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Similkameen Star 1913-05-02

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 ■ax_e__-
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flineral resources varied, most extensive in the world.
Sickness is the offspring of sin: Be sinless, perfectly healthy.
14th Year   No. 18
PRINCETON, B.C., FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1913.
PER YEAR : $2 Cash
Single Copy, sc
Safe and sure are the ground floor opportunities here now.
MINES AND MINERALS
COPPER HAS GOOD
DEMAND 111
The future of Leadville is assured.
J. C. Reilly discovered the Mother Lode.
It is over 30 feet wide. Reilly and Jensen have established a camp in four feet
of snow, and have got in five shots on the
lode.   It opened surprisingly good.
J. M. Short, of Joplin, Mo., the largest
owner of zinc mines iu the world, was in
Princeton recently on his way to Tulameen and Leadville. He could not reach,
camp Leadville owing to the snow but
will come again when it is gone.
The B. C. Copper Company, recently,
bonded the following claims on Copper
Mountain : Little Gem, Spider, Tin Cup,
Oriole, Verde, Jennie Silkman and King
Solomon. The owners are D. M. French,
C M. and J. Snowden, Thos. and CO.
Day, L. G. Barron and S- R. Almond.
The B C. Copper Co. has six diamond
drills at work on Copper Mountain.
Announcement is made from New
York that the directors of the Granby
Smelting company have declared their
regular quarterly dividend of $224,000,
^payable June 2. but the report creates
no surprise, as it was stated that at
t.ie time of the resumption of disbursements the company would apportion $1.50 a share among its stockholders every 90 days.
The current issue of the Boston
Commercial, which is unusually well
informed as to the copper situation,
states that the metal is in 'good demand.' Foreign consumers, either due
to better banking accommodation or
t'ie belief that copper is to enjoy a
sharp advance, are coming into the
market for good sized quantities of
the red metal both for near and forward delivery.
KEEP MONEY HOME.
Never send a dollar away from
home when the article that the dollar
will purchase can be obtained at
home. Money is our financial blood.
Its circulation keeps the business body
alive. Bleed that body by sending
money away and business will soon
put on a look of lethargy. Always
trade at home. Watch the bargains
offered by enterprising advertisers in
this paper and you will learn the best
places to spend those home dollars.—
Summerland Review.
TRANSPROVINCIAL ROAD.
Government road work is now in
full swin- and will be continued during the season. The transprovincial
road is being completed into town and
will follow nearly the old road down
to Vermilion avenue. It will take
about two weeks to complete this portion and then the main camp will be
established at the end of the completed road near Whipsaw. Engineer Ingram will have charge of the technical details in connection with the
grading, W. A. McLean is general su
pervision and N. McFadden is bridge;
foreman. A bridge with 79 feet span
is being built by the latter over Whip-
saw creek. Bert Thomas has. charge
of the repairers and improvements as
well as constructing new roads and
trails in the district. Needless to say
the large appropriations for roads
and trails to mining camps and farming sections will be carefully expended and as in former years the results
will prove the necessity for opening
up the country. Road Superintendent
Turner has a busy season ahead and
his experience will, no doubt, produce
the roads and trails economically for
developing the vast resources of the
Similkameen.
Homer   McLean   is   timekeeper    this
season for the T. P. R. force.
RAILWAY POINTS.
The contract for the construction of
the Kettle Valley in Coquihalla Pass is
reported to have been let to Grant,
Smith & Co.
C. J. Seymour, C. E., has left the serv
ice of the Kettle Valley railway company
and has joined the Pacific and Great
Eastern near Lillooet.
Soundings for the K.V. bridge across
the Fraser at Hope reach a depth of 80
feet without striking bedrock.
E. E. Coley is running lines near town
on tbe K.V. extension to Copper Mountain.
W. H. Burns, engineer for the K.V., is
locating from Osprey Lake toward
Princeton.
It is reported that the Kettle Valley
rightofway agent is buying on the line
at Asoen Grove.
y "PLATINUM IN B.C.
By FRANK BAILEY, M. E.
(From the Mining Journal of March
1,   1913,   London,  England.)
Considerable attention is now being
paid to the alluvial deposits of the
Similkameen and Tulameen rivers in
Southern British Columbia, owing to
the fact that the Talumeen district
has the richest platinum deposits on
the North American continent and
partly in view of the high price which
platinum has attained and the scarcity of the metal. The rise in the price
of the metal is probably due to its
extended uses in the setting of precious jewels, for which purpose it is
better adapted than gold.
To such an extent has platinum invaded the jewellery field, that it has
largely displaced gold as a mounting
for precious stones. In the Fifth Avenue shops in New York one can look
over hundreds of thousands of dollars'
worth of ornaments without seeing
anything but a platinum mounting.
Dr. Kunz, a world-wide authority on
gems,, stated in a recent number of
the Engineering & Mining Journal
that two-thirds of the finest jewels
are now set in platinum, which holds
its setting without any danger of loss
as in the case of gold. It is an ideal
setting for stones, especially for diamonds, as the colour harmonizes better than the yellow colour of gold,
and also has the faculty of making a
Continued on page 2.
TOWN AND DISTRICT
LACROSSE CAME
PROBABLE
'/7W
./.
L. W. Shatford, M.P P., arrived in
town last night on a visit of inspection
of public works and also to meet with
his constituents. He is in excellent
health and beams with his usual optimistic and encouraging spirit.
B. L. Smith, manager of the Bank of
Montreal, returned from a business visit
to Spokane last week.
J. H. Jackson, reported last week as
seriously ill in a Spokane hospital, is
better and is coming home.
A meeting ofthe lacrosse club will be
held at the Princeton Drug Store at 8:30
p. m. on Saturday, May 3rd. All players
and members are requested to be present.
The club has been requested to hold another of their popular dances on Friday,May
9th. This matter will be taken up at the
meeting on Saturday. The Sec'y of the
Princeton lacrosse club has not as yet
received a reply from the Keremeos club,
confirming the report that the Princeton
lacrosse team would play there on the
24th of May.
Miss Olding, teacher, of Grand
Forks, is visiting her sister, Mrs.
Hunter.
The Princetou carriage and iron works
and blacksmith shop owned by Knudson
& Co has been rented by Mr. McGillivray
blacksmith of Coalmont. He will conduct the business from the ist of Ma3'.
Mrs. Wilkinson, daughter of J. Budd,
a nd, ner'son~aTe"visUing ___■ fa-bet—at
DeerValley rancji% having come from
Oklahouia\ab(yJT/three weeks ago.
The Oddfellows' 94th anniversary service last Sunday was conducted by the
chaplain of Princeton Lodge No. 52,
Rev. T. A Osborne. He preached an
eloquent sermon from Luke x: 'The Good
Samaritan' being the subject, linking
with it an account ofthe working of Odd -
fellowship and its effect on society at
large. There was a large attendance of
brethren and sister Rebekahs, together
with the general public. This benevolent order is flourishing in Princeton and
the membership is increasing rapidly.
