BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Similkameen Star 1911-09-13

Item Metadata

Download

Media
similkameen-1.0386211.pdf
Metadata
JSON: similkameen-1.0386211.json
JSON-LD: similkameen-1.0386211-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): similkameen-1.0386211-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: similkameen-1.0386211-rdf.json
Turtle: similkameen-1.0386211-turtle.txt
N-Triples: similkameen-1.0386211-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: similkameen-1.0386211-source.json
Full Text
similkameen-1.0386211-fulltext.txt
Citation
similkameen-1.0386211.ris

Full Text

 _X
	
	
1
6-^r* <&JL>t>**-e^»
? .!_£
Coal & coke need tne wider market—Reciprocity helps
Measures, not men; country, not party; the people, not a class.
The measure of a country's wealth is in its raw resources, without these it is 1 no man's land '—Princeton and district are not excelled
in variety or abundance  of minerals—A smelter Is   an Immediate necessity—Large gold and platinum dredging propositon in progress.
Vol. XII. No. 38.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER W/A9W*
$2 a Year^in Advance
BIG COAL MEASURES
An Interesting Report on Coal
Lands  Owned by the
Princeton Collieries.
Three Mining Engineers Examine the
Property and Favorably
Report Thereon.
1
.'Sr-
/v
Following is a summaryo£jxport made
bv A. Faulds, ]^Ei^r_nib_r of Institute
of Mining Etfgtneers, for the Princeton
Collieries, Limited, owning some 18,000
acres of coal lands adjoining Princeton
townsite and the coal lands of the Princeton Coal & Land Co. The report may be
considered as representative of the~whole
Princeton coal basin, which is owned by
several companies in various stages of de
velopment and operation.
The Princeton Collieries, Limited, is
composed of well-known financiers in
Spokane, Vancouver and Montreal, large
interests in it being held by certain officials of a large transcontinental line of
/railway. The land is suitable tor agricul-
tural purposes and is well timbered. The
Great Northern now has track .laid
through the property of the company on
which the prospective town of West
Princeton will be built. Nature has
abundantly supplied every want for economic mining, and the Star is informed
that the early production of coal is intended by this company. The Princetcn
Collieries, Limited, has for its president
A. Laidlaw, of Spokane, who has other
large investments in this district.
Historical and Introductory.
Introductory to Mr. Faulds' report, he
says :
"Being requested to furnish you with
a report on the coal lands near Princeton,
taken up by the Princeton Collieries,
Limited, and which embraced originally an area of 12,294ac.es to which
have been added since 5^.900 acres,
making a total aggregate area of
18,194 acres or thereby; and having
traversed and carefully examined the
topography and stratigraphy of those
lands south of Princeton, with which the
reporter has become familiar, enabling
him to submit to you the follow(
" The first geological work in ..
trict was from 1859 to 1861 by Mr. BaHe
man. In 1887 Dr. G. M. Dawson spent
the season in geological exploration, aud
again in 1888. In 1901 boring for coal began. Six bore holes have been put dowu
by the Vermilion Forks Mining and De
velopment Company, two bv the Similka-
meen Valley Coal Co., by William Blake-
more, M.E., and one by Alexander Sharp.
Mining T.vpy_t'for'V   _ n r tl a _> gpitipa_y
The same year Provincial Mineralogist
W F. Robertson, examined and reported
on the Princeton district, making no re-
e dis-
r-
ference to the general geology, and the
International Boundary Commission Survey with Dr. A. Daly, Canadian Geologist,
mapping the district. ,
"The following mining engineers examined and reported on the same district:
Wm. Blaktmoreiuigoi, tb^eajjrter in
July, 1907, and August, 1909, RrH. Mo.ris
in May, 1910, and A. R. Larson in September, 1910.
" The genjerSl topography of the Princeton coal basin is of a rolling character,
ja«th numerous and beautiful plateaux,
well timbered and watered with.execllent
farming bottom and good mountain pasture lands, about 2,500 feet above sea
level, Princeton being 2,100 feet, with an
absence of heavy glacial drift of the
Pleiostocene or yuateruey Age of torma-
tion or deposits of the Post Tertiary
Period on the higher lands.
" The pasture is exceedingly heavy and
good, 6,000 head of cattle pasturing annually;
" The climate is- considered pleasant,
with light rain fall iu summer and con
siderable snow in winter. With proper
precautions against frost and snow col
liery operations can be cariied on con
tinuously.
" The property is in latitude 49 degrees
22 Jiret north, and longtitude 120 degrees
ijojfijjtt west, in the Kamloops, Osoyoos
and Yale Divisions of British Columbia,
adjoining the town of Princeton, which
is located at the confluence of the Tulameen and Similkameen rivers, and by the
Y.,V& E. Railway, presently being constructed, will be about 150 miies from
Vancouver, and is 307 miles from Spokane.
.—    (To be continued iu next issue.)
TULAMEEN LABOR DAY SPORTS
The celebration at Tulameen on Labor
Day was a pronounced success and a
credit to this rising town by the lake.
