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Similkameen Star 1911-08-30

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 ■WHIPS
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Coal &_coke need the wider market—Reciprocity helps
Free trade within the empire and with United States is the goal.
The effects of high Protective Duties are seen In huge trusts, mergers and multi-millionaires in Canada and the United States—Protection makes
the rich richer, the poor poorer—Reciprocity or free trade permits one to buy in the cheapest and sell in best markets—Protection fosters food trusts
Vol. XII. No. 36.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 191U
$2 a Year in Advande
CEMENT CITY GROWS
Industrial   Works   Pushed in
Construction in Busy-
East Princeton.
Large Expenditure in Improvements
and Brisk Demand for
Real Estate.
East Princeton, Aug. 29.—Superintendent Morgan of the Great Northern,
inspected the cement works Tuesday and
was impressed with the progress made.
E. P. Galliac, manager" of the United
Empire coal mine, returned from Spokane yesterday.
Lots in East Princeton have been sold
within the past four weeks totalling
|2ojjap. The lots bring -*_Tflfi-r"pi_ce
than improved lots in much older towns.
This is due entirely to the fac_.that the
owner is making it a niodel town from
the start and "giving goera values with the
property.
Grading on the spur is being rushed to
completipn night and day.
Let anyone investigate the cement
manufacturing towns of Blairmore, B.C.,
Metaline Falls and Boncrete, Wash., and
compare them with the opportunities
offered at East Princeton. It will prove
an eyeopener to them. An ideal town 'is
sure to spring up. East Princeton will
have all the accessories of a modern
town, morally andCphysically clean, inviting to the homeseeker and a climate
unsurpassed in the world. Buy while
ground floor prices prevail.
W. J. Bud,d is expected back from Calgaryin_~Iew days.
■ Improvements and outlay on the town-
site will represent a large expenditure
which the purchaser will derive an immediate benefit ftom. Permanent resident workmen in connection with the
cement works will soon be here in large
numbers, the temporary laborers being
employed on railway construction principally. wAj*^
A church, sch*>o" Sand opera hoiise are
plannedjipf.onstrucfio4_r W
oH
POLITICAL MEETING HELD.
Martin Burrell, ex-M.P., arrived in
Princeton last Thursday and delivered a
polifical address to an average size audience, presided over by E. Waterman.
Ladj^s.were in attendance and the speaker was heard attentively. Mr. Burrell did
not arouse enthusiasm, speaking,itj_a
monotone ^hich lacked inspiriting forceV
It is _i_fe to state that Mr. Burrell did not
make a single convert toanti reciprocity.
Willi a: large majority over a weak opponent and without any national issne in
the election of 1908 there is little to base
Mr. Burrell's prediction that he will be
elected with an increased majority. The
meeting closed with cheers for the candidate and 'God Save the King.'
CANDIDATE ENROUTE.
Following is the itinerary of tbe Liberal
Candidate, K. C. McDonald: Lytton,
Aug. 23, afternoon; North Bend, Aug. 23;
Lillocet, Aug. 24; Ashcroft, Aug. 25;
Notph Hill, Aug. 26; Greenwood, Aug.
28; Phoenix, Aug. 29; Grand Forks, Aug.
30; Midway, Aug. 31, afternoon; Rock
Creek, Aug. 31; Bridesville, Sept. 1; Penticton, Sept. 2; Summerland, Sept. 4;
Keremeos, Sept; 5; Hedley, Sept. 6;
Princeton, Sept. 7; Merritt, Sept. 8; Kamloops, Sept. 9; Barkerville, Sept. 11;
Quesnel, Sept. 12; 150 mile house Sept.
13; Chase, Sept. 14; Kelowna, Sept.'15;
Vernon, Sept. 16; Salmon Arm, Sept.-18;
Mara, Sept. 19, afternoon; Enderby,
Sept. 19; Armstrong, Sept. 20.
TULAMEEN CELEBRATES.
- Labor Day celebration at Tulameen is
giving promise of attracting a large number of merrymakers. To many the novelty of seeing picturesque Tulameen arid
its beautiful lake for the first time will
prove a strong induceuient.^3__ose who
have already visited Tulameen will willingly suceumb - to the/ seductive scenic
beauty and the- {Measure afforded by a
day's sport and grand hop. The ambi
tion of .Tulameen to celebrate for the
first time is admirable and-worthy of the
patronage of its neighbor towns. Advance, Tulameen!
TO INCREASE COAL OUTPUT.