A. S. Black, .barrister, of Greenwood,
was in town an a business visit last week.
He likes ^Princeton in its every aspect
and wm'probably locate here in the not
very distant future.
H. L Nelson is leaving Princeton next
week and is closing out business. Mr.
Nelson has made many friends in his
business relations during his stay here.
Wherever he locates his many friends-
will wish him success.
Rev T. A. Osborne leaves next Monday
for Armstrong, a- C., where the district
meetng of the Methodist church for the
Okanagan and Similkameen districts will
be held. From there Mr. Osborne proceeds to the annual conference at Wesley
church, Vancouver, on the 12th instant.
Services in the meantime will be discontinued until further announoement.
Next Sunday may be Mr. Osborne's last
sermon in this section.
The Ladies' Hospital Auxiliary will'
give another afternoon tea from 3 p m..
to 6 in the building next the moving pic-
ure show on Friday May 16. The public
generally is cordially invited to patronize
the auxiliary in the work of aiding the
hospital. The last afternoon tea was
very successful, netting #21. The teas
will be given monthly.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Willarson were recent
visitors to Spokane.
THE WIDE WORLD.
A bill to abolish plural voting at
elections in the British isles has been
introduced in the House of Commons
by the government, and has passed
its first reading by a vote of 303
against 107.
Direct election of United States senators became one of the provisions of
the Constitution on the 8th inst., by
Connecticut's ratification of the
amendment to that effect. Thirtysix
states, the requisite three fourths of
all in the Union, have now approved
the change.
Included in the Democratic tariff revision bill introduced in Congress on
the 7th inst., is an income tax section
which would require every resident of
the United State who earns more
than four thousand dollars a year to
pay a tax of 1 per cent, on his income
in excess of the exemption, adding a
-surtax of 1 per cent, additional on incomes in excess of twenty thousand
dollars; 2 per cent additional on incomes in excess of fifty thousand dollars, and 3 per cent additional on incomes in excess of one hundred thousand dollars. The bill also would re-
enact the present corporation tax law
imposing a 1 per cent, tax on the
earnings of corporations, stock companies, insurance companies, and the
like, but it would exempt partnerships. Estimating the loss of revenue
from the new tariff rates at eighty
million dollars a year, the revenue
from the income tax will be estimated
at a like amount.
William J. Bryan, secretary of state,
is ready to put forward his first distinctive policy of an international
character. It is a plan for promotion
of world peace which contemplates
the negotiation of treaties between the-
United States and all the civilized nations of the earth. It will have as its
most original feature a temporary limitation upon the armament and war
preparations of disputing nations.
Joseph Cook, the new opposition
leader, in a speech delivered at Parra-
matta, Australia, recently, and which
opened the Liberal federal campaign,
declared that the road to its attainment was unification.
 fi
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
1913
PLATINUM IN B.C.
From    fage'l.
gem set in it look larger than it really
is. A leading jeweler remarks:
"Everything is platinum now, and it
seems to have a great future ahead
of it."
In addition to its value for jewellery, platinum is in so much demand
in the arts as for electric, chemical
and scientific apparatus and other
uses, that scientific men say it must
be found, as there is nothing else
known to take its place.
That platinum exists in economic
quantity in British Columbia placers
is evident from the returns officially
recorded. The Geological Survey
give the production in earlier years
as follows:—
Year.
Value.
Year.        Value.
1887  ..
.  $5,600
1895 $3,800
1388 ..
.    6,000
1896          750
1889  ...
.    3,500
1897       1,600
13C0  ..
.    4,500
1898     1,500
1C91  ...
.  10,000
1899           825
1892  ..
.    3,500
1900         Nil
IcJj    .•>
.    1,800
1901           457
1:9i ...
950
1902            190
This
gives  a total estimated vali
:6f $44,972.
The records available are, however,
. ery imperfect. In those days,' too,
r.o'cody paid any attention to platinum,
regarding it as worthless, and the
^prices ranged from 50c. to $3.50 per
ounce.
The Similkameen country has for
yea,r_ teen known as a rich mineral
district, and the Tulameen riv .r is
its main west fork. The rapidly
growing town of Princeton is situated
in th. forks of the two rivers, which
in former days were known as the
Routh Similkameen and Vermilion
rivers—today the Tulameen.
My first visit to the Tulameen was
in 1899. I have, however, repeatedly
visited this district of great possibilities every year.
whilst the Similkameen river was
found rich only in spots, the early
placer miners in the 'sixties got
<-_i__er __.d larger returns from the
Tulameen. The largest gold nugget
found drring the Granite creek excitement was reported to me to be
worth $350.00, whilst several nug-
;rets, ranging in value from $85.00 to
$150.00 were picked up from the beds
of the Tulameen river and its tributaries. Several conflicting reports
ere m .de on the estimated output of
gold from the Granite Creek and Tulameen diggings during and long after
■the rush of miners from the California
g£[ld__-_eL. to" the Tulameen. They evidently a.~i made good, and spent their
gold dust as fast as they made their
daily cleanups. This has been corroborated ty the few old timers who re-
t rued lo this district at the close of
the Cariboo excitement, which was the
direct cause of the general exodus or
miners iroru the Tulameen district into Co _:r north.
The Tulameen river heads in the
Forie range of mountains, near the International boundary line, and flows
-north to Summit Camp, thence in an
easterly direction to the mouth of
Pe? r Creek, thence in a southeasterly
direction to Granite Creek, keeping a
general southeasterly course through
the main canyon of the Tulameen to
the Princeton coal basin, whence it
flows northeasterly to its confluence
with the Similkameen river at the
town of Princeton.
At the present time there are many
different ways of reaching Princeton
____d the Tulameen district. The quickest route from the cities on the Pacific
Continued on page 3.
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
T. C. Brooke leaves next Monday for
Lethbridge aud will probably go to England to settle up an estate. He will te
away some months.
Mrs. D. McCuffrey will receive secoud
Wednesday in each month.
Wilson Bros, have the contract for a
residence for R. W. Morean, the location
being on the bench overlooking town.
W. Lowe, of Keremeos, has been in
town visiting and is looking fine.
J. J. Malone arrived from Nelson on
Wednesday.
Married.—On the 1st inst. at the home
of  Mrs.   P.   Wilson,   Geo    Ramsay   of
Wash., U. S.,  to  Lily   Boone,  of Sacra
mento, Cal.    Rev.  T.   A.   Osborne conducted the service.
M. S Wilson has the contract for remodeling and decorating the residence
on Fenchurch Av., belongii g to the
Princeton Coal and. Land Co.
The board of trade has received
from Frank I. Clarke, a request to
give any information relative to the
district, for publicity purposes. Mr.
Clarke is appointed by the government
to gather similar information from all
parts of the province, the whole to be
forwarded to the agent general for B.