Following is the result of the sports:
Hop, Step and Jump—Victor Ryder,
first, 39ft. iin.; Wm. McDougal, second,
38ft. 5«n.
Broad Jump—Victor Xyder, first, 17ft.
7^in. ; Wm. McDougal, second, 17ft.
4>-in. \ J
High Jump—Vicwr Ryder and Wm.
McDougal, tie, 5ft.
Tug-of-War—Princeton vs. Tulemeen,
Princeton won.
220 Yards' Dash—Len. Marstan, first;
A. Miller, second.
100 Yards' Dash—Len. Marstan, first;
A. Miller, second.
Putting Shot—Wm. McDougal, first,
42ft. 2in.; Victor Ryder, second, 36ft 4in.
Base Ball—Tulameen vs. Princeton—
SjHSjre, 7-3 in favor of Tulameen.
wimming Race—Jess Rash, first; Ben
arlow, second.
Greasy Pole—Jess Rash, first; Ben
Barlow, second.
Gjeasy Pig—Caught by Elmo Hen-
d*ra<__.
' "Girls'   Race,   50   Yards'   Dash—Miss
Pellis, first.
POLITICAL MEETING
Liberal   Candidate   Expatiates
on Virtues of Lower
Tariff Wall.
Forceful Speech   Enlivens Audience
to Punctuate Periods with
Generous Applause.
*X?
The meeting la^fThursday night, addressed by Dr. __TC. McDonald, was well
attended by electors and a fair sprinkling
of ladies. A. M. Mclvor presided, and
with him on the platform was George
Kirby of Keremeos, who spoke on the
general benefits to be derived from reciprocity and urging electors to study their
own interests and support this measure,
which gave another large market to Canada. As an Englishman and loyal to his
King and country, he entertained no fear
of annexation or loss of patriotism through
adoption of reciprocity.
Dr. McDonald gave one of the best
political speeches ever given in Princeton, and was heard with pleasure and
profit throughout, being frequently applauded when, with telling effect, he
nailed the fallacies of opponents to reciprocity. He traced the history of reciprocity from its birth down to the latest
minute of its existence. He asked those
who had doubt regarding the loyalty of
those making the reciprocity agreement
on behalf of Canada, if Ambassador
Bryce, who watched the proceedings for
Britain, could reasonably be accused of
disloyalty. He said the Liberals were
charged with treason, but if it was treason
for them to advocate reciprocity it must
also have been treason for the great Tory
leader, Sir John A. McDonald, to warmly
support reciprocity. When supported by
both political parties, reciprocity must be
right. It was the Liberals who gave the
preferential tariff of 33 per cent., thus de
monstrating their loyalty to the mother
country. He said that reciprocity would
benefit the great mass of consumers by removing the tax on food, hence the opposition of the food trusts, the pork packers
and millionaire manufacturers. He said
no province in the whole of Canada would
benefit more, from the pact than British
Columbia; its lumber, fruit growing,
fishing, coal mining and coke industries
all stand to be greatly benefitted because
of the door being*opened to a market of
ninety millions of people. He said he
was a fruit grower and he saw nothing
but good to be derived from reciprocity,
because it gave the apple glower access to
the choice markets and big prices. B. C.
apples were the best in the. world, as
borne out by prizes won at American ex:
hibitions and in London, England. He
referred to the pamphlets issued by the
Penticton and several other Okanagan
boards of trade, emphasizing the large
profits to be made from fruit growing, as
high as $10,875 being made per year from
a 20-acre orchard. Such large profits, he
said, did not require to be.protected with
a high tariff. Eighteen millionaire Liberals, including Jack Eaton, of the T.
Eaton Co., had bolted from their party
because of their fear that reciprocity
would benefit the great masses of the people too much and thus diffuse wealth and
make prosperity more widespread. Referring to the article in the Vernon News
in which he was accused of sanctioning
an anti-reciprocity resolution in the board
of trade, Dr. McDonald said it was false
and utterly without foundation, as he
would prove before a Vernon audience.
The meeting closed by singing God Save
the King.
THE POLITICAL PARTIES.
The standing of the parties in the House
of Commons at dissolution was as follows:
Ontario—Libs., 35 ; Cons., 51.
Quebec—Libs., 53 : Cons., 12.
New Brunswick—Libs., 11 ; Cons. 12.
- Nova Scotia—-Libs; 12 ; Cons:, 6.
Prince Ed. Island—Libs., 3 ; Con., r.
Manitoba—Libs., 2 ; Cons., 8.
British Columbia—Libs., 2 ; Cons., 5_
Saskatchewan—Libs., 9 : Con., 1.
Alberta—Libs., 4 ; Cons., 3.
Yukon—Lib., 1.
EAST PRINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, Sept. 12.—The graders
on the G.N. spur have reached the cement
works and are now preparing the sidetrack for the steel.
W.'Ritchie and party, of Summerland,
were in town last week, and, before leaving, visited the B. C. Portland Cement
Co.'s works and the United Empire coal
mine.
