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Similkameen Star 1911-11-08

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 ipt
No choked pipes or flues if Princeton coal is used.
Politeness is natural with the real lady or gentleman.
Two railroads, will serve Pririceton and * district in the near future; the Great Northern (V.,V.& E.)t is already here and the
C P.R., (K.R.V.), is building—Investments made now will increase rapidly—Large industrial enterprises will be established.
Vol. XII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1911.
No. 45.
BUILDING IS ACTIVE
Large Number of Buildings in
Course of Erection in
'Old Town/
Business Block on Bridge Street Receiving Foundations—First
Church Structure.
Contractor Knudson is losing no time
on the A. E. Howse building. The big
cellar excayation was quickly made by
Hans Lof with his horse power scrapers.
The cement foundations are now being
made and the carpenters will soon have
the frame of the building in position.
When finished this structure will be a
prominent addition to the business houses
on Bridge street, and will represent an
expenditure of some $10,000.
Max Wilson has his handsome bungalow ready for occupation on the corner of
Lime and Billiter avenue. The architecture of this dwelling attracts considerable
attention, and many favorable comments
are heard.
T. C. King has his dwelling house on
Ve milion avenue far advanced and will
shortly be in occupation. Wm. Cleaverly
i the contracting carpenter for this building. Mr. King is an architect of wide ex
perience and the prettiness of design,
combined with an air of comfort and
stability which feature this building,
testify of his ability.
Forsyth Bros, have completed thejr
comfortable and good appearing house ou
Tapton avenue, which gives tone and a
certain air of prosperity to this part of the
town.
C. Bromfield has -finished his row of
tenements on Riverside/-.enue, and they
are proving to be^/c real necessity for
working men.
Wm. Thomas is finishing his two cottages on Kenley avenue and already has
applicants for rent.
J. J. Priest, photographer, has recently
moved into his new house on Kenley ave.,
and is n~w partakiug the comforts of this
cosy cottage.
[gert Irwin is finishing up his own reside on Kenley avenue and will shortly
b_ able to live in what promises to be a
happy home. When painted, thig<_ouse
will favorably compare with\^my in the
town.
J. Thompson has painted and improved
the McMullen residence on" Endcliffe
avenue, which he has recently purchased.
F. Stamper has built a dwelling on
Bridge street between Riverside and Tap-
ton avenues.
The Anglican church is making good
progress, and Contractor Kansky is push
ing the work with energy.
A number of buildings are in course of
construction and projected throughout
the town to which Star will in future refer. A real, live building boom may be
expected with the early spring.
RAILWAY POINTS.
M__* E. Brooks, engineer for the C.P.R.,
has a party located near Osprey lake, on
Fivemile creek, and is running a line
down to near its mouth on the Similka
meen river. This line affords an alterna
tive route for the Kettle River railw
and will continue up the Similkamare^0
East Piinceton cement works, Princeton
coal mines and the coal mines at Coal
mont, thence through Ottei valley to the
head of Coldwater, where now st.el is
laid from Merritt.
Five miles of grading contract on the
Kettle River railway has been let to L.
M. Rice, from Penticton towards Princeton, and outfits of graders are at work
now. As soon as a practicable route has
been fonnd near Summerland, contracts
will be let covering much of the fifty
miles between that point and Princeton
The fifth crossing of the Tulameen
river between Princeton and Coalmont
has been made, and tracklaying will be
resumed. Steel is expected at Coalmont
by the end of the present week. Now
that the false work is all in place, work
on the superstructure of the five bridges
will begin. It is not probable that the
Coalment stretch will be open for regular
traffic before the new year.
THE WEEKLY GRIST
First Flurry of the f Beautiful
Snow,' but It Soon
Goes Off.
Hospital Auxiliary   Chooses  Officers
.an_tj(_nnounces Annual Grand
Masquerade Ball.
EAST PRINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, November 6—W. J.
Budd arrived from Vancouver today.
J. MacDonald, contractor, has started
work on the Similkameen bridge and will
rush it >6/fcompletion. The bridge is a
Howe_fa_3S with two spans ofVso and 100
feel^reepective lengths, t'tae approaches
will be about two hundred^feet in length.
The Methodist church has secured two
lots on the corner of Seventh avenue and
Portland street. They will erect a church
at once.
D. G. McCurdy has built an ofBce on
the corner of Princeton street and Seventh
avenue, to be used temporarily as the
townsite office.
W. H. Carsly will start work shortly on
his residence on Ninth avenue.
Fred Keffer and Mr. Studenbaker, experts for the B.C. Copper Co., motored
from Greenwood on Monday and visited
Coalmont and Copper mountain.
Ben Baker has been recently at work
on the Duke of York erecting a large
bunk house.
The Great Northern 'needs the mon.'
Business has increased to such an extent
as to require three men at the railway
Station. \/
At the annual meeting of the Ladies'
Hospital Auxiliary, last Thursday, the
following officers were elected for the ensuing year: President, Mrs. Howse ; vice-
president, Mrs. Osborne ; secretary, Mrs.
