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Similkameen Star 1912-05-01

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  ■»*n__. ■    _-___-_
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As a DomesHc/Doal the Princeton fuel is^nbeatable.
fit
In adversity be patient; itk prosperity keep * cool/
Capital anc^energy with brain and muscle, Reproving the vast resources of Princeton district and will place the future beyond all doubt'
or dispute—The- payroll goes with industrial enterprise : Princeton gives promise of a large payroll city—Mines, smelters, manufactories.
Vol. XIII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, MAY p 1912.
Na. 18
MINING MEN ON WING
B.C. Copper Co., Granby and
Trail Consolidated Experts
Pay Visit.
Copper Firm at 15 60 to 15.75-Gra_.by
Smelter Makes Record in
. Ore Treatment.
Leo. H. Dornberg of Spokane, Wash.,
was in town last week on mining business.
M. J. Turnbull, of the Consolidated
Mining & Smelting Co., Trail, B. C, arrived in Princeton last week and is visiting mining properties in this section
accompanied by C. M. Snowden, F.
Bailey and C. Saunders.
E. E. Campbell, representing the
Granby Mining, Smelting & Power Co.,
Grand Forks, B. C, has been in this section for the past few days accompanied
by Guide Snowden, and is examining
mining properties He visited\Fivemile
and saw the claims of Uh__P*&*۩x.
The U ranby sme.WP*___!,"week broke
all previous records iu ore treatment and
blister copper shipments. The ore treatment for the week was 25.406 tons and
the copper shipments for the week 528,000
pounds. For the year the total is
7,018,500 pounds
Fred. Keffer, E G Warren, R.G. Ha--
greaves, W. G. Mitchell, and E. Hibbett
arriyed in Princeton Sunday night, having driven by auto from Greenwood in
12 hours. The party went to Voigt camp
on Monday where the B. C. Copper Co.
is developing on a large scale the mineral
properties of that very promising camp.
Mr. Warren is superintendent of the
smeltei at Greenwood. This is his first
visit to Princeton and thinks the town
has a great future before it" Mr. Keffer,
consulting engineer, expects to return in
a couple of weeks.
company, who is at the Hume. The
factory will have a capacity of 700 barrels per day, said Mr. Budd last night,
•with orie unit in operation. Provision
will be made for two addit onal units so
that tlie plant when completed to its full
capacity will manufacture over 2000
barrels per day. ' Between 40,000 and
50.000 barrels of cement will be required
on tbe Canadian Northern construction
work between Kamloops and the- coast,'
he said—Nelson Daily News.
EAST PRINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, April 30.—The B. C.
Portland Cement company is erecting a
six-roomed oflice_;U^jdJaboratpryJjj^Iding.
The building will be frame, with cement
veneer finish. The company intends
having their brick machine in operation
in a few days.
The carpenters have the Methodist
church ready for the plasterers.
Preparations are being made for commencing work oh the water system.
A car of electric transmission machinery
arrived last week for the cement factory.
By July 1 the British Columbia Port-
laad.Cement company's plant at Prince!
t'QB^the first cement plant to be con
structec. on the mainland ot this province,
is expectec-to be in operation, according
to H. M. Budd, a representative of the
AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION
The meeting held last Friday night to
consider the purchase of 40 acres on the
upper bench near the bunch grass field
was well attended and showed a strong
sentiment in favor of acquiring a racetrack and athletic grounds. A comniit.te'e-
was appointed to further the scheme and
report at the regular meeting of the board
of trade next Monday night. The forma
lion of the Similkameen Agricultural
association was endorsed by the meeting
under which name it would be possible,
to enlist government aid for fairs and at
the same time encompass, the object of
:possessing a racecourse and athletic
grounds.
ODDFELLOWS' ANNIVERSARY.
The 93rd anniversary of Oddfellowship
was celebrated on Sunday by a large
muster ot brethren who attended religious
service and heard, an able and instructive
sermon by Rev. Bro. Osborne, the text of
which was from Luke 10:30-37. "H_
stated that the order now numbered
2,_ioo,ooo members and disbursed$13,000
per day in providing for the widow and
orphan and aiding sick and distressed-
The Daughters of Rebekah are a branch
of Oddfellowship and they also are doing
good work in love, mercy and truth.
Tbe sermon was full of scriptural truths
forcefully presented and was highly
appreciated by the large audience.
BANE MERGER.
The Toronto Mail and Empire says:
' The absorption of the Traders' Bank of
Canada by a larger institution will at
least receive official confirmation within
the next few days, when it will become
necessary for the directors to announce
the terms on which the Traders' bank
shares will be retired in exchange for an
issue of the Royal Bank of Canada.
This new combination of the Traders'
and the Royal banks will result in a bank
which will rank third in (Htriada,--its
paid up capital aggregating nearly $12,-
000,000. Traders' bank stock enjoyed a
sensational boom on the local exchange,
during the last fortnight since merger
rumors began to take tangible." form.
This is because of a belief that the fro-
posed basis of exchange will be distinctly
to the advantage of the Traders' shareholders.'
C. O. Brownell, piano tuner, is in town,
RAILWAY RUMBLINGS
Preparing for Action in Coquihalla Pass; Dirt Must
Fly Soon.
Chief of Construction of V.,V. & E,
at Hope ; C.N.R. Steel There
This Month.
: J. H. Kennedy, chief engineer of the
■V. V. and'E., was in Hope recently. He
had no definite news of construction, but
is still confident that work will be begun
at an early date. He has given a contract
;to A. F. McDonald for the building of a
house fo. him on Fourth avenue on the
lot he had previously purchased near the
C. N. R. rightofway. This housewill be
his headquarters during  construction.
Reports in the coast papers announce
that the C. N. R. tracks will be into Hope
bv May ist. This date is a little premature but not very much. Mr. Gee, who
is in charge of the tracklaying operations,
spent Wednesday and Thursday in Hope.