The contract for the railway bridge
across the Similkameen river has been let
to J. McDonald, Victoria, B.C., who
arrived today.
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
. The Princeton Coal & Land Co. have a
large number of men at work enlarging
the facilities for producing and shipping
coal from theafmine.
Section 143, Dominion Election Act,
says : Where there is a voters' list, each
elector shall be entitled to vote at-the
polling station of the polling division or
one of the polling divisions upon the list
of voters for whiph his name, is entered
as such voter, and at no other.
The B.C. Cementptf. will shortly produce building bric_^_nd are experimenting with a fire cray from Roanie Camp.
Totty Ipwin, sister of Bert Irwin, Is a
visitoj^^nd is giving music lessons with
's/Waddell.
Has anyone ever heard of the cost of
living being increased by removing the
taxes lev'ed on food ?
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
September
1911,
THE SJMUUMEEN STAR
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advauce.
'If not prepaid all names will be dropped off the
list of subscribers.
ADVERTISING RATES :
Land Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Heading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
8 cents per line each subsequent'insertion*
Liquor Licenses, $5 each. G>f_J
Advertisfenients by contract, $1 per in.lpjj^monih
rin.fp
w _iatter exclude delivered not
Copy for publication as read
sively or for advertisingshjiul
later than Moaday^ , S?£$
Address all coUl_<___cations and make cheques
(/i      payable to
J. M. WRIGHT.
LET THE PEOPLE/iRTgLET^
Never in tfee^i-rory of Canada
has there been a question of greater
moment before the electors than tbe
one wbich will be decided  in  the
ballot   box   Thursday,   21st   inst.
Never has any elector had the responsibility  of a  serious   national
question  borne  on him with such
force as the present one.     On him
rests  the  triumph  or  defeat  of a
great   principal.     Reciprocity,   or
free  trade,   means  more  than  the
mere momentary benefit to be derived from the- free interchange' of
trade between two friendly nations
—it means the emancipation of the
people from the'dominating influence of concentrated wealth in huge
trusts, corporations and millionaire
monopolists, all which thrive under
the fostering care of protection. The
triumph of democracy, over aristocracy and despotic wealth has been
recently obtained in Britain through
the defeat of the lords and the passage of the veto and old age pension
bills.     In  the   United  States  the
courts have decided that the principle '_>f protection, or high tariff, is
--oppd'sed to the welfare of the peoples-a whole, andthe trusts'have
been forced to disgorge and disband.
The  president 'ahd*'congress have
made  it  plairi'.fc__.  the American
people must r.ule, and we see budding free trade in a measure of reciprocity with  Canada.    It  remains
for the voters of the Similkameen
and the whole Dominion to accept
the  proffered   hand   of   friendship
from   our   great   neighbor.      The
United  States  and  Great   Britain
have just completed a peace treaty
in which  they are  sworn  friends.
Will Canadians endeavor to annul
that treaty of peace between members of the great Anglo-Saxon family by spurning the extended hand
of reciprocity ?    Never!
OUR COURSE DEFINED.
Referring to the necessarily brief
announcement in last week's Star
regarding the change of ownership
of this paper, it may be stated that
the policy governing it can be summed up as follows : To at all times
advocate and promote the genera-
good of Princeton and district in the
encouragement of enterprise and development   of  our    great   natural
wealth ; to assist in the furtherance
of any legitimate movement which
will tend to give greater publicity
to the inducements offered for the
investment of capital and the establishment of large industrial works
in the district; to support the principal of ' land for the people and
people for the land,' impressing up-
hsih the governments and owners of
l^rjje tracts of coal and grazing lands
the necessity for  affording  opportunities to the small cultivator and
homesteader ;  to revive the Board
ofiE^ade and with it to endeavor to
feotain a school of mines for the initial purpose of teaching the fundamentals of mining and prospecting ;
to encourage the moral health of the
country by assisting in the due enforcement  of the  laws  controlling
vice and the preservation of order ;
to aid all effort in the judicious conservation  of our  vast  natural  resources and wild animal life, and by
humble endeavor assist in the promotion of peace and amity between
nations,   races   and   creeds,   aud,
finally, exert at least some small influence,   through   clean,   uplifting
journalism,   to   bring   about   that
happy consummation, the brotherhood of man and universal peace.
Politically, the Star has no cause
to change its attitude towards the
provincial    government,    knowing
that the administration of Premier
McBride has been one of progress
and abounding development.    His
masterful railway policy has resulted in the expenditure of many millions  of dollars  in   building  lines
unthought of by his predecessors in
office and which have spurred the
province  into  new  life  and  prosperity.    In our local representative,
Mr. Shatford, his works will remain
a monument to his splendid services
and devotion to the welfare of his
constituency.    No  newspaper,  unless  blind  to  the  interests of the
community it serves, could oppose a
member who   has  shown in word
anddeedthatthe interests of the people are his also.    In Princeton and
district    improvements    in    roads,
trails, streets and bridges, together-
with the construction of new highways,  are  evidences  that  no par-
tizan, however bigoted, can ignore.