McDougall ; treasurer, Mrs. Andras. The
auxiliary is in a flourishing condition and
has accomplished much good work during the past year. It is worthy of the
patronage of every lady, and the membership should be largely augmented during
the next year. The annual masquerade
ball will be held at the new year.
H A. Turner, road superintendent was
in town Saturday.
Mrs. J. D. Lumsden, some four weeks
ill, left on Friday for Vancouver, where
she will have special treatment. She was
accompanied by her husband and Mrs. W.
D Young, the latter kindly going as far
as Spokane to assist in the patient's care.
Many friends here will be glad to hear of
Mrs. Lvmsden's complete recovery.
H-y. Mfeausette, plumber and ainsmith,
has/fe<_)ened at the old stand in the
Infill .Slock.
R. Hewat, of Fairview, assessor and collector of Kettle river disU_cts, was in town
last Saturday on a business visit.
On the ist inst., at th&.residence of her
soninlaw, J. A. Bom#ard, Mrs. C. A.
Larabe passed awaySt the advanced age
of 76 years. She was born at Tamworth,
Ont., and has a sister and brother living
at Badax, Michigan, besides leaving three
daughters and one son. To the bereaved
relatives Star extends sincere sympathy.
The funeral service was conducted by the
Presbyterian missionary student, J. R.
Craig.
THE STAGE.
The Jeanne Russell Co. played to good
houses during their three engagements
in Princeton. Of the different plays presented the American Girl proved the
most popular and acceptable. The Devil
was played to a full.house Saturday night.
From a dramatic standpoint it was'tSs?
appointing, being full of inspired sug^es-'
tiveness and far fetched comedy. Miss
Russell, Mr. Brandon, Mr. Darnoclc and
Miss Beaton are finished actors, filling)
their respective roles with that instinctive
impersonation which proves that actors
are born, not made. In the vaudeville
Mr. Darnock was exceptionally funny
and took the audience by storm, while
III M'
Mr. Gray's singing won deserved encomiums.
The two colored entertainers, Sherrahs,
who were here recently in the I.O.O.F.
hall, presented a very humorous and
varied program. Some of the old darkie
songs were sweetly and soulfully rendered, carrying one back to familiar southern
scenes. The negro is naturally musical,
and in their plaintive songs are particularly interesting and winning. The
Sherrahs gave a clean and wholesome
performance and will be well received
here at any time.
King Kennedy, ventriloquist, magician
and moving picture exhibitor, will be in
Princeton shortly and give one of his
unique entertainments. King is now 37
years in the show business and he knows
how.
COALMONT NEWS.
Coalmont, November 4th, 1911 —The
Columbia Coal & Coke Co. are taking
advantage of the prevailing fine weather
to prosecuta a large amount of surface
work. Ten teams and a force of fifteen
men are at work grading a couple of long
sidiugb^OH tHe Company's ground. Two
miles of this work is to be completed as
soon as possible, and will afford room for
the storage of coal cars. Another gang
is busy constructing a large breakwater
for the purpose of diverting a branch of
the Tulameen and thereby reclaiming
about twelve acres of valuable .gronn"_~__r"'
thecompany.
Hankinson's railroad camp moved into
town about a week ago, and are at work
cleaning up the grade through the town
prepartory to the laying of the steel. The
last crossing of the Tulameen river will
be effected by Sunday evening, and the
'track-laying machine should arrive at
Coalmont by Tuesday night. It is stated
on good authority that as soon as the passenger service is inaugerated, the all-night
stop-over of the Great Northern trains at
Oroville will be cut out, the trains running
straight through from Spokane to Coalmont, the new terminus.
The Coal Co. are now making arrangements for the installation of a new saw
mill about a mile above town, on some
extensive limits which Have just been
acquired. The new inil/will cut 10,000
feet of lumber per daj. A spur will be
built by the companyconnecting the mill
yards with thevGjN. main line, so that
the product may?He delivered right at the
town without a great deal of teaming.
Mr. Jones, manager of the Nickel Plate
mines at Hedley was a visitor in town
this week, driving up from Princeton
with Mrs. Jones. This was Mr. Jones'
first visit to Coalmont, and he expressed
himself as being agreeably surprised at
the great headway which had been made
to date both at the mine and in the town.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Darrah arrived
from Merritt on Sunday last to take up
their residence here.
K>£»
 The veteran prospectors, Dick Roberts
and Alec Robb, who are working with A.
S. Johnstone, storekeeper and postmaster
at Poplar, Kootenay, claim to have discovered the famous lost mine of the
Bayonne country and show some old
hand-made tar-covered fuse and a box of
caps they assert had been left from ihe
previous workings over 25 ytars ago.
There is rich ore in the 200ft. tunnel as
well as in the surrounding rock, and the
samples brought in are of high values.
The advent of fuel oil has become an
important factor in railway locomotion.
It is estimated by the Unit d States Geological Survey that from 20,000,000 to
25,000,000 tons of coal per annum are replaced by oil, and a large part of this is
used by locomotives.
Last year the United States mined 501.
