describe  some  Souie
appOOS, that ns._    to    fr. i-|_g_l—_~r pi-tain
place in what is now our cattle range, as
having the body of a man, the head of a
deer'with large branching antlers, the
face of a man coveied with deer hair, the
eyes large and deeply pathetic in ex
pression, the limbs those of a deer, and
from the shoulders sprung the wings of a
bat, which seemed to vibrate in the air
perpetual y. These spirits are described
as kindly rather than otherwise. The
spirits most dreaded by the Similka
meens are the spirits of the dead, which
the Indians imagine are easily offended
;and very vindictive, even to their late
friends. Their eyeballs gleam with baleful fite and from their nostrils smoke
proceeds; their appearance is altogether
frightful and they do not glide about HKe
honest Christian ghosts, but spin lound
and round like tops, when they ad
.vance to meet their late friends, making
the while the most unearthly noises.
These frightful apparitions are generally
appeased by a feast or poilatch which, I
think, is nothing more or less thin afeait
in honor of the dead.
The medicine man, or doctor, is a veiy
important personage, and really not the
entire humbug that he is represented by
those who merely give him a cursory
glance. Some of these doctors have de
veloped a strong magnetic power, and the
extraordinary power they do exercise
over their patients Is due entirely to animal magnetism. I have not the least
doubt of it, and I have seen many cases
where they have really effected cures.
The music they use is a sort of half drum,
resembling a torn torn, and Ihey keep up
a low monotonous chant while charming
the evil spirit from their patient. Sometimes a certain mat is used, and a spirit
once beguiled on to it has to stay there
till released by the doctor. All sickness
was formerly believed to be the work of
an evil spirit who fastened on a victim
and hung on, drawing away his life, till
charmed away by the doctor, who would
work himself into a state of perfect
frenzy, singing and dancing while he was
trying to lure the evil spirit from his
patient; and he would go through the
motions of wrestling with some invisible
f_e, the sweat pouring from his body;
then he would fall down perfectly exhausted, or fall and roll over and over as
if struggling with some powerful adversary. I have often watched them from a
little way off and am sure that if there is
any deception, it is the doctors really deceive themselves. I am convinced that
they are possessed \ ith the belief that
they are struggling wilh some supernatural power. I have often seen a strong
man so exhausted after six hours of doctoring that he could hardly walk.
[To be continued.]
TO RENT -
A well equipped and stocked farm,
situated eight miles from the town of
Princeton, B C. Good house and farm
buildings. A married man with family
preferred. For further particulars inquire of S. R. GIBSON,
Princeton. B. C.
Westwood & Brooke
POULTRY FARM
PRINCETON, - British Colombia
"SPOKESMAN"
This White Leghorn male bird won 2nd prize
Spokane Poultrv show, 1911. .ilso headed 2nd
prize pen at same show. He Is sired by ist prize
winner al Spokane Poultry Show, 1911, which
also won shape and color specials at same show.
iAlso was ist prize winner at Seattle in 1910
' We a e'l.owbooking orders for Kgg Settings,
and foi ward same when required by customeis
PhN No, i—Our selected prize winning stcck,
|$5 pt r s. tting of 15 eggs.
j   Pkn No. 2—A choice pen  that   will   produce
^winners and layers. $3 per setting of 15 eggs.
Pen K0.3-A sp einlid utilitv pen for egg production. $1 50 per setting of '5 eg.?**.
Book your orders early. T^rmscash with order.
Address:   PRINCETON, B. C.
J. KNUDSON
Contractor   and   Builder
___L
1
Estimates Furnished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
4"
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   L.   CUMMINGS,   Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc.
General Blacksmithing.
carriage Building and Repairs
">  All Work Neatly & Promptly
£ Phone 28. Executed.
^
—J —
 i|#    ... _l,_P.
	
-—
	
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
Aprii,  io, 1912,
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS
WATER BRANCH
. In the matter of the Board of Investigation created by Part III. of the "Water
Act" for the determination of water
rights existing on the 12th day of March,
1909; and in the matter of the following
creeks in the Similkameen Water District:
Alder creek.
Alkali lake.
Apex creek.
Ashnola river.- -
Atwood creek.
A-che-ghip-Flat creek.
A-tsi-Klak creek.
Asquatic creek.
Armstrong creek.
Buckhorn creek.
Bench stream.
Bromley creek.
Baker creek.