C. in London, England. As a guide
for investors *he information should
be thoroughly reliable and every person interested in the district can help
the board to collect data, &c.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O, LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD JOHN AIRD
General Manager Assistant General Manager
NOTICE is given that Meh Jone has
purchased the laundry owned by Moy
and Hop Lee. He will continue the
business and do good first class washing,
as cheap, as the cheapest. Give me a
trial with your collars and fine linens.
Laundry, Tapton Av.,near Bridge Strett.
Yours truly,
MEH JONE.
FRANK BAILEY, M.C.M.I.
Mining Engineer
Seventeen years' experience in
British Columbia.
BOX 102
PRINCETON, B.C.
Come and make your choice now.
Lots selling from $25.00 to $100.00
Fire,   Life  and  Accident
Insurance
eal Estate
Princeton
CAPITAL, $15,000,000 REST, $12,500,000
TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES
Issued by The Canadian Bank of Commerce enable the traveller to
provide himself with funds without delay at each point of his journey in
a convenient yet inexpensive manner. They are issued payable in every
country in the world in denominations of
$10,   $20,   $50,   $100,   $200
with tlie exact equivalent in the moneys ofthe principal countries stated
on the face of each cheque. They are economical, absolutely safe self-
identifying and easily negotiated.
J. D. ANDRAS, Manager,PRINCETON BRANCH.
T
ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
Incorporated in 1869
Head Office—Montreal, Que.
CAPITAL   PAID   UP—$11,500,000.
Reserve-$ 12,500,000 Total Assets-$ 175,000,000
A General Banking o ..siness Transacted  Savings Departments
in Connection.   Accounts of Out of Town Customers
Receive Careful Attention.
J. C. ROBERTSON, Manager Princeton Branch
<>~w,
^.&»M_i.^l^
m
-Si
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-9
^-#1
furns & Go* Ltd.
High Grade Meats of all
Kinds, Always on hand.
Fish,    Eggs     and  Poultry.
Try Our Home-Made Sausage
The Best in the World
P* Burns & Go* Ltd*
I*
sir
m
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&WWWWW * WWftfWW^iVifWWWWWWWW*^
We have just opened up our Spring Stock of LINOLEUM r.nd now ha* e a
fine range of entirely new patterns. The designs .re altogether diffeiem fr. m
anything we have had before and are strictly the latest on the market.
If you are contemplating a purchase of the above goods it will certainly
be to your advantage to see our stock before placing your order.
A. l Willie's furniture store
STAR, QUICK PRINTERY
May 2, 1913
THE     SIMiLK AME IN    STAR
I BAM OF MONTREAL I
**** ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL &
A R- B. ANGUS, Esq., President t
X H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., Generai, Manager *?
♦^Rt. Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal G. C. M. G., G.C. V.O, Hon. Pres.^%
% Capital          -          I          -       $16,000,000.00 ♦$♦
P Reserve and Undivided Profits   -  $16,000,000.00 ***
♦j> SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTflENT X
*-4*. Deposits received from $i upwards.   Ranching and Mining Business 4^*.
B** given every attention %
♦|> BANKING    BY    MAIL *$*
B** Deposits may be made and withdrawn by mail.   Out of town accounts I X
'X receive every attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted ***
PRINCETON BRANCH
B. L SMITH, Manager
v*<~x~;«m>:^
House Cleaning Til
VOl WANT ROOMS PAPERED AND PAINTED ?
Call and Examine our New Stock of
Artistic Wall Papers, Burlaps, Etc
&
<*
CHURCH'S   ALABASTINE
The only Permanent Wall Finish
The most complete line of Paints, Oils,
Brushes and  Painting Supplies in the Simil=
kameen.     Estimates Furnished.
max s. wilson, Decorator
The poor man's    W~*\ JT~^ ¥"""} 1"^   The rich man's
beverage J- _*    |j __ ^ I ^ JtC   ^m*Q '***'-**
Nourishing,    Satisfying,     Strengthening
The NELSON BREW INO Co.,
PRINCETON,
B.C.-^
. Families supplied.      Hotel orders promptly delivered.
Patronize home make-
Subscription for Star $2 a Year
PLATINUM IN B.C.
From   Page 2.
coast is via the Canadian Pacific Railway to Merritt in the Nicola valley
(nine hours), thence by automobile
stage to Coalmont (four hours),
thence by the V. V. & .3. Railway
(Great Northern Railway) to Princeton (one hour), the total distance from
Vancouver being about 290 miles. Another route is by all rail from Vancouver to Princeton and Coalmont via
Spokane, Washington, U. S. A., on the
Giyeat Northern Railway..
Both the V. V. & E. Railway and the
Kettle Valley Railway (C. P. R.) are
building their lines up the Tulameen
..alley as far as the headwaters of the
Coldwater river on the divide between the watersheds of the Okanagan
and Fraser valleys, but from this summit they both go down the Coquihalla
valley on the one line to Hope, where
they again build separate lines to Vancouver. The Provincial Government
are, about to construct a waggon road
up the Tulameen river to Summit
Camp from Otter Flats (now known
as Tulameen City). At present the
only available method of going up the
Tulameen is by the old Hudson's Bay
pack trail from the end of the present
waggon road. Both these new railways should give direct transportation to Vancouver when their lines are
completed, in less than two years from
date. .   '
The Similkameen and Tulameen rivers have been for many years famous
for the remarkable quantity of black
sands contained in their gravels,
which all, more or less, contain gold
and platinum. Mr. C. F.. Law, who
knows the district, places the production of platinum from the Tulameen
and its tributaries at 20,000 ozs. While
this amount was saved and marketed,
how much more was probably lost?
The black platiniferous sands held in
the riffles and sluice boxes were regarded as of no value in those days,
and were thrown away. For instance,
according to the "Mineral Industry,"
platinum was selling in Russia in 1898
at $7.75 to $8.75 per oz. Today it is
quoted in New York at $45.50 per oz.
for refined metal and $48.00 per oz.
for hard metal.- This represents an
average increase in price of over 50
per cet. per annum, or 600 per cent, in
ten years. The Tulameen platinums
are classed as hard metals.
Many papers and ar.ticles have from
time to time been published in different journals on the platinum deposits
of the Tulameen by prominent mining
engineers and scientists, quotations
from which are as follows:—
The late Dr. G. M. Dawson said of
the platinum in the Tulameen in his
work on the "Mineral Wealth of British Columbia": "The metal occurs in
notable quantity in the region of the
Upper Similkameen in minute scales
where the gold is fine, but increasing
in coarseness to small pellets and
nuggets in places where coarse gold is
found. Coarse grains and'pellets have
so far been found only on Granite,
Cedar and Slate Creeks, all entering
the Tulameen, on the south side. In
certain claims in these creeks the
platinum has been found to equal half
the weight of gold obtained.
Though above referred to as platinum,
the metal so named is alloyed with
several other metals of the same class,
of which osmiridium is the most abundant."