596,378 short tons of cpal or'riearly two
fifths of the year's total production for
the world. This coal would load a train
stretching back and fourth across the
United States from the Atlantic to the
Pacific 33 times—a train approximately
100,000 miles long. Eleven years ago tbe
United States for the first time surpassed
Great Britain "with a production of 253,-
741,192 tons, only a little more than half
of last year's output. The mere increase
of the coal output of the United States for
1910 over that of 1909—40,781,762 tons—
was greater than the total production of
any foreign country except Great Britain,
Germany, Austria, Hungary or France.
Last year 725,030 men mined coal in the
United States. The great coal production
record of igiowas made in spite of a series
of labor strikes participated in by 215,640
men. The loss in wages alone amounted
to nearly $30,000,000.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Anglican church services for next Sunday next, Nov. 12th: Princeton School
House, 11 a.m., Matins, Holy Corntnunicn
and Sermon. 7-30 p.m., Evensong and
Sermon.
Presbyterian church services.—Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
service, 11 a.m.
Methodist church service, Sunday,
Nov 12th. In Oddfellows' hall, at 7:30
p.m. ; cement works at 11 a.m.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject for Sunday, November 11: 'Mortals
and Immortals.' For ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus. And
if ye be Christ's, then are ye Abraham's
seed, and heirs according to the promise.
—Galatians 3 : 26, 29,
Similkameen Land & Mines
H. B. BROWN, Broker
443 Pender St. W. Vancouver, B.C.
Will Buy or Sell.
Nicola to Okanagan. ' Bulldog
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
TDOARD OF TRADE, PRINCE-
*-* TON, B. C. Meets first Monday in
each month.
J. D. Lumsden, K. C, Brown,'■
President. Secretary.
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given to  all
Mail  Orders.
A SHOWING OF
.NEW.:
Calabash Pipes
JUST RECEIVED
_**'    _3*f    _3*
It is not too early to think about
one for a present
SEE THE  WINDOW
b*t*^      .£&      Bfr*
PRINCETON
I)  $1.00 to $10.00 5
1
1
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Drug and
Bookstore
GEO. G. LYAI,_, Manager.
»_>"-_.
COUNTY  COURT, YALE.
A sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Friday, 13th
day of October, ign, at the hour of n o'clock in
the forenoon. By Command
HUGH HUNTER.
Registrar County Court.
UH____.NOTICE, the above court is postponed
to Friday, Nov. 3rd, 1911.
HUGH HUNTER.
_B^.NOTICE—The above court is postponed
until Friday, December ist, 191 r.
HUGH HUNTER.
Stomach trouble is but a symptom of, and not
In itself a true disease. We think of Dyspepsia,
Heartburn, and Indigestion as real diseases, yet
they are symptoms only of a certain specific
Nerve sickness—nothing else.
It was this fact that first correctly led Dr. Shoop
In the creation of that now very popular Stomach
Remedy—Dr. Shoop's Restorative. Going direct
to the stomach nerves, alone brought that success
and favor to Dr. Shoop and his Restorative. Without that original and highly vital principle, no
such lasting accomplishments were ever to be had.
For stomach distress, bloating, biliousness, bad
breath and sallow complexion, try Dr. Shoop's
Restorative—Tablets or Liquid—and see for yourself what it can and will do. We sell aud cheer,
fully recommend
Dr. Shoop's
Restorative
Advertise in the Similkameen Star,
Africa Crete
Arabia Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
CAPITAL - $10.000.000        REST, -   $8,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the folio wing countries without delay :
Greece New Zealand Siberia
Holland Norway Soudan
Iceland Panama South Africa
India Persia Spain
Ireland Pe™    . Straits Settlements
Italy Philippine Islands    Sweden
Japan Portugal Switzerland
Java Roumania Turkey
Fr'ch Cochin China Malta Russia United States
Germany^ Manchuria Servia Uruguay
Great Britain Mexico Siam West Indies, etc.
The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling-, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. A233
J. D. ANDRAS,  Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
Australia
Austria-Hungary
Belgium
Brazil j
Bulgaria
Ceylon
Chili
China
Egypt
Faroe Islands
Finland
Formosa
France
P. BURNS & Co
•
MEAT CONTRACTORS
Wholesale and   Retail  Butchers
and Provisioners
i******B4*B********B**BB*BB*B*%B*B**BB^BB*B4^ *bAAb*^A
^^B^^B^B**^***^^^******^
| Lay In Your Winter Stock
Of Potatoes, Apples and
Vegetables,  Etc., From
O. H. CARLE
THE GROCERYMAN
PRINCETON, B.C.
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We Carry a Complete Line
Of Excelsior, Cotton Top and Cotton Top and
Bottom, AH Cotton Felt, Restmore, and
Ostermoor   Mattresses
L L WHITE, TIE TOWIIRE MAN
PERCY W. GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
Dressmaking & Millinery
Aims. TURNER & BYSOUTH
French Block, Bridge Street
Orders Promptly Attended To
SPECIALS.
A grand opening ball will be held at
the Dominion hotel, Tulameen, B.C., on
the evening of Wednesday next, Nov. 15.
Invitation extended to^all. Good music
and supper.   D. McKae, proprietor.