Star will  not  cultivate  opposition
merely for its sake.    On the other
hand it will preserve that independence which makes for clean, public
life,   and   its   criticisms,   tempered
with moderation, will be honest and
sincere.    This paper has nothing to
retract regarding reciprocity, standing foursquare in its favor. Stripped
of   all  sentimentality,   reciprocity,
commends itself to Star purely and
simply as  a   business  proposition,
and as it has begun so will it end in
the greatest campaign ever witnessed in Canada.
€*+Z**Z*4**Z*+Z**Z**ZK^
4+4
t
t
t
i*
Y
f
1
The New City with The Paproi
Give you the opportunity for one of the
>T ilWESTl
In British Columbia.
CITY LOTS ARE  BEING OFFERED  FOR
SALE FOR THE FIRST TlflE.
IT IS INEVITABLE THAT THE VALUE OF
THESE LANDS WILL GREATLY INCREASE
I
f
Here are some of the Reasons :
East Princeton is surrounded by huge de=
♦*♦   posits of Coal, Cement, Copper, Gold, and
y.B    /._-t._t_' «-..-»_.*•--*-*■**•*■   r*i-
>J*   other important flinerals.
I
The British Columbia Portland Cement
.|. Co. is erecting a half a million dollar plant,
***  which will employ between 300 and 400 men.
The United Empire Co. is shipping a lig=
nite coal of the besl quality and is developing
immense copper deposits, requiring large re=
duction works and several hundred em=
ployees. The Princeton Coal __ Land Co. is
increasing its daily shipments to 300 tons of
coal, providing employment to about 150
men. Other coal companies are spending
over $2,000,000 in development, and will give
work to at least 1,000 men.
For transportation, East Princeton will
have, in the near future, the Great Northern
and the Kettle Valley lines, both of which,
will pass through the towwnsite.
East Princeton is beautifully situated on
the Similkameen River, with an abundance
of water power available. The new city has
every facter for growth into a big industrial
centre.
It presents a rare opportunity for invest=
ment.    Get full particulars immediately.
D. G. McCURDY
RESIDENT AGENT.
Or write RAYMOND E. WARD, Pacific blk, Vancouver.
f
A
t
y
A
41*
V
*?
*i*
4*4
A
A
*l*
t
f
*l*
♦.
I
X
I
S-f
'♦_ .
A
i
x
T
f
__*___
t
I
*t*
t
t
T
T
A
I
A
A
*&
x
f
f
f
T
♦;♦
f
f
f
T
f
T
T
I
I
m
T
*t*
1 _ ♦♦♦
Wh-yf _____»'"'
September i.3» *9"«
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
Sam Spencer and wife and H. Campbell ^
have every reason to be satisfied with development of their mineral properties on
Whipsaw, and show some vere fine specimens of ore.
Disguised as peddlers or agents a house-
to-house political canvass is being made
on behalf of food trusts and monopolies.
Beware of them, as they report to the
head centre.
I
k
k
k
__£
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
_.___-»
k
k
k
I
1
1
I
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
i
Coalmont
A legitimate
Investment
Today      J ^.
TlTfOST PEOPLE want to invest their money where
AVJL they are reasonably sure of a good return. If the
investment is to be made in real estate there are several
things to be considered : The situation of the town, climatic
conditions, transportation facilities, and primarily the
amount of the monthly payroll. When these questions are
asked regarding Coalmont they may all be answered to the
credit of the town. The situation and climatic conditions
are ideal; the main line of the V.,V. & E. railway runs
through the town on its way to Vancouver.
The Columbia CoaJ & Coke Co. operating here have practically an inexhaustible supply of a pure bituminous coal.  •
They are installing immediately a plant which will handle
2000 tons of coal in 8 hours—this means employment for between
800 and 900 men all told.
Figure out this payroll and see how many coal mining towns
in B.C. can beat it.
In a very short time Coalmont will necessarily have a population of from 2000 to 2500 people. Will this cause real estate to rise ?
We all know the answer. Then take the opportunity that presents
itself now—buy first hand and reap the benefit of this increase.
The prices and terms are such that anyone can afford to inves
to the extent of one or two lots. They range from $175 to $550, on
terms of )i cash, balance over 18 months.
Address all communications and remittances to
WILLIAMSON & TURNER,
Soi^E AGENTS,
COALMONT, B.C.
A novel and unique entertainmeut is
being arranged for Friday, the 29th, by
the ladies of the Anglican congregation
for the church building fund.
No ribbons, banners or favors to be
displayed on election day or eight days
previous. All bars to be closed during
the whole of polling day. Poll shall be
open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The farmer will get a better price for
everything he raises by reason of the
ninety million market of reciprocity.
A week from tomorrow, Thursday, 21st
September, is election day.