Mr. Gee stated positively that progress
towards Hope'will be resumed on Monday, April 22, and he estimated that a
little over two weeks wouldi be required
to close the gap between Cheam and
Hope, provided that the stringers for the
Silver creek bridge arrive in time. This
would mean the arrival of the tracks in
Hope between the 5th and 10th of May.
It is expected the V. V. & E. telegraph
line will be complete in a few days to
Coalmont, after which trains will be run
through to end of track there twice a
week.
J. J. Warren, president of the Kettle
Valley railway, states that construction
will begin immediately from the end of
the track on the Coldwater toward"
Princeton.
I Dick Carew, packer, was in town yesterday and reports that Brooke's survey
party is now camped at Myron's and
location of the Kettle Valley now about
four miles from Jack Thynne's ranch;
The next camp will de pitched at the
head of Otter lake.
The inspection of the Coquihalla vaHey
by the engineer of the Dominion railway
fcommission has not taken place yet,
although representatives of both the
railway companies interested in lis report, the Kettle Valley and V. V. and E.
fail way companies, declare their anxiety
/or an early decision and the opportunity
to get to work.
preposterous   problems    and   ndicul.ifs
situations.    Tbe   day  of  sickening  love
scenes   and heavy  tragedy,   fit  only for
mental heavyweights, is passed arid" most
people with a bent for the humorous will
patronize  the  show   affording  the   most
laughs, but it must be chaste and wholesome.    Tom Marks more nearlv caters to'
public   tastes   th.n   any  show  recently"
coming to Princeton  and he  will always
be sure of a welcome.    His speech before
the curtain on the prospects of Princeton
was full of optimism  and   caused   much'
risibility. -   .j
TOM MARKS COMEDY CO.
The three performances given by this
comjjany were in the lighter vein of
comedy and kept the audience in uproars
of laughter. Popular taste now runs to
drama clean and witty, punctured with
THE ROYAL BANK.
The 42nd annual report of the Royal
Bank of Canada has been printed in a
handsome book, which, besides giving a.
financial statement of the bank's operations and a list of shareholders, contains
a lot of useful statistical information for
ready reference. The bank is in a healthy
financial ^cqndition as its growing ac-
C6_n_»*'_nder-«tbe heads' of assets an <V
profits would indicate. The following is
an extract,frpm the report:,
'The assets of the bank have been
carefully revalued, and all, bad and
doubtful debts have been provided for.
Acting under your authority, the directors issued in December last new capital
stock to the extent of $2,000,000, which
was allotted to the shareholders at a premium of $110. This large increase was
necessitated by the phenomenal expansion of the bank's business during the
past three years, as indicated by the
growth of assets in that period, viz., from
$50,000,000 to $110,000,000. The resulting pressure on our note issue has been
very great, and it has only been possible
to keep within the legal limit by circulating the notes of other banks throughout
the year at nearly all our principal offices
—a course not only unprofitable, but
prejudicial to our interests.'
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
Anxious friends of Paddy Murray,.
prospector, would be glad to hear any
tidings of him, search, so far, has not revealed his whereabouts.
Rev. John Mackay, D. D., principal of
Westminster hall, has sent a long letter,
which will appear next week, in reply to
a Star editorial re Christian Science.
Oh the bells, beautiful belles, cowbells.
If Poe could only come back he could
'find inspiration for another Poem. Some
cow on the village green.
Last week Dignan &. .Atkin pjyffiased
_fe plumbing .and., tinsmithing business.
*gf- tt. ■ffifiJHisette.and moved the"' plant to-
4^_i_r«av.i__-baB' Dignan &TA__in now
possess the best equipped shop in the
interior, and their business extends from
Keremeos to Otter valley.
Bert Thomas has completed the grade
improvement above the Similkameen
bridge and now there is a straight pull
to the top of the hill. It will be a boon
and a blessing to horses and teamsters.
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May i, 1912,
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
J. J. Warren, president of the Kettle
Valley railway, and Reeve Foley Bennett
of Penticton, arrived in  town   yesterday.
B^ard of trade meeting Mcnday night.
Frank Wilns purchased a lot near the
court house last week, and will shortly
have carpenters at work building the
latest in bungalow architecture.
J. Peck MacSwain, promoter of the now
celebrated whale milk industry, will give
any information regarding this scheme
to intending investors. In street jargon
it is a 'whale' of an undertaking.
C. V. Semerad moved his family to
Orangeville last Tuesday where he has
erected a commodious hotel. Beside
railway construction on the Kettle Valley
line there is probability of a new mining
section springing into prominence, all
which will form a commercial center for
.hat section.
C Schisler has been appointed game
•warden for the Similkameen district and
has entered on his duties for the summer.
Chas. E. Mink, sharpshooter and
■demonstrator, gave an exhibition of
crack shooting last Wednesday before a
number of ladies and gentlemen. Mr.
Mink represents a large cartridge company-who advertise their goods by his
skill and not through tbe usual mediums
of advertising. From cracking walnuts
in the air to hittiug a .22 caliber bullet
hAe, piercing quarter inch steel and
breaking glass bottles he proved to be a
skilled marksman and a dangerous man
to meet in a duel with coffee and pistols.
I Today is May day (the gathering of the
flowers) and many a May queen will be
crowned \ith flowers, and while she sits
in state, the youth and beauty will dance
around her.
John Budd, the Coalmont horse fancier
aud liveryman, is delighted over the
prospects of Princetou getting a race
track, park and exhibition grounds and
says he will do all in his power to help
the 'good work' along. Jack has a few
'dark ones' that he is working out for the
fall race meets in the Nicola, Similkameen and Okanagan.
Mrs. H. Priest of Merritt, who has been
visiiing friends here for the past two
weeks, left for home last Friday by
Thomas' auto, Mrs Priest was accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Priest.
Orrin Allen is now doing business in
bis own block. Another pool table has
been added and altogether the place is a
great improvement.
A number of bachelors have gone into
canvas quarters for the summer on the
banks of the rivers. Fresh trout landed
from the water right into the filing pan
is one of the luxuries of this simple camp
life.
