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Similkameen Star 1909-06-30

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 1
Sixty feet of Coal under Princeton—'Coalopolis.'
Toil is the price of Success ; Adversity is the trial of Principle.
Princeton and district present varied opportunities for investment, and that man would, indeed, be hard to please who turned back from
here without finding anything to suit him—Mineral resources practically unlimited—Grazing, farm, garden and orchard valley lands.
Vol. X. No. 27.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 1909.
$2 a Year in Advance
GREAT STRIKE OF ORE
Large Body of Bornite Shown
at Friday Creek, is
High Grade,
Tonnage in Sight Should Spur Bail-
way Construction Throughout
Princeton District.
What is probably the greatest strike of
copper ore yet made in theSimilkameen,
after 18 years of prospecting and development work included with annual assessments, was recently made on the
Columbia Copper Mining Co's property
at Friday Creek. It was long ago known
that a rich quality of bornite, more or
less bunchy, could be obtained, but it
was the main lead which drew the prospectors on and caused eager search for it
every year.
E. P. Wheeler, president and manager
of the Columbia Copper Mining Co., has
been at Friday cieek for the past two or
three weeks directing the tunnel work.
By his efforts and unswerving confidence
s in the existence of a rich lead the strike
is largely due aud he now has the satisfaction of realizing all that his best hopes
could possibly foreshadow.
- The lead has been pierced a width of
34 feet on one side of Friday creek, which
cleaves the formation. On the opposite
side of the creek a tunnel has been driven
71 feet. It is designed to crosscut a 250-
foot dyke containing what is believed to
be the same rich grade of bornite ns now
uncovered.
Bornite, commonly called 'peacock
copper' is 55.58, but varies considerably
in pureuess. The Friday creek ore assays
15 per cent, copper, containing, also, gold
and iron values. It lies between granitic
walls and occurs in the cyanite and
schist. Forty tons of the ore are now on
the dump and Mr. Wheeler estimates
10,000 tons in- sight or blocked out. He
could begin continuous shipping tomorrow were transportation given by the
V.,V. & E.
Friday creek mining properties are all
luckily situated for cheap operation, there
being unlimited water power in that
vicinity. The railway has been surveyed
across some of the claims. Distance
from Princeton 15 -miles, from Ashnola,
6. Copper and Kennedy mountains are
nearer Ashnola and, as everybody .knows
are capable of vast ore tonnage.
Mr. Wheeler discovered this property
in 1886 and has since done a lot of work
in proving its extent and value. He is
delighted with the result, and some 700
lbs. of the ore which he brought down
affords ample proof and reason for good-
spirit and gratification. He will visit the
A.Y.P. at Seattle and will have samples
of the ore on exhibition there and later j
at the Spokane fair.
The urgency of quickened railway construction through the Similkameen to the
coast is daily receiving impetus from
various sources. Coal, ore, placer and
dredger mining are at a standstill for
want of railway communication. Wit
all our vast mineral resources there i§
a pound of ore or coal being shipp^rl
thus delaying the permanent wealth
of the country. The Star respectfully
reminds both tbe governments at Ottawa
and Victo ia that the Similkameen looks
to them for adequate railway accommodation to its several mining camps anrl
for speedy construction to the coast.
Our mineral riches, with their concomitants of smelters and coke ovens, are of
little use without the connection of,a
through line of railway.
THE CELEBRATION.
Everything Points to Due Observance
of the Day—Invitation to the
Earliest Inhabitants.
With tbe promise of fine weather for
tomorrow there is every prospect of a
good celebration and a genuine holiday
tor all. The various committees report
encouraging progress. The races, trap
shooting contest, Caledouian sports, baseball and the grand ball possess such attractiveness as to warrant a tig crowd in
any town. The present neat and clean
appearance of the town, its beautiful
setting by nature, the profusion of wild
flowers, fresh painted buildings, all these
are noted by the visitor and impress him
favorably. Decorations of evergreens,
flags and bunting will enhance the picturesque general view and everyone is
privileged to assist. The usual contingent of natives may be expected. In the
absence of any specific invitation to them
the sportive editor addresses them in his
choicest Chinook, as follows, which will
tend, no doubt, to make their attendance
more binding:
O, kanawa tillicums, chacko kopa
Princeton, July 1st, pee nanitch delate
skookum cutens coolie, spose mika iskem
skookum he he cuten hyas kloosh, mika
lulu kopa Princeton, B.C. Hyas kloosh
mika icht snow capit Hudson Bay cayuse,
Princeton, Jitnhillkameen. Pea mika
klatawa conamoxed, O, Tim Hill slow,
kopa yaka hyas skookum cuten. Princeton yaka delate ticka mika alta. Railroad bumbye. "Skookum sun, typsum
yaka skookum alta, hiyu fish kopa chuck,
hiyu mowitch kopa mountain. No use
a-talkin, Jim Hill do jes' as he likes.