R. Fitzgerald has made a new strike of
arsenical sulphides on Whipsaw, which
he is having assayed. The samples are
very promising.
if
1
1
i
___
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
k
k
k
___
k
k
k
k
k
k
k
m |- k
_..i..&4__;i..-_f__.^
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, -   $8,000,000
FARMERS'   BUSINESS
The Canadian Bank of Commerce extends to Farmers every facility
for the transaction of their banking business including the discount and
collection of sales notes. Blank sales notes are supplied free of charge
on application.
BANKING   BY   MAIL
Accounts may be opened at every branch of The Canadian Bank of
Commerce to be operated by mail, and will receive the same careful
attention as is given to all other departments of the Bank's business.
Money may be deposited or withdrawn in this way as satisfactorily as
by a personal visit to the Bank. A231
J. D. ANDRAS, Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
__
1
S
*_
x
Y
__
35
X
X.
X.
Y
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
T
X
X
X
Y
__
3_
*»**l**Z**l<**Z<<<**Z*<*^
Pioneer Meat Market
5
<MW^^^AA^
±
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR
Beef, Pork, Mutton, Fish, f
AESO in stock: J.
Fresh Butter, Eggs,  Sausage, Pickled |
Pig^ Feet, Salmon Bellies, Her-      g
ring, Prime Lard, Etc. |
P. BURNS & CO., LTD. |
Y
,Z**Z**Z**l*****l**l*<**l**l^^ Y
♦v^♦♦M<^>♦^^♦^♦^♦^♦^^H^^^^^^,^
1
1
A
T
T
i
I
V
m
All HUNTERS TAKE NOTICE
THAT IT IS LAWFUL TO SHOOT but not ot_*_*-
wise Bill Blue and Willow Grouse from ist September^ to-
31st December ; Ducks, Geese and Snipe from ist September to 28th February; Deer from ist September to r5th
December; Prairie Chicken during month of October only.
Ducks, Geese aud Snipe may be sold during the months of
October and November only. Our Stock of Guns and
Ammunition may be sold any day.
A
€
i
A. L Wllltr8 FURNITURE STORE
+Z**Z***l>**X**Z**Z**<**^**^^
I
T
I
1
_? ***
x
t
X
y
x
x
t
Y
f
X
X
Y
Y
Y
X
X
Y
Y
Y
Y
_e
Y
Y
Y
4
4
4
V
A±***±^^^^^*3£j4~J4tJ4*At+'^+AB,4* AAA A*+BM.+*AAA*^ij>BAA&^BA2L*t,A*B __■ _♦_ _»_ _♦-_♦_-.». AAA -»-. A_*-._*-.J A
W* KING & GIBSON   1 |
X
. DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
**Z<**Z<<<<<~1<<<<<~1*
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
x*
_
Y
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station g
PRINCETON, B.C. |
^^P^^^__^^__lill_^-i^^^^--^^^^^^^w^
 .
^fm*r*B—********
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
SEPTEMBER  13,   I9"t
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
Messrs. Budd, Pringle & Shea is the
name of the firm that will conduct a
livery stable at Coalmont. They are now
erecting a barn, 48 x 66, and a shed, 50 x
18, opposite tbe site of the railway depot.
The vacancy created by the resignation 1
of E. B. Hall from the school board will I
be filled by an election, to be held in the
school house on the 23rd inst., of which
all electors should take notice.
F. R. Prosser and family left on Monday for Calgary, having sold/jut his harness business to Messrs. Xnompson and
Prosser, who will retain tjie shop and fill
all orders. • \y
W. H. Ricardc, P.L S., recently on the
provincial hydrographic staff, is surveys
ing a water grade road between Granite
Creek and Coalmont.
Knight & Day are getting things in
shape for continuous work on th__C'„cky
Pair, Camp Whipsaw. '
Anglican church services for next Sun-]
day, Sept. 17, in Princeton School -House:'
11 a.m., Matins, Holy Communion.; Sub-1
ject, "Giving God Thanks. 7-30 p.m.,)
Evensong and Sermon ; Subject: *' In- .1
dividualism in Religion." ■-■ A
Methodistj   church    service,   Sunday, |
Sept. 17.   In   Oddfellows'   Imji, at 7:30
p.m.   Service at the cement/works at 3
p.m.
Presbyterian church services.—Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
service, 11 a.m.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject, Sept. 17 : 'Matter.' He that heareth,
and doeth not, is like a man that without
a foundation built an house upon the
^dafth ; against which the stream did beat
vehemently, and immediately it fell; and
the ruin of that house was great.—Luke
6: 49.
^^^^^^^^^^^^_^^i^^^^^^p^^?^^^^5JW^
_
X
X
X
?
Y
Y
_
_
Y
Y
X
5.
Y
Y
X
8.