The Dominion government is calling
for tenders for a tri-weekly mail service
between Coalmont and Merritt, leaving
Coalmont on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays, and Merritt on Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays. This service
is expected about June 1, and the dis
tance 55 miles, will be covered every day.
J. Roylance, of the electrical depart
ment of the Princeton Coal & Land Co.
left last Friday on a pleasure trip to
Phoenix, Grand Forks and Spokane.
SPECIALS.
Great Reduction in Prices—Men's suits,
summer underwear, fancy summer
#hirts—Ladies' summer blouses. Prices
to suit at THOMAS BROS.
FOR SALE—Lots 14 and 15, block 19,
corner Halliford avenue and Lime street
Price and terms apply J. M  Wright.
FOR SALE—Two timber limits on the
Similkameen river, near Saturday and
Sunday creeks. For terms and price
write WRIGHT, Princeton, B.C.
HOTEL  ARRIVALS.
At the Tulameen: L H Dornberg, Ed
Baden, Spokane; Dan McRae, .shnola;
R G Strachan, C P Ballendine, Vancouver; G N Gilchrist, Nelson; J M Turnbu 1,
Trail; T S Gould, Calgary; E E Campbell,
D McElroy, Phoenix; W W Green, Five-
mile; Thos Brown, Hedley; Dick Fitz
gerald, Whipsaw; J C Budd, Coalmont;
Larry Tobin, Copper mountain; Tony
Sebastino, M Macarino, Rome; H T
Bailey, town.
At the Similkameen: H H Cowley, T
D Pickard, W A Martin, Vancouver; G
Johnson, Copper mountain; G R Thomp
son, Spokane; Hank Sibley, Osprey lake;
EJ McNeely, Calgary; F W Smith, Con
conully; D L McElroy, H P Walter,
Phoenix; R Carew, K V R Co; EG
Warren, E Hibbert, F Kefler, R G Har
greaves, W E Mitchell, Greenwood.
STRAYED
Came to my premises, April 19 1912
one yearling Clyde colt, bay, white legs
white face, no brand. Owner can have
same bv proving property and paying all
expenses. JOHN BROMLEY.
Princeton, April 29, 1912.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, -   $8,000,000
FARMERS'   BUSINESS
The Canadian Bank of Commerce extends to Farmers every facility
for the transaction of their banking business including' the discount and
collection of sales notes. Blank sales notes are supplied free of charge
on application.
BANKING   BY   MAIL
Accounts may be opened at every branch of The Canadian Bank of
Commerce to be operated by mail, and will receive the same careful
attention as is given to all other departments of the Bank's business.
Money may be deposited or withdrawn in this way as satisfactorily as
by a personal visit to the Bank. A231
J. D. ANDRAS, Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
>Z**Z**Z**Z' ♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦
_^J
BANK OF MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL
R. B. ANGUS, Esq., President
Sir EDWARD CLOUSTON, Bart , Vice-President
H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., Generai, Manager
Capital - - -       $14,887,570.00
Reserve and Undivided Profits   -  $16,855,185.36
SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTT1ENT
Deposits received from $i upwards.   Ranching and Mining Business
given every attention
BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits may be made and withdrawn by mail.   Out of town accounts
receive every attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted
PRINCETON BRANCH
B. L SMITH, Manager
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LIQUOR ACT, 1910
"NOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
ftfij June next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for
the grant of a license for the sale of liquor by retail
in and upon the premises known as Ashnola Hotel
situate at Ashnola, in the Province of British Columbia, upon the lands described as Block 14, Lot
21. corner Third streetand Third avenue.
Dated this 1st Day of May. 1912.
W. C. McLKAN
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
FLESHERS   AND
FISH    DEALERS
Prime Beef, Pork,  Mutton.   Salmon,   Halibut,
riackerel, Herring.    Eggs, Butter, Lard
Largest Dealers in the West PRINCETON,  B. C.
lipl Bank ol Canada
CAPITAL
RESERVE UNDIVIDED PROFITS,
i,99.,ooo
$,275,000
A General Banking Business Transacted
DEPOSITS MAY BE MADE FROM $i UP
Special attention given to out of town accounts
Interest allowed on savings accounts at higest current
rates.    Drafts and money orders sold on all  points.
PRINCETON BRANCH       G. M. K. MACLEOD, Manager
Linoleum, Etc.
Housecleaning is now the order of the day and is the most
convenient time to replace worn out Linoleum, Curtains, and
other house furnishings with new goods. We have just received a large consignment of Linoleum direct from Scotland
and have the best range of patterns in Princeton. Have a
look at it—the prices are right. We also have a splendid
range of Lace Curtains.
A. L. WHITE'S  Furniture Store
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar  Shingles  $3.50 per M
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays, in the Oddfellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL. Clerk.
May i, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
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! M. S. WILSON
—DEALER  IN-
Wall Papers, Burlaps, House
Lining, Etc.
Paints, Oils, Varnishes and Stains
Brushes of all kinds. Hearth Rugs
and Decorative Brass Goods.
Try our flaple Leaf Paints and
you will be convinced that they are
the best on the Market. FULLY
GUARANTEED.
Estimates given on all classes
of Decorating
We purchase direct from the Manufacturer
and can give you close prices.
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'4*.BB******i»*^4 4*44 4*44^44 BB44t**,*4.4
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIKTO-S
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH  ROOflS, ETC.
Commercial M Sample _£ Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
Great Northern
 HOI
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
KARL H. MORSE
Ladies and Gents' Tailoring
CLEANING and PRESSING
Vermilion Ave. opp. Similkameen Hotel,
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
\ Regular meetings. 8 p
  '       m., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate   in
Thomas Block.   •' Oddfellows Hall."
Jas. Gellatly. p. Russell,
Noble Grand. ' Secretary
PRINCETON,
B.C.
Slillaieen Hotel
SIMMERS & WARDLE
PROPRIETORS
Large and New buildin?, well Furnished and Plastered; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION.
Preparations are being made for the
early commencement of actual construction work on the Summerland section of
the Kettle Valley railway. Already a
number of men have arr'tfed and are encamping along the route. A. Richardson
is now erecting camps for more men. Mr.