Bear creek.
Bear lake.
Beaver cteek.
Beaver lake.
Bitter creek.
Blue Joint creek.
Blue lake.
Boswell cjeek. .
Boulder creek.
Boundary creek.
Brodhagen creek.
Bunch Grass Field spring.
Big Rock creek.
Blind creek.
Brown creek.
Buchanan creek.
Bull creek.
Boomerang creek.
Blytbe creek,
Causlen creek.
Camp creek.
Canyon creek.
Canyon lake.        ??S_J
, Carmi cr ek.
Cedar creek. .&>>-
Cedar lake.
Christina lake.
Christina creek.
Clearwater lake.
Clearwater creek.
. Clark creek.
Colchester creek.
Cold creek.
Conkle creek.
Copper creek.
Cougar creek.   -
Cyclops creek.
Cawaher creek.
Coldstream creek.   I
Coldwater creek.
Chain lakes.
Coteay creek.
' China creek.
Chinpatlin creek.
Cranberry creek.
Cranberry creek, south fork of.
Curry creek.
Conklin creek.
Canon creek.
Colvs creek.
Chandler creek.
Croscut brook.
M Dauphin lake.
Deadeye creek.
DeadwoodSyreek.
Deadman gulch.
Deadman lake.
Deep creek.
Deer creek.
Daly gulch.
Douglas creek.
Dominion creek.
Dog lake.
Duck lake.
Damfino creek.
, Eholt creek.jjL
' Eighteen milecreek.
Eighteen mile creek, branch of.
Elkhorn creek.
Eleven-mile creek.
• Frena creek.
Fair creek.
Farleigh lake.
Fifteen mile creek.
Fisherman creek.
Fisherrnan creek, west branch.
.'JFiye-mile creek.
Fons Perenius spring.
Fourth July creek.
■iFoiirth July  creek,   unnamed   tribu
tary of.
Fraser creek.
Flatt creek.
Franklin creek.
Fish lake.
French creek.
Farrel creek.
Gerald creek.
Goat creek.
Little Goat creek.
Gold creek.
Gold Hill creek.
Green lake.
Gibbs creek.
Gloucester creek.
Gilpin creek.
Graveyaid creek.
Glover creek.
Granite creek.
Gregoire creek.
Gold Drop creek.
Harrison creek.
'Hatlssener creek.
Hardy creek.
Horse creek.
Havnes creek.
Hester creek.
Hamilton creek.
Hell creek.
Henderson Sawmill creek.
Henry creek.
Hewlitt creek.
Hornet creek.
Hughes creek.
Hulme creek.
Hydraulic creek.
Ingram creek.
Ingram creek, east fork.
Incameep creek.
Irrigation creek.
Italy creek.
Inglam creek.
Iron creek.
Joshua creek.
James creek.
Jolly Jack creek.
Jim creek.
Keogan creek.
Kepler creek.
Keremeos creek. .
Keremeos creek, south fork.
Keremeos creek, west fork.
Kilpoola lake.
Kuslas Ktin-ska sken creek.
Kelly creek.
Kettle river.
Kettle river, north fork.
Kettle river, east branch of north fork
.Kettle river, west branch of north fork.
Kettle river, west fork.
Kettle river, east fork of west fork.
Kingston creek.
Knappen creek.
-. Kearns creek.
Lime Kiln lake.
Lind creek.
Ivittle Volcanic creek.
Lost Horse creek.
Lime creek.
Line creek.
Lynch creek.
Loon lake.
Lome lake.
Long Joe creek.
Long lake.
Lost creek.
Little creek.
Little chief creek.
Marama creek.
Manuel creek.
Marks creek.
Marron creek.
Marron lake.
May creek. .
Meadow creek.
Milligan creek.
Mollie Pritchard creek.
Moody creek.
Mother Lode creek.
Murphy creek.
Myers ireek.
-Myers creek, tributary of.
Meyers Sreek.
Maloan creek.
McCraie creek.
McCarren creek.
McCounelllpreek.
Mclntyre creek.
Mill creek.
•Mulligan creek.
Maida creek.
Murray creek.
Murray gulch.
. McRae creek.
Munroe creek.
McCuddy creek.
Mica creek.
Mohr creek.
Mud creek.
McFarlane creek.
Nogi creek.
Nine-mile creek.
Nicholson creek.
Napoleon creek.
N'Kam-rino creek.