Konawa ichta skookum kopa Princeton,
hyas kloosh chaco kopa Dominion day.
Hoop la! hoop la !
Board of Trade meeting Monday night.
There should be some new business and
a good attendance.
Gospel preaching next Sunday at 11
a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
ROBBERS' HOT TRAIL
gin on the Tra
Results in KijMng
Both Sid/
Every Precaution  taken
Escape—Outposts on Guard
All Around.
With all the machinery for the capture
of bad men working at high pressure it
would not be surprising to learn at any
moment that the Ducks train robbers had
been taken dead or alive. A reward of
$7 500 has been hung up for the apprehension of the gang Bloodhounds
have been on the trail of the robbers for
some days aud it is only a question of
hours to wear down the fugitives.
Later—Word was received yesterday
afternoon from Kamloops that a hot trail
of the flying robbers had been struck
near Ashcroft resulting in a conflict in
which two men were killed, a special
constable and a robber. Another robber
has been taken alive but the others are
still at large.
Apparently the.gang is broken up and
it is now 'every man for himself.' A
posse of special sharoshooters left Prince
ton yesterday to guard every mountain
pass and trail leading to the boundary.
The desperadoes are dangerous and will
probably die with their 'boots on' rather
than submit to capture.
ing, hardening and solidifying, thus
withstanding the heaviest load. .With
the completion of the proposed sidewalk
to tbe government buildiug and at least
jne sidewalk from bridge to bridge,
rinceton will be modern arid western
n appearance.
J. O. Coulthard came up from Blaine,
Wash., last Wednesday on a short visit.
His family are summering at the salubrious seaside and visiting relatives. He
speaks in terms of high praise of the
A.Y.P. He disposed of his nugget collection of platinum at very satisfactory
prices. Mr. Coulthard received many
inquiries about Princeton and never
failed to impress on his hearers its great
advantages.
GREATER PUBLICITY
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
The contract for building the fences,
gates and cattle guards along the V.,V.
& E. from Keremeos to Princeton has
been let to J. M. Young, of the former
place.
Miss Summers, sister of 'Kit' and Will
is visiting her mother and brothers.
The meeting called by the school trustees Saturday night to hear rumored
complaints regarding Principal Cochrane,
must have had a soothing effect upon
him, if he ever was disturbed by the
aforesaid rumors. Outside of the teacher
and trustees, three citizens turned np out
of pure curiosity. Not a whisper of a
complaint was heard and the teacher now
stands even higher than ever before the
jury of public opinion. He will remain
another year in Princeton.
Mrs. Baird is visiting her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Hagerman, One-Mile.
Semerad & Co. have taken the dining
room of the Hotel Princeton.
Bridge street will stand favorable comparison with any thoroughfare in the interior for finish and perspective. The
material used, a burnt clay deposit, has
proved thus far an admirable top dress-
Two Gentlemen Come  and See  the
Town and District and Urge
Advertising Scheme.
G. S. Lawrence, of the British Columbia Fruit Land Co., Keremeos, and J. D„
Duthie, representing the London, Eng.,
Daily Telegraph and the Norwest Farmer,
of Winnipeg were visitors to ' Princeton last week. Both gentlemen had
heard of this part of the valley and to
verify reports of it came to see for themselves. They were shown the coal mine
in active operation and samples of ore
from the outlying camps. Limited time
alone prevented them from visiting the
farming sections. Mr. Lawrence is carrying on an energetic advertising campaign for the purpose of inducing easterners to locate on the fruit lands of his
company at Keremeos. He presents a
scheme of systematic advertising to embrace the whole Similkameen, each section of which would have its special features and resources written up by local
authors, the whole to be embodied in ones
pamphlet and given world wide circulation. The matter will be brought to the
attention of the various boards of trade
for their approval. The necessity for a
first class descriptive work with copious
illustrations has been long standing;
now is the time to supply the deficiency
on a scale commensurate with our resources and make a bid for the capital
that seems to be passing by.