McArthur's engineering camp will remain about where it is in Peach valley,
ahd another is being opened near Dean's,
on the upper Trout creek. It is stated
upon good authority that G. A. Carlson
& Co. have the contract for that portion
of the line between Trout creek canyon
aud the summit about 30 miles. A
representative of that concern was in town
this week. It is understood that this
company will erect a warehouse for equipment and supplies and that they have
secured a site for this purpose immediately adjoining the fruit shed on the
waterfront and will build beside the track
there. They already have a carload of
provisions at the dock and equipment j
will arrive fonhwiih. It would appear,
that the Kettle Valley Railway company 1
will themselves build the big steel bridge |
across Trout creek.-Summerland Review. I
B. C. MAGAZINE.
• The British Columbia  Magazine maintains its usual excellence in   the  current
number   for   April.    Its leading article:
' The Peace River  Country,'  illustrated, I V
is well written and describes that wonder-1 »j
ful country by one who spent a decade ofi .*.
years   there.    Jther    articles:    'Wiping
out the  Buffalo,' 'British Columbia and
Her  Imperial   Outlook,'   etc.,   afford instructive magazine reading and are valuable iu histo.ical research.    Subscription
price,  $1.50 per year.    Offices,  711 Seymour street, Vancouver, B. C.
PERCY W. GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
■_____..■   .■■___      _.  i_» ___■!__ .■■■.■■. .»j__a______--!r-__--M. . i._     •_ ' ■■
T. CLARK KING
Architect
Graduate of the Art and Science Department
Kensington, London, Eng.
Member of the Alberta Architectural Association.
Plans and  Specifications  of Buildings  furnished  at reasonable rates.
Office : KING & GIBSON
! Vermilion Av. Princeton, B.C.,  Phone 18
D. R. BOUCHER
ARCHITECT
Coalmont, B.C.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,    -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK.
SCIENCE AND INVENTION.
Our Rai:CWays Kill 10,000 a Year!'.
—Recent statistics published by the
United States Commerce Commission,
show that during the.year ending June
30th, 1911, nearly 10,000 people were
killed on our railroads and over 70,000
were inju-ed. It should be borne in
.muad that 5.2^4 of the killed and 5,614
of the injured we're trespassers, and presumably the blame for their deaths is
chargeable to themselves and not to the
railroads.
Thawing Frozen Water Pipes.—
Since the discovery that frozen water
pipes could be thawed out by passing a
rather heavy current of electricity through
them ' from the nearest electric .ight
mains, this neat method of reaching a
literally 'deep seated' trouble has had
increasing application.
Aeronautics in France.—The latest
figures with regard to aviation and aeronautics in France are $4,800,000 for
aeroplanes and $1,600,000 for airships.
Fifteen of the latter type will be constructed, and at the end of 1912 it is pro
posed to have 334 aeroplanes in operation. At the present time the French,
army has over two hundred.
h:_:_;_:_;_:..;_:_;_>x^X»>X~>>>>>>«K"5
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TULAMEEN, B. C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Centre
Mp$.t J. Henderson
PRORIETOR
"MODEL"
LIVERY STASH
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs—Good   Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
Notice to Delinquent CoOwnep.
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given to  all
Mail  Orders.
ToT, C- REVEI.Y—Take notice that unless
you do pay, 'within qi days from the date hereof,
the sum of $231.95, being your proportion of the
expenditure required for the years K.03-4-5-6-7-8-Q
10-11 by Section 24 of the Mineral Act, upou the
Trans^Efa. Fraction Mineral claim situated on
Copper Mountain in the SimilkameeifM&inLng
Division,together with interest and all costs of
this notice, to the undersigned your co-paitner
in the said claim, your interest in the said claim
shall become vested in the undersigned who has
made the required expenditure.
A. E. HOWSE.
Dated this 29th day of January, 1912.
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
Scavengers
JOHNSON & REHN
Work promptly attended to. Town
health regulations complied with ; lawful
sanitary conditions in force. Orders may.
be left at C. Willarson & Co's.
 m
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May i, 1912,
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(j.n. wrioht)
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co
fair basis. It may be years before
another revival in copper occurs
and there is neither profit nor
pleasure in weary waiting.
SUBSCRlP'lIO.. RATES:
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year-   -   -   -   - $2.25
Payable in Advauce,
ADVERTISING RATES :
I,and Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
_egal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
S cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Ad vertisemtnts by contract, $1 per in. per month.
" Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Monday.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
The presence of a number of
mining men in Princeton, all representing large companies, is indicative of the attractiveness of this
section and its importance from a
mineral standpoint. At no time in
the history of Princeton and district has there been so much inquiry
for mineral properties and actual'
investigation with a view to purchase. All the camps have renewed
hopes and prospects now that experts are coming for samples and
geological report. Behind this
activity is the rising market price
of refined copper and the decreasing
surplus stock on hand. Every
owner of a genuine mineral claim
or raining property should be prepared to seize the opportunity for
selling and deal on a reasonable and
The Similkameen Agricultural
Association is now fairly before the
public and it is up to citizens of
Princeton to make good. With
the prospects of obtaining an eligible
site for holding exhibitions, races
and sports there will be an added
asset to the town which will make
it the center for celebrations, etc.,
and the large assemblages of people
usual on these occasions. As an
investment the proposition is perfectly safe and sane and if citizens
do not close the deal it will be their
loss. 	
Many people do not realize the
knock it gives a town to be sending
away their cash for merchandise of
any kind which can be purchased
at home. The profit on money
spent with local dealers accrues not
only to the dealer in a direct way
but through him in improvements
to every workingman and industry.
And the dealer, or anyone, if he is
loyal to himself and the town will
not send money away for plumbing,
blacksmithing, carpentry, watchmaking, harnessmaking, or printing. All trades represented in a
town should be patronized by citizens, for it is the payroll which
counts and no town can live with
out it. If a town is divided it cannot make progress, and disloyalty
on the part of citizens will recoil
with double force on their own
heads.    Keep tbe money  at home
KING-HAMILTON
The following is from the Spokane
Chronicle of April 23: 'Miss Vella Hamilton of Spokane and Thomas King of
Princeton, B. C, were quietly married
Monday evening, April 22, at the home
of the bride's sister, Mrs. Charles Joyner,
of 04817 Madison street. The Rev. M. E.