N'Kam a-hi-nat-no creek.
N'Kam-eep river
Norwegian creek
Namless creek.
Okanagan river.
Olalla river.
Oro Fino creek
. Omellette creek
Old Tom creek
Osoyoos lake
Overton creek
Ontario creek
Paik rill
Pass creek
Pass creek, south fork
Porter creek
Prather creek
Parker creek
Prairie creek
Pathfinder creek
Prior creek
Providence creek
Qulllette creek
Quartz creek
Rat lake
Reed creek
Rice creek
Riddle creek
Rock creek
Rock creek, south fork
Round lake
Ruby creek
Ruckle creek
Richter creek
Rocky creek
Rattler creek
Sand Bank creek
St. Anne creek
Sand creek
Sandner creek
Savage creek
Sawmill creek
Sawmill lake
Sheep creek
Sheep creek, west fork
Schwartz creek.
Sicond creek
ScLillings creek
Shingle creek
Schumaker creek
Shuttleworth creek
Shuttleworth creek, lake at head of
Stray Horse creek
Smuggler spring
Similkameen river
Similkameen river, south fork
Six-mile creek
Sixteen-mile creek
Sken Kam Ske-Noo-Ske-Tan creek
Skibbiugton cr. k
Slate creek   .
Smith cret k
Stray Horse lake
Sultan creek
Sunset creek
Susap c eek
Susap ct eek, north fork
Sutherland creek
Spring gulch gs
Spring creek
Smelter lake
Stirling creek
Strawberry creek
Split cieek
Summit lake
Summit creek
Snowball cieek
Stashla-Valentka creek
Stewart creek
Snt wshoe crec k
Snehumption creek
Stevenson creek
Scot McRae creek
Snit Hse-tse-pa. Kan creek
Snit-I e-Naie-Tan creek
.em pie creek
Sixteen-mile creek
Stuart creek.
Tayior creek
Taylor lake
tTeslalinda creek
Texas creek
{Three S jring creek
^Tinhorn creek
Togo creek
Tom creek
Tom Tit creek
Trout creek
Trout lake
Twenty-mile creeK
Twenty-two-mile crek
Twenty-two mile creek, east fcrk
Twin creek
Twin creeki east fork of
Twin creek lakes
Twin creekjjSeek running into
Tea river
Trby creek
Trapper creek
Trail creek
Ten-mile creek
Thirtytwo-mile creek
Twilight creek
Tug-ul-nuit lake
Upper Clear lake
Upper Keremeos creek
Victoria creek
Volcanic creek
Vaseaux lake
Verde creek
Wallace creek
Wallace lake
Ward lake
Whites creek
Wild West creek
Williamson creek
Wilson treek
Wiseman creek
Woodworth lake
Wolf creek
Wolflake
White lake
White lake creek
Wilkinson creek
Waddel creek
Wolverine creek
Williams creek
Wartman lake
Woodcregk
West Fork lake
Yellow lake
Young creek
Unnamed Springs and Streams
Lak _3tuate one__ile nort__)_____.iew wagon
road about nine miles from Keren_jt»s.
Lake on scuth line of sub lot 7, lot 2710.
Spring on lot 667 (S)
Small creek ou the Florence mineral claim
Creek on sub lot 16 of lot 2613
Small creek about fourteen miles west of
Penticton
Spring three-quarters of a mile northwest of
south boundary of lot 538, group 1. township 72
Small unnamed lake ou lot 973 (S)
Spring on lot 2138
Small creek running from west ove.- southwest
portion Stem Winder mineral claim
Spring on Smuggler mineral claim
Small unnamed creek one mile and a half
south ofcTtnhorn cretk
Small unnamed creek about one mile and a
half north from Colden Gate Hotel, Fairview
SpringEjjsing; on the EBr.ka mineral claim'-
Spring on lot 2456
.   Unnamed stream rising lot 1297 (S)
Unnamed stream flowing through lot 1738
Small stream on tht Fairview townsite
Spring ou Pre-emption record 2517
Small stream near south end of Pre-emption
record 2944
Small creek on northeast corner of lot 351.   I
-.   Spring on section 31, township 49
Spring near west boundary of Pre-emption
record 125 (S)
Spring near noitheast corner oflot 282, group 1
Spring On lot 454 (S)
Small stream ou Blue Diamond mineral claim
J^Stream coming down mouutaln in front of LaWe
homestead
Spring rising in northwest V, section 24,
township 28 ^
. -^.all spring on southwest portion of lot 51s
Spring on 1 ittle Frank mineral claim.