C.P.R. WILL BUILD, TOO.
The Nicola Herald says there will be
something doing in railroad construction
shortly. The C.P.R. has deposited in
the land registry office, Kamloops, all the
profiles, etc., showing the first section, 30
miles, of the proposed extension of the
Nicola, Kamloops & Similkameen railway from Merritt to Similkameen. The
road will be built along the Coldwater
and the first step in construction will be
taken about the first of July. All this is
good news, one effect of which will be
the stimulus to construction on the V.,
V. &E.
 w
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
June 30, 1909.
The Similkameen Star.
J.  M. Wright,
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
One Year,
$3.00
Payable ill Advance.
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reporting any change in address or
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month
advertising.
No transient advertisement inserted unless
accompanied with the cash.
DOMINION DAY.
From the Atlantic to the Pacific
united Canada will celebrate tomorrow the 42nd birthday of the
Dominion, the day upon which the
scattered provinces joined hands in
the great task of nation building.
The first settlement in Canada was
made by the French under Cham-
plain just 300 3'ears ago. It remained a French colony until the
British captured it in 1759, since
then it bas passed through the varV
ous evolutions of a struggling dependency until now, it puts on some
frills and talks of Btnpire on which
the sun never sets, of Imperial unity
and defence. If Britain cares to
• take her sons beyond the seas into
full partnership the style of the
firm would be John Bull & Sons,
Unlimited, but if she will keep the
boys tethered to mothers apron
strings, not giving them a 'say' in
a parliament of Empire, the sign
will continue to read J. Bull, Limited. Dominion Day recalls the progress made since confederation, at
which time very little was known
of the regions beyond, of the great
lone land, now producing over one
hundred millions of bushels of grain.
•Canada is 3500 miles long by 1400
■broad. British Columbia is the
largest province in the Dominion,
400 by 700 miles, and is larger than
the British Isles, Switzerland and
Italy combined. Its foreign trade
is the largest in the world per head
of population, $48,121,639. It has
101 banks, 150 lumber and shingle
mills ; it has 182 millions acres of
timber aud produces $23^ millions
worth of minerals yearly. From
3638 postoffices in .1870 the total
number has increased to 11,823 in
the Dominion. Canada has more
railway mileage than Australia and
New Zealand, or Italy and Spain
combined. It will be observed that
Canadians have a just pride in their
heritage. Within this century we
will surely be in the vicinity of
one hundred millions strong and the
dominating power of the continent.
CANADA IN 1950.
The following article from the
Edinburgh (Scotland) News will,
no doubt, be read with much appreciation by all interested in the progress of this vast Dominion. There
are various estimates as to the increase of population, but our best
guide will be found in comparison
with the United States. The News
says : fjg:..
"What is Canada's future ? The
Toronto Globe, perhaps the ablest
of the colonial newspapers, and certainly the most influential newspaper in Canada, boldly prophesies
that in forty 'years from now Canada will have a population of thirty
millions and an annual revenue of
^100,000,000. This is to say, by
1950 Canada will have attained a
rank among the Great Powers.
However extravagant it may seem
a similar belief is held by all good
Canadians as an article of faith.
And this faith is not mere exuberance and blind optimism. At one
time it was thought—and may still
be thought by old fashioned people
—that habitable Canada consisted
of a relatively narrow belt of terri-
towi^long the United Star^Lfooun-
dalfc li^e, and that ever/^jhLthe
rigofle of\ Canadian winter maV-my
justified tae term 'habitable.' Btr^
weSt«ow^hat the Canadian winter
isTWwWe only in comparison with
our own, and is no worse than a
winter in New York or even Berlin. As for 'habitable' Canada, no
one can now point with certainty
to the degree of- latitude which
limits the wheat producing area,
and every year sees another northward advance of the wheat fields.
In 1900 Canada's population was
roughly equal to that of the United
States at the beginning of the 19th
century—about five and a half millions. From 1800 to 1850 the
population of the United States increased fivefold in spite of the tact
that the distributing machinery of
the railways, nowadays the great
avenues of settlement, was then
lacking and expansion westwards
was correspondingly cramped. .