The Princeton Coal and Land Co., as
will be observed by advertisement, ^s
inviting tenders for three buildings, the
larger one being 100x30, to be erected at
the pithead. These buildings will house
the large and uptodate plant now to be
installed for the mining of coal on a large
scale. The" present plant is totally inadequate for the growing demands made
upon it, Princeton coal having fairly won
its way into the markets. When the
V.. V. & E. is completed, coast cities noiw
anxiously waiting for this superior domestic coal, will be supplied by the pioneer Princeton Coal and Land Co. The
shipments now amount to about 120 tons
dailv.
HEDLESCAND LABOR DAY.
Hedley, with her usual hospitality, has
made big preparations for her annual
celebration on Labor, Day. Citizens of
Hedley and Princeton believe in and
practise reciprocity on their annual fete
days and it generates a feeling of amity:
among the twolpeoples—it has the same
mollifying effect in all cases. The Princeton band under Prof. Coulthard'sleadership, and a holiday crowd, will go down
and assist in crowning labor king of
earth and the Similkameen. Hedley,
the golden, long may you prosper !
RECIPROCITY RECIPES
Will Make Good Times Better by ExpandinglOur
Foreign Trade.
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Laurier Must Finish His Work: Free
Trade In Empire and with
United States.
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Conservatives: say that the times have
changed since their political saint, Sir
John A. Macdonald, offered reciprocity
to the United States. But they forget
that the principle of reciprocity never
changes. Sir John • wanted the wider
market for the farmers, coal owners and
producers generally, so does Sir Wilfrid.
What was all right for Sir John is all
wrong for Laurier, the Liberal. The in
ttlligent voter sees the in<___sistency of
Tory leaders who love party more than
country and he will vote for reciprocity-.
'Fighting' Joe Martin, English M.P.,
like the itch, is with us again. He says :
'Reciprocity will undcubtedly mean more
money for Canada and more money for
Canadians.' -But he hates Laurier and
like Sifton, Bourassa & Co., will try to
throw him. Here is a man full of lowest
revenge, ready to sacrifice his country's
welfare that he may work off a personal
grudge. Martin is a reriegade Liberal
and Canadian representing St. Pancakes
in the British parliament. If he would
stay where he is put and attend to the
wants of his poor constituents in East
London inste__ of looking for trouble in
B.C. he might accomplish some good.
The Liberal candidate, Efr.- McDonald,
will be in Princeton on Thursday, 7th
Sept., in the I.O.O.F. hall. Every elector should hear him, as well as the public
generally.   Ladies invited.    /   , '
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Let Laurie_T_t_ts_i his work^JJreeTtrade
within the empire and with the United
States.
Bourassa, the French Canadian Nationalist, condemns Laurier for his Imperialism and loyalty to British institutions. Yet we see the Conservative leader, R. L. Borden, Dr. Sproule, Senator
Bowell and Sifton making a political
bedfellow of Bourassa, the red revolutionist and rank Romanistr To what
extremes will not the Tories bend in order to defeat Sir Wilfrid?
Mr. Burrell and his party favor a gift
of $25,000,000 cash to the old country to
build dreadnoughts for its navy. K. C.
McDonald and the Liberal party fayor
buildiug a navy in Canada, thereby developing our own resources and establishing the shipbuilding industry. It
does not seem just that a young and
struggling country should donate a huge j
sum to the old, and wealthiest country iu
the world. Canada can build her own
navy and it is an insult to the intelligence of Canadians to say they cannot.
Of course, the money to build with will
have to be borrowed from J. Bull, Esq ,
the world's moneylender, and that is
S_hy -he-Hkes- colonies—they are safe and
profitable for investment and afford
homes for his teeming population-
TOWN AND DISTRICT..
Chief Engineer Hogelaad-, J. H. Kennedy and A. Guthrie arrived on Great-
Northern special and went to Coalmont-
Tuesday. The railhead is now at the
second crossing of the Tulameen, four
miles west of Princeton..
Mr. and Mrs. Lnmsden and Miss Mc-
Tavish, matron of the Prince Rupert
hospital, arrived from the coast last week.
W. S. Cleveland",, recently in the hospital with an axe- wound on the knee,
expresses sincere- thanks- to the hospital"
matron, Miss Thomas, and to many,
friends for kindnesses received. Mr;
Cleveland is welf on: tbe way to recovery...
J. G. Geddievo. the Bank of Commerce,
now holidaying-with" the 'laird of Tulla~
hard' up Onemile, on his return will leave
for Penticton, there to occupy a prominent position in the agency of that city.