Dr. Jackson, dentist, will be in Princeton next Wednesday, 15th inst.
For Sale.—Lot 636S, lying about half a
mile south of Allison, 205 acres. Price
$1,800.—Apply J. M. Wright, Princeton.
The A. E. Howse Co. have on sale the
celebrated Bias Filled Corsets. Ladies,
see them and get our prices.
Darce in the I.O.O.F. Hall, Friday
night. Princeton Orchestra in attendance.
Good time assured.
Guaranteed Strictly Fresh Eggs, Hazel-
wood Butter, Snow Cap Butter and Oroville Butter on sale all the time at
Semerad's.
Wanted.—By young man, position,
two years' j experience in store, good
teamster.—Apply Star office.
Grain and timothy hay for sale by F. F.
George. Inquire at the harness shop of
Thompson & Prosser.
Owners of lots on Bridge street and
Vermilion avenue, desiring to sell, will
please communicate with J. M. Wright,
Princeton, B.C.   State lowest price.
THE HOSPITAL.
Articles of incorporation have been received from the Provincial Secretary
whereby the board of management of the
Princeton general hospital becomes vested with certain powers and constituted a
governing body within the meaning of
the Public Hospitals Act. Anyone is
eligible for membership who subscribes
$5 annually, which entitles him to one
vote. Larger amounts entitle the donor
to proportionate votes. The Secretary
will be pleased to receive subscriptions
toward the maintenance of this useful
institution.
COAL SHORTAGE.
Mr. Crombie, chief of the information
and statistics bureau of the provincial
government has made an investigation
into the coal situation and finds that
practically all the outlying points already
have not more than 20 per cent of the
winter supply of coal. During his investigation Mr. Crombie visited practically
all of the points along the Goose Lake
line, and portions of the Canadian line
and the Grand Trunk Pacific line from
Saskatchewan to the border.
The shortage of fuel seems to be general
throughout the province, but the warnings of the government have been heeded
and steps are being taken to secure an
adequate supply for the winter. In some
places it was impossible to lay in a stock
of coal, as the bins were needed for the
storage of grain.
J. R. Craig will take for his subject
next Sunday evening, at the Presbyterian
church in the Court house, ' Is it wrong
to gamble ? '
Joe Wigmore, one of the best known
and handy men with the silk, has stepped
down from the box on the stage running
between Tulameen and Princeton, and
will take a needed rest« Driving a stage,
although it looks easy, is hard on the
nerves. Turning sharp/curves on heavy
grades with but an inch to spare betweeu
a rock bluff and 'Davy Jones'locker' and
the old stage creaking under its load cf
humanity is a responsibility which would
make any man round shouldered and
humpbacked. But Joe is neither. He is
thinking of starting a line from Welldo
to Merritt.   Good luck, Joe.
Ourj Business
Has Increased
And we are extending trade to all
parts of the district. Our business
principles, combined with GOOD
GOODS £ have produced Satisfactory
Results. We want new customers
and an enlarging trade. That is
why we advertise.
Groceries Are 111 Choice and Fresh!
Clothing of the Best Manufacture
For Fall & Winter Wear
Try One of Our Genuine
STETSON HATS
The best money can buy
*bA4*B*<\**,\*******   .fii******S***BA*****4**4**4*****4+*4A**4*\********^
Thomas Bros.
PRINCETON, B.C.
NELSON BREWING CO.
|| PRINCETON, B.C.
Physicians Recommend Our Beer
for Emaciated Patients
As ,a beverage, healthful;  for the table, appetizing ;  for social
aud proper use, better than wine.    Families Supplied.
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KING & GIBSON       |
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DEALERS IN X
V
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
_.____. _t_ AA .♦. A^B^B B** -*- A J*. _♦.. J*.
**^^**^^^^^4^*^4p*,tBWtXB*^*^*i^
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
>*i<<**l*<r<**Z<**%***r^Z<<*<r^Z<**l**i^^^
Star Needs $• scriers
J. KNUDSON
Contractor   and   Builder
Estimates Furnished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
DO ARD OF TRADE, PRINCE-
*-* TON, B. C. Meets first Monday in
each month.
J. D. Lumsden, K. C. Brown,
• President. Secretary.
"AT IT HERE S_0CE 1900.
you WORK,
MmyoufirtorfEy
WORK TOO.
BH PEFOSfTIMG. ODRMViriGS
WITM US THE. WIU. BIRH
A% INTEREST WHICH,!
WECREPITMOriTHIJ.  :
<m none, is return.-
ABLE On PEMANP
AS QUICKLY AS THE MAILS
GAN CARRY IT.
PEOPLE JUST /ISC/IREFUL
.MP CAUTIOUS .5
you cai.be,
/IRE WELL PLEASE!?,
AND THOROUGHLY
SATISFIED,
WITH THE VM.y IMWHICH
our Business is
TR/WSACTEP- . BUSINESS
MANAGED BY PEOPLE OP
MnTOEDfiraiEME
*HI<_.E5TinTE<_R.TX
n posm.GiviMG
yOUR hMME OPPRESS
Wilt PROMPTS BRING YOU
PUtHM FORMATION.
i WRITE TOM
SHOULP YOU HAVE AM?
