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Similkameen Star 1912-05-08

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 Princeton Coal is high in heat, low in waste.
An honorable reputation is more valuable than rubies.
Capital and energy with brain and muscle are proving the vast resources of Princeton district and will place the future beyond all doubt
or dispute—The payroll goes with industrial enterprise: Princeton gives promise of a large payroll city—Mines, smelters, manufactories.
Vol. XIII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 19J2.
No. 19
KETTLE VAUEY BUSY
Grading Contract Let to Os-
prey Lake Westward
from Penticton.
Nothin' Doin' on the Jimhilkameen
Line West of Coalmont and
People Waiting.
L. M. Hale, Great Northern engineer,
arrived yesterday and will have charge
of ballasting between here and Coalmont.
J.J.Warren, president of the Kettle
Valley railwa., spent three or four days
in and about Princeton last week, leaving
on Saturday for Penticton. He thinks
Princeton will grow with the de'velop
ment of its resources.
It is not probable any contracts for
grading on the Kettle Valley line will be
let from Princeton east or west before tl e
latter part of summer or early fall. There
is only one locating survey party in the
field, Brooke's and until he has finished
it is conjectural where the line will finalh-
be located. From the Fivemile country
there are two routes by which to approaa_|
ton, was in Princeton last week combining business and pleasure. He states
that Penticton is making rapid progress,
deriving considerable impetus from rail-"
load construction in that vicinity. He is
.delighted with Princeton and admires the
many beautiful residential sites within its
■boundarie^ |  /^f(
, Rev. Tf-A- Osborne l«t on Monday for
Summerland to attend'/district me ting,
•going from there to the Methodist con-,
ference at Vancouver.
Dr. Thomas P.. Lavalley arrived on
'Monday from Portland, Ore., on a visit
to his parents and will remain for a mouth
or two. Dr. Lavalley is a graduate in
chiropractic-neuropathy.
The formal opening of the courts of the
Princeton tennis club will take place on
Saturday, the nth inst. It is hoped that
there will be a large attendance of members.    Tennisonians please note.
C. L. Cummings has been doing
agricultural work on his farm dining the
past week at Orangeville.
Princeton.
. ^minutes
G. A. Carlson & Co. of Spokane have
secured the contract for 35 miles of road
on the Kettle Valley line west of Penticton. Their work will begin about five
miles west of Penticton, or at the end of
the portion which Carlson, Chindahl &
Co. are completing. This will bring the
line to Osprey lake, a point about half
way between Penticton and Princeton.
No time is set for the completion of the
contract, bnt it is understood that it is to
be completed not later than early in the
new year. Employment will be eiven to
1500 men.
The material for ihe three steel bridges
'•n the first five mile section west of
• Penticton is already on the way. The
Kettle Valley officials will move into
heir offices in the new station building
at Penticton in a few days, while work
has already been started on the spur line
through town. When the Carlson firm
get the full force at work on their»new
contract it will mean apayroll of almost
$ 100,000 a month.
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
e initial number of the Coalmont
ourier has reached the Star palace. It
is a 4 page 7-column folio containing a
lot of interesting reading about CqMnjont
and district, and a bunch of g6od live
ads that will make the Courle/a dividend
payer from the 'grass roots.' Typographically, editorially and loa^y the
Courier looks like a winner. The editor
is Ed N. Clark, and theiStar wishes him
the best that this rich district has on tap.
E. Foley Bennett, ex-rpeve of Pentic-
BOARD OF TRADE
The board met on Monday night with
a fair attendance, President E. Waterman
in the chair, and J. D. Andras, secretary.
A list of delinquent   members   and   the
were read. TUe president reviewed the work of the board for the past
quarter. Correspondence re public
buildings for postoffice, etc., had been
received. Bylaws and stationery for the
board are in preparation. Tbe question of
a suitable room for the board was again
left in the hands of the committee to
proceed with. The racetrack committee
reported that $600 out of $1000 required
as a first payment on purchase of track
had been paid in and there is good reason
to believe that the balance will be forth
coming. The committee desire subscribers who have not yet paid to meet
their amounts due. The fire chief reported the hose reel was expected any
dav and that practice would begin when
it was installed. Board adjourned to meet
first Monday in August.
= fr
The music loving publicjfte pleased to
note the progress made by the band under instructor, Prof. GHoson New talent
is being added weekly to the strength
and ability of the band, and the progress
of beginners is quite satisfactory. There
is no doubt that Piinceton will have an
uptodate band, deserving of every encouragement and support. The erection of a
baud stand ou Vermilion square is a contingency calling lor action and should
not be much longer delayed.
Married—_t Calgary on the 22nd April,
H. G. Hankinson to Miss Anna Summers
of Princeton. Both the principals are
popular young persons in Princeton and
will receive showers of congratulations in
which Star heartily joins.
9
COPPER IS STRONGER
Price Shows Rising Tendency
of Red Metal; Silver
Jumps Up.
Tree Miners Certificates Expire End
of Month—Mining Outlook
Is Bright.
Concerning the copper situation G. L.
Walker writes as follows in his weekly
Copper letter: Copper is very strong.
Lake and electrolytic are selling for 16
cents and 16^ cents cash and i6^s cents
for June delivery. 'The buying demand
Continues good for both foreign and
domestic account Producers are endeavoring to supply all consumers with
Sufficient copper to meet their immediate
requiremehts, being opposed to any
further advance i_i the prices at the
present time. It may be possible to keep
quotations down around the present level
until the end of the summer; but it would
seem reasonably certain that prices must
be higher in the fall and also next year.
The adyance in copper share prices continues.. Increased and still increasing
earnings are responsible for the steadilv
'rising quotations. A 16-cent metal market
means great prosperity for all the producing companies and it also means
larger dividends. Last year's selling
prices yielded an average profit of about
2,]/2 cents a pound on the world's copper
output. It now looks as if this year's
production would be sold at a profit of
7 cents, giving'the producing companies
net earnings of $140,000,000 against
$70,000,000 in 1911.