" Why should not Canada, with
her advantages, make equal progress? The tide of European emigration is being diverted, slowly
but still surely, to the Canadian
ports. Within the North American continent itself the migratory
movement has changed its direction
from west to north, and the farmers
of the Western States are sending
their sons over the borders into
Canada's untenanted spaces, all of
them pioneers by heredity, and,
what is more, with an adequate
supply of capital. This year alone,
it is estimated some 100,000 young
American farmers will enter the
Dominion. From Europe there
will come a much larger increment,
in some ways not so desirable an
element^ perhaps, bnt nevertheless
one which will, in the main, be
readily absorbed. The marshalling
and distribution of this annual host
has been made a science ; as one
tract is filled up others are opened
with new railways ; new centres of
population arise, and year by year
the romantic story of Winnipeg and
Calgary, cities springing into life
and bustle on the prajrie or amid
forest clearings, is told anew."
C L. CUMMINGS
Horseshoeing
a Specialty
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
Carriage Building, Repairing
and Painting
AH Work Neatly and Promptly
Done
PRINCETON BMERV
and CONFECTIONERY
FRESH BREAD DAILY—ALL KINDS
OF PASTRY, PIES, &C.
ICE CREAM MADE EVERY DAY
ICE CREAM SODA and SOFT DRINKS
'Orders for Ice  Cream taken fiom
tucketf:
One Pint up.
RESTAURANT
C. V. Semerad & Co.
fireil noi
MAN LEY & SWANSON, Props.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
j§ Insurance
INSURE NOW : You Don't
Know what to=morrow
may bjsno; forth.
FOR SALE
FARM LANDS
FRUIT LANDS
STOCK RANCHES
CHICKEN RANCHES
Business & Residential Lots
IN PRINCETON
AVERY & AVERY
Real Estate, Insurance, Notary Public
NOTICE.
Yale Land District, District of Yale. Take
notice that I, George Batstone. of Otter Valley,
B.C., occupation rancher, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands :
Commencing at .a post planted i, runnings.
40 chains, W. So chains, N. 40 chains, £$. 60 chains
to point of commencemert
GEORGE BATSTONE.
Dated 14th May, 1909.
Largest Sale in Canada
You I
need to eat meat if you want to
enjoy life.    We have the best.
FISH-SALHON,
HALIBUT
Fresh from the Sea.
SUMMERS & WARDLE
BUTCHERS
NOTICE.
Certificate cf Improvements.
Brooklyn. Lela and Kev West mineral claims,
situate in the Similkameen mininpr division
of Yafe district. "Where located : Kennedy
Mountain.
Take notice that I, Eogar R. Burr, free miner's
certificate No. B79354, octing for self and others,
\. K. Howse fmc B19474; F. S. jdurr, f.m c.
Bc^^S; A. D. Cowles, f m.c. JJ10710; H. L. Jones,
fih.c. U10776 artd T. C. Revely, .fmc. 679384,
intend 60 days from the date hereof, to apply to
the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements for tht* purpose of obtaining a Crown
Grant of the above claims
And farther take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance '
of such Ceitificate of-Improvements.
Dated this 9th day of March, A D. 1909/
Motel.I
mitt f
TULAMEEN, B.C.
•  <3»
PRORIETOR
FIRE ALARMS, &c.
Four sharp taps' on the bell, with slight
pause between each four, will indicate
that the fire is in Ward I. Two sharp
taps, with pause between each two, will
locate the fire in Ward 2.
Continuous moderate ringing of the
bell will be used for meetings of any
kind, for public demonstrations or for
giving the correct time daily. Tolling
for the dead will be one stroke of the
bell with measured intervals of ten seconds, ad.
Subscribe for Star . $2.
i
^N
June 30, 1909.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
LAWN TENNIS.
Lawn tennis has taken a firm hold in
Princeton and is now the leading outdoor
recreation, proof of which may be found
in the animated scene at the court on
Saturday afternoons. Following is the
score last Saturday :
1st Game—Mrs. Waterman and W. C.
Brown beat Miss Edna Lyall and A. J.
Marlow.    Score 6-5.