PINAflGIAL BUSINESS IN
V/1I.G0UVER-VU.N1T.,
REhT5T0C0l___CT,
AGREEMENTS FOR SALE"
MORTGAGES TOISOK/HTER
Am COL. EGT,
FIRE IMSURflTIGE TO PI_1C__
LET US ATTEND TO IT.
VVE ARE PLEASING
OTHERS WE Witt-BE SURE
TO PLEASE YOU.
Wip^GoiTD.
___
A/<M\co\iver _..(>♦ <^
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November 8, 1911,
November 8, 1911.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STA
R
1
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. n. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advauce,
ADVERTISING RATES :
_,and Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
8 cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, Ji per in. per month.
Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Monday. ___&_
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
No matter how positive or reasonably certain a statement may be,
there are always the doubting ones
to cast some derogatory reflection
upon it. When Premier McBride
stated during the last provincial
elections that the Kettle River Valley railway would run into Princeton, there were certain lewd fellows
of the press who derided the premier's assertion and endeavored to
interpret it as a ' political dodge.'
That the premier meant business
there is proof now in the fact that
the Kettle Valley line is being surveyed down Fivemile creek toward
Pjinceton. It will also be recalled
that L. W. Shatford, M.P.P., was
instrumental in having a clause inserted in the agreement between
the Kettle River Valley Co. and the
government making Princeton a
station on the main line or a spur.
From a reliable source it is now
learned that the main line will pass
through Princeton, giving this town
the benefit of a competitive route to
seaboard.
A critical friend points out to the
editor the numerousmistakes found
in any issue of/otar, and asks if it
is not possible to avoid at least the
more palpable ones. Our reply is
that these mistakes are not the result of either carelessness or non-
intelligence. When the Star is able
to afford a proof press and a proof
reader our average of mistakes will
then be reduced to the level of the
ordinary journal. At present everything about the Star and the whole
staff from the ' devil' up and down,
are working at high pressure, and
such a trivial thing as a mistake, is
overlooked in the excitement caused
by 'going to press.' We confess
many imperfections and blunders,
but we have never yet made the
mistake of overlooking a two dollar
bill for a prepaid subscription. Will
our critic try to catch us in this
latter 'error' ?
If there is no censor of plays in
Canada then there ought to be no
delay in appointing one. This conclusion is arrived at after seeing a
play that afforded neither instruc
tion nor amusement. No amount
of good acting can atone for a play
full of drivel, evil promptings and
sensualism. Drama that is not
educative, elevating, refined or of
that quality of humor which provokes the innocent laugh should
not be presented on any stage. An
unpolluted drama, well presented,
is what the intelligent public require,
and in this they ought to be aided
and protected by a government
appointed censor.
CHRISTIANITY-SOCIALISM.
The proposal to populate our
mnsicless mountains and woods
with songbirds is sure to meet with
general support and approval.
Who does not long for the trill of
the birds so familiar to the boys
and girls of the east and other
lands. A man long from home
once remarked : 'I would give five
dollars to hear just a few bars from
the long ago ago robin that used to
sing in the tree by the spring.'
There are many who would love to
hear the old songbirds. Send the
feathered songsters along and let
the lonely woods and hills echo
with inspirational song.
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
The Provincial game warden, A. B.
Williams, has notified deputy game warden, C. Schisler, as follows : 'The season
for beaver opens on Nov. I, 1911, with
the exception of a small area compaising
all the creeks and watersheds of the
Okanagan river and lakes between Penticton and the United States.'
J. E. McCauley presented Star with a
large blue print of Copper Mount-in,
showing the mineral claims compiled
from recent data. It is accurate and
affords a lot of information concerning
miners and prospectors.
J. L. Huston is improving from his
severe attack of inflammatory rheumatism, and many friends hope to see him in
his usual health shortly, He has been
confined to his home for about two
months.
Owing to the absence of the president
of the board of trade, the meeting which
was to have been held on Monday night
last was postponed until next Monday
night A good attendance is desired. T.
C. King, architect, will read a paper on
' The Septic Tank : Its Construction and
Uses.' New members of the board will
bs inducted.
C. O. Brownell, piano tuner, will give
a recital at Penticton on November 9th.
Mr. Brownell is a high class tenor and
will also lecture on the great musical
authors.
In the hurry of last week mention was
inadvertantly omitted of two important
events—the ball gjjgen by the Oddfellows
on Hallowe'en night and the invitation
ball given by the Orangemen. A very
enjoyable time was spent on both occasions, and these popular fraternal orders
again scored social successes.
J. H. Jackson inflow operati i =1 the stage
line between Princeton ant. fulameen
and repDots the business a? t look very
bright in the latter place.  ^
Col. Robert Stevenson, the veteran
mining man, has recovered fairly well
from his indisposition caused by exposure on Big Plateau.
Rev. J. Williams is holding services at
Coalmont and Tulameen this week.