- Stream flowing through No. 3 mineral claim.
Underground creek on Victoria mineral claim
Spring cVeek about the center of the Grey
Eagle mineral claim.
Small spring on lot 2531
Small unnamed creek rising on Pre-emption
record 4613
Sfering rising en Pre-emption record 76 (S)
Small spring on wagon road between Boundary
lall^and second bridge below Anaconda.
Small spring situated on lot 515, township 67.   .
Small lake on Pre-emption record 238 (S)
Small stream and spring situate on lot 27 (S)
Small unnamed creek on the northeast ii section 28, township 47
Spring on lot 177
Spring on lot 261, section 33, township 55
Spring near easterly end of New York mineral
claim
Small creek running info Myers flat and rising
on Oro Fino mountain
Stream rising on Barnes & Ironsides mineral
claim in Greenwood camp
Stream rising on Apex mineral claim
Three small la_es si'.uated on ea«t side of
Okanagan lake and twelve miles below Mission
creek
Spring on Comet mineral claim
Unnamed stream running alongside road that
borders lot 900
Spring and unnamed creek on lot 191. group 1
Spring or ereek on lots 2834 aud 280, towmhin
89
Small creek running 'southeast from Maple
Leaf mine   -
Small spring on St. Maurice mineral claim
Unnamed stream running through ^Missing
Link No. 2 mineral claim
Springs on lots 337 and 374 (S)
Unnamed spring on Pre-emption record 628
Small stream half a mile southwest of southwest corner of lot 3334
Spring about 42 chains north oflot 3205, group 1
Spriug situate near centre of" .he northwest y.
section 13, township 28
.. .finrin_..nea r, south-lice of lot 907
Unnamed spring on or near _T<_ emption record
4037
Small spring or stream on lot f49
Spring onjjPreremption record 4774
Unnamed small stream flowing from spring on
lot 380
Spring on lot 471
Spring sit-ated about the centre of north line
of lot 668 (S)
Small lake near southeast corner ofPre-emption
MS)
Small creek on Pre-emption record 2986
Small lake situated on Pre-emption record 2773
Small unnamed lakeot slough near east line of
lot 500, Osoyoos
Unnamed slough near lots 494 and 493, group 1,
Osoyo.os
s^Sanngon lot 334
Spring on lot 1359
Springs near northeast corner oflot 365
Springs on lot 2394
Spring near centre of lot 380
Stream running out of Loon lake
Spring on lot 3009, groijp,j.,jQsoyoos
Small creek flowiflg into Kettle rlv_r, -five i_i__i
south of Grand Forks
Small stream about six miles and a half south
of Eholt..
Creek or springs on lot 494
Spring on Colville reservation
. A5\|>ring on reserve
■Spring into Norwegian creek
Creek on lot 908
Jt Stream running through   sub  lot 3203 of lot
2716
And all named springs, streams, creeks, ponds,
gulches and lakes tributary to or in the vicinity
of the above named streams
Take notice that each and every person, part-
nership, company or municipality who,.on the
said 12th day of March, 1909, had water rights on
any of the above mentioned creeKs, is directed
tojfo'rward on or^efore the i9th«dAy of April,
1912, _>;t_e Chief Water Commissioner at. the
Parliament Buildings at Victoria, a memorandum
of claim in writing as required by section 28 of
the said act as amerded. Printed forms for such
memorandum (form No. 19) can be obtained
from any of the Water Commissioners in the
province;
And taKe notice that the said board of investigation intends to proceed-O tabulate such claims
on or about the 31st day of May, 1912.
After the claims have been tabulated by the
board, notice will be given of the places and days
on which evidence-and argument will be heard
at local points.
Dated at Victoria this 28th day of February^
1912.    _
J. F. ARMSTRONG.   >-'
Chairman.
Advertise and Prosper
April 3, 1912
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
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REPLY TO 'IMPERIALIST'
Editor Star—Sir: I notice in your
issue of March 6 a letter from some one
signing himself 'Imperialist,' criticizing
the Princieton Loyal Orange Lodge and
Orangemen in general for the stand
which they have taken in opposition to
home rule. I cannot understand why
the writer should sign himself 'Itn
perialist,' because he lacks one of the
essential qualities of an imperialist or
Britisher, and that is, to have the manliness and courage to come out and fight
in the open instead of skulking behind
the cover of a nom de plume.