Mr. Geddie is courteous and capable and—
will be much? missed in social circles*
He is succeeded by J. Morrison.
Hon. Price Ellison-, minister of finance,.
was in tow_» Saturday, going to Merritt.
Several rounders tried to break into
jail this week with t_re result that a motley
bunch of sisr we^elanded by Constable
Sproule ami special Bill Martin.
T. C. Kinglefit a> fine sample of green
corn at the Star, perfect in ear and stalk
six feet high* _t' was grown in his garden and Is proof that even in high altitudes the soil and climate are productive
of many kinds of. table vegetables.
C. ^. Semerad has gone to Edmonton
aud will disp___ of seme valuable pro •
perty which he and Mrs. Semerad were
fortunate in acquiring'in the early days
of that wonderful city. Mr. Semerad
will sell his bakery and restaurant business in Princeton an_fwill move to Or-
angeville.on Fiiemitfe, where be expect*
to engage in holejkeeping and farming.
Now is your opportunity to procure'
good photos from  Priest the Photogra
pher.    Films developed.  [A
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Eighty-five per centT df all headaches
are- the result of eye strain. Are you
troubled that way ? If so, consult S. L.
Taube (of the Taube Optical Co., of
Calgary) who will be at the Princeton
Diug Store on Friday afternoon Sept. 8,
and Sat. morning, Sept. 9.
Auction sale of household furniture
will be held in the Avery block, Saturday, at 2 p.m. H. H. Avery, the auctioneer, has received instructions from E.
B. Hall to sell household effects.—Big_
bargains may be expected..
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
August ;o, 191 i.
The Similkameen Star.
A. E. Howse.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
One Year,
Payable In Advance.
fa.oo
S ubscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reporting any change in address or
regularity in receipt of tlfeir paper.
' dvertlsing rates furnished on application.
Legal notices io and 5 cents per line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month
advertising.
No transient advertisement Inserted unless
accompanied with the cash
RECIPROCITY AND COAL.
Perhaps  in   no   other  article of
■commerce will the  benefits of reciprocity  be   more  marked  than  in
that  of  coal.     Where  the United
States formerly levied a  duty of 45
cents on slack coal, by the terms of
reciprocity it is reduced to 15 cents.
A very large  amount of slack coal
is shipped  across  the border to U.
S. factories and a still greater trade
is  expected   under  the  new  tariff
and the reclassification of this coal.
Thus  reciprocity  helps.  ; But it is
in the waiting market for coke, the
product of coal,  that  the  mines of
this province  will receive immense
benefit.    With coke on the free list,
tbe U.S. tariff is now $1.20 per ton,
the bituminous mines of B.C. would
more than double their output. The
Washington and Montana smelters
will welcome our coke with its short
haul  as  against the long haul and
greater cost  of Pennsylvania coke.
Only  the  wilfully and party blind
will not appreciate the benefits to be
derived from reciprocity as it affects
coal.     The  bituminous  and semi-
bituminous mines in Princeton district have all to gain and nothing to
lose by  reciprocity.    If the people
of Princeton district as well as those
of Union  Bay   and   Crow's   Nest
Pass want to  sec big payrolls they
will endorse a policy that means the
encouragement of the coal and coke
industries.    Reciprocity  now,   and
free trade to follow within the Empire aud  with tbe United States is
:t'ie goal of all  progressive citizens.
flourishes and in Germany where
despotism rides on the necks of the
poor.
The Gazette is not fair. The
horse raisers of Ontario are in favor of reciprocity because tbey get
better prices in Buffalo than in Toronto. Teams worth $500 in Toronto quickly bring $800 in Buffalo. This on the authority of A.
Yeager, the largest exporter and
raiser in the province. Thanks,
Gazette, for the opportunity of correcting you.
^<**4>^*ll**X**t**t**^^^^
THE NEW TOWN
Conservatives never tire of boosting protection as the great antidote
for hard times  and  the empty dinner pail.    Let us see  how it works
with  our   highly  protected  Uncle
Sam.    Last week the News-Advertiser   had  an editorial comment on
the discharge  of six thousand employees by the Southern Pacific railway line  and  emphasized the generally    depressed  condition  of the
labor market at Seattle and all over
the States.    And this  in  the most
highly    protected  country  in   the
world.    The fact is that protection
never made the  workingman  prosperous in any  country, for the reason that it tends  to make the rich
richer and the poor  poorer.    If the
workingmen  of   Canada  are prosperous  today  it  is in spite of protection and due to  the  progressive
policy of a government  that favors
reciprocity and free trade.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
After repeated efforts to obtain
reciprocity with the United States
Sir Wilfrid Laurier avowed that he
would not ask that government or
the President again to accept it. He
kept his word and presently U.S.
commissioners ask him to resume
negotiations for reciprocity. His
show of manly independence was
the means of 'bringing them to
th.ir milk.'