Professor James Fullum Kemp was
probably one of the first to make a
study of the Tulameen platinum deposits in 1900. He states that platinum has been detected in pyroxenites,
and even in crushed and chloritised
granite in the Tulameen region; also
that the richest platinum nugget yet
assayed and recorded gave 86.50 per
cent, platinum, and that the proportion of the metal' found runs down to
68.8 per cent, and adds: "Platinum
has been obtained in commercial quantities in connection with the gold
washings of South Western British
Columbia, and this source has proved
to be the most productive of all thus
far developed on the North American
Continent. As regards platinum, the
area of chief interest is in the valley
of Slate Creek and along the Tulameen
river."
In the summary report of the Geological Survey of Canada for 1908, R.
W__ Brock,. Director,, remarks:   "Mr..
Chas. Camsell completed his study of
the Hedley mining camp, and-began a
survey of the Tulameen district. The
latter is unique in that it is the only
district in Canada where platinum
gravels have been worked on a commercial scale. Railway facilities for
this section are projected, and with
the solution of the transportation
problem it is expected that this portion
of the country will be actively developed. The present work is in anticipation of this."
Mr. Charles Camsell, of the Geological Survey of Canada, gives some
very interesting information regarding the Tulameen alluvial deposits in
the different Blue Books lately published by the Department of Mines at
Ottawa. Mr. Camsell is now known by
his colleagues as the "Diamond King,"
as he was one of the first to discover
diamonds in place in the platinum belt
of the Tulameen, and the Department
Continued on page 5.
Princeton
Picture Show
Dignan Bros.
Complete change of program Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Good,
Clean Entertainment. Nothing to
offend.
If onr show pleases you, tell others; If not, quietly tell us.
Cor. Bridge and Angela Street.
Prices:
Children 15c. Adults 25c
NEW BARBER SHOP
MRS. GEE-SING
Located    Between   the   Court
House and Post Office
FIRST-CLASS   WORK   GUARANTEED
Photographer
Princeton       1
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON, 1    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBTA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that thirty days
after date I intend to apply to the Minister of Lands for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands situate in the Sitnilka--
meen land division of Yale district:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of lot 1041, being also
the northeast corner of lot for coal license
number 6568, thence east 80 chains, south
80 phains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres.
Dated March 25, 1913.
W, HOMER MCLEAN, Locator.
Ii.. D Russell, Agent.
I.
1
___**_
I.
I
up
■\J-^~
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May 2, 1913
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. fi. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
•   At PRINCETON, B.C.. by
Princeton   Printing and   Publishing  Co
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
British Empire. One Year,    -
$5
00
Foreign, One Year    -    - . -
t*
•50
Payable in Advance.
ADVERTISING RATES :
Land Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notices, 20 ctuts per line each insertion
Legal Advertising, 12cents per line, 1st insertion,
8 cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
A i vertisements by contract, $1 per in. per month
Special rates for long term ads.
Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Wednesday.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
All who love the white-winged
dove of peace will wish the United
States secretary of state the greatest measure of success in his efforts
to tiring about universal peace. It
ought not to be an insuperable task
in the hands of such an able advocate as Mr. Bryan backed by the
peacemaking record and prestige of
the great republic. Progress and
peace have divine sanction and are
worthy of the very best thought
and support.
The Labor commission appointed
by ,the provincial government to
enquire into all matters relating to
labor will sit in Princeton next
Thursday, May 8th, at the court
house. There are many questions
affecting labor which require renie-
d al legislation and due enforcement of existing laws. It is cer
tain that anything which will better
the conditions of labor morally,
physically and financially, will reflect in the contentment and happiness of laborers.. The present high
cost of food, weekly payday, cash
or credit, one day of rest each week
for-man and brute, abolition of the
credit and treating systems, womanhood suffrage and law re rent and
debt simplified and made quicker in
action, these are some crude suggestions for witnesses to elaborate
and emphasize and they all concern
those who receive pay for labor of
any kind. The unrest of laborers
is traceable to two direct material
causes : Greed for dividends and
the grinding process to obtain them;
lack of confidence in employers.
Cold reserve, hauteur, lack of social intimacy, superior airs on the
part of officials and owners breed
estrangement and contempt. On
the other hand employees violate
rules regarding time and faithful
service provoking strained relationships and distrust. Anyone having
.interest in the broad question of
labor is invited to attend the meeting of the commission.
Under the cloak of loyalty some
jingo patriots in south Vancouver
and also at Victoria have asked that
British born be given preference in
city work.    What a fine sample of
egotism, selfishness and gall? This
is a free country, without class distinctions or the preferred few. If
preference or favor is shown in, any
civilized country it is to the native
born, the members of the national
family. Canadians invite the respectable people of the whole world
to come and make their homes
here and become citizens. It would
not be honorable or just to deny
taein certain positions because they
were guilty of the 'crime' of having
been born in the United States,
France, Germany, Denmark, Norway, Switzerland or Sweden. No
citizen's blood or origin should bar
him from filling the highest position in the land. Special privileges
to a few would mean tbe revival of
feudalism and government by the
hereditary nobles. liberty, equality, justice are the fundamentals of
democracy and are opposed to serfdom, a privileged class, favoritism,
characteristics of aristocracy and
those who ape it. Canada must be
fair and impartial to all its subjects.
If permanency 'and stability of
the British empire are to be absolutely assured it can only be attained by Britain accepting her colonies into full, unreserved partnership, giving them equal representation in an imperial house and sbar-
ing\with them the honors, benefits
and responsibilities accruing to a
great nation. Imperial unity thus
acquired would make one sold
nation, one nationality, oue flag,
j'.o other name than 'Briton' woul 1
be necessary to describe the people
of this vast empire, on which the
sun is forever rising. Britons could
then dictate to the world peace,
free trade and international rights.
B.C. Portland cement Co.
United Empire Coal Mining CO.
These Companies will Shortly
Operate on Extensive Scale and
Establish    Permanent   Payroll.
**4*Z**Z**Z*****Z**<******^^
The Kamloops Standard has a
long editorial repeating the wail oi
the preachers on the lack of interest in reiigion and pointing out that
the church should be more practical
if 'indifference' is to cease. The
greatest preacher of all time was
followed by the multitude because
he not only preached but healed as
well, giving sight to the blind, making the lame walk, curing all diseases, finally commanding his disciples in every age and clime to
'preach the gospel and heal the sick.'
'The works that I do shall ye do.'
Preaching and healing are inseparable and for 300 years after the
ascension of the Saviour the church
did both as bidden. When return
is made to the primitive way there
will be multitude audiences. Too
much learning has made preachers
Pharisaic and disobedient. The
new testament was not written by
D.D's but nearly all by three humble fishermen, a tentmaker and a
publican. The scholars have muddled religion until there are hundreds of sects and beliefs where
there should only be one, hence the
great falling away and lack of interest i__s__u_ce_i .by .the Standard.