Very little attention is paid, nowadays,
to men who are either ashamed or afraid
to accept the responsibility for what they
write; aud a number of our best news
papers, such as the Vancouver News-
Advertiser and the Victoria Colonist, are
refusing, to . print any communication
without the name of the writer being
made public. If all newspapers followed
his rule it would make writers on controversial subjects be sure of their iacts
before rushing into print; and a man
would hesitate before he would take the
public responsibility of making statements such as 'Imperialist' has made,
that are no credit either to his veracity
or his intelligence. As a rule communications of this kind should be treated
with the contempt which they deserve;
bnt as 'Imperialist' has gone out of his
,way to deliberately slander and misrepresent the members of the Orange association, 1 hkve thought it well, as an
official representative of the order, to say
a few words in reply.
In the first place, the Orange associ
ation lays no claim, either to exclusive
Protestantism or exclusive loyalty, but it
admits no one within its ranks whose
principles are not loyal and whose creed
is not Protestant. It aims t.> unite Pro
testants of all denominations on a common platform in opposition to the
political pretensions of the Church of
Rome. The Orange association has no
animosity whatever towards the membeis
of the Roman Catholic church. An
Orangeman believes that a Roman
Catholic has exactly the same right as
any Protestant to worship God according
to the dictates of his conscience and, if
necessary, will help him to secure that
right. But the Orange association objects to the Roman Catholic church as a
political body, attempting to interfere in
purely civil affairs, and for thrtt reason
has consistently opposed the granting of
any special privileges whatever to
religious "'denominations.
-. Let me quote a few words from the
Presbyterian Record of August, 1910, for
the benefit of 'Imperialist:' 'The Pro'
testant church and Protestant people are
one and the same. The Roman Catholic
church and the Roman Catholic people
are not the same. The Roman Catholic
church is an organization above • and
apart from the people. The people be
long to it and obey it, but bave no part
in determining its policy. Roman
Catholic people may be our very kind
friends and would not interfere with the
exercise of our religion. The;-Roma'n
Catholic church, where it has the power,
invariably limits or wholly takes away
th: religious liberties of others.'
If the last sentence of this quotation be
true, and the history and experience of
this last thousand years proves that it is,
is it any wonder that the Orangemen and
all good Protestants of the empire aie
uniting in opposition to a measute that
would deliver the civil and religions
liberties of the Protestant minority of
Ireland into the keeping" of the hierarchy.
of the Roman Catholic church.
It is utter nonsense for ' Imperialist' or
any one else to say that home rule is not
a   religious  question.   Why,   even   the
Roman Catholic church has quit keeping
up the farce any longer.
The Catholic -Times of January 21,
1910, says: 'As a matter of fact the home
rule question is a religious question. We
have said this many a lime and we repeat
it now/
J. P. Farrell, M. P., one of the Nationalist members in the British house, in
addressing a recent meeting of the Longford branch of the United Irish league,
boldly declared: 'I regard a man that
turns from being a Nationalist to a
Unionist as a renegade Catholic, turning
his back on his coreligionists.'—Roscommon Herald, October 14. 1911.
In further p oof of the fact that home
is a religious question I might point out
that in the selection of candidates at the
last election in 73 Irish constituencies no
fewer than 752 priests took an active
part. In Bast Mayo a priest acted as
John Dillon's election agent. Out of 63
conventions for the selection of Nationalist candidates priests presided at 31, or
one-half; 136 priests' either proposed or
seconded the selection of candidates.
The nomination papers of selected candidates were signed by 291 priests, including four bishops. If the Roman Catholic
church in Ireland takes such an active
part in politics now, what will she do
under home rule when she will have
.Sings'all her own way?
The difficulty of the task of dealing
with a conntry where the Roman
Catholics form a large majority of the
population lies in the fact that the Roman
Catholic church claims equal rights
where she is in the minority, but does
not allow^them where she has the power.