_C
__
T
I
I
4
******
Groceries Fresh Provisions
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF
its and vcgcHNes
Removed to Irwin Mock   • I
_V_r ITe AND IF YOU ARE SATISFIED TELL OTHERS,
kiy U_» IF NOT, TELL US.
real iNortiiern
—Hotel—
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
*B^*****^^m******»*
O. H. CARLE,   The Grocer,   Princeton.  :i
4t4 4*4+**AA*t**Z**Z*^
Koi isireai Estate Nurseri
||        VERNON, B.C.   MP
. Have a very fine assortment ot
FRUIT TREES
ORNAMENTAL AND SHADE TREES
AND SHRUBS
A ^
I Budded Stock a Specialty 1
»
■**ni
1
A
*Z*
__>
i
a
Uf*
■I
V
i
1
♦_.
Princeton, B. C.
FOR SALE.
OWL SKATING RINK
For Sale or Lease.
J, OSWALD COULTHARD,
■f Manager.
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
wi      i __^.>_________U__Jli_.    Je,. i     ,
r4
All Trees offered for Sale are grown in Our Own
Nurseries on the Coldstream Estate
I
A
A Nurseries on the Coldstream Estate X
A    General Agent, V. D. CURRY, Vernon, B.C.     %
SiiiiKameen Hotel
J. N. NEIS01N, Proprietor
Large and New building, well Furnished and Plastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
.Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatlS executed* g~)
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money'.'
refunded.
Careful attention given to  all
Mail Orders.
"MODEL"
LIVERY STAILt
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety  of  Rigs— Good  Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
I
I
t \
I
m
|
i
i
i
!
1
i
tn
|f$      THE LATEST
taffies' corMAe
hand hub
IN PLUSH AND
LEATHER
$2.25 to $9.50    .
fi5*    tttr*    e5*
Vancouver & Spokane
Daily Papers
fl__>W     .jr1     **&
PRINCETON
Drug and
Bookstore
GEO. G. LYALL, Manager.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS.
Province of British Columbia.
Notice is hereby given  that all public
highways in unorganized districts aud all
main trunk roads  in organized  districts
are sixtiy-sixfeet wide, and have a  width
of thirty-three  feet on  each side of the
main centre line of the travelled road.
THOMAS TAYLOR,
.-   .   .; -.Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works,
'.Victoria, B. C, July 7, 1911.
_
m
6
m
1
2
1
t
t
t
I
I
m
t
jl
|
COUNTY  COURT, YALE.
A sitting of the County Court- of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princetou, Friday, 13th
day of October, 1911, at the hour of 11 o'clock iu
the forenoon. By Command
HUGH HUNTER,
Registrar County t_ourt.
PERCY W. GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc.'C.B.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
.Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
In the Matter of the Railway Act
AND
In the Matter of the Vancouver, Vic-
' toria and Eastern Railway and
Navigation Company.
Notice is hereby given that the plan,
profile and book of reference of the
fallowing sections of the line of the
Vancouver, Victoria & Eastern Railway
and Navigation Company duly approved
and certified by the Board of Railway'
Commissioners for Canada has been filed
ifj the Land Registry Office in the city of
Kamloops, nameiy:- Mileage o to 12;
12 to 16; 16 to 17; and 17 to 39.
'Dated this 21st dav of Aug, A.D. 1911.
A. H. MACNEILL,
Solicitor for the Vancouver, Victoria and
*.. Eastern Railway and Navigation Co.
WATER NOTICE.
The Princeton
Liverg I Feed
1*2 stales
IN. HUSTON, PPOPT
General Livery business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice '■.
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
W. C. Fry, Limited, of Princeton, B.
C, gives notice that it intends on the
28th day of September next, at eleven
o'clock in the forenoon, to apply to th.
Water Commissioner at his office at
Fairview, B. C, for a license to take and
use 275 cubic feet of water per second
from the Similkameen river.
The water will be used on Lot 1822 for
power purposes.
W. C. FRY, Limited.
Dated this 18th day of August 1911.
NOTICE.
Similkameen division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ernest Waterman, of
Princeton, B.C.occupation mine manager,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1822 thence
south seven chains to the southwest cor-
of Lot 1822, thence west along the north
boundary of Lot 2049 to the high water
mark on the right bank of the Similkameen river, thence northeast along .the
said high water mark to the point of
commencement and containing five acres
more or less. ERNEST WATERMAN,
Ausr.25, 1911.    Percy W. Gregory, agent.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   I  B.C.
■BRITTON BLOCK
September 13, 1911.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
ml
m
JgjTl
i
»    mm    •
PRINCETON BAKERY
and CONFECTIONERY
FRESH BREAD DAILY—ALL KINDS
OF PASTRY, PIES, &C.
RESTAURANT
C. V. Semerad & Co.
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Jobbing Work Promptly Attended to.
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays, in the Oddfellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL. Clerk.
J. KNUDSON
Contractor    and   Builder
Estimates Furnished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
____^SS________S_____gS-^^SgSJg&3
 Hotel...
oner
TULAMEEN, B.C.
Good Ej^hing, Boating
Mraing Centre
• L« *3b
V
PRORIETOR
•a********!***"
C L. CUMMINGS
a Specialty
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
Carriage Building
Painting, Repairing
AH Work Neatly and Promptly
Phone 28]     Done
NOTICE.