EAST   PRINCETON
The manufacture of cement will begin in a few
weeks. A permanent payroll and a growing town
with electric light system, waterworks and cement
paved streets, will result from the industries now in
formative stages. According to the history of progress in this province investments made now in East
Princeton real estate must double and treble in a
short space of time. This is the experience in other
towns, why not the same in East Princeton ? Two
railways will serve transportation.
^^^♦^♦^♦^^♦^♦^♦^♦^^^
\
Information as to prices of Lots and
Terms given by G R. Briggs, Gen.
Agent, 615, Hastings St W* Vancouver, or apply D. M McCurdy,
East Princeton.
Mav 2, _y_3
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
•tpr* B*f*
A large  consignment  of Garden and  H
Field Seeds Just Arrived g
RENNIE'S and STEELE BRIGGS' I
4)*r* •*&
Secure Your Seeds Early
Don't leave it till it is too late
***** B*r*f
THOMAS BROS.
Plumbing and Heating, Sheet Metal
work, Tinsmithing |
Shop corner Angela Av. and3ridge St., in 'Murdock's blacksmith shop'
jjl  fr. DIGNAN     1
PRACTICAL WORKMAN—PROPRIETOR
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
WATER NOTICE.
For a licence to take and use water.
Notice is hereby given that I, Thomas
Rabbitt of Tulameen Valley, will apply
fi r a licence to take and use 250 acre feet
p. r annum of water out of a small Creek,
which flows in a southerly direction
through Lots 391 and 15I and empties into
Tulameen River on Lot 151. The water
will be diverted at Lot 391 and will be
used for irrigation purposes on the land
described as Lots 151 and 101, Yale Division of Yale Distrrct.
This notice wes posted on the ground
on the 21st day of April,1913. The application will be filed in the office of the
Water Recorder at Ashcroft.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller
of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B. C.
THOMAS RABBITT
Applicant.
WATER NOTICE.
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
^Regular meetings. 8 p
m., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.     Hall situate in
.Howse Bldgs cor. Bridge St. and Vermilion Ave.
C. Willarson. D. G. McCurdy,
Noble Grand Secretary.
For a licence to take and use water.
Notice is hereby given that I Thomas
Rabbitt of Tulameen Vallev will apply
for a licence to take and use 250 acre feet
per annum of water out of a small creek,
which flows in a southerly direction
through Lot 152 and empties into Tulameen River near Lot 152- The water
will be diverted at Lot 152 and will be
used for irrigation purposes on the land
described as Lot 152, Yale Division of
Yale District.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 21st day of April, 1913. The application will be filed in the office of the
Water Recorder at Ashcroft.
Objections maj' be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller
of Water Rights, Parliament Bnildings.
Victoria, B. C.
THOMAS RABBITT
Applicant.
VIENNA BOARDING HOUSE.
- Rooms and firstclass board by the day,
week or month. Street in rear of court
house.. Miss Schotzko.
PLATINUM IN B.C.
From   Page 3.
of Mines have recently published Mr.
Camsell's bulletin on the Tulameen
diamond deposits, which is very interesting, and this last summer the investigations made by Mr. Charles W.
Thompson, the diamond expert from
South Africa, confirms the writer's belief that the gravel bars and behches
of the Tulameen and its tributaries
from the Tulameen Canyon, about six
miles below Granite Creek to about
half a mile above Champion Creek,
could be profitably worked on a large
scale by the many different companies
and individuals now owning and holding leases in the above mentioned
area.
Whilst nearly all <■ these extensive
gravel bars and benches carry gold
averaging from 30 cents to $1.50 per
cubic yard, they are rich only in spots,
and many of these rich spots were
worked in early days near and on bedrock, which was exposed in the bed of
the Tulameen river and Granite Creek,
but the majority of the larger gravel
benches have great possibilities, more
especially so in the old river channels,
which can be traced in different parts
of this district.
The search for platinum veins or
deposits has not as yet been a commercial success, the platinum being
very unevenly distributed in the chromite and magnetite irons, as well as
the olivines, serpentines (Tulameen
dunite), pyroxenites and peridotites,
besides the other rocks in this "platinum belt," but both the gold and platinum nuggets found in the alluvial deposits show that they are of local origin. The largest nugget of gold and
platinum the writer has handled from
this district weighed about _ ozs..
which was owned by one of the old
timers of Granite Creek.
In early days the placer miners-were
greatly hampered with what they
called "white gold" in their sluice boxes, which was then worth practically
nothing, many many hundreds of
pounds of valuable platinum were
dumped out and covered up by their
rollings, and Messrs. Cook, Blair &
Rabbit bought a lot of it for 50 cents
per pound, whilst today it is worth
over $45.00 per ounce. When it became a little more valuable many
sacks of platinum were packed out
and shipped to the California markets,
New York, and Hatton Garden, London. A sample of this Tulameen platinum was also sent by Mr. Gilbert
Fl*>ir (now of Vancouver, B. C.) in
1897 to England for analysis, the percentage of which is as follows: Sheffield Smelting Company. Sheffield,
Rn_i.nd, June 18, 1897—Platinum
(Pt) 78 per cent, gold (Au) .45 per
cent., silver (Ag) .28 per cent, iron
(Fe) 9.80 ner cent., nickel (Ni) .10 per
cent, iridium (Ir) 4.02 per cent., Palladium (Pal) .50 per cent, copper
(Cu) .85 per cent, osmi-iridium 6.00
per cent.
A recent assay by the Government
Assay Office of some of the black
sSrai taken from a bench on Granite
•"•reek gave the following returns:
Black sand—Gold, 3.6 ozs. per ton:
r>lf>tinum, 7.6 ozs.
Another sample of black-sand taken
from the Roamy hydraulic leases, situated about five miles below Granite
Creek, near the Tulameen river, which
|||| assayed in Victoria, B. O, gave
the following results: Gold, 2 ozs. 4
dwts.: platinum, 1 oz. 3 dwts.
In December last Mr. Blair sent to
*'-,.. T.9Dartment of Mines at Ottawa
for . vamination. a sample, of 4 ozs. o*
Ma. k; sand concentrate from 1 1-2 to 2
cubic yards of river sa,nd and st av_i.
The report, dated- December 28. 1911
->• "On assay this material was found
+o contain: Platinum at the rate of
R21.57 o7s. tier ton of 2,000 lbs. of concentrate; osmiridium at the rate of
5° s? ozs., gold at the rate of 75.82 ozs..
Mjmg very small quantity undetermined." This represents  $1.15 to the
' ' - yard of gravel.
One of the best det)osits of'alluvial
m .« .um is between the mouth of Bear
Creek and Eagle Creek, on the leases
now held by Messrs. Ford &McCon-
nell. a large amount of both gold and
platinum was washed up in rockers
and sluice boxes in the early days on
the shallow bars in the bed of the Tu-
lameen/river and near bedrock, where
i.V_V_*__A__*__»__*__*__.^^
North west Home _t
loan company
CAPITAL       -      -      $100,000.00
Head Office, Winnipeg, Man.