Silver, after selling around 58^0. for
some time, started to advance again last
week when it rose to 6o#c. This week
another advance of 1 cent took place at
the lore part of the week. Seventy-five
cents for silver is now Drobable.
All free miners' certificates, without
which no mining operations can legally
be carried on in this province, expire on
the last day of this month. They may be
renewed at any time before May 31 at the
office of the mining recorder, in_ the
courthogsj^J.)
H. B^Brown of Hedley arrived in town
yesterday on mining business.
SUMMIT CAMP
Railroad Creek, April 26.—At last-men
of experience andtmeans are taking hold
in the upper Tulameen country to prospect it. Robert Stevenson and associates
are the latest arrivals. They reached
within a mHseof Railroad creek with ten
horses, fern as the snow from here on to
Summit camp, where they are bound
for, is deep and heavy they sent the
horses back, and are packing their sup
plies necessary to do the sampling of the
Indian group, eight miles on their backs.
They have already commenced clearing
out the old tunnels with part of the crew.
Ernest Rice and another man are packing
up the balance of the supplies. It is
thought by men well posted that they
have a good show of striking ore bodies
in deep crosscutting exploration work
that does not outcrop.
We have never seen or heard it mentioned that besides the lead, zinc and
silver bearing ores there are small fissures
carrying chlorides and antimonial silver.
The lead filled fissures are irregular in
size; they vary from a few inches to six.
or even eight feet in width. Of course
the camp is all located. Dan Ross of
Granite creek has two claims crown
granted right in the hub of the camp,
and one about three-quarters of a mile
northeast from there splendidly situated
for deep and cheap exploration. This is
supposed to be the lead that Andy Jensen '
owns, where Spokane parties took hold,
but something like two miles to the
southeast,  j
Mr. Edwards did some shaft and drift
work on Jensen's claim this winter.
There were two chinooks here in the
early part of the winter and caused so
much water to run into the shaft that the
men would not work in it and hoist water
with a windlass.
Frank McKinley and J. C. Riley drove
73 feet of tunnel this winter near the
mouth of Railroad creek; and it looks
as if they had a lot more driving to do
before they .have a mine. They have got
gray and black copper ore carrying:
silver, and quartz running a little in gold,
apparently intermixed with hematite.
They have hopes up here of springing
something big and of economic importance almost as rare as the diamond find.
The diamond expert, who was here las.
fall, is expected in any day.   See him.
Charley Connolly is expected in soon
to take out a shipment of ore. At present he would have to pack about 23 miles.
The entire distance from the end of the
road at Slate creek is exceedingly easy to.
make a wagon road over. It would be
one of the most profitable pieces of road
work that the government could do, and
now is the time to commence it.
Mr. Wade and W. B. Dunbar of Spokane have been up here.
The shareholders of the Bank of Montreal have been called to attend a meeting on June 18 to authorize the application for an increase in the capital of the
bank to $25,000,000. The present capitalization is $16,000,000. It is stated
that this is a precautionary measure due
to the bank's desire to keep up with the
demand for circulation and to keep
abreast of the constant development end
expansion of the country generally.—
News.
\
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May 8, 1912.
May 8, 1912'
"1 ri__     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
TBE WEEKLY GRIST
A meeting will be held next Saturday,
nth inst., to which all baseballers are
urgently requested to attend. Come,
boys, get a move on, and induce those
who enjoy the sport to come too.
C. O. French arrived from Greenacres,
Wash., last Wednesday, having been
away from here during the winter. He
notes considerable improvements and
still maintains strong faith in this section.
Mr. French haa large interests at Welldo
and is only waiting for railway connection
with the coast to dispose of fine acreage
.property. Regarding the presidential
election Mr. French has named the win-
tier, and of course Mr. Taft will succeed
ifaimself.
Robert Stevenson, Ernest Rice,  B. S.
Jennings, J  Farrant and F. Rice returned
from Summit camp last week.   The party
.vere in seven feet of snow on the Hope
.mountains.
J. H. Ward, painter, paperhanger, sign
■writer, etc., will open a shop on Bridge
street,   next   the   Model   livery   stable,
where he will be prepared to attend to all
orders.   As soon as these premises are in
repair from the late fire  Mr.  Ward will
occupy, meantime any inquiries made at
the Tulameen hotel will receive attention.
The tennis club d .nee is anticipated by
lovers of the ever popular valse with much
pleasure.    Prof.  Knight's orchestra will
be there and that spells good   time and
good times for all.   Come and drive away
dull care.    Remenib rthe d-te—Friday,
May 17.    Gentlemen $150, ladies free.
„ J. Isbister of Coalmont passed  through
on his way to Vancouver last Wednesday.
He may  return   to attend  an  important
event   in   the   lives   of  two  prr tuinent
friends on July 4.
For an artistic display of painters' supplies, household decorations, vases of
beautiful design, etc., see the window in
M. S. Wilson's store, Vermilion avenue.
Also a line of saddles which intendirg
purchasers should see
Posters are out announcing the celebration of Victoria day, Friday, 24th
inst., at Coalmont. A good program of
sports will be provided and in the even-
ijjg.a grand complimentary ball will he
heldjin. the Coalmont hotel. Coalmont
is the youngest yet one of the most
vigorous towns in the Similkameen
valley. See Coalmont in gala attire on
the 24th.
Mrs. Kansky left for Spokane last week
having been summoned by an accident to
her son.
S. R. Gibson has a fine pedigreed
Clydesdale stallion, Bunch Grass Chief,
four years old, weighing 1600 pounds.
From this sire several fine specimens of
equine beauty and strength may be seeu
in this district.
Frank Mansfield, the squire of Granite
creek, was enjoying city life in Princeton
yesterday
The Tulameen Lumber Company are
delivering lumber at Knudson's yard on
Bridge street. This company has recently begun cutting at their mill aud are
turning out an excellent quality of
lumber.
Gardening and seeding generally are in
forward state.
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, -   $8,000,000
SPECIALS.
TAILOR WANTED—Good all round
man.    Apply Karl H. Morse.
House to rent—Coal shed, cellar and
well.    Garden.    Apply J   M. Wright.