Yale division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, Samuel A. Cawley,
ef Chilliwack, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described
Tatids situated near Princeton: Commencing at the northeast corner of Lot
361. tnence south, to southeast corner of
Lot 361, thence west to south west corner of Lot 361, thence following Tulameen river 10 point of commencement.
SAMUEL A. CAWLEY,
Aug. 10. 1911. W. Martin, agent
PRINCETON   LODGE
r.O.O.F. No. 52.
\ Regular meetings. 8 p
   '       tn., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.     Hall situate   in
Thomas Block.   •' Oddfellows Hall."
J. F. Waddell,        Jas. Gellatly.
Noble Grand. . Secretary
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Lydia L. French, of
Evanston, Ills., occupation wife of C. O.
French intends to apply for -permission
to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about one
mile west of the south west corner of
Charles Bonniviers' pre emption on
Roche river and marked Lydia L.
French's S E corner, thence 80 chains
west. 40 chains north, 80 chains east, 40
chains south to the point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LYDIA L. FRENCH,
July 29, 1911.       Chas. O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Chas. O. French, of
Princeton, B. C, occupation tinsmith intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of Chas. Bonnivier's pre-emption on Roche river marked C. O.
French's n w corner thence 89 chains:
east, 40 chains south, 80 chains west, 40
chaihs north to the point of commencement and containing 320 acres more or
less. ' CHARLES O. FRENCH,
July 29, 1911.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Nicholas Codd, of
Colfax, Wash., occupation farmer intends
to apply for permission-to- purchase'the
following described lands. Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
corner of Gus. Powell's pre emption and
marked Nicholas Codd's s w corner thence
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains south to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or iess. NICHOLAS CODD,
July 26, 1911.   Chailes O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Susan Nokes, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation wife of
Aaron Nokes intends to apply for permission to purchase the follov. ing described lands: Commencing at a post
planted on the northwest bank of Roche
river about two miles from the mouth of
Cambie creek and marked Susan Noke's
n e corner, thence 80 chains west, 80
chains south, 80 chains east, 80 chaius
north to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
SUSAN NOKEc.,
Ang. 4, 1911..   Charles O. French, agent.
, Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that John Gifford, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation cattleman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the ■ following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked John Gifford's
n e corner thence 80 chains west, 80
chains south, 80 chains east, 80 chains
north to the point of commencemeutand
containing 640 acres more or less.
JOHN GIFFORD,
Aug 2, 1911.     Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Nettie Laird, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation musician,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a prst planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked Nettie Laird's
s w corner thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less,
NETTIE LAIRD,
Aug. 2. 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Bridget McGovern, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation housekeeper
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about 8
miles west of the mouth of Copper creek
marked Bridget McGovern's n w corner
thence 80 chains south, 80 chains east, 80
chains north, 80 chains west to the point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
BRIDGET McGOVERN,
Aug. 1, 1911.   Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Edward A. Nokes, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation coachman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about two
miles northwest of the mouth of Cambie
creek about 40 cbains northeast of said |
creek and marked E A. Nokes' n  e corner  thence 80 chains south,   80  chains
west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and contain
ing 640 acres more or less.
EDWARD A. NOKES,
Aug. 4, 1911.   Charles O. French, agent.
Yale laud division, Yale district.
Take notice that Henry Magee, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation clerk, in
tends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: Com
mencing at a post planted about 8 miles
west of the mouth of Copper creek
marked Henry Magee's n e corner thence
80 chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains
north, 80 chains east to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. HENRY MAGEE,
Aug. 1, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Margaret Durgan, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation wife of
Michael Durgan, intends toapply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted about 8. miles wesf Of* the niouth
of Copper creek marked Margare.tJDujf^
gan's s w corner, thence 80 chains east,
80 chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south to the point of commencement
and containing 640 acres more or less.
MARGARET DURGAN,
Aug. 1, 1911.    Charles O.'"French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
_ Take notice that Tessie Warren,' of
Evanston, 111., occupation stenographer
intends to apply for permission to purchase the followiug described lauds:
Commencing at a post plauted ou the
northwest bank of Roche river about
two miles from the mouth of Cambie
creek and marked Tessie Warren's s w
corner thence 80 chains north, 80 chaius
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
TESSIE WARREN,
Aug. 4, 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Kelly, of
Spok.ue, Wash., occupation married
woman intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the northwest bank of Roche river
about two miles from the mouth of Gamble creek and marked Mary Kelly's s e
corner, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains south, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
MARY KELLY,
Aug. 4, 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Horace Gifford, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation cattleman
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked Horace Giff
ord's n w corner, thence 80 chains south,
80 chains east,.8o chains north, 80 chains
west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
HORACE GIFFORD,
Aug. 2, 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that William H. BelTTof
Chicago, Ills., occupation electrtcian intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing_at a post planted about
seven miles up the Roche river from its
mouth and about ten chains north of
said river and marked W. H. Bell's n w
corner thence 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north to
the point of commeucement and containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. BELL,
Aug. 4, 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Laird, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation wife of F.