Bollen of Opportunity officiated. Only
a few immediate friends of Miss Hamilton were present. The bride wore a pale
blue crepe de chine gown. She carried
bride's roses and was unattended. After
the ceremony a supper was served in the
dining room, which was decorated with
daffodils and other flowers. Mrs. King
has made her home in Spokane for several years. The couple will leave today
for Princeton, where Mr. King is in
business. Those present were: Mr. and
Mrs. T. F. King, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Joyner, Rev. M. E. Bollen, Ned Joyner,
S. McGregor and f. Horrietan.'
Mr. King is a popular citizen of Princeton and is identified with the growth and
upbuilding of the town, being associated
with his father in the firm of King &
Gibson. To the happy couple Star e_>
teuds congratulations and bids them a
prosperous voyage over life's 'solemn
main.'
J. McCreath of the Greenwood Liquor
company was giving the glad hand to
Princeton and district hotelmen the latter
part of the week. Mr. McCreath is an
old time visitor to this section and remarked that Princeton looks better and
prospects brighter every trip.
COALMONT NEWS.
Coalmont, April 29.—The Coalmont
Hotel company had their grand opening
last Wednesday night which, in the form
of a ball, was attended by about 300.
Their license was issued them on the
13th inst.
The train will resume running twire
weekly in a few davs, when the telegraph
connections will be completed. Mr
Ingram, the Great Northern agent at
Orient, Washington, will be transferred
to Coalmont.
Dan Ross has given an option on his
well known galena claims at the summit.
The price is to be $60,000. The prospective purchasers are taking in supplies
from Coalmont with a pack train often
horses. The snow is still seven feet deep
on the summit.
Budd & Pringle, liverymen, are increasing their stock and establishing a
branch barn at Tulameen.
A Vancouver company known as the
Tulameen Gold & Platinum company
will operate a dredge on the Tulameen
river, west of Coalmont.
May 1, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Presbyterian church services —Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
service, 11 a.m.
Subject next Sunday: 'Christly life
and gainful death.'
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject for Sunday next: 'Evetlasting Punishment.' Evil pursueth"sinners: but to
the righteous good shall be repayed.
—Proverbs 23:21.
Methodist church service, Sunday,
May 5. In Oddfellows' hall, at 7:30
p.m. ; cement works at 11 a.m.
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THE MAN WHO CAN FORESEE
f    THE TOMORROW OF
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EAST PRINCETON
WILL MAKE MONEY BY INVESTING THERE
I NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
A HODEU CITY
Water system.
Electric light.
Cement walks.
Natutal parks.
Nicely wooded.
Fine garden soil.
Athletic grounds.
Excellent drainage.
No danger from overflow.
Can have fine sewer system.
Wide streets and lanes.
Local and long distance phone system.
A PAYROLL CITY NOW
Furnished by the B C. Portland Cement
Co.: Cement, Lime, Bricks.
United Empire Co. : Coal and Copper.
Princeton Coal & Land Co. : Coal.
Princeton Lumber Mills Co. ; Sawmill.
B.C. Copper Co. : Copper.
The Platinum-Gold Fields Co.: Placer
Miuing.
One thousand men will be employed
inside of year.
A RAILROAD CENTER
The Kettle Valley railroad, which will
soon be the main line of the C.P.R. system, brings Vancouver 300 miles nearer
Winnipeg, passes through the townsite.
Final survey is now being made.
The Great Northern has tracks on two
sides of the townsite and will soon be
finished to Vancouver. These two roads
give transportation in all directions from
East Princeton.
Natural centre, ranching country, fruit growing. Huge deposits ot copper, gold, silver, platinum and other minerals. Has
big water power development. Lots in such towns as Grand Forks, Kamloops, Blairmore, Alta., Baker, Wash., are worth 5 times
what is  being  asked at East Princeton and the payroll is not as large.
FREE CEMENT walks with each lot sold—cleared streets.    Water main to be laid in streets this summer.
BUSINESS LOTS $450 up : Terms 10 p.c. cash, 5 p.c. per mo. Residence lots, $200 up : Terms, 10 p.c. cash, $10 per mo.
7 p.c. on annual balances.    {% of all lots are to be reserved) for future sale.     Get full particulars at once.
C. R. BRIGGS, Gen. Agent, 6I5 Hastings W., Vancouver. D. G. McCURDY, Resident Agent, East Princeton, B.C.
************************^^
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THOlf|fS BROS.
Come and get our CASH
PRICES. We will give you
great reductions
Boys' and Children's BOOTS AND SHOES
Boys' and Children's STRAW HATS
Boys' and  Children's SAILOR HATS
A large assortment of up=to=date Dress
Goods and Prints to select from
Bedsteads, Mattresses, Bed Springs and
Cots at very reasonable prices
See our large cans of   Evaporated flilk,
two cans for 25 cents
m    1 nomas DroS. General Merchants  g
H PRINCETON, B. C. |
THE SIMILKAMEEN INDIANS
Plumbing and Heating, Sheet Metal
|f    work, Tinsmithing
Shop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St., in 'Ivlurdock's blacksmith shop'
DIQNAN & ATKIN
PRACTICAL WORKMEN—PROPRIETORS
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
K<**>Z**Z*i<<**Z*<K'<**Z'**<^^
If.    CARLE
Headquarters for Groceries, Vege=
tables and Provisions
Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Cranberries
ORDERS PROHPTLY ATTENDED
0.    H.    CARLE,    THE   GROCERYMAN
Read  the advertisements carefully then make  your
purchases"No reason now to send away.
BY MRS. S X,. A_,X,ISON.
[Continued from last week.]