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Rich Resources
SURROUNDING
EAST
PRINCETON
The New City With The Payroll
Give you the opportunity for one of the
SOUNDEST INVESTMENTS
In British Columbia.
^.^♦%^AH»H/vVvVV
CITY LOTS ARE  BEING OFFERED
SALE FOR THE FIRST TlflE.
FOR
IT IS INEVITABLE THAT THE VALUE OF
THESE LANDS WILL GREATLY INCREASE
Here are some of the Reasons:
For transportation, East Princeton will
have, in the near future, the Great Northern
and the Kettle Valley lines, both of which,
will pass through the townsite.
D. Q. McCURDY
Wfc RESIDENT AGENT.
Or write RAYMOND E. WARD, Pacific blk, Vancouver.
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East Princeton is surrounded by huge de=    X
posits of Coal, Cement, Copper, Gold, and
other important ilinerals.
The British Columbia Portland Cement
Co. is erecting a half a million dollar plant,
which will employ between 300 and 400 men.
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The United Empire Co. is shipping a lig=
nite coal of the best quality and is developing
immense copper deposits, requiring large reduction works and several hundred em-
ployees. The Princeton Coal & Land Co. is
increasing its daily shipments to 300 tons of 4%
coal, providing employment to about 150 ♦♦♦
men. Other coal companies are spending
over $2,000,000 in development, and will give
work to at least 1,000 men.
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East Princeton is beautifully situated on Y
the Similkameen River, with an abundance £
of.water power available.   The new city has 4t4
every facter for growth into a big industrial &
centre.
It presents a rare opportunity for invest-
ment.    Get full particulars immediately.
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Hyprocisy   Attacked,   Anarchy  Denounced, Christianity Only
Solution.
' There are as many hypocrites in the
Socialist ranks as there ever were, or are,
in the church. The man who sits night
after night around the hotel fire and raves
about what socialism could and would do,
did it have a chance, and then deliberately refuses to register his vote, is nothing short of a blatent hypocrite.'
Such was the conclusion arrived at by
J. R. Craig, in his discussion last Sunday
evening on  Socialism.     Taking a text
from the old testament,  ' The Year of
Jubilee,'.he showed that from the earliest
ages the cry of the poor and distressed
had gone up to heaven.   Poverty, gaunt,
portentous and tragic, had ever shadowed
civilization.   It had perplexed alike the
minds of legislators,  philosophers   and
peoples.   Poets, from the time of ancient
Greece, had made it their theme. Utopian
.  schemes on paper had been framed D3'
dreamers, of a certain age when poverty
would be no more.   The Hebrew commonwealth was but an attempt to realize
the great ideal of the brotherhood of man.
These had all failed.   Why ?  The answer
was simply selfishness.
'But,' asked the preacher, 'If these
have all failed, are we to simply sit still
and do nothing? Is there no solution of
the problem which men can turn to and
expect a betterment of conditions ?
vSocialism was all right up to a certain
point.    We were discontented with present conditions, and it was no sin to be
discontented.    But the true principles of
reform suffered at the hands of those who
were trying to peddle them.   The public
were scared to accept the doctrines of
men  whose characters, and  reputations
for sound judgement, were questionable
in the extreme.   Men who were simply
' kickers ' would never be reformers. The
attitude of so called socialists towards religion and the church in general was, and
would ever be, deterimental to the success of their propoganda.    Coming to an
analysis, the majority of such ranters had
absolutely no inside in/ormation  regarding the Christianity of the modern church.
It' was with them all hearsay.  They were
human gramapbones. They repeated often
what they heard once.   And the. old proverb was true, ' Bad hearing was bad rehears ng.'     A   man   who,  like   Robert
Blatchford, boasted that he had considered and   discarded   the  doctrine of the
atonement before he was six years of age,
could not be taken seriously on a great
subject, like 'Social Reform,'and themen
who declared that 'Under socialism, wife,
child and home could not exist' were not
considered safe leaders of  the   people.
' For,' exclaimed the preacher, ' if I am
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Princeton Bakery
Fresh Oysters, New York Counts,
_Can or Bulk.
Fresh Cranberries,
Fruit, Vegetables,
and Confectionery.
A legitimate
Investment
Today
Call at CARLE'S for
MORNING GLORY
EGGS
FOR BREAKFAST
CUoice Fruits and CoDfecfionerg
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays, in the Odd
fellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. WADDELL. Consul.
P. RUSSELL, Clerk.
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*4*4***X**Z**Z*^Z* *** ♦♦♦ ^♦><$m_HS. <*^<*^*x*<*^^^<*^» ♦?
Subscribe for tbe Similkameen Star.
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SK. MM
MOST PEOPLE want to invest their money where
they are reasonably sure of a good return. If the
investment' is to be made in real estate there are several
things to be considered : The situation <5f the town, climatic
conditions, transportation facilities, and primarily the
amount of the monthly payroll. When these questions are
asked regarding Coalmont they tnay all be answered to the
credit of the town. The situation and climatic conditions
are ideal; the main line of the V.,V. & E. railway runs
through the town on its way to Vancouver.