Loyalty in action is worth mpre
than volumes of lip loyalty. That
subject is- most truly loyal who votes
for the general good of his country
and the toiling masses as opposed
to the so called classes, trusts, millionaire monopolists ard combines.
A high protective tariff, such as the
Conservatives advocate, is the mother of monopoly and class legislation. Observe its working in the
United'States where the food trust
Martin Burrell's speech against
reciprocity last Thursday night was
heard by abont 150 people. He
followed the line of argument his
leader adopts and deprecates all Sir
Wilfrid's political acts. He said
the Prime Minister was anti-imperialistic although he gave preferential tariff to Britain, penny postage
within the empire and now offers
empire free trade ; he ridiculed Canada's navy, although as with every
other country it must begin small ;
he said Canada's raw resources
would be hauled to the U S. and
there manufactured, forgetting that
every manufacturer must establish
nigh his raw stuff if be desires to
compete ; he feared annexation if
reciprocity carried, although his
great leader, Sir John A. Macdon-
ald, never thought of such a dire
thing as annexation, and so on to
the end of his labored speech. Mr.
Burrell had none of tbe fire be
exhibited in former campaigns and
the audience heard him patiently
aud quietly. His speech could only
make converts for reciprocity.
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Regular meeting of the board of trade
will be held on Mouday next at 8 p.m. in
the court house. New members solicited
and large attendance invited.
The Tuianieen Stage Co. will erect a
stable at Coalmont and ply a daily
stage to Merritt.
H. A. Turner, road superintendent,
was-a visitor .his week.
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A Payroll City
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Manufacturing is the
Backbone of
GREAT CITIES
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The British Columbia Portland Cement Co's
Plant represents an expenditure of a Half
nillion Dollars and will manufacture Portland Cement of the highest quality, Shale
Brick, Lime, and Vitrified Clay Products.
The United Empire Co. is now producing a
Sub=Bituminous Coal of first quality for domestic use. This Company is also opening
up immense Copper deposits which will require a large reduction plant.
Other mining companies operating near East
Princeton are spending large sums in development and will employ many men.
Do You Realize what Industrial Works and
Payrolls mean to a city ?
EAST PRINCETON, A MODEL
CITY,   PARKS, CEMENT
SIDEWALKS, WATER
Invest now  and watch  your investment grow with
the town.    For full particulars see
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A
D. Q. McCURDY
RESIDENT AGENT.
Or write RAYMOND E. WARD, Pacific blk, Vancouver
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August 30, igri.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
A typographical error in the Tulameen
labor day posters makes the baseball
prize read '$80' instead of $30. Fans
and tans will please note the error and
charge it to the 'devil.'
Some fine oats grown on Fivemile and
six-rowed beardless barley grown on the
Nicholson ranch, near Copper mountain,
were shown the agricultural editor of the
Star recently and pronounced No. 1.
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Coalmont
A legitimate
Investment
Today
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MOST PEOPLE want to invest their money where
they are reasonably sure of a good return. If the
investment is to be made in real estate there are several
things to be considered : The situation of the town, climatic
conditions, transportation facilities, and primarily the
amount of the monthly payroll. When- these questions are
asked regarding Coalmont they may all be answered to the
credit of the town. The situation and climatic conditions
are ideal ; the main line of the V..V. & E. railway runs
through the town on its way to Vancouver.
The Columbia Coal & Coke Co. operating here have practically an inexhaustible supply of a pure bituminous coal.
They are installing immediately a plant which will handle
2000 tons of coal in 8 hours—this means employment for between
800 and goo men all told.
Figure out this payroll and see how many coal mining towns
in B.C. can beat it.
In a very short time Coalmont will necessarily have a population of from 2000 to 2500 people. Will this cause real estate to rise ?
We all know the answer. Then take the opportunity that presents
itself now—buy first hand and reap the benefit of this increase.
The prices and terms are such that anyone can afjord to inves
to the extent of one or two lots. They range from $175 to $550, on
terms of X cash, balance over 18 months.
Address all communications and remittances to
WILLIAMSON & TURNER,
Soi,e Agents,
iMM COALMONT, B.C.