LOANS FROM $500 to $ 10,000 TO
BUY OR BUILD A HOME
Do you own a  home ?   If no , consider our plan and STOP RENT
Money   Loaned   at    5  p.c.   yearly
Interest.     Write or consult
J. F. waddell, Agent, Princeton, B.C.
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!S«^K<»K<K«K<*<.»K»J'K«*X'><KK»
P
[To he continued.]
D. Q. McCURDY
REAL ESTATE
Pire  and   Life   Insurance
 Specialty	
EAST PRINCETON LOTS
EAST  PRINCETON
B.C.
Simiihameen Hotel
SUMMERS S WARDLE
PROPRIETORS JS!®
WOOD FOR SALE.
Dry or green wood  in  cord or carload"
lots.,   Orders left at Len Huston's.
Perkins & Allison .
The Place to Meet
The Man Yon Know
AT
LEN HUSTON'S
Cipr & News Stand
TOBACCOS, CIGARS   PIPES
Agent for Nelson Club and Kusko-
nook Cigars, made by
NELSON CLUB CIGAR CO.
Ice Cream, Sodas, Confectionery
.IRWIN BLOCK
g J. L. HUSTON,   -    -    Prop. „
.!
Large and New buildin?, well Furnished aud Plastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample   Rooms, spacious,, in  hotel.
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway, station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
DOMINION HOTEL
D. McRAE, Proprietor
TULAMEEN,  B.C.
LIVERY IN CONNECTION
Miners',-Prospectors'   and Travelers' Home
RATES : $1 to $2.50 per Day
THE GATEWAY TO THE
Tulameen Gold and Platinum Mines.
 6
THE     S l ■ M
Gasoline
Benzine or
Carnations
Which do you prefer ?
Nice to have people sniffing
gasoline or "benzine when you
come near them.
Gasoline and benzine will
clean soiled clothing, gloves,
etc., but it will also explode
and is most inflammable.
NYAE'S KLE-NEM will do
all that Gasoline or Benzine
will do in the way of cleaning
but it will neither burn nor
explode.
It also leaves a dainty odor
of carnations.
^youe who ever used Kle-Netn
will never go back to the old fashioned way.
Kle-Nem is only a quarter a
bottle.
Princeton Drug and Book Store
GEO. Q. LYALL, Manager
$♦«_>*««<:••*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*
»
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***
NOTICE is hereby given that meetings of the
Provincial Labor Commission willbe held at the
following places;—
Penticton—Tuesday, May 6th, lo a.m.
Hedley—Wednesday, May 7th, 2 p.m.
Princeton— Thursday, May 8th, 8 p.m.
•- .Greenwood—Saturday, May 10th, 2p,m.
Phoenix—Tuesday, May 13th, 2 p.m.
Graud Froks—Thursday, May 15th, 8 p.m.
O ._.•_. meetings will be announced "later.
The Commission will haar evidence on all matters affecting labor conditions in the  Province.
All persons interested are invited to be present.
H. G. PARSON,
Chairman.
K. E. McNamasa,
Secretary. m .20
The Right Kind!
of paint or varnish looks best all
the tiipe, and saves most money
in protecting and preserving.
Maple Leaf Paints and Varnishes
are the right kind and give every
cents' .. orth of value paid for them
in covering power, wearing qualities,
protection and preserving of your
property.
Maple Leaf Paints nnd Varnishes
make good because they are made
good.    Ask your dealer for them.      6
WIH^.K^#3RONftt|^ifANCO0E.R:
For Sale by Max Wilson
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and.neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given to  all
Mail  Orders.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Replations.
COAL turning rights ofthe Dominion, in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Yukon
Territory, the North-west Territories and in a
portion ofthe Province of British Columbia, may
be leased for a term of twenty-one years at an
annual rental of $i, an acre. Not more than
2,56o acres will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by the
applitcant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent
ofthe district in which the rights applied for
are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal sub-division of
sections,aud in unsurveyed territory the tract
applied for shall be staked out by the applicant
himself.
Each application must be accompanied by v
tee of $5. which wtll be refuuded if the rights
applied for are not available, but not otherwise.
A royally shall be paid on the merchantabfe
output of the mine at the rate of five per cent per
ton
The person operating the mine shall furnish
the Agent with sworn rerurns accounting for
the full quanity of merchantabl e coal mined
and piy the royalty thereon. If the coal
raining rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least once a
year.
r The lease will include the coal mining rights
onlv, but the lease may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface tights may
be considered necessary for the working of the
mine at the rate of $10.00 an acre.
For full information   application   should   be
made to the Secrstary  of the   Departmeut  of
the Interior,   Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-
Agent of Dominion Lands,
__«fiB__R_j&. W. W. CORY   M
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication of 'this ad-
vertisment will not be paid fo-
FREE
TO FUR SHIPPERS
The most accurate, reliable and only Market Report
and Price List of its kind published.
"Slip. _. trotter! 0ijtpp_er"
Mailed FREE  to those interested In  Baw Furs
SEND US YOUR NAME ON A POSTAL-TODAY
It's not a Trapper's Guide, but a publication issued
every two ■weeks, which gives you reports of what is
doing in all the Markets of tbe World in American
Raw Furs. This information is worth hundreds of
dollars to you.
Write for It—NOW—IT'S FREE
A.  B. SHUBERT
The Largest House in ihe World dealing exclusively in
American Raw Furs
25-27 V.. Michigan St., Dept. 44 CHICAGO, ILL, U.S.A.
EN      STAR
May 2, 1913
PROSPECTORS-MINE OWNERS
NOTICE.
Certificate of Improvements.
Copper King Mineral claim, situate
in tbe Similkameen mining division of
Yale'distiicf Where located: On Kennedy mountain.
Take notice that Charles Bonnevier
for himself and agent for Gustaf Pouwels
F.M.C. No. 53823.3, Free Miner's Certificate No 53824B, intend sixty davs from
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Re
corder for a Certificate of Improvements,
for the purpose of obtaining a Crown
Grant ofthe above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of snch Certificate of
Improve-ments.
Dated this 7th day of March, 1913.
60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Argentine Fraction mineral claim:
situate in the Similkameen mining division of Yale district. Where located ,
Voigt mountain.
Take notice that I, George W. Aldous,
Free Miner's Certificate, No. 60892B, in
tend, sixty days from date hereof, to ap
ply to the Mining Recorder for a certifi
cate of improvements for the purpose of
obtaining a crown grant of the above
claim. And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be com
menced before the issuance of such certi
ficate of improvements.
Dated this 20th day of March, 1913.
' Trade Marks
Designs
.... Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
Quickly ascertain our opinion free whether a_
iuvention is probably patentable. Communications strictly eoiillrtential. HANDBOOK on Patent"
sent free. Oldest aueucy for securing patents.