Great Reduction in Prices—Men's suits,
summer underwear, fancy summer
8'iirts—Ladies' summer blouses. Prices
to suit at THOMAS BROS.
FOR SALE—Lots 14 and 15, block 19,
corner Halliford avenue and Lime street.
Price and terms apply J. M. Wright.
FARMERS'   BUSINESS
The Canadian Bank of Commerce extends to Farmers every facility
for the transaction of their banking business including the discount and
collection of sales notes. Blank sales notes are supplied free of charge
on application.
BANKING   BY   MAIL
Accounts may be opened at every branch of The Canadian Bank of
Commerce to be operated by mail, and will receive the same careful
attention as is given to all other departments of the Bank's business.
Money may be deposited or withdrawn in this way as'satisfactorily as
by a personal visit to the Bank. A231
J. D. ANDRAS,  Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.   .
J. H. WARD
Painter, Paper Hanger, Decorator
carriages Painted and Enamelled
BANK Of MONTREAL
Prices moderate    Satisfaction guaranteed
Shop—Next Model Livery Barn
SIMItKAMEEN (iUIDE===M/'"i"«Me";Tour
lstsand Sportsmen.
PacK horses provided. Apply C. M. SNOWDEN-
P. O  Box 17, Princeton, B. C-
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FOR  SALE
For sale lot  twenty-eight   (28),   block
nineteen (19), on Bridge street.    Address
CHARLIE BURCH,
RF.D. No. 2        Ashland, Wisconsin
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ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL
R. B ANGUS, Esq., President
Sir EDWARD CLOUSTON, Bart , Vice-President
H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., General Manager
Capital
Reserve and Undivided Profits
SAVINGS
Deposits received from
$14,887,570.00
$16,855,18536
BANK
DEPARTHENT
Si upwards.    Ranching and Mining Business
given every attention
BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits may be made and withdrawn by mail.    Out of town accounts
receive eveiy attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted
PRINCETON BRANCH
B. L SMITH, Manager
STRAYED
Came to my premises, April 19 1912.
one yearling Clyde colt, bay, white legs,
white face, no brand. Owner can have
same bv proving property and paying all
expenses. JOHN BROMLEY.
Princeton, April 29, 1912.
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LIQUOR ACT, 1910
TijOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
■^ June next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial < olice for
the grant of a license for the sale of liquor by retail
in and upon the premises known as Ashnola Hot* 1
situate at Ashnola, in the Province of British Co -
umbia, upon "the lands described as Block 14, Lot
24. corner Third street and Third avenue.
Dated this 1st Day of May, 1912.
w. c. Mclean
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
FLESHERS   AND
FISH    DEALERS
■rr—_■—_n—-n_r"^__r—^——u—'-m    -i ir-~-i^r--____r-____r-___r--__r-~rr*-—rr
Prime Beef, Pork,  Mutton.   Salmon,   Halibut,
riackerel, Herring.   Eggs, Butter, Lard
Largest Dealers in the West PRINCETON,  B. C.
lop! Rank ol c«ii
CAPITAL,       -       -       - $6,993,000
RESERVE UNDIVIDED PROFITS,   $8,275,000
A General Banking Business Transacted
DEPOSITS MAY- BE MADE FROM $1 UP
Special attention given to out of town accounts
Interest allowed on savings accounts at higest current
rates.    Dratts and money orders sold on all  points.
Summer Goods
We are showing some neat patterns in Seagrass Chairs and
Rockers. These are very nice for either verandah or inside
use—comfortable, durable and inexpensive.
Hammocks and Picnic Baskets are also among the goods
we are offering for summer. If you are going camping or
picnicing it will be to your interest to see these
A. L. WHITE'S Furniture Store
PRINCETON BRANCH        G. M. K. MACLEOD, Manager
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar Shingles  $3.50 per M
TUTODERN WOODMEN
iVi OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondavs, in the Odd
fellows* Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL, Clerk.
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
T. CLARK KING
Architect
Graduate of the Art and Science Department
Kensington, London, Eng.
Member of the Alberta Architectural Association.
Plans and  Specifications  of Buildings  furnished  at reasonable rates
Office : KING & GIBSON
Vermilion Av. Princeton, B.C., Phone 18
O. R. BOUCHER
ARCHITECT
Coalmont, B.C.
_-__-_-_------_----------_B_____^__a__________a______^__B___________a________a_
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
Sli_^^__l^^^_iiiw^i_______l_l_lli
I   ...Hotel...   I
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I    TULAMEEN, B.C.    jfc
X       Good Fishing, Boating'       X
♦|« Mining Centre ♦*♦
l__rs.L J. Henderson I
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SCHOOL REPORT.
Following is the April report of the
first department of Princeton public
school, Miss E. McCaffrey, teacher:
Senior IV—Doris Lyall, 6y, Gladys
Coulthard, 61.
Junior IV—John Osborne, 56; Effie
McLean, 52.
Senior III—Victoria Hunter, 69; Fred
Schisler, 69; Ada Kirkpatrick. 59; George
Prest, 52; Joe Lloyd, 49; Annie Cunningham, 48; Bruce McLean, 44; Archie
Courtney, 40; Theodore Prest, 39.
Senior II—Mary Young 85; Kathleen
Kirkpatrick, 73; Margaret Norman, 61;
Earl Jackson, 53; Birtney Osborne, 40;
Powell Courtney, 37; Jav Dillard, 32;
Wencel Semerad, 30; Jessie Hayes, 26;
lohn Oelrich, —.
Some pupils missed some examinations.
"MODEL"
LIVERY STABL
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of  Rigs—Good   Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
__©®iI_l_LD_____IS0_
R P. COOK
General Merchant
Miners' outfitter
Princeton,   Granite Creek
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Christian Science lesson -sermon subject for Sunday next: 'Adam and fallen
man.' In that day I will taise up the
tabernacle of David that is fallen; . . .
I will raise up his ruins, and I will build
it as in the days of old.—Amos 9:11.
Methodist church service, Sunday
May 12. In Oddfellows' hall, at 7:30
p.m. ; cement works at II a.m.