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THE CANADIAN £ANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., L.L.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER   LAIRD,  GENERAL MANAGER
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, -   $8,000,000
THE SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
of The Canadian Bank of Commerce will receive deposits of $1 and
upwards, on which interest is allowed at current rates. There is no
delay in withdrawing the whole or any portion of the deposit. Small.
deposits are welcomed. A234
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, to be
operated by any one of the number or by the survivor. A joint account
of this kind saves expense in establishing the ownership of the money
after death, and is especially useful when a man desires to provide for
his wife, or for others depending upon him, in the event of his death.
J. D. ANDRAS, Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
%$i*iy*\\w®i&^z**>*>^
,eem
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% WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR
I Beef, Pork, Mutton, Fish,
I ALSO IN stock:
X
I Fresh Butter, Eggs,  Sausage, Pickled
:|       Pig's Feet, Salmon Bellies, Herri ring, Prime Lard, Etc.
I P. BURNS & CO., LTD.
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SPECIAL-For the balance
of this month only we are
offering greater bargains in
Baby Carts, jGo-Carts; Refrigerators and many other lines
than any Mail Order house ever
thought of offering.
s»   Call and See the goods and
get our prices
A. L white's Furniture store
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I       KING & GIBSON
X DEALERS IN
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I      Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
$ Hardware, Paints & Oils
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4.    Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
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t|t OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
4 PRINCETON, B.C.
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
Be at the general roundup at Tulameen
on Labor Day. Sports begin at io a.m.
at the lake.
Anglican church services for next Sunday, Sept. 3rd, in Princeton school room:
11 a.m., matins, holy communion and
sermon ; 7:30 p.m., evensong and sermon.
Methodist) church service, Sunday,
Sept 3. In Oddfellows' hall, at 7:30
p.m. Service at the cement works at 3
p.m.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject, Sunday, Sept. 3: 'Man.' The steps
of a good man are ordered by the Lord :
and he delighteth in his way.—Ps. 37 : 23.
Presbyterian church services.—Sunday;
school, 11 a.m.   Evening service in the.
court house, 7:30.   Coalmont—Morning
service, n a.m.
EYE
CALL FOR TENDERS.
YOUR EYES
will appreciate the ease and comfort  derived from  wearing  ' proper fitting glasses.'    If you have not had your ' eyes \ attended to,
WHY PUT IT OFF?
We have arranged with
The Taube optical coipaig
132 Eighth Avenue East, Calgary, Alberta,
to send their representative to our store on
Friday, p.m,t Sept. 8, and Saturday, a.m., Sept. 9th
Make it a point to consult him.    All work fully guaranteed
PRINCETON  DRUG &, BOOK STORE
******************.**********************************************'***■****************************************&
_A^v_yvvvvvvvvwvvyvvwvvvvvvw vww
Building 100x30 feet, tenders to close
Wednesday, 6 p.m., Aug. 30th.
Building 40x30 feet, tenders to close
Saturday noon, September 2nd.
Building 24x16 feet, tenders to close
Saturday noon, September 2nd.
Plans and epecifications may be seen j
at the mine office.
Prices to be furnished in each instance
for buildings complete, also separate tenders in each case for labor only.
Lowest prices on any tender not necessarily accepted.
THE   PRINCETON   COAL   &  LAND
CO , LIMITED.
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
In the Matter of the Railway Act
AND
In the Matter of the Vancouver, Victoria and Eastern Railway and
Navigation Company.
Notice is hereby given that the plan,
profile and book of reference of the
following sections of the line of the
Vancouver, Victoria & Eastern Railway
and Navigation Company duly approved
and certified by the Board of Railway
Commissioners for Canada has been filed
in the Land Registry Office in the city of
Kamloops, nameiy:- Mileage o to 12;
12 to 16; 16 to 17; and 17 to 39.
Dated this 21st dav of Aug, A.D. 1911.
A. H. MACNEILL,
Sol_3|br for the Vancouver, Victoria and
'--Eastern Railwav and Navigation Co.
Groceries Fresh Provisions
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF
Fruits and vcieiilles
Removed to Irwin block
Try Us
AND IF YOU ARE SATISFIED TELL OTHERS,
IF NOT, TELL US.
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O. H. CARLE,  The Grocer,  Princeton. |
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& *$4$*$*4$***\}**1**^^
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I Coldstream Estate Nurseries!