Paten tp taken through Munn _. Co. recelva
9*HCial noiice. without charge, in the
cientific flmerican,
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest circulation of any scientific journal. Terms, $ 3 t
year; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers.
W3SJNN &Co.36,Broadw^NewYor_f
Branch Office- 625 J. St, Washington. D. C-
Company Wants Mineral Properties
in Princeton District.
The following circular may be found
interesting to those owning prospects
or developed mines and who are in
need of capital to further explore or
develop. The directors of the Canadian Mining and Exploration Co., L'd,
are among the most sound financiers
in the United States and Canada,
mention of their names as follows,
being only necessary to, confirm the
confidence and financial influence at
their command: D. Coulson, E. C.
Converse, P. A. Rockefeller, Sir
William Mackenzie, Sir Edmund
Walker, J. R. DeLamar, D. Lome Mc-
Gibbon, Sir E. B. Osier, C. H. Sabin.
Information may be obtained from J.
D. Andrus. local representative.
The Canadian Mining and Exploration Company, Ltd., has been formed
for the purpose of financing and operating favorable mining enterprises^
connected with any class of mineral
product. Opportunities in Canada
receive first consideration, but the
company is open to investigate propositions submited from other sources.
The company is prepared to provide capital for the extension of plant
or reequipment of producing mines
or to undertake their management;
to finance and work idle properties,
already developed'; or to test prospects from the earliest states of their
development. In view of the natural
limitations to the outside activities
of a single company, it is impossible,
in most instances, to consider propositions presented without satisfactorily definite and reliable data regarding the probable extent and value
of the mineral occurrence, so far as
existing indications permit. It often'
happens that mining companies, in
search of promising prospects, will
pass over good opportunities because
presented to them in terms too indefinite to inspire the confidence necessary to warrant a field inspection.
The prospector or owner is urged
to perform as much exploration as
his means allow, before seeking funds
for equipment. This development
should increase the prospective value
of his ground, and, by enabling him
to express its mining possibilities in
more definite terms, place him in a
stronger position to negotiate for the
provision of working capital.
. For the general guidance of those
who may be prepared to bring propositions to our notice and may be
little acquainted with the requirements of preliminary valuation, there
are given below a few notes on the
data most advisably submitted, in
communicating with our Canadian or
New York offices.
Mining prospects—locality, character of deposit and country rocks.
.Testing results to date. Sketches,
however rough, showing the outcrop
of the vein or deposit provided, and
the position and extent of workings,
are invaluable. It is important to
state clearly the character and average width of the vein, the distance
over which it can be traced, the number of exposures, how far these have
been stripped and how far ap vt.
Samples from the various exposures
should also be taken. These samples
can be very easily cut with a small
prospector's pick and a moil and
should weigh approximately two
pounds per lineal foot of sample
trench, care being taken that the
sample constitutes a'complete section across the vein, including poor
and good streaks alike. The width
of each sample should be carefully
measured and this width, togther with
the location of the sample, should be
shown on the sketch This information, accompanied by the samples or
certificates from a reliable assayer, is
of primary importance in arriving at
a definite conclusion.
History of the prospect, noting by
whom  it has  been previously  examined.
Title.
Terrrfs upon'which owner wishes to
deal.
Accessibility of property.
Nearest mines, active or idle.
Labor, water, waterpower, fuel conditions,  etc.,  unless  abnormal  or for
some   reason,   vitally   important,   require  only  the  briefest  reference j in
preliminary   communications.
Developed mines—In the case of developed mines, possibly having a record of production, the information
available may be very extensive. In
this case, those communicating with
us are requested to submit a general
description and history of the property, indicating therein what plans,
sampling data, records bf production,
expenditure, analyses, etc., could be
forwarded fpr inspection, should we
find the proposition sufficiently promising for further consideration. It is
also desirable to state how far the
mine workings are open for examination and sampling.
Terms—As a general rule, the Canadian Mining and Exploration Company, Limited, seeks, to provide all
the capital required for development
and equipment, and to acquire a majority interest in the control of the
property. The policy is favored of
allowing the owner to retain a considerable share in the concern. This
basis of negotiation is considered tc be
in the best interest of both parties.
It proves that the owner, with .an intimate knowledge of his property, has
faith in its possibilities. Further, we
appreciate the assistance that may be
rendered by the owner, by reason of
his special acquaintance with the past'
records and local conditions, in making the property an industrial success.
SPECIALS.
Anyone requiring tents, awnings and
camping goods leave orders at Max Wilson 's.
For house cleaning look over King &
Gibson's stock of Senours Paints, Varnishes and Calotints.   Prices right.
FOR SALE-—Team of gray mares.'
Weight about iooo lbs. each. Well
broken, gentle, clean limbed. Age 6
and 7 years. Also second hand harness
and double seated democrat in good condition. Will sell cheap. Good seed
pofetoes, iXc per lb. Apply B. R.
Barlow, Box 7, Keremeos, B. C .
FOR SALE—A reading or music lamp,
adjustable. Price, fl.50. Apply Star
office.
FOR SALE.—Tulameen property, Two
lots with 100 feet frontage on -Otter Avenue, almost opposite Britton's new block,
$250 each, cash. Apply Star office; Princeton, B. C.
BREAD—Good homemade bread
supplied at J. Knudson *s, Tapton avenue.
Try it and be convinced.
«* __________P       A
I COALMONT HOTEL f
I COALMONT, B.C.
f* First-class accommodation
for ail guests
I
?:        Mr
.*. Hotel is new and well furnished.
9. Near station 'f_.^
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Excellent cuisine and bar supplied
with the best
n The Coalmont Hotel Co., Ltd. |
WWWVMMWWWWWW^^*^^^^^^'
J. W. KANSKY
Carpenter and Builder,
jobbing and Shop work.
Store Fronts, Doors, Windows,
Furniture repaired and made,
Upholstering Work.
Bridge St. & Halliford Av.
M\JiflJ\fU\JXTJ-L~\rr~T*'(~- -**■»■ ■ -_-_-_-_ ______-_____-_■_--_.
^
_____   2,  1913
"IHE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
&
ih_. J^tF^. /u^/^-
Cheap
Footwear
*\\ is rather an expensive economy, for as a rule, you not only suffer in
comfort, bnt in appearance as well.
% Wearing qualities also are inferior to the better shoe and you seldom
feel that you have had just returns for the original cost.
1[ INVICTUS shoes are not cheap shoes. They are made from selected leathers, by skilled workmen, on foot-form lasts. Their style is
distinctive and their comfort so perfect that your feet are forgotten.
1[ They give the utmost of wear  and
in the satisfaction you receive.
§ A better shoe man never wore.
§ The best good shoe, InvictuS*
are  worth  many times their cost
The A. E. HOWSE Co. Limited,
A MYSTERIOUS CAVE.