Presbyteri tn church services—Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service in the
court house, 7:3". Coalmont—Morning
seivice, 11 a.m.
Subject next Sunday: 'The parable
of the sower.'
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPKRT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All  Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given co  all
Mail   Orders.
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M. S. WILSON
-DEALER IN—
Wall Papers, Burlaps, House
Lining, Etc.
Paints, Oils, Varnishes and Stains
Brushes of all kinds. Hearth Rugs
and Decorative Brass Goods.
Try our JTapIe Leaf Paints and
you will be convinced that they are
the best on the Market. FULLY
GUARANTEED.
Estimates given on all classes
of Decorating
We purchase direct from the Manufacturer
and can give you close prices.
.$5
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Priest
Photographer
Princeton
—■"'    1      ir    i.i-_--C______m______i___________________bb
Scavengers
JOHNSON & REHN
Work promptly attended to. Town
health regulations complied with ; lawful
sanitary conditions in force. Orders may
be left at C. Willarson & Co's.
WATER NOTICE.
For a license to take and use water.
Notice is hereby given that Similkameen
Power Company, I imited, of Vancouver, will
apply fra license to take and use twenty cubic
feet per second of water out of Red creek, which
flows in a westerly and southerly direction
through crown lands and tmptiesinto Fivemile
creek, near Similkameen river. The w__ter will
be diverted at the falls about two miles from the
junction of Red creek with Fivemile creek and
will be used for power purposes on the land at
the mouth of Red creek and to be sold within a
radius of thirty miles thereof.
This notice was posted on the ground on the
4th day of May, 1912. The application will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder at Nicola.
Objections may be filed with the said Water
Recorder   or   with   the   Comptroller  of  Water
Rights, Parliament Buildfngs, Victoria, B. C
SIMILKAMEEN POWER COMPANY, Limited,
Applicants.
By 3. A. Cleveland. Agent,
WATER NOTICE
For a license to store or pen back water.
Notice is hereby given that Similkameen
Power Company, Limited, of Vancouver, will
apply for a license to store or pen back twelve
hundred acre feet of water from Red Creek, a
stream flowing in a westerly and southerly direction and emptying into Fivemile creek rear
Similkameen river. The water will be stored in
two reservoirs of 200 acre feet and 1000 acre feet
capacity, respectively, to be built at the falls of
the creek and at a ooint approximately one mile
up cre< k from the falls, and will be used for
power purposes as authorized under a notice of
at>plicatiou for a license to take and use water,
posted herewith, ou the land described as crown
lands at the mouth of Red creek; the power lobe
sold within a radius of thirty miles thereof.
This notice was posted on the ground on the
4th day of May, 1912. The application will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder at Nicola.**
Objections  may  be  filed with the said Water
Recorder   or   with   the   Comptroller   of Water
Rights. Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B C.
SIMILKAMEEN POWER COMPANY, Limited,
Applicants.
By E. A. Clevfland, Agent.
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIETOKS
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments !!
BATH ROOflS, ETC.
Commercial _* Sample _* Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
Great Northern
—Hotel—
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
PRINCETON,
B.C.
KARL H. MORSE
Ladies and Gents' Tailoring
CLEANING and PRESSING
Similkameen Hotel
SUMMERS « WARM.
PROPRIETORS
Vermilion Ave. opp. Similkameen Hotel,
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
Regular meetings. 8 p
^^=, ^a—i-        m., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate  In
Thomas Block.   •' Oddfellows Hall."
Jas. Gellatly. P. Russell,
Noble Grand. Secretary
Large and New buildin,, well Furnished and Plastered; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
 I*!.:;.!-.   ■
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May 8, 1912,
May 8, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. n. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
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Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Monday.
PRINCETON WATERWORKS.
The necessity for a good and
serviceable water system for a
town such as Princeton needs no
argument to substantiate. Pure
water is a vital requirement and
plentiful water is a chief factor in
cleanliness and fire protection. No
•town making any pretentions toward modern civilization and pro
gress can afford to neglect its water
•system. Other and less important
adjuncts of an embryonic city may
be deferred but an efficient water
supply demands instant attention.
A circular letter issued by the
Princeton Waterworks Company
has been given Star, liberal extracts
from which will present the proposition of raising money for increasing plant efficiency and extending
supply   to  "intending    consumers.
The circular will be distributed to
citizens inviting subscriptions for
stock and is as follows:
'Dear Sir: In view of the rapid growth
of the town of Princeton it is most im
perative that the water system should be
extended and improved in order to meet
the demands of consumers and at the
same time insure adequate fire protection.
' You are urgently requested to co
operate with the Water Works Company
by taking up some of the shares now
being issued in order to provide funds
necessary for these purposes.
Up to the present date the entire cost
of installing and operating the water
works system (with the exception of no
shares) has been borne by the Princeton
Coal and Land Company, and this company feels that you and other citizens
of Princeton whose interests are so deeply
involved in the growth and welfare of the
town should not hesitate to do all in your
power to assist.
'Every effort is being made to provide
the town with an efficient water supply,
and the operating expenses are being
conducted with the greatest economy,
but it must be borne in mind that these
expenses are proportionately very much
greater than will be the case when there
are a larger number of consumers.    *   *
* * ' During a recent visit, Mr. Reeves
of the Insurance Company- of North
America, expressed the opinion that with
some small additions to the present fire
equipment a reduction in fire insurance
rates might  reasonably be expected.      *
* * ' In conclusion, we wish to point
out that the value of all property held in
the town is greatly increased by a proper
extension and maintenance of the water
system and that as the town increases in
s'ze and population the value of this stock
will be greatly enhanced.
'Appreciating the support you have
already given us and trusting that you
will see your way to further assist us
by an application for shares, we remain,
yours, faithfully, Princeton Waterworks
Co., Limited.'
There are many citizens who
could out of their surplus invest in
the Princeton Waterworks company
and thus help to place it on a basis
commensurate with the growing
needs of the town. There are
many workingmen who could invest, say $25, in shares which
would iu all likelihood prove a
profitable 'nest egg' in the future.