Where religious liberty exists it does
"soTiot because of the Roman Catholic
church, but in spite of it. These are the
facts of history and experience, and in
the light of these facts is it any wonder
that the Protestants of Ulster protest
against a measure which to them means
nothing short of home rule and the curtailment of their civil and religious
liberties? Canadians have an excellent
examp e of home rule in the province of
Quebec where the Portestants form a
small' minority of the population and
where they do not get equal rights with
citizens of the Roman Catholic faith. So
obnoxious has home rule become iu that
province that the Protestants are leaving
it and coming to the ot er provinces
where they will have the civil and re
ligious liberty that they  are entitled to.
I would advise 'Imperialist' to read- a
book called 'The Tragedy of Quebec,' by
Robert Sellar, and he will get some
valuable information as to how home rule
works. Before leaving this point I
would like to ask 'Imperialist' ^hy, if
home rule is not a religious questit_i as
he claims, John Redmond and Winston
Churchill are talking about guarantees
to the Protestant minority. Unless home
rule is a religious question Ijiere is ho
nece-.sity whatever to t___- about
guarantees.
Yours truly,
J. W. WHITELY,
Provincial Organizer.
Orange Association.
Vancouver, March 20, 1912
(Cc ncluded next w ek )
COUNTY   COURT, ^YALE
--■A sittfng^f the-_»untjM___.-of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Monday, filh
day of May, 1912 at the hour of 2:30 o'clock in the
afternoon.   By command.
HUGH HONTBR,
Registrar County Court.
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||      An Eye Opener    ji
to the good mechanics is our showing of tools of all description.
And they are good tools. They are the kind that will become- like
old friends to vou. They will last and stav and work for you for
years and years, and help you earn your daily bread. Therefore,
they are more reasonable in price than others—quality considered.
And so it is with all kinds of Hardware, and for that matter with
all kinds of merchandise, irrespective of what it is called. You want
the best, don't yon? That ought to bring you here—for the least
skillful buyer can come here and be sure that what he or she buys is
good—because we make it good.
That is one of the reasons that customers are coming to us in
constantly increasing numbers; and it will pay you too—to get
acquainted with us—pay in quality—in service—aud in money saved.
New arrivals at our Store this week
ONE CARLOAD BUILDERS' HARDWARE
Get our prices on nails, locks, glass, windows, building paper, tar
paper, roofing, paints, brushes, etc , etc.
New Shipment Men's Perfection Brand Clothing
BOYS AND CHILDREN'S  CLOTHING
Ask our clerks to show you our new suits for boys from 7 to 14
years of age .at $3.50, $4, $4.50 per suit. They are unmatchable values.
New Shipment of Summer Silks
in the most beautiful colorings and exquisitely tasty patterns at
40 cents, 50 cents and 60 cents per yard.
Get the Habit of trading at Howse'*—it will save yon money.
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The A. E. HOWSE CO, Ltd
PRINCETON, B.C.
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Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave,, near Station
PRINCETON, B.C
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. CiMiCHNTf
*    The Town ol Opportunity ~rk
The rails have been  laid  into  the town and Coalmont is now the new
terminus,   the  base  of operations for .the nest  forty miles of railway
building.
Before six months have passed there should be a payroll in Coalmont of
between  350  and  400  men : This  means population, which naturally
means good business.
IF YOU ARE WISE YOU will invest in a little Coalmont real estate
now while tbe choice is s_ill good.
Don't let this oppoinnily slip along with the others which have got
past you. Wri!e for our circular and price list ; a post card will brin^
it to you.    There are still some 50-foot lots left
Two blocks from the centre of town at only
$225, $55 cash, bal. in 18 months to suit.
fl% Williamson  & Turner
AGENTS, COALflONT,  B.C,
—I—
 I
prince:, dim
According to the laws of industrial progress and the experience of founders of western towns,
i_iere must be a tangible, genuine basis on which to establish the future city. No amount of
coaxing can bring blood otn.-of a*_»tone, nor can the greatest scientist extract sunbeams from a
cucumber. Every man makes his own destiny==his own fortune==nothing comes by so-called
good luck.   The door is wide ajar for all who have pluck and a little capital.    Investigate Now!
*^l__.!'^ r' -^r■■u' "'*j:S____^ . . *'   , £f?   _>-__
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With Its Unequalled Mineral Resources
Its  Healthful Climate arid Pretty Site
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Is destined to be the Largest City in the Interior of British Columbia.
Five hours' run to Vancouver when the V., V. &E. is finished.
ygt.
^four Oftppr tunity Is NOW!
CHOICE LOTS FOR SALE
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to Suit All Requirements
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Priecl01 coal I inl Co
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