I have known as many as ten horses
given by an old man for a young wife
and when the girl eloped with a young
man the disconsolate husband insisted on
having not only the horses but their increase returned. Another man gave a
log house as boot in trading his wife. It
was thought wicked for a man or woman
to marry their mother's relation, but
they might marry their father's if they
liked. A plurality of wives used to be
allowed, two being the general number.
Old Spentlum had six; he employed them
rocking gold dust.
Adultry was often punished by cutting
off the woman's nose or splitting her
ears; though generally compromised by
the other part3' doing likewise or receiving compensation; usually horseflesh
from the offender. In one case where
the wife of a chief was carried off by an
Indian of a kindred tribe the chief despatched a messenger with orders to ride
after the runaways night and day, and to
take summary vengeance on the man,
but bring the woman back. This order
the messenger did not hesitate to perform most thoroughly; for on overtaking
the rival of his chief, he slew him, carved
him up to his own satisfaction, smeared
himself from head to foot with hi= blood,
and then returned in triumph with the
woman. This man was in ordinary circumstances a polite and kindly individual Husband and wife do not hold
property in common, but each retains
whatever they possessed before m .rriage,
and also whatever they subsequently
acquire The strongest affection that an
Indian seems capable of exists between
father and son and mother and daughter.
Slaves taken in war were well treated,
but always had oue eye blemished to
mark them.
The Similkameens will often prove
their devotion to a dead relative in
the most revolting manner. Once when
a corpse was being moved from one
burial to another a friend of the deceased
perceiving some drops oozing from the
orpse instantly caught and rubbed himself with the loathsome exudation, in the
belief that some portion of his late friend
would become incorporated with himself.
In another case where a young woman
died from rupture of a blood vessel, a
portion of her blood remained clotted on
the floor, her molher gathered it up and
swallowed it in her frenzy of grief; afterwards when she reflected on what she had
done she could not eat or sleep, but came
to me for medicine to drive the horror
she felt from her mind. This woman was
a Christian and usually of mild kindly
disposition. Many cruelties were prac-
ti:ed by the Similkameens frcm kindness
and without the least idea of being cruel.
I was once told by one of the tribe that a
youth was so sick that he could not eat
or move himself; but that as he knew
the other members of his family wished
to go hunting he told them to go; so the
dying man was laid on a mat and covered
over face and all with robes and blankets
and left for a week. When his friends
returned from their hunt he was dead;
then they went to great expense to bury
him. Another case was brought under
my notice was that of a young man dying
of lingering consumption and thoroughly
tired of life; one day his father came into
the store and asked for stuff to make
grave clothes. I asked, 'Is Chilkpabst
dead ?' 'No,' replied his father, 'but he
wishes to be buried tomorrow, he is tired
of waiting.' And buried he was sure
enough, some said before he died, others
indignantly   denied   this.   The Indians
Continued on page 6.
$ CAMERAS
! FILMS 1
AND AU,
PHOTOGRAPHIC
SUPPLIES
. AT THE
PRINCETON
Drug and
Bookstore |
GEO. G. LYA .L, Manager.   '
Real Estate, Finance, Mines
The Door of   Opportunity is
Wide Open.
The . West' affords many examples of fortunes ,
made from ground floor investments. Winnipeg,
Calgary, Edmontoti and Vancouver had a similar
beginning to that of Princeton. Fortunes have
been made in real estate from a very small investment. Princeton, which includes East Princeton,
has undoubtedly the best prospects of any town
on the map. Invest while the town is yet in its.
infancy and see prices steadily rise.
FOR SALE
Lot on Bridge Street, within 100 yds. south of
Vermilion av.
Townsite Welldo. Two railways-^old-platinujn
placers, ore and coal mining.
Ranch 1% miles west of Princeton, 192 acres,
$3,000.
Two lots in Hedley, inside and corner. Price
$200 and $250—Also in east addition op- Mr. Smigia
house.   Price $350.
Lot 6, block 24, house rents for $6 per mo., $600,
Agricultural land, near Coalmont, 80 acres, $1600.
Claim in diamond belt, $500; locations made.
|   Mineral properties.
Water power.
Suburban acreage to lease.
Address :    J. M. WRIGHT.
Princeton, B.C., Canada-
COUNTY   COURT, YALE
a sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Wednesday,
8th day of May, 1912 at the hour of 2130 o'clock in
the afternoon.   By command.
HUGH.HUNTBR,
Registrar County Court.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910.
T^OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day orf
■*■ ' June next, application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police for the grant
of a license for the sale of liquor by retail in and
upon the premises known as the Great Northern
Hotel, situate at Princeton, in the Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as
Block 4, Lot 8, corner Bridge street and Harold
fcygnite*'.:.
j  Dated this 24th day of April, 1912.
PETER SWANSON, Applicant
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that George I.aurie Fraser, of
Coalmont, B. C, occupation mi|i£j__iuia£erji_i^;
tends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing at
a post planted at southeast corner of Lot37G,
thence running south 40 chains, west 60 chains,
north 40 chains, east 60 chains, to point of commencement, containing 240 acres, more or less.
G. L. FRASI
Coalmont, B. c, March 25,19T.
■
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THE SIMILKAMEEN INDIANS.
From 5'h Pagre.
are chary of mentioning such matters, as
they are amenable to the white man's
Jaw.
Chiefs formerly had the power of life
and death and did not scruple to use it.
The late In-cow-la, who was head chief
of the Similkameens and Okanagans,
was a stern, just man, a-friend to the
whites and feared by his own people, executed justice in rather an appalling
manner—the delinquent oi delinquents,
as the case might be, were lassooed and
-dragged at the heels of a wild horse till
death ensued. When one man killed
auother, where summary vengeance was
not taken, blood money was demanded.