—,1    m,i _n-_f^**PT_if^M**^ M
The Columbia Coal&Coke Co. operating here have practically an inexhaustible supply of a pure bituminous coal.
They are installing immediately a plant which will handle
2000 tons of coal in 8 hours—this means employment for between
800 and 900 men all told.
Figure out this payroll and see how many coal mining towns
in B.C. can beat it. „ _ffii_*
jX**jj&xt&fc
In a very short ti_ae<a_oalmo_t will necessarily have a population of from 2000 to 2^00 people. Will this cause real estate to rise?
We all know the answer. Then take the opportunity that presents
itself now—buy first hand and reap the benefit of this increase.
The prices and terms are such that anyone can afford to inves
to the extent of one or two lots. They range from $175 to $55°, on
terms of % cash, balance over 18 months.
Address all communications and remittances to
WILLIAMSON & TURNER,
Soi,_. Agents,
COALMONT, B.C.
C. V. Semerad __ Co.
"MODEL"
LIVERY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety  of  Rigs—Good  Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
B_00M.__.D_ GARRISON
STAR
JOB PRINTERV
_____== DO YOU WANT ___=__=
Letterheads
Billheads
Meal Tickets
Milk Tickets
Printed Envelopes
Visiting Cards
Ladies', Gent's, Misses'
Business Cards
Posters
Dodgers, Dates
Statements
Invitations
Wedding and Ball
Ball Programs
Bills of Fare
Butter Wrappers
Letter Circulars
Memos.
Cotton Signs
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY!
STA|R QUICK PRINT
60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
_S.
Tbade Marks
Designs
______t_____m  Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communica.
tlons strictly confidential. HANDBOOK onPatenta
sent free. Oldest agency for securingpatents.
Patents taken through Munn <_ Co. receive
epecial notice, without charge, in the
Scientific Jhnericatt.
A handsomely illustrated weekly. largest cir»
eolation of any scientific Journal. Terms for
Canada, $3.75 a year, postage prepaid. Sold by
all newsdealers.
RHONS. & Co.S6,Broad^ New York
Branch Office. 625 F j__> Washington, I__C_  .
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
CHRISTIANITY-SOCIALISM.
Prom 5'h Page.
called upon to give my casting vote in
favor of socialism as against home and religion, then be it known unto you, men
and brethren, I shall unhesitatingly support both my home and my religion.'
And all right thinking people would do
the same.
I ask you,  however,  said  Mr.  Craig,
further, not to listen to such men.   They
are not true socialists.    They are fools.
Under their system it is utterly impossible for a man  to be a christian and a
socialist.     The socialist who has really
the interest of the masses at heart is no
ranter.    He does not preach ' Divide up.'
It is the present division that he is dissatisfied with.   And is it wrong, as we
hjve asked, to be so ?   It is the waste involved under the present regime that he
wants to catch up and more equally divide,
and he hopes to accomplish this, not by
antagonizing people, but by persuasion
and reason.   Now, 'If it is no sin to be
discontented, then why cannot a man be
a christian and a socialist or discontent ?'
What does Christianity seek   to   do ?
Simply to regenerate humanity.    How ?
Individually, of course,    Can a man be a
reformer without first being  reformed ?
Christianity, then, is the only salvation
of the masses and solution of the  problem.    A man. must first be a reformed
Christian  before he can  be  of material
use in the reclama ion and regeneration
of his fellow men.
In conclusion, Mr. Craig urged his
hearers to exercise wisdom and caution
before passing judgment on men who
were sincerely anxious to do something
for the benefit of others, but not to listen
to the anarchist who preached that every
man was a law to himself, and that no
man had a right to frame laws for others.
That was revolution and impractical.
Christianity preached revolution, but it
vas individual revolution, and only by
'that means could we have political and
economic regeneration. And to the worker
the advice of all true socialists was to
make the influence of their thought and
action felt at the ballot box.
It Really Costs Very Little
To Keep Warm and Comfortable
Even In The Coldest Weather !
Permit Us to Suggest "How"
JUST FULFIL TWO CONDITIONS :
FIRST:—Buy Only All-Wool Underwear, for it is only ALL WOOL
UNDERWEAR that keeps your skin and body in that dry, healthy, cold-
resisting condition, which is so necessary to the perfect enjoyment of crisp,
bracing, winter weather.
SECOND:—Buy AH Your Underwear from Us, for in that way only
you can be absolutely sure that you are getting ALL WOOL. We guarantee
it. | Besides, by buying your Underwear from us, you obtain it at the Right
Price, yes—at such a low price that it costs you really very little to keep
warm and comfortable during the coldest weather.
We have several excellent lines of Men's Under-
wear in stock, ranging in price from $i to $2.50
per garment, but would call your special atten=
tion at this time to our i4=Karat lien's AH=Wool
Underwear, in all sizes from 34 to 44, with
Drawers to match, made from Pure i4=Karat
Wool, extra heavy, unshrinkable, double=breasted
Shirts at $1.50 per garment. Try a suit or two !
This number is a winner !
THEN :— ' GET THE HABIT OF TRADING AT HOWSE'S—
IT WILL SAVE YOU MONEY."