And, although the circular is addressed to citizens more particularly
it is not improbable that outside
subscriptions would be welcome as
well as those at home. The share
capital of the company is $25,000,
divided into 5,000 shares of $5 each.
Form of application for shares may
be obtained either at the company's
office or at the Canadian Bank of
Commerce.
KEREMEOS KRUMBS
Keremeos,    May    6.—The    irrigation
ditch ou the Lowe ranch  has been  completed.
A general raid on bacteria, microbes
and all disease breeding germs, has been
made by the cleaning up brigade and
Keremeos now presents a pretty and
healthy appearance.
A grand celebration will be held on
Victoria day at Keremeos.    The program
will consist of horseracing, trapshooting
for the Shatford cup, baseball and other
sports. In the evening a grand ball will
be held to which everybody will be welcome. A prize of $100 will begiven winners in the baseball tournament.
Efforts will be made to have a special
train service between Coalmont and
Keremeos on Victoria day for the accommodation of visitors
The fruit crop is very promising at
present and if nothing unioward happens
there will be a bumper yield this yeur.
H. C Etches, our genial and obliging
postmaster, took a run up the valley last
week and reports prosperity wherever he
went.
It is expected the Princeton brass band
with its excellent repertoire of music will
be in attendance and enliven the commemoration of Victoria day.
HOTEL   ARRIVALS.
At the Tulameen: G O Sedgwick, H
Woodruff, J J Warren, E Foley Bennett,
S H Parsons, C C Brownell, Penticton;
H C Etches, Keremeos; J O'Roylance,
London, England; R T Lawrence, Spokane; H E Evans, Hosmer, B C; Robert
Stevenson, town; J T Ryan, G SJermyn,
Coalmont; E Voigt, Voigt camp; Frank
Sheel, H Foster, Loomis; Frank Mansfield Granite; John Donohoe, Ashnola;
Rod Atkins, Indian rese ve.
At the Similkameen: Mike Gavnor,
G C Smith, Mike O'Brien, H Brown,
Hedley; M H Reese, Spokane; F H Prosser, L M Hale, L McDonald, W A Read,
W McDonald, Vancouver; C Beamish,
Coalmont; E A Rice, Tulameen; E D
Mitchell, W G Scoit, Nelson; W P Welby,
C A Gales, J Goodwin, Penticton; W J
Budd, Calgary; T C Tolson, J H Quinu,
Greenwood; E B Ford, Marcus.
W.J.  Budd,  manager   of  the   B.   C.
Cement Co., arrived yesterday.
EMS
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THE MAN WHO CAN FORESEE
THE TOMORROW OF
EAST
CETON
WILL MAKE MONEY BY INVESTING THERE
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY Jl
A riODEL CITY
Water system.
Electric light.
Cement walks.
Natutal parks.
Nicely wooded.
Fine garden soil.
Athletic grounds.
Excellent drainage.
No danger from overflow.
Can have fine sewer system.
Wide streets and lanes.
Local aud long distance phone system.
A PAYROLL CITY NOW
Furnished by the B C. Portland Cement
Co.: Cenient, Lime, Bricks.
United Empire Co. : Coal and Copper.
Princeton Coal & Land Co. : Coal.
Princeton Lumber Mills Co. ; Sawmill.
B.C. Copper Co.: Copper.
The Platinum-Gold Fields Co.: Placer
Mining.
One thousand men will be employed
inside of year.
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A RAILROAD CENTER   ♦♦♦
The Kettle Valley railroad, which will *^
soon be the main line of the C.P.R. sys- *&
tern, brings Vancouver 300 miles nearer  *jr
1
Winnipeg, passes through the townsite.
Final survey is now being made.
The Great Northern has tracks on two ^P
sides of the townsite  and will soon be vy'
finished to Vancouver.   These two roads ..>
give transportation in all directions from  4 .>
East Princeton. A*.
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Natural centre, ranching country,   fruit  growing.    Huge  deposits  ot copper,   gold, silver, platinum and other minerals.    Has £
big water power development.    Lots in such towns as Grand Forks,   Kamloops,  Blairmore,  Alta., Baker, Wash., are worth 5 times ♦
what is  being   asked at East Princeton and the payroll is not as large. ***
FREE CEMENT walks with each lot sold—cleared streets.    Water main to be laid in streets this summer. «-.
BUSINESS LOTS $450 up : Terms 10 p.c. cash, 5 p.c. per mo.      Residence lots, $200 up :   Terms, 10 p.c. cash,  $10  per mo. A
Get full particulars at once. J>+
C. R. BRIGGS, Gen. Agent, 6I5 Hastings W., Vancouver. D. G. McCURDY, Resident Agent, East Princeton, B.C.      A
m
4&****?*t^*A*************^^
7 p.c. on annual balances.    (% of all lots are to be reserved) for future sale.
THOMAS BROS.
GREAT REDUCTION
Ills   IN   PRICES
Men's Suits
Men's Summer  Underwear
Men's Fancy Summer Shirts
Ladles'  Summer Blouses
IN   GREAT   VARIETY
PRICES TO SUIT
THOMAS BROS., Merchants
PRINCETON, B. C.
Plumbing and Heating, Sheet Metal
If   WOM, Tinsmilhing    S
Shop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St., in 'Murdock's blacksmith shop'
DIGNAN & ATKIN   ||
PRACTICAL WORKMEN—PROPRIETORS
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
k_5"__5__5__5__.*__..__*^
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CARLE
1 Headquarters for Groceries, Vege=
I tables and Provisions
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♦{> Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Cranberries
4
Y ORDERS   PROriPTLY   ATTENDED
V ____________________________________________
I.
1 0.    H.    CARLE,    THE   GROCERYMAN
p*f^z**z**z**i**i**i**z**i**i**i^ . _*&.
Read  the advertisements carefully then make  your
purchases==No reason now to send away.
OPINION OF CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Editor Star—Sir: In your issue of
April 3rd you have an article based on a
very brief reference to my lecture in
Penticton. That reference, because of its
very brevity, is somewhat misleading.
In what I said I had no intention of
making an attack on Christiau Science.