C. Laird, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about 3%
miles up the Roche liver from its mouth
and about ten chains northwest of said
river and marked Mary Laird's n e corner therce 80 chains south, 80 chains
west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
MARY LAIRD,
Aug. i, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Laird, of Spokane, Wash., occupation widow intends to
apply   for   permission   to purchase the
following described lands:   Commencing
'at a post planted about six miles up the
Roche river from its mouth and about 40
.chains ucrth-west of said river and marked Marv Laird's n e corner thence 80
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains
north, 80 chains east to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. MABY LAIRD,
Aug, 4,1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ella Warren, of
Evanston, 111., occupation clerk, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing
at a post planted about six miles up the
Roche river from its mouth and about 40
chains northwest of said river and marked
Ella Warren's SW corner thence 80
chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains south to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. ELLA WARREN,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land diyision, Yale district.
Take notice that Andrew I aidlaw, of Spokane
■ Wpsh , occupation mining broker, intends to apply for permission^o purchase the' following
described lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of .the, Sljnilkameen riverabcut
-_tf^__i_s*^_or__ of the mouth of Roche river
marked Andrew Laidlaw's NI$ corner thence 40
chains west, 80 chains south, 40 chains east, 80
north to the poiut of commeucement and containing 320 acres more or less.     '^_?
ANDREW LATDLAW,
July 28. 1911, Gharles O. Freuch, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Jeffrey R: Short, of Spokane,
Wash., occupation clerk iutends to.apply for per-
■ mission to purchase the following described lands:
j Commencing at a post planted at the southwest
1 corner of timber limit No. 36826 and marked J
t R, Short's N. corner thence 80 chains south, 80
1 chains west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640
acres more or Jes's.      JEFFREY R. SHORT.
July 27,1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that I.ee Bel1, of Spokane, Wash.,
occupation stenographer intends to apply for
permiseion to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted about one
mile up the Roche river from its mouth and on
the north bank thereof and marked Lee Bell's
SW corner thence 40 chains north, 40chains east,
40 chains south 40 chains west to the point of
commencement and containing 160 acres more
or less. LFE BELL,
July 28, 1911. Charles O. French, agent,
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Elizabeth C Laird, cf Spokane, wash., occupation widow intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands: Commencing at a post planted
about 2% miles up the Roche river from its
mouth on the northwest bank thereof and
marked tE- C. Laird's SE corder thence 80 chains
north, 80 chains west, 80 chains south, 80 chains
east to the point of commencement and contain- .
ing 640 acres more or less.
ELIZABETH C. LAIRD,
Julv 29, 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick C. Laird, of Spokane, Wash., occupation broker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following describe lands; Commencing at a post planted
about 2% miles up the Roche river from its
mouth and on the northwest bank thereof and
marked F. C. Laird's NE corner thence 80 cbains
west, 80 chains south, 80 chains east,1 80 chains
uorth to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
FREDERICK C. LAIRD,    -
July 29 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice thatClara G. Laidlaw, of Spokane,
Wash., occupation wife of Andrew Laidlaw, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing at a
post planted about 2%. miles up the Roche river
from the mouth of said river on the northwest
bank thereof and marked C. G. Laidlaw's NW
corner thence 80 chains east, 80 chains south, 80
chains west, 80 chains north to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less,
CLARA G. LAIDLAW,
July 29,191I. Charles O. French, agent-
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Jennie O'Laughlin. of Spokane, Wash., occupation teacher intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described'lands: Commencingat a post planted
about three miles south of the mouth of Pasayton river and about ten chains west of said river
marked J. O'Laughlin's SW corner thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains south, 80
chains west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less,
JENNIE O'LAUGHLIN,
July 29,1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take   notice  that   William  A.   Nicholas,   of
Spokane, Wash., occupation broker, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the  following
described lands.   Commencing at a post planted
about two miles north of the mouth of Roche
river and  one mile west of the  Similkameen
river and  marked W. A.  Nicholas' SW corner
thence 80 chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM A. NICHOLAS,
Aug. 8. iqii. Charles O. French, agent.
Similkameen Land & Mines
H. B. BROWN, Broker
443 Pender St. W. Vancouver, B.C.
Will Buy or Sell.
Nicola to Okanagan.       'Bulldog^
iji
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
September   13, 1911,
. . . The Town of . . .
British   Columbia
VljsHsS
il
^^^^^^1^
I'.'. -1K\   '--
l _»'.__„--.
if If <Jsw_4
I
1
I
1
I
^r
At the confluence of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers
Send for Maps
SIMILKAMEEN DISTRICT
_t£ «__» «-_*
and Price I___5t to
'
;',. ERNEST   WATERMAN
Resident    Manager
VERMILION    FORKS    MINING   A&)     DEVELOPMENT    CO'Y
*£*!     "1
..j
.    "^___S^j_E_

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.similkameen.1-0386211/manifest

Comment

Related Items