2nd—Mrs. Marlow and W. C. Brown
beat Mrs. Waterman and A. J. Marlow.
Score 6-3.
3rd—Mrs. Marlow and E. Waterman
beat Mrs. Waterman and A, J. Marlow.
Score 6-1.
4th—Mrs Marlow and E. Waterman
beat Mrs. Waterman and A. J. Marlow.
Score 6-3. ,i*^
5th—Miss Edna Lyall and A. J. Marlow beat Mrs. Marlow and W. C. Brown,
Score 6-4. 1 ij-j&jr ■
TOWN AND DISTRICT. ■■
Mrs. C. E. Spence, of Portlafiid, Ore.,
is visiting her parents, Mi. aud Mrs. La-
valley. • •■'.<?•''" ■   :
For good ice cream try the Pri«cet6n
Bakery; s'"-y-' ■>■■*'»       *
Chas. - GamSell, Dominion geologist,
arrived in town yesterday on his way io
the Tulameen platinum field, where'he
will spend the summer studying the
conditions there. He will be assisted by
Mr. Reinercke. ,
For bread, cakes*...cookies ..and pastry
go to the Princeton Bakery. *
Uhler & Cox left for the coast last Friday going but via Hope trail. They expect to interest some mining people in
fhis section and will endeavor to bring
back an expert with them.
E. P. Wheeler left for Conconully,
Wash., on Monday's stage.
W. Garrison and Bert Thomas have the
contract for supplying the telephone
poles required for the exchange.    (.vtjifisv
For a' square meal and the ..best cup
of coffee i,ri. the valley try the Princeton Hotel.:;:;■"   ' .'-..':'.-..    -;s"-';    *
Dr. Lavalley, son of our esteemed
townsman, T. Lavalley, has sent from
Portland, Ore., a number of tracts dealing with chiropractic. Dr. Lavalley is,
evidently, a believer in knifeless surgery,'
the practice of which TsJiiqw adopted .$5?
some eminent surgeons.
Now the days begin,,fc> shorten.
The Sunday School' picnic last Fri lay
was a grand success, the general public
responding heartily to the invitation.
Try our cooking and you call again.
Princeton Hotel. *
At the Masonic' Grand Lodge held in
Vancouver last week H. N. Rich, of Ladner,  was elected  Grand Master; Secie-
tary, R. E. Brett, Victoria ; District Deputy Grand for Similkameen and Okanagan, Dr. Boyce, Kelowna.
Sam Spencer has been appointed Deputy Fire Warden by the provincial government.
S^FTDRINKS
Ginger Beer,  Iron  Brew,
Lemon Soda,
Cream  Soda, Ginger Ale.
GET QUOTATIONS AT THE
Princeton Brewery.
PRINCETON BAKERY
and CONFECTIoIIrY
FRESH BREAD DAILY—ALL KINDS
OF PASTRY, PIES, &'C...
ICE CREAM MADE EVERY DAY
ICE CREAM SODA and SOFT DRINKS
Orders for Ice   Creamjtaken from
One Pint up.
RESTAURANT
C. V. Semerad & Co.
INSURE NOW : You Don't
Know what to=morrow
may bring forth..
FOR SALE
FARM LAN©
FRUIT LANDS
STOCK RANCHES
CHICKEN RANCHES
Business & Residential Lots
IN PRINCETON
AVERY & AVERY
Real Estate, Insurance, Notary Public
Subscribe for Star . $2.
•   p
Selling oil
A large quantity of Prints, Dress
Goods, Ladies Summer Waists, Mens
Shirts and Underwear at
RemarkaMy low prices for cash
J0JTIT WILL PAY YOU TO GIVE US A CALL^^f
.   TH0MS BROS., Princeton, B.c.   ,
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
DEAD   OFFICE? TORONTO
ESTABLISUED  1867
B. E. WALKER, President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Reserve Fund, -   6,000,000
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
COUNTRY BUSINESS EveryfacilitTaffordedtofarmers and
others for the transaction of their
banking business.    Sales notes willbe cashed or taken for collection.