To say that it is related to Buddhism is a
compliment to Christian Science and is
very far from being equivalent to comparing Christianity with heathenism.
Buddhism is one of the great religious
systems of the world and for centuries
has influenced a very large proportion of
the human race, and competent scholars
recognize in it and Confucianism, Mohammedanism, etc., not false systems,
but imperfect ones each having a measure
of truth, but falling far short of Christianity, the ultimate truth about God,
man and the universe. In my lecture I
was urging upon my audience a greater
seriousuess in attempting to understand
the great central ideas of the religion
they professed. At the same time I tried
to show that the intermingling' of races
which is gOThg on in so many ways in
our day was bringing into our midst
ideas and systems of thought lower and
less full than Christianity and only
serious thought could distinguish the
lower forms fioru the higher.
In this connection I referred to Christian Science as one of these partial sjs-
tems, which though it might prove helpful to some who are within the Christian
church, but who have nev r grasped the
significance of Christianity, yet in so far
as it is intelligible at all, is thoroughly
Buddhistic in its central ideas. Of
course Buddhism itself is only one form
of the pantheism which is the substratum
of most of the ^religious thought of India
How like these Indian s3-stems Christian
Science is may be seen from a remark of
Pundita Ramabai, one of the most remarkable Christian women of our time,
who is a native of British India and
knows its religions and their results
thoroughly. After a careful study of Chris
tian Science she says: ''Ifyoli wish to see
the moral fruits of Christian Science
teachings, where they have time and opportunity to mature, go to India." The
ordinary layman can see for himself the
close kinship between Buddhism and
Christian Science and the vast diffeience
between these two systems and Christianity from the following among hundreds of similar facts which might be
adduced:
First—As to God. Christianity teaches
that God is a personal spirit, perfectly
good, who in holy love creates, sustains
end orders all things. Christian Science
teaches that "God is all and all is God."
"God is principle." In the third edition
of Science and Health (1881), Mrs. Eddy
distinctly sta,es "God is not a person,
God is principle." In "No and Yes" she
says: "God is love and love is principle,
not person." Buddhism knows no God
but the All into which all beings are
finally absorbed.
Second—As to prayer. Christianity
believing that God and man are personal
beings believes that the fullest communion is possible between them and in
prayer adores, supplicates, offers thanksgiving and expresses desire for those
things which bring the soul more fully
into harmony with God. Christian
Science believing God to be principle
alone simple makes affirmation about it
and man's relation to it. Nothing else is
needed to show the Christian Science
idea of prayer but a study of the per
version of the Lord's prayer used in every
Christian Science service. Buddhism
does not believe in prayer excepting in
the same kind of affirmation as Christian
Continued on page 6.
OUR  25c I
PAPETERIE I
IS  A    WINNER 4
= 5
Plain and Ruled T
* Paper, of good qual= f
»   ity, with Envelopes
t   to match
V            v
Drug and
Bookstore
GEO. G. LYALL, Manager.
_^<x:
Real Estate, Finance, Mines
The Door of   Opportunity is
Wide Open.
The ' West' affords many examples of fortunes
made from ground floor investments. Winnipeg",
__lgary, Edmonton and Vancouver had a similar
beginning to that of Princeton. Fortunes have
been made in real estate from a very small investment. Princeton, which includes East Princeton,
has undoubtedly the best prospects of any town
oh the map. Invest while the town is yet in its
infancy and see prices steadily rise.
FOR SALE:
Lot on Bridge -Street, within 100 yds. south of
Vermilion av.
ToWnsite Welldo. Two railways—gold-platinum
placers, ore and coal mining.
Ranch l'A miles west of Princeton. 192 acres,
$3,000.
Two lots in Hedley, inside and corner. Price
$200 and $250—Also in east addition op. Mr. Smiths
house.   Price $350.
Lot 6, block 24, house rents for $6 per mo., $600,
Agricultural land, near Coalmont, 80 acres, $1600
Claim in diamond belt, $500; locations made.
Mineral properties. •
Water power.
Suburban acreage to lease.
Address :    J. M. WRIGHT,
Princeton. B.C., Canada.
COUNTY   COURT, YALE
A sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Wednesday,
8th day of May, 1912 at the hour of 2:30 o'clock in
the afternoon.   By command.
HUGH HUNTBR,
Registrar County Court.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910.
TvJOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
*^ June next, application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police for the grant
of a license for the sale of liquor by retail in and
upon the premises known as the Great Northern
Hotel, situate at Princeton, in the Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as
Block 4, Lot 8, corner Bridge street and Harold
^venue^!; jc_«*i _
Dated this 24th day of Apri£f1912.
PETER SWANSON, Applicant.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that George Laurie Fraser, ol
Coalmont, B. C., occupation mine manager, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing at
a post planted at southeast corner of Lot 378,
thence running south 40 chains, west 60 chains,
north 40 chains, east 60 chains, to point of commencement, containing 240 acres, more or less.
G. L. FRAS-5R;
Coalmont, B. C, March 25,1912.
 /**y_,J_8---» "*"
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May 8, 1912,
PRINCETON
The sun Kissed simll-
hameen District
Land of Beautiful Scenery and
Healthful Climate |
Land of Vast, Varied Mineral
and other Resources
Land of Big Game, Fowl,
Fish, Natural Reserves
Land of the Prospector and
Homeseeker, the Capitalist and
Investor
Land of Promise, Hope and
Prosperous Days—Come and See
If you want to keep in touch
with Princeton and District. .
Subscribe for the Star
$2 PER ANNUM
OPINION OF CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
'  From 5th Page.
Science teaches, i.e., the attempt to submerge the human consciousness in the
All which it believes is the final goal
of the soul.
Third—As   to  the  material   universe.