VERNON, B.C.|    f
Have a very fine assortment ot
FRUIT TREES
ORNAMENTAL AND SHADE TREES
AND SHRUBS
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I Budded Stock a Specialty |
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All Trees offered for Sale are grown in Our Own
A Nurseries on the Coldstream Estate
H    General Agent, V. D. CURRY, Vernon, B.C.
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NOTICE.
Similkameen division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ernest Waterman, of
Princeton, B.C.occupation mine manager,,
intends to apply for permi_;ion to pur-
chase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1822 thence
south seven chains to the southwest cor-
of Lot 1822, thence west along tlie north
boundary of Lot 2049 to the high water
mark on the right bank of the Similkameen river, thence northeast along the
said bigh water mark to the point of
commencement and containing five acres
more or less. ERNEST WATERMAN,
Aue.25, 1911.    Percy W. Gregory, agent.
WATER NOTICE.
L. T.JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given to  all
Mail Orders.
W. C Fry, Limited, of Princeton, B.
C, -gives notice that it intends on tbe
aSthjriay o' September next, at eleven
o'clock in the forenoon, to apply to the
Water Commissioner at his office at
Fairview, B. C for a license to take and
use 275 cubic fett of water per second
from the Siniilk .me. n river.
The water will be used on Lot 1822 for
power purposes.
W. C. FRY, Limited.
Dated this i8ih day of August 1911.
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS.
August ;o, 1911,
SI. B. MEAUSETTE
_______ and Plumber
ALL KINDS OF
Tin work, Plumbing, Pipefitting, Repair*
ing a Specialty. Warm air heating.
Complete Stock in hand
Estimates Furnished
Work Guaranteed
IRWIN BLOCK BRIDGE STREET
Great Northern
Hotel
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
Princeton, B. €.
Siilliiieen Hotel
J. N. NEISON, Prtprlelw
Large and New building, well Furnished aud Plastered; Comfortable . Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Province op British Columbia.
Notice is hereby given that all public
highways in unorganized districts and all
main trunk roads in organized districts
are sixty-six feet wide, and have a width
of thirty-three feet on each side of the
main centre line of the travelled road.
THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, July 7, 1911.
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
"MODEL"
LIVERY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety  of  Rigs—Good  Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
BROOiHriELD fi CARRI80N
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
The Princeton
Livery g Feed
stables
N. HUSTON, J>_0p'_
-J.-&
General Livery business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
August 30, 1911,
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
PRINCETON BAKERY
and CONFECTIONERY
FRESH BREAD DAILY—ALL KINDS
OF PASTRY, PIES, &C.
RESTAURANT
C. V. Semerad & Co.
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Jobbing Work Promptly Attended to.
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERICA
Meetings, third- Mondays, in the Oddfellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J.~ F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL. Clerk.
J. KNUDSON
Contractor   and   Builder
Estimates Furnished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
*************************************************************************
...Hotel...
er| f la
TULAMEEN, B.C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Centre
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Y PRORIETOR V
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G L. CllMMINGS
Horseshoeing
a Specialty
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
Carriage Building
Painting, Repairing
All Work Neatly and Promptly
Phone 28]     Done
NOTICE.
NOTICE.
Yale division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, Samuel A. Cawley,
of Chilliwack, B. C., intends to apply
for a license to nrospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described
lands situated near Princeton: Commencing at the northeast corner of Lot
361. tnence south to southeast corner of
Lot 361, thence west to south west corner of Lot 361, thence following Tulameen river  lo point of  commencement.
.AMUEL A. CAWLEY,
Aug. 10, 1911. W. Martin, agent
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. S3.
(Regular meetings. 8 p
 '       m., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate  in
Thomas Block.   •' Oddfellows Hall."
J. F. Wad. elc. jas. Gellatly.
Noble Grand. Secretary -
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Lydia L- French, of
Evanston, Ills., occupation wife of C. O.
French intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about one
mile west of the south west corner of
Charles Bonniviers' pre emption on
Roche river and marked Lydia L.