BANKING   BY   HflAIL    Accou.nts may be opened  by mail   and
monies deposited or withdrawn in this
way with equal facility. • 122
A. J. MARLOW,  Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH     .
&sswsilkameen Lnmher Co«, ud* |
J. F. Waddell, Mgr^
ROUGH AND DRESSED LUMBER
All kinds  of mouldings made.       Orders promptly
attended-' to.       For   further   particulars   apply   to
IELL, Princetonm
Interest Charged on Accounts 30 Days Overdue, ,'x>y.-.
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A FULL LINE OF
5 Lowney's
CHOCOLATES
The City Drug Store
has  a  varied stock to
select from.
Call Early and See the Goods
Perfumes
Fancy Articles
-New Store
New Goods
City Drug Store,    Bridge St.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is liereby given that thifty days after
date I intend to apply to the Supt. Provincial Police, Victoria, for a retail liquor license
for Tulameen Hotel, Tulameen, B.C.
DONALD McRAE.
; Tulameen, B. C, June 15th, 1909.
General  Livery business   carried on..
Horses for. hire, single or double.    Wood
or   coal   delivered   on   shortest   notice.
Draying in all its branches.  Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
NOTICE.
tt
MODEL
fM
LIVERY STAPLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
Variety   of  Rigs—Good   Roadsters-
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
Proprietors
Yale Land District, District of Yale. Take
notice that I, Martin Bresnik, of Otter Valley,
occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described laud :
Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
Come jof lot iooq, thence south 20 chairs, east 20
hcains, north 20 chains, west 20 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 40 acres more
orjless. MARTIN BRESNIK.
23rdMarch, 1009.
F. PYMAN
Watchmaker,
Jeweler and
Optician.
All kinds of timepieces
for sale.   Repairing neatly done.
— A TRIAL IS INVITED. —
Star Building. Bridge Street.
PRINCETON   LODOB
I.O.O.F. No. 5a.
Regular meetings, 8 p
m.i Thursdays.
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situated in
Thomas Block.   •' Oddfellows Hall:g.SS
j. L. Huston, h. Cowan-,
6 Noble Grand. Secretary
 !—n
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
June 30, 1909.
SMILES.
St. Peter—What makes you so busy ?
Angel—I am making record of the number of sighs'that will be made before Jim
Hill completes the V..V. & E. to the
coast.
A woman in Kootenay has sued an editor because, in writing the obituary of
her husband, he stated 'he had gone to a
happier home.'
*I admires a man,' said Uncle Eben,
'dat keeps hopin' foh de best. But I
doesn't like to see him sit down and call
it a day's work.
Jim—There goes the widow Naggs.
They say she drove her husband to an
untimely grave. Charlie—Well, that
isn't so bad. She might have made him
walk there.
F. W. GROVES
Civil and flining Engineer
B.C. Land Surveyor
Examinations   and   Reports.
12 percent interest charged on all accounts 30 days overdue.   .
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that thirty days from
date I intend to apply to the chief commissioner
of lands for a license to prospect for coal on the
following described land, viz : Commencing at
a post planted at the S. E. corner of Lot 969,
Kamloops division of Yale district, thence extending north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south 80
chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement. W. S. WILSON,
Princeton; May 10, 1909. Applicant.
Subscribe for Star . $2.
Our King, One People, One Empire.
§ GRAND  CELEBRATION
MNMINKNNDAY,1909
Canada's National Holiday
Princeton, B.C., July 1st
(THURSDAY)
The 42nd Anniversary of Confederation will be duly
Observed in Princeton by all loyal and well
disposed persons with sports, &c.
PROGRAM:
HORSE RACES-
600 yards, best 2 in 3 heats,  freeforall, entrance fee 10 per
cent, of 1st money.    Winner barred. - 1st, $85, 2nd, $25
Cowboy Race, 50 yards, three turns. - - $20 and $10
% Mile Pony, 14.2 and under, 2 in 3, entrance 10 p.c. first
money. ..-'-- $40 and $15
Saddle Horse, 600 yards,   owner up,  winner  of previous
races barred, entrance 10 p.c. of first money. -     $25 and $10
5^ Mile dash, freeforall, entrance 10 p.c. of 1st money. $40 and $20
Consolation race, for horses that have not won a race.       I $25 and $10
^ Mile Klootchman's race, no entrance fee. - $5 and $2.50
3 HORSES TO ENTER OR NO RACE.
BASEBALL: PRIZE, $100.00—
Match to be played between Princeton, Keremeos, Hedley, or other
teams. At least two teams to compete. Game begins at 10 a m.,
1st July.    Grand stand seating.