Christianity   teaches   that   the  material
universe is  a real  n.anifestation  of the
divine spirit, that it has great laws which
can be understood  and. applied   for  the
unfolding and enrichment of the human
spirit.    From this Christian attitude has
grown up the splendid  science  which is
doing  so   much   for   the   comfort   and
advancement of humanity.      Buddhism
teaches that the material universe  is an
unreal world of seeming to be got   rid   of
by   denying   its   existence   and   slowly
ceasing   to   rely upon'It, until even the
life of man itself is swallowed  up in   the
ocean of non-being, the All, which is the
only   supreme   being   Buddhism and all
pantheistic  systems  know.     The   result
of this is that there is no science, no great
beneficient ministry of nature to man  in
the land where Buddhism has held sway
for   centuries.      Christian    Science   has
exactly this Buddhistic   idea   abcut   the
material universe calling it an   error   of
mortal mind and  if it were conceivable
that Christian Science   would   some day
He universally accepted   all   our   manufactories, our universities, our benevolent
institutions   would  cease to   be and the
magnificent achievements of the scientists, the philosophers, the toilers in every
realm   which   deals   with serious  mind
with   the   material   universe   would   l:e
thrown on the scrap pile.
For instance, Mrs. Eddy says: "The
daily ablutions of an infant are no more
necessary than it would be necessary to
take a fish out of water once a day and
cover it with dirt in order to make it
thrive more vigorously thereafter in its
native element." And again: ''My
favorite s'.udies were natural philosophy,
logic a_d moral science. To my brother
Albert I was indebted for .essons in the
ancient tongues, Hebrew, Greek and
Latin. My brother studied Hebrew
during bis college vacations. After my
discovery of Christian Science most of the
knowledge I had gleaned from school
books vanished like a dream." I regret
that your challenge and the thoroughly
characteristic eulogium of Christian
Science with which you accompany it
makes it necessary to give my reasons for
the statement I made in my lecture as I
know from fifteen years cf association
with Ch:isiiati Scientists and study of
their system that they bitterly resent
anything that looks like criticism of their
peculiar tenets and maintain one of the
most expensive and far reaching publicity
bureaus in the world to counteract any
such criticism.
I know many Christian Scientists who
are beautiful Christian characters, but
they are such because of what they have
carried over from the Christian church.
No man can accept the claims which
Mrs. Eddy makes for herself and reltnaiii
a Christian. Whatever is good in the
system is found in Buddhism and a dozen
other pantheistic systems Whatever.is
characteristic of Christian Science as snch
is not only not Christian, but actively
anti-Christian. It only maintains its
plausible claim to be Christian by using
Christian words in a sense entirely different to that given them by Christians.
If yon will take the eulogium which you
quote in your editorial and insert for the
great words used there their real Christian
Science meanings, you will see how
quickly the seemingly Christian claims of
Christian Seience vanish. These are:
God—principle, Christ—idea of truth,
Christianity—Christian Science, theology
«_><}$_»_»^$<^>$^>{_S^_$4<g_g_3_$44i
I Real Estate, Mines I
I =Financc=
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Do you want to Invest
Ground floor price?
Double your money inside of one year
TWO LOTS mm
_._*.__.    one front>
ing on Bridge street, corner of
Tapton avenue, and the other
facing Tapton avenue. House,
woodshed and cellar. House
rents for $7 per month.
PRICE $1100
Half cash,   balance equal instalments 6 and :2 months
Location   suitable   for  Store,
Boarding House, etc.
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J. M. WRIGHT
Real Estate, Finance and Mines
PRINCETON, B. C.
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DO YOU WANT:
Continued on page 7.
Letterheads
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Meal Tickets
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PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY!
STAR QUICK PRINT
FOR SALE
TWO and one-half   acres   suitable   for
garden, in good state of cultivation;
cellar; house; on Similkameen river.
Price, $200 cash.    Apply to
WONG SING.
jghv
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May 8, 1912
THli    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
The Pflpceion
Livery g Feed
statues
N. HUSTON, P.0PT
General Livery business carried on
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   L.  CUMMINGS,  Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc. |
General Blacksmithing.
Carriage Building and  Repairs
> All Work Neatly & Promptly
f Phone 28. Executed
J. KNUDSON
Contractor   and   Builder
OPINION OF CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
From 6th Pase.
—Science and Health (Mrs. Eddy's bpok)
religion—Christian Science. If you or
any of your readers want to study the
subject more fully I would refer to
Christian Science, the Faith and its
Founder, by Lyman P. Powell, published
by G. P. Putnam, New York. But I fear
that I have trespassed on your space too
much. If, in any case, I have misrepresented Christian Science, I am willing to apol
ogize, as I have no other desire than the
triumph of truth.    Sincerely yours,
JOHN MACKAY.
Vancouver, April 22, 1912.
Estimates Famished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
Westwood & Brooke
POULTRY FARM
PRINCETON, - British Columbia
I SPOKESMAN "
'. This While Leghorn male bird won 2nd prize
Spokane Poultiv show. ign. .ilso headed 2nd
priz^ pen at same-show. He Is sired by ist prize
winner at Spokane Poultry Show, 1911, which
also won ghape and color specials at same show.
Al«o was ist prize winner at Seattle in igio.
We a e now hocking orders for  Hgg Settings,
at d f .1 ward same when required by customers
. I'kn No. 1—Our selected prize winning stock,
$5 per setting of 15 eggs.
Pen No. 2—A. choice pen that   will  produce
winners and layers, $3 per setting of 15 eggs.
Prn No. 3—A sp endid utility pen for egg production. $1.50 per setting of 15 egg .
' Book your orders early. Terms cash with order.
Address:   PRINCETON, B. C.
[Replying to the above letter it is due
to say that the writer of this note has no
authority on behalf of Christian Science
to controvert misstatements regarding it
and is not, as yet, a member of that
church. He has been a student of
Christian Science for the past two years,
daily reading the Bible and the text
book, 'Science and Health.' Born and
bred an Anglican, then Baptist, and
identified with other orthodox churches
and Christian work, earnestly searching
for the truth and that promised peace and
happiness to those who diligently seek it,
he has no hesitation in testifying that
Christian Science is the best interpretation of the scriptures—it is the very religion that Jesus, the Christ, taught and
practised. No other re.igious teaching
combines the work of soul saving, healing
of sin ami sickness,), with curing bodily
ills. Yet these were the works of Jesus
which he demonstrated before the multitude and finally in his great commission
told hi* followers in all ages to do as he
did. Dr. Mackay is not a true tollower,
for while he .may teach and preach he
makes no effort to heal the sick by the
power of God, Spirit, in whom we live
and move and have our being and whom
we must worship in Spirit and truth.