French's S E coiner, thence 80 chains
west. 40 chains north, 80 chains east, 40
chains south to the point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LYDIA L. FRENCH,
fuly 29, 1911.       Chas. O. French, agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Chas. O.  French, of
Princeton, B. C, occupation tinsmith in
tends to apply for permission to purchase
the   following   described   lands:    Commencing at a post planted at the south
west corner of Chas. Bonnivier's pre-emp
tion   on    Roche   river   marked   C.   O
French's n w corner thence 80 chains
east, 40 chains south, 80 chains west, 40
chains north to the point of commencement and containing 320 acres more or
less. CHARLES O. FRENCH,
July 29, 1911.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take   notice that   Nicholas Codd,   of
Colfax, Wash., occupation farmer intends
to apply for permission to  purchase the
following   described   lands.   Commenc
ing at a post planted at the   southeast
corner of Gus. Powell's pre emption  and
marked Nicholas Codd's s w corner thence
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west,   80   chains   south to  the point  of
cotrimencement and containing 640 acres
more or iess.        NICHOLAS CODD,
July 26, 1911.   Chailes O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Susan Nokes, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation wife of
Aaron Nokes intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted on the northwest bank of Roche
river about two miles from the mouth of
Cambie creek and marked Susan Noke's
n e corner, thence 80 chains west, 80
chains south, 80 chains east, 80 chains
north to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
SUSAN  NO__E_i,
Ang. 4, I9ri.   Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that John Gifford, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation cattleman,
intends to apply for. permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked John Gifford's
n e corner thence 80 chains west, 80
chains south, 80 chains east, 80 chains
north to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
JOHN GIFFORD,
Aug 2, 1911.     Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Nettie Laird, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation musician,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following -described lands:
Commencing at a pest- planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked Nettie Laird's
s w corner thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less,
NETTIE LAIRD,
Aug. 2, 1911.   Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Bridget McGovern, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation housekeeper
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about 8
miles west of the mouth of Copper creek
marked Bridget McGovern's n w corner
thence 80 chains south, 80 chains east, 80
chains north, 80 chains west to the point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
BRIDGET MCGOVERN,
Aug. 1, 1911.   Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Edward A. Nokes, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation coachman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about two
miles northwest of the mouth of Cambie
creek about 40 chains northeast of said
creek and marked E A. Nokes' n  e cor
ner thence 80 chains south,   80  chains
west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and contain
ing 640 acres more or less.
EDWARD A. NOKES,'
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Henry Magee, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation clerk, in
tends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: Com
mencing at a post planted about 8 miles
west of the mouth of Copper creek
marked Henry Magee's n e corner thence
80 chains sonth, 80 chains west, 80 chains
north, 80 chains east to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. HENRY MAGEE,
Aug. 1, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Margaret Durgan, of
Spokane,    Wash.,   occupation   wife     of
Michael Durgan, intends to apply for per
mission to purchase   the following   described  lands:    Commencing at   a  post
planted about 8  miles west of the mouth
of Copper creek  marked Margaret Durgan's s w corner, thence 80 chains east,
bo chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south  to   the  point   of commencement
and containing 640 acres more or less.
MARGARET DURGAN,
Aug. i, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.        i
Take   notice that  Tessie Warren,   of'
Evanston, 111., occupation stenographer
intendsto apply  for permission  to pur-f
chase   the   following   described    lands: ]
Commencing   at n post plauted ou  the
northwest   bank of   Roche   river about
two miles from   the  mouth of  Cambie
creek and marked  Tessie Warren's s w
corner thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains  west to
the point of commencement   and containing 640 acres more or less.
TESSIE WARREN,
Aug. 4, 1911.     Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Kelly, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation married
woman intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the northwest bank of Roche river
about two miles from the mouth of Gamble creek and marked Mary Kelly's s e
corner, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains south, 80 cbains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
MARY KELLY,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Horace Gifford, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation cattleman
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked Horace Giff
ord's n w corner, thence 80 chains south,
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
HORACE GIFFORD,
Aug. 2, I9ir.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that William H. Bell, of
Chicago, Ills., occupation electrtcian intends to apply for permission to pur
chase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
seven miles up the Roche river from its
mouth and about ten chains north of
said river and marked W. H. Bell's n w
corner thence 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. BELL,
Aug. 4,1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Laird, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation wife of F.
C. Laird, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about 3^
miles up the Roche tiver from its mouth
and about ten chains northwest of said
river and marked Mary Laird's n e corner thence 80 chains south, 80 chains
west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
MARY LAIRD,
Aug. 1, 191T.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Laird, of Spokane, Wash., occupation widow intends to
apply   for   permission   to purchase the
following described lands:   Commencing.!
at a post planted about six miles up the
Roche river from its mouth and about 40
chains northwest of said river and marked. Mary Laird's n e corner thence 80
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains
north, 80 chains east to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. MABY LAIRD,
Aug, 4, 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ella Warren, of
Evanston, 111., occupation clerk, intends
toapply for permission to purchaserthe
following described lands: Commencing
at a post planted about six miles up the
Roche river from its mouth and about 40
chains northwest of said river and marked
Ella Warren's SW corner thence 80
chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains south to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. ELLA WARREN,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O  French, agent.