In one case five cows, several horses and
'one hundred dollars was the price agreed
on. These Indians have a strong sense of
justice. An Indian dying from the effects
of wounds received in a drunken-brawl
called his friends together and told them
that the fault laj'with himself as he began the quarrel and he alone was to
blame for the consequences. He then
made them all promise that the man who
.had inflicted the wounds on him should
be held blameless, and also that they
should defend him as far as possible from
'white man's justice.' This promise was
faithfully kept
Theft was punished by whipping,
though in some cases rest:tution was con-
sideied sufficient. The Indians are con
sidered great thieyes, but I have not
found them so, and I have lived amongst
them for thirty-three years. When alone
amongst them I never locked my house
door, indeed in summer I used to leave
it open all night, and no one ever
molested me.
The Similkameens of today are a peace
loving, law abiding people; they have too
much property to wish for war, or trouble
of any kind with . the settlers; but they
are' proud and independent—they will
accept nothing from the government.
They have their own farms and employ
white and Chinese labor. They possess
large bands of cattle and horses and keep
hogs and chickens; they are employed
driving cattle and breaking ' horses.
Formerly they were expert horse thieves,
but'now they have left that practice for
their better civilized neighbors.
An Indian who had been an expert
horse thief told me the following story:
There was a stranger traveling through
the country who, not wishing to turn his
horse loose for fear of losing it, iied a
long rope to it and slept on the end of
the rope. The Indian who had been
watching for the horse crawled up,
severed the rope with his knife, then deliberately filling his mouth with grass,
chewed the en'd of the rope left with the
sleeper and very quietly led the horse
away. The traveler waking and examin
ing the rope imagined that the horse had
bitten it in two and escaped.
At the Indian village of Chechewewa
there is now a small church, and most of
the Indians have comfortable log houses.
They _re every day becoming more
civilized, and the time is not far distant
(if they survive the civilizing process)
when there will be little or no distinction
between a Similkameen Indian and his
white brethren.
[THE END.]
SIMILKAMEEN GUIDE===Minin? Men Tou-
istsana Sportsmen.
PacK horses provided. Apply C. M. SNOWDEN
P. O. Box 17, Princeton, B. C.
FOR  SALE
For sale lot twenty-eight  (28),  block
nineteen (19), on Bridge street.   Address
CHARLIE BURCH,
R.F.D. No. 2       Ashland, Wisconsin
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
PRINCETON
The sun Hissed $_____-
ihameen District 1
Land of Beautiful Scenery and
Healthful Climate
-i
Land of Vast,; Varied Mineral
and other Resources
Land of Big Game, Fowl,
Fish, Natural Reserves
Land of the Prospector and
Homeseeker, the Capitalist and
Investor
Land of Promise, Hope and
Prosperous Days—Come and See
If you want to keep in touch
with Princeton and District. .
Subscribe for the Star
$2 PER ANNUM
May i, 1912,
*z**i~z<<<<<**z~z**z<**^
I
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Real Estate, Mines
=Finance=
Do you want to Invest
Ground floor price?
Double your money inside of one year
TWO LOTS 111
ing on Bridge street, corner of
Tapton avenue, and the other
facing Tapton avenue. House,
woodshed and cellar. House
rents for $7 per month.
PRICE $10001
Half cash,   balance  equal instalments 6 and 12 months
Location   suitable   for  Store,
Boarding House, etc.
J. M. WRIGHT H
Real Estate, Finance and Mines
PRINCETON, B. C.
,«:_X~:r<~X~X«X">K~:~X~I"-«X~H~H~>
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Letterheads
Billheads
Meal Tickets
^JViilk Tickets
Printed Envelopes
Visiting Cards
Ladies', Gent's, Misses'
Business Cards
Posters
Dodgers, Dates
Statements
Invitations
Wedding and Ball
Ball Programs
Bills of Fare
Butter Wrappers
Letter Circulars
Memos.
Cotton Signs
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY!
STAR QUICK PRINT
FOR SALE
TWO and one-half  acres   suitable  for
garden, in good state of cultivation;
cellar; house; on Similkameen river.
Price, $200 cash.   Apply to
WONG SING.
I
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May 1, 1912
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
The Princeton
Livery g Feed
stables
N. HUSTON, PPOp'P
General Livery business carried on
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   L.  CUMMINGS,  Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc. 5
General Blacksmithing.
carriage Building and  Repairs
I J. KNUDSON I
Contractor   and   Builder
All Work Neatly & Promptly
Phone 28 Executed.
Estimates Famished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
Westwood & Brooke
POULTRY FARM
PRINCETON, - British Columbia
" SPOKESMAN "
This While Leghorn male bird won 2nd prize
Spokane Poultiv .how. io.il. -ilso headed 2nd
priz.- pen at same show. He Is sired by ist prize
winner at Spokane PouMr} Show, i_u/ which
also won shape and color specials at same show
Al=0 was 1st prize winner at Seattle in igio.
We a e now booking orders for Hgg Setttnggj
and f.i ward same when required by customers
Pin No. l—Our selected prize winning stock.
$5 Dtr s ttina of 15 eggs.
Pex No. 2—A choice pen that will product
winners and layers. $3 per setting of 15 eggs.
Pf. . NO. 3—A sp endid utility pen for egg production. $1 50 per setting of 15 eggs.
Book y.ur orders early. Termscash with order
Address:    PRINCETON, B. C.
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 5a.
(Regular meetings. 8 t
_ '       m.,Thursdays,.
Sojourning brethren wel'ome.    Hall situate   iu
Thomas Block.   ■' Oddfellows Hall."
Jas.Gei.f.ati.y. P.Russell,
Noble Grand. Secretary
PRINCETON GEBERAL HOSPITAL
Statement of Receipts and Expenditures—Subscriptions Wanted.
The proven usefulness of Princeton
general hospital and the wider field opening for it have encouraged the board of
directors to appeal to the public for further assistance. The enlargement and
improvement of the present premises are
necessary to place it on a basis to cope
with increasing demands on its accommodation and general efficiency. Every
resident of Princeton and district have
an interest in some degree in making the
hospital the success it was intended to be
when founded. So long as medicine and
surgery are practised the hospital will be
found a most valuable aid. To become a
member of the institution onjy requires
enough public spirit and cbarity to sub
scribe a smaR
' The memt
be subscribei s of
who shall b
year followin
contribution, viz:
ers of th*  institution shall
dollars annually
ified as such for the
annual subscription
and shall be entitled to one vote. Members subscribing ten dollars shall have
two votes and an additional vote for each
additional five dollars subscribed by them
to the limit of five votes and no member
by virtue of any donation shall be en
tilled to more than five votes.