TRAP SHOOTING: SHATFORD CUP-
This trophy, presented by the hon. member for Similkameen, to be competed for at annual celebrations of Keremeos, Hedley and Princeton.
GRAND BALL-
Grand March at 8:30, good music, good refreshments, good floor.
Caledonian Games and Children's Sports
EVERYBODY WELCOME TO THE FEAST OFjSPORT AND FUN
TIELICUMS COME AND SEE THE 'ELEPHANT'
By Order of Publicity Commmittee.
C. E. THOMAS,
Chairman Citizen's Mettings.
GOD SAVE THE K^fG.
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CALEDONIAN
WHISKEY
CLEAR ROCK
MINERAL WATER
make a
Perfect Blend
- So1*! bv all Dealers.
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific   Exposition
The Princeton Board of Trade invites
all Mine Owners and Prospectors to co
operate with it in sending Mineral samples to the above Exhibition.
The Secretary of the Board will be
pleased to receive such specimens not
later than the first Monday in May.
The size of Ore samples should be one
cubic foot.
E. WATERMAN,
Chairman of Committee.
NOTICE.
Yale Land District, District of Yale. Take
notice that I, Martin Bresnik, of Otter Valley
occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following descritSgd land :
' Commencing at a post planted at the S. W
Come aof lot iooq, thence south 20 chairs, east 20
hcains, north 20 chains, west 2o chains to point
of commencement, and containing 40 acres more
orpess. MARTIN CkESNIK
23rd March, 1909.
Ginger Beer,  Iron Brew,
Lemon Soda,
Cream Soda, Ginger Ale.
GET QUOTATIONS AT THE
Princeton Brewery.
60   YEARS*
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
Anyone Reading a sketch and description ma;
Quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
Invention is probably paten table. Communications strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on PatenU
■ent free. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive
tpecial notice, without charge, in the
Scientific Mmrica.
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest circulation of any scientific journal." Terms for
Canada, $3.75 a year, postage prepaid. Sold by
all newsdealers.
,.&Co3e«ro.dwa,,fjeWYork
Branch Office, 625 F BU Washington. D. C.
COPPER
HANDBOOK
(New Edition issued March, 1908.).
SIZE:   Octavo.
PAGES:    1228.
CHAPTERS:   25.
SCOPE :   The copper industry of the
world.
COVERING: Copper history, geology, geography, chemistry, mineralogy,
mining, milling, leaching, smelting, refining, brands, grades, impurities, alloys,
uses, substitutes, terminology, deposits by
districts, states, countries and continents^
mines in detail, statistics of production,
consumption, imports, exports, finances,
dividends, etc.
The Copper Handbook   is   concededly
the
World's Standard Reference
Book on Copper.
The miner needs the book for the facts
it gives him regarding geology, mining,
copper deposits and copper mines
The metallurgist needs the book fot
the facts it gives him regarding copper
milling, leaching, smelting and refining.
The copper consumer needs the book
for every chapter it contains. It tells
what, and explains how and why.
The investor in copper shares cannot
afford to be without it. The Copper
Handbook gives statistics and general information on one hand, with thousands
of detailed mine descriptions on the
other, covering the copper mines of the
entire world, and the 40 pages of condensed statistical tables alone are worth
more than the price of the book to each
and every owner of copper miuing shares.
PRICE : $5 in buokram with gilt top,
or $7.50 in full'library morocco.
TERMS: The most liberal. Send no
money, but order the book sent you, all
carriage charges prepaid, on one week's
approval, to be returned if unsatisfactory,
or paid for if it suits. Can you afford
not to see the book and judge for yourself of its value to you ?
WRITE NOW to the editor and publisher,
HORACE J. STEVENS,
550 SHELDEN   BLDG.,  HOUGHTON
MICH., TJ. S. A.
Junk 30, 1909.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
ODDS AND ENDS.
V.D.Curry*, a practical farmer of Kam
loops, is touring the province, lecturing
on irrigation under Government auspices.