Yale land diyision, Yale district.
Take notice that Andrew I aidlaw. of Spokane
Wash , occupation mining broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Similkameen riverabcut
60 chains north of the mouth" of Roche river
marked Andrew Laidlaw's NE corner thence 40
chains west, 80 chains south, 40 chains east, 80
north to the poiut of commencement and containing 320 acres more or less.
ANDREW LaTDL._W,
July 28. -911, Gharles O. French, agent.,
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Jeffrey R. Short, of Spokane,.
Wash., occupation clerk intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencingat a post planted at the southwest*
corner of timber limit No. 36826 and marked J
R, Short's NE corner thence 80 chains south, 80
chains west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640-
acres more or less. JEFFREY R. SHORT,
July 27,1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Lee Bel', of Spokane, Wash.,,
occupation stenographer intends to. apply for
permiseion to purchase the following described,
lauds: Commencing at a post planted about one
mile up the Roche river from its mouth and on
the north bank thereof and_ marked Lee .Bell's
S W corner thence 40 chains north, 40 ehains east.
40 chains south. 40 chains west to the point of
commencement and containing 160 acres more
or less. LEE BELL,
July 28, 1911. CharTe. O. French, agent..
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Eli_abeth> C Laird, cf Spokane, wash., occupation widow intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands: Commencing at a post planted
about 2j_ miles up the Roche river from its
mouth on the northwest bank thereof and
marked E- C. Laird's SE corder thence 80 chains
northi 80 chains west, 80 chains south,, 80 chains
east to the point of comi__ucement and containing 640 acres more or lessi
ELIZABETH C. LAIRD,
July 29, 1911. Charles O. French, agent;.
Yale land div__bt_, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick C. Laird; of Spokane, Wash., occupation broker, intends to app- y
for permission to purchase the following describe lands: Commencing at a post pla_-r_
about 2% miles up the Roche river from its
mouth and on the northwest bank thereof a :d
marked F. C. Laird's NE corner thence 80 cbains
west, 80 chains south, 80 chains east, 80 cha:ns
uorth to the point of commencement and cju-
taimng 640 acres more or less.
FREDERICK C. LAIRD,
July 29 1911. Charles O. French, agent..
Yale land division, Yale'district'.
- Take notice thatClara G. Laidlaw, of Spokane,
Wash., occupation wife of Andrew Laidlaw, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing a- a
post planted about 2% miles up the Roche ri er
from the mouth of said river on the north*. \st
bank thereof and marked C. G. Laidlaw's NW
corner thence 80 chains east, 80 chaius south, 80
chains west, 80 chains north to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less,
CLARA G. LAIDLAW,
July 29,191I. Charles O. French, agent..
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Jennie O'Laughlin. of Spokane, Wash., occupation teacher intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted
about three miles south of the mouth of Pa say-
ton river and about ten chains west of said river
marked J. O'Laughlin's SW corner thence 8">
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains- south, 80
chains west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less
JENNIE O'LAUGHLIN,
July 29,1911. Charles O.. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take   notice- that   William. A.   Nichola s,   of
Spokane, Wash., occupation broker, inten is to
apply for permission to purchase the  folio ving
described lands.   Cdnimencing at a post plaited
about two miles north of the mouth of R _:he
river and  one mile west of the  Similkameen.
river and  marked W. A.  Nicholas' SW orner
thence 80 chains north, 80 chains east, 80 c'lains
south, 80 chains west to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM A. NICHOLAS,
Aug. 8. loir. Charles O. French, ae. tit.
FOR SALE.
HOLMES FLAJ
less.   With
212   acres more fo
Record   of 300 inche
from- Fivemile Cr
Just four miles .feast of Princeton
Part cash, balance on easy terms.
Apply to
KEREMEOS LAND CO.,
Keremeos, B.C
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
August   o, i^ii.
Bg533--eB---2BSgSa35BS_3-----PW
♦ ♦ ♦
The Town of ♦
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British   Columbia
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At the confluence of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers
SIMILKAMEEN DISTRICT
Send for Maps
"***%*'   «-?^    *«.
and Price List to
ERNEST   WATERMAN
!
:
VERMILION    FORKS
Resident    Manager
MINING   AND     DEVELOPMENT    CO'Y
#
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