' A subscription of $50 at any time shall
constitute the donor a life member who
shall be entitled to one vote and an addi-
t onal vote for every additional subscription of $50 up to the limit of five votes.'
The following is a statement for the
past year:
Balance sheet as at March 15, 1912:
ASSETS
Cash $   56 99
insi.nnce  (unexpired)    134 70
Furniture    1120 90
Building and site  5868 18
7180 77
Impairment  of capital
by loss on administration   f >r   twelve and
< ne-half months     85482
LIABILITIES
G wernment grants	
Private subscriptions...
Members #2612 <4
Others     923 ;5
4500 00
3535 59
$So3j 59 $8035 59
Copy of profit and  loss, or administration account:
RECEIPTS
From paying patients $ 2794 10
From government—pro rata al
lowance       527 00
Loss        854 82
$4175 92
EXPENDITURES
Salaries  $ 2411 25
Fuel and light       249 20
D,-dgs and  equipment      401 11
M lintenance        933 19
In'ere.-, and exchange        46 98
Orifice expenses, stationery, telephone, etc         68 89
Written   off   for insutance  expired        65 30
.4175 92
J. D. ANDRAS,
Honorary Secretary Treasurer.
C rtified correct:
Stephen Freeman ) .■,,*„,„
t    _   iit__ r Auditors.
J.  B.  WOOD )
F. P. COOK
General Merchant
Miners' Ouimtcr
Princeton,   Granite Creek
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
Advertise and Prosper
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Fishing Tackle
This is another new line we have added to our stock this year
and a most complete one at that. In its selection we have been
especially careful to obtain and offer for sale only such goods as are
demanded by this locality. Therefore, no matter how inexperienced
a fisherman you may be, yon will get results with the tackle bought
from us. Our fishing rods are sensitive to the faintest nibble of the
gamey trout, and are strong enough to land even the big fellow that
in the proverbial fish story always get away.   We have:
Two piece Bamboo Rods, complete with guides, 50c. each.
Three piece Split Bamboo Rods,
silk wound, cork handle,
snake guides, extra tip, nickel
plated reel ferrule, at $1 75
and $2.50 each.
Four piece Split Bamboo Rods,
with extra tip, snake guides,
cork handle, silk wound,
nickel plated reel ferrule.
This rod is 8 foot long when
put together and is short
enough when taken down to
go in a Suit case. Each $2
and $5.
Steel Rods, 3 piece, the Luckie,
$2 50; cork handles, the
Rainbow, $3.50.
One piece collapsible Steel
Rods, best Bristol rod, maple
handle, line runs through
center of rod, 9 ft. long, $5.
Braided Trout Lines, oiled silk,
waterproof, 25 yds on card,
25c, 50c, 75c, $1 per card.
60 yard reels from 40c to $1
Gut Leaders, 6 ft long, with
extra loops, 15c and 20c each
Landing Nets, $2.50 each.
Wicker Baskets, $1.50 and $2.
Trout Spinners, Hendrix, all
sizes, that are needed in this
locality, 25c each.
Trout Flies, specially dressed
spring steel hooks, every good
fly that a trout desires in the
assortment, per dozen, 35c.
Trout Bait Hooks, mounted on
gut, per dozen, 30c.
The A. E. HOWSE CO, Ltd
PRINCETON, B.C
♦^♦^^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦~*~^
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KING & GIBSON
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
^_*^*^i?^**_.**_.**_^******»**_?^_p__j__?__p
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
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OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
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PRINCETON, B.C. X
<_:_:_;„:_:„:_:_:_:_:.i^^
COMltflONT
The Town of opportunity
The rails have been  laid  into  the town and Coalmont is now the new
terminus,   the  base  of operations for  the next  forty miles of railway
building.
Before six months have passed there should be a payroll in Coalmont of
between   350  and  400  men : This  means population, which naturally
means good business.
IF YOU ARE WISE YOU will invest in a little Coalmont real estate
now while the choice is still good.
Don't let this opportnnily slip  along  with  the  others  which have got
past you.    Write for our circular and  price list; a post card will bring
it to you.    There are still some 50-foot lots left
Two blocks from the centre of town at only
$225, $55 cash, bal. in 18 months to suit.
Williamson  & Turner
AGENTS, COALHONT, B.C
^
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***Bf**mk\\*wm!m***mm^**^m
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May  i, 1912,
LET
_ i MELON
WITH  INVESTORS
Sell them Princeton Real Estate
Make Money out of Old Earthp
C__l!?3__
'T"fHE probabilities of success in real estate speculation are in pro=
'"■*■''' portion to your faith in the possibilities of a town or country'
Princeton has possibilities^somcsay her possibilities are illimitable. It
would be a blind, unreasonable faith, for one to invest, say, in the great
Sahara.desert or inside the Arctic circle. It is different with Princeton
to mosttowns=-the position, the possibilities, the.resources all are prima
facie, self-evident-=a blind man can see them with his mental eye.
Opportunity rarely knocks more than once or twice at your door and
lightning never strikes twice in the same place. This analogy illustrates
how carefully one should exercise sound judgment in the when, how and
where of investment in real estate. There is land for everyone if the
other fellow does not gobble more than his share. Remember, single
tax is coming, and then land values will jump skyward. Princeton is
the center of coal, ore and placer mining. Good grazing and agricultural
land. Beautiful climate, fishing, hunting. Two railroads will afford
transportation. Electric light, waterworks, hospital, etc. Write the
Princeton Coal & Land Co., or better still, come and see for yourself
5
1
WRITE   OR    CONSULT    THE
Princeton Coal & Land Co.
.- -.%l --,, •/>•.. . -   £-   WATERMAN,   Manager        .   :il|...    , f:
Owners of Townsite and the Best Domestic Coal produced
1
'• i

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