This power to heal is the privilege and
right of the humble fisherman a* well as
the doctor of divinit>. But as God is all
in all, omnipotent, no trust in material
remedies can please him—Jesus did not
use them. Long litters to tLe press
a complish nothing by faintly praising
I Christian Science here and depreca-
1 ting it there. In saying that a compliment is paid Christian Science in its
alleged relationship to Buddhism he indulges in unadulterated sarca_m. As to
the intelligibility of the book, Science
and Health, that depends on the spirituality of the person reading it—the Bible
is full of contradictions and absurdities if
interpreted by the carnal mind which
wars against spirit. As to the Lord's
prayer, pantheism and the 'bitterness' of
Scientists of which the learned doctor
wr.tes, readers are asked to refrain irom
judgment until they have read Science
and Health with Key to the Scriptures.
Regarding the charge that Scientists
'maintain one of the most expensive and
far reaching publicity bureaus in the
world,' it is true that their literature is in
much demand and their daily newspaper
is a model of cleanliness and wholesome
reading. Includid in the membership of
Christian Science churches are judges,
doctors aud ministers formerly of the
same denomination as Dr. Mackay. No
attempt is made to proselytize; the worn
of healing pronounced incurable cases
abandoned by doctors together with
ordinary ills backed by the testimony of
thousands has attracted many to ihts
teaching. But it is in spiritual uplift
and happiness that C. S. commends itself
to the world generally. As the Stir is
a mining and general utility newspaper
it is scarcely the proper medium for a
protracted religious controversy, therefore the discussion must now end.—Ed.]
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I  Fishing Tackle    M
This is another new line we have added to our stock this year
and a most complete one at that. In its selection we have been
especially careful to obtain and offer for sale only such goods as are
demanded by this locality. Therefore, no matter how inexperienced
a fisherman you may be, you will get results with the tackle bought
from us. Our fishing rods are sensitive to the faintest nibble of the
gamey trout, aud are strong enough to land even the big fellow that
in the proverbial fish story always get away.   We have:
Two piece Bamboo Rods, complete with guides, 50c. each.
Three piece Split Bamboo Rods,
silk wound, cork handle,
snake guides, extra tip, nickel
plated reel ferrule, at $1 75
and $2.50 each.
Four piece Split Bamboo Rods,
with extra tip, snake guides,
cork handle, silk wound,
nickel plated reel ferrule.
This rod is 8 foot long when
put together and is short
enough when taken down to
go in a suit case. Each $2
and $3.
Steel Rods, 3 piece, the Luckie,
$2 50; cork handles, the
Rainbow, $3.50.
One piece collapsible Steel
Rods, best Bristol rod, maple
handle, line runs through
center of rod, 9 ft. long, $5.
Braided Trout Lines, oiled silk,
waterproof, 25 yds on card,
25c, 50c, 75c, $1 per card.
60 yard reels from 40c to $1
Gut Leaders, 6 ft. long, with
extra loops, 15c and 20c each
Landing Nets, $2.50 each.
Wicker Baskets, $1.50 and $2.
Trout Spinners, Hendrix, all
sizes, that are needed in this
locality, 25c each.
Trout Flies, specially dressed
spring steel hooks, every good
fly that a trout desires in the
assortment, per dozen, 35c.
Trout Bait Hooks, mounted on
gut, per dozen, 30c.
The A. E. HOWSE CO, Ltd
PRINCETON,- aC
♦♦-, A***A4**************4%*^^
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W&i^4l**il*+4MLi*4-**4y'*&ffl
KING & GIBSON       I
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
bb*bb*bb*bb*bb*4b\b********S***4************
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
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OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
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PRINCETON, B.C. X
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~z**z**z~z**z*°***z>**<<<******<*^^^^
Mi ONT
The Town of opportunity
The rails have been  laid  into  the town and Coalmont is now the new
terminus,   the  base  of operations for  the next  forty miles of railway
building.
Before six months have passed there should be a payroll in Coalmont of
between   350  and  400  men : This  means population, which naturally
means good business.
IF YOU ARE WISE YOU will  invest in a little Coalmont real estate
now while the choice is still good.
Don't let this opportnnity slip  along  with  the  others  which have got
past you.    Write for our circular and  price list; a post card will bring
it to you.    There are still some so-foot lots left
Two blocks from the centre of town at only
$225, $55 cash, bal. in 18 months to suit.
Williamson  & Turner!
AGENTS, COALflONT,  B. C.
i
 ..■HI
 ; _ _ - —.	
8
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May 8, 1912,
LET
MELON
WITH  INVESTORS
Sell them fPrinceton Real Estate
Make Money out of Old Earth
hliisQ
'"T"rHE probabilities of success in real estate speculation are in pro-
■■■ portion to your faith in the possibilities of a town or country*
Princeton has possibilities--some say her possibilities are illimitable. It
would be a blind, unreasonable faith, for one to invest, say, in the great
Sahara desert or inside the Arctic circle. It is different with Princeton
to most towns—the position, the possibilities, the resources all are prima
facie, self-evident-=a blind man can see them with his mental eye.
Opportunity rarely knocks more than once or twice at your door arid
lightning never strikes twice in the same place. This analogy illustrates
how carefully one should exercise sound judgment in the when, how and
I where* of investment in real estate. There is land for everyone if the
other fellow does not gobble more than his share. Remember, single
tax is comfng,*a_u_ then land values will jump skyward. Princeton is
th§ Center of cdalVore and placer mining. Good grazing and agricultural
land. Beautiful climate, fishing, hunting. Two railroads will afford
transportation. Electric light, waterworks, hospital, etc. Write the
Princeton Coal & Land Co., or better still, come and see for yourself
WRITE   OR    CONSULT    THE
Primoetoa Goal & Laml fSm.
(!   ;    _   iv--
E.   WATERMAN,   Manager
Owners of Townsite and the Best Domestic Coal produced
1
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