Speaking at Grand Forks recently, he
gave some interesting pointers on irrigation and dry farming. So long as the
soil a few inches below the surface is
damp enough to hold together when
squeezed, he said, it has enough water,
whether irrigated or not. The usual
trouble with irrigation is too much water
and too little cultivation. Potatoes
should only be watered twice, once before they Bower and once when in flow
er. The flooding svstem is one of the
best on lands that will not bake, as it
distributes the water evenly over the
land, while ditches, in open soils, give
too much water to the ground near them
•and not enough to the rest.
Prospective railroad construction in
central Washington is attracting a great
(leal of attention once more: The Great
Northern has filed a certificate for the
building of a line from Wenatchee along
the Columbia river and then np the
Okanagan river to Oroville. The Great
Northern is at work on a $35,000 depot
|:.3h Wenatchee and is enlarging itstermi-
nals there. A branch will be built into
the Methow valley, wliich is being sur
veyecl.
* The 1t PW8E CO., limited
THE BIG STORE
to
to
to
&_     To the Farmers in the Similkameen Valley :
M HAVE YOU GOT A
i
to
to.
to
to
to.
erne,
cue Grinder
We can supply you with
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to.
to
to
to.
to
to
LsMsapes
droops
ff ]$ Portraits, fie
Photos of Families taken at their
Homes—Views of Princeton
and Surrounding Camus.
AMATEUR WORE FINISHED
Address   'P;'PRINCETON. hC.
PRINCETON DIRECTORY.
■I-:?
1;
a
A
.-'Information Designed for the Benefit
;  of Readers Abroad.
Coroner aud Health Officer— Dr.Lazier.
I.O.O.F.   Hall,  suitable  for all public
functions,  shows,   &c,  seating capacity
400,  large   proscenium,   piano, gasoline.
Terms, apply to Hugh Cowan, Princeton.
Passenger Agent  Atlantic    Steamship
,£&ines—American,  Leylarid,   White Star,
.•■"Dominion, Red Star, Atlantic Transport.
.  'fT?    : ;H. H. Avery.
Member  of Parliament—Martin   Burrell, Grand Forks, P.O.
Member Provincial Assembly—L. W.
Shatford, Penticton, P.O.
I Board of Trade—W, C. McDougall,
President; A. J. Marlow, Secretary.
. Justices of the Peace—E. Waterman,
C. E. Thomas, Thos. Murphy, Granite
Creek.
. Mining Recorder, Assessor and Collector, Clerk County Court, Issuer of Marriage Licenses—H. Hunter.
" Constable, Deputv Game Warden, San-
itary Inspector, Inspector of Orchards,
A~,j>^gp£onald Hewat,
V-> ^Postmaster, Telephone' Agent,  Inland
Revenue Inspector—A, Bell. '•%<
Public School—Donald Cochrane,B.A.
Teacher ; Trustees : J.  O. Coulthaid, W.
f^f    C. McDougall, C E. Thomas.
Notaries Publie—C. E. Thomas, A. E.
Thomas, H. H. Avery, A. Bell. . /:-
I Fence viewers—L.  Gibson, C. Schisler,-
T. Murphy.
, Presbyterian  Church—Rev.   T« Thurburn-Conn.
/^Hedley -Princeton stage connecting
with the V.,Y. & E. at Keremeos—Stage
arrives at 12, noon, departs at 2 p.m.,
daily, except Sunday, F. Revely, Prop.
Princeton-Nicola stage, arrives each
Wednesday about noon, departs Thursday mornirig.   M. P. Stewart, Prop.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
Just Arrived: The Finest Assortment of
Crockery and |j§§
II Earthenware
Dinner, Tea arid Toilet Sets, Etc
couches, jed Lenges
I Dresser sums S Chairs
TO SUIT ALL TASTES
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to.
to
to
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Sjwjww^^
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
June 30, 1909.
■waaassrasassasafl^^
aM^fcSaSg^ffSS^iy^^
♦      ♦
I The Town of ♦ ♦ ♦
:;•-
British   Columbia
^
•■v
!i
At the ccnfluence of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers
SIMILKAMEEN DISTRICT
Send for Maps
,*2g* iSfr t«p.
and Pr'c  List to
ERNElT
WATERMAN
Resident    Manager
VERMILION    FORKS   MINING   AND     DEVELOPMENT    CO'Y
1
1
¥
I
\vcac^s^gg-isas&,:'j:^*:^'43^aa«^^
HFTr^'—°=SE?saESS
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