Editor Star—Sir: The following is
from the lips of a man w__5 lay dying
near Loomis, Wash^-ten years ago
which he told a fja__ad of mine and I
now repeal/wifcti your permission in
the e ol. _nnpafyour bright, newsy and
valuable paper. He said tnis old man,
whose name I am not at liberty to
publish now, told him that there was
a cave on the Tulameen river several
miles above Princeton which he visited with a party of friends who went
into the caveTXtrt ne.*,-' came ouTT" He
said" 111 Me Were terriDie rumblings and
loud explosions when his friends went
in. He was so scared that he hurried
away with the horses to a place of
safety. Hearing of this another party
of six men went to look for the cave
some years later. They went up on
the right bank of the Tulameen river
and were told to look for the remains
of .n old cabin, near which was the
cave. They left their horses on the
east side of the Tulameen and all
crossed over. His five friends and he
seTched for the cabin and found it
and all his friends went in. He was
too scared to enter. But the five went
in and he heard awful noises. After
waiting a day for his friends he hurried alone across the river and back
to Loomis. His friends never came
back. He wanted to tell it before he
died and after telling it he died the
next day. The man that told me about
this cave is now keeping store in Mol-
_on, Wash.., and I believe he was telling the truth. Geologists tell us .there
were vojj-_noes along thgJPaiameen in
pio P^qdjoite as__-an_r that accounts
for s6 lOTpixfock in the coal or coal
in thV-__-__ My"son always intended
to go and look for this cave but something prevented him. I am not used
to writing for publication.
R. C^RMSTJ. ONG.
Tlereniepj^April 25.
.■wv
...Roiei
8_r
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TULAMEEN, B.C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Center
Mrs. t J. Henderson
PRORIETOR
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HOTEL TULAME
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIETOKS
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOriS, ETC.
Commercial _s* Sample «^jE cofn
GOOD ATTENTiy__r^3ia$f^
Headquarters for Mining Men
KING   &
♦ .
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::
DEALERS IN
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9
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9
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Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
**^r*)^*^Jr*^*^*4^4^p^^*ij^*^j*^^*^**t^**^*^
ESTIMATES FURNISHED TO BUILDERS
OFFICE: Bridge Street, Near Bank Commerce
PRINCETON, B.C.
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SMILES.
A man may pay cash for all else that
he buys,
■^ut !n purchasing fish, why, he
Ought  not  to  be  filled  with   a  deep
surprise
If it's sent to him "C. O. D."
*$k**i**:**:~i**:*****^^^
F. P. COOK
ieneral lerclMf
Princeton, Granite Creek,
Coalmont
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
NOTICE.
NOTICE,
Yale land district, district of Yale.
Take notice that Thomas Henry Browt
nf Rossland, B C occupation, banker,
intends to apply for permission to purchase tbe following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 281, thence south 40
chains, east 40 chains, north 40 chains,
west 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres.
THOMAS HENRY BROWN,
H. C. A. Cornish, agent.
February 12, 1913.
Yale land district, district of Yale
Take notice th.U George Howard Owen
of Rossland, B.C., occupation, banker,
intends to apply for permission to. purchase the tollowing described laids:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 281, thence south 20
chains, west 40 chains, north 20 chiins
more or less to the Tulameen river,
easterly along the Tulameen river to
point of commencement, containing 80
acres more or less
GEORGE HOWARD OWEN.
H. C. A. Cornish, agent.
February 12. 1913
Perhaps the proposition to have the
fovernment coin a halfcent piece lan-
ish'.s because of the opposition of
the merchants who nowadays in mak-
' g change always keep the odcMialf-
cent.
.
Hotel Princeton
P. SWANSON, Prop.
Now completed   on  site of
Great   Northern.    Only
hotel in Sitiiilkameen.
first class house.
the old
br itk
A
F.rst Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cig<
PRINCETON,
B.C.
'Docs your wife want the vote?' 'No
She wants a larger town house, a
villa on the sea coast, and a new lim-
ot)V^° i.'ir every six months. I'd be
pleased most to death if she could fix
her attention on a small matter like
the vote."
'Remember, Arthur, you are the son
of a gentleman. Try to behave like
ore for just one day.' 'All right,
■mother, but it will spoil the whole day
for me.'
Conjurer—Will someone in the audi-
o.v-e l^Tid me five dollars, please?
Voice (_ar back)—At what per cent?
Medium—Shall I call up the spirit
of vour dead wife? 'Half a moment
while I put out my cigar; she never
allowed me to smoke.'
NOTICE.
Yale land district district of Yale.
Take notice that A'frrd-Thomas Collu
of Rossland, B. C occupation, printer
intends to a^ply for permission to pur
cha.e the following described 1 .n.!c :
Commencing at a post planted at lb-
S.E. corner of Lot 281, thence north 6b
chains, east 40 chains, south 60 chains,
west 40 chains to pr.nt of commence
ment, containing 240 acres.
ALFRED THOMAS COLLIS.
H. C. A. Cornish, agent.
February 12, 1913.
'Did your daughters marry rich
mrn?' 'Not exactly. One married a
farmer, and another married an ultimate consumer. But the third may
make np for all that.' 'How so?' She's
°ngaged to a middleman.'
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Anglican services will be held on Sunday at n a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Union service will be conducted in the
.Miri'iotise Sunday  next  at 7:30 p.m. b3"
•Zrv  T. A. Osborne.
Christian Science lesson-sermon sub
ject next Sunday: 'Everlasting Punish
ment.' Be sure your sin will find yon
out     Numbers 32: 23
East Princeton service will be held
in the Methodist church at 3 p: m. by
Rev. T. A. Osborue.
stables
_. HUSTON, Prop'r
Genera] Livery business carried on
Horses for hire, single or double. WVod
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
"MODEL"
mm\ si
PRMCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs—Good   Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
All kinds of Coffins and Caskets on hand
I Vermilion Av. op. Similkmeen Hotel
-__■£------
 I
y.mwmniiiiiiii	
8
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May 2, 1913
'ffffl>
Priiieeloii coal I um Co.
Five Reasons, For You To Invest In Princeton
_£e_£
Because Princeton is the
Center of a Coal? Ore and
Placer Mining District.
*&S
Because There are Splendid
Opportunities for Manufact=
uring Industries.
Because the Surrounding Country is Adapted For Cattle, Horse,
and Sheep Raising. Farm, Garden and Poultry Products Find a
Ready Market at High Prices, at Princeton. Climate and Water are
Excellent. School and Church Facilities are the Best in the Similka=
meen Valley.
SgjJ£
Unlimited Water Power,
Rivers and Creeks Afford
Millions ot Horse Power,
Now Running Waste.
Two Railroads Building to
Coast. Great Transprovincial
Trunk road-Rivers and Roads
converge here.
Write or Consult, Em Waterman, Resident Mgr*
PRINCETON   COAL & LAND CO.
j*-&mL
5_a
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<jr2*T' '
m

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