The A. L nowse Co., Ltd.
PRINCETON,  B. C.
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
f ***Z**\M**Z**Z**Z<**^^^^ a
:f Coldstream Estate Nurseries!
VERNON, B.C.
Have a very fine assortment ot
FRUIT TREES
ORNAMENTAL AND SHADE TREES
Si AND SHRUBS
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Real Estate, Finance, Mines
Heal Estate is dull but prospects are bright.
Good time to buy.
FOR SALE
Three mineral claims, showing gold and platinum, $25,000.
Ranch \lA miles west of Princeton, 192 acres,
$3,000. ■
Lot 27, Block 19, with 2"roomed house, price,
$400.   Wood aud coal shed, root cellar and well.
Lots 7 and 8, block 43, 50x190 feet and 50x165
feet. Choice residential, second bencK above
town.   Price $400 each.
Lot 11, block 8, 50x100 feet.   Price $350.
Two lots in Hedley, inside and Corner. Price
$200 and $250—Also in east addition op. Mr. Smiths
house.   Price $350.
Lot 6, block 24, house rents for $6 per mo., $500,
Agricultural land, near Coalmont, 80acres, $1600.
Claim in diamond belt, $500; locations made.
Mineral properties.
Water power.
Suburban acreage to lease.
Business lots in east Princeton from $450 to
$600. _3_#-
Address:    J.M.WRIGHT,
Princeton, B.C.. Canada.
| Budded Stock a Specialty *}
<J> All Trees offered for Sale are grown in Our Own
Nurseries on the Coldstream Estate
General Agent, V. D. CURRY, Vernon, B.C.
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PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
J Regular meetings. 8 p
m., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate  in
Thomas Block.   " Oddfellows Hall."
J. F. Waddeli,, Jas. Gellatly.
Noble Grand. Secretary
KING & GIBSON
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils *
^^^^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦*
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
♦♦" ***
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Star Needs stsDscrifters
November 8, 1911,
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
Great Northern
—Hotel—
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
PRINCETON,
B.C.
Slmlihameen liotel
SIMMERS & WARDLE
PROPRIETORS
Large and New building, well Furnished and Plastered; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIETORS
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOriS, ETC.
Commercials Sampled Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
*>Z**Z**>Z<<**Z<<~ZK**1<*<^
...Hotel...
oner nut
TULAMEEN, B. C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Centre
Mrs. [. j. Henderson
PRORIETOR
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K><^<M^^^^^^<_^^K_«>_M>«^.:_{_.ji
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   F.  CUMMINGS,  Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc.
General Blacksmithing.
Sleighs Built to Order.
All Work Neatly- & Promptly
Phone 28. Executed.
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November 8, 1911.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
BAND DIFFICULTIES
EXPLAINED.
Editor Star—Sir: The position of a
band leader is not all ' roses,' far from it,
especially as leader of a small country
town or village band. In the first place,
in many cases the instruments are pur-
'chased by money received by voluntary
contributions, and, as nearly all the
citizens contribute to the cause, naturally
they think tha__oar boy^should play in
the band, whether he is musically inclined or rfoFT The instruments arrive, and
everything is band, band, band, till the
novelty is worn. Here comes the bandleader's troubles to select for each pupil
the instrument they should learn. It is
necessary here to explain that wood,
wind, brass and stringed instruments are
not like the piano to teach any person,
whether they have an ear for music or
not. They can learn to play the piano,
mechanically, because the teacher tells
them that such a note is C and this one is
D, etc., so that, when the pupil sees the
notes on the music, all that is necessary is
to strike the note on the piano and the
instrument does the rest ; but with a
brass, wood, wind or string instrument
this is not the case ; the pupil must make
the note according to his own musical
ear. Going back to the original subject,
you can see that the band leader has quite
a task. Just fancy, the sporty member
who hasn't time to practice, and thinks
that one night in two or three weeks in
the bandroom is plenty to make one
master of any instrument! Then comes
our hero, the allround man, the man of
many instruments. His family think him
a wonder. This is the kind of a member
that can't learn anything, simply because
he knows it all before he begins, and the
next thing is an ' Oh, it's high time to get
a new band leader. I'm an influental
citizen of the town and a large ratepayer,
and I will bring this matter up immedi
ately.' So you can see from the above
how long a bandmaster lasts, as a rule, so
I will quit before I get kicked out. Yours
truly, J. Oswald Coulthard.
Princeton, November 3, 1911.
The Princeton
Livery»Feed
Stables
N. HUSTON, Prop'.
General Livery business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
WATER NOTICE
R P. COOK
PRINCETON
COALMONT
GRANITE CREEK
General Merchandise
The Similkameen Power Company,Limited, of
Vancouver, B C, give notice that we intend, on
the 10th day of November next, at eleven o'clock
in the forenoon, to apply to the Water Commis
sioner at his office at Nicola, for a license to take
and use 20 cubic feet of water per second from
Red Creek, a tributary of Fivemile Creek, near
Princeton.
The water will be used at Fivemile Creek, about
% of a mile below Red Creek, for power purposes.
We intend to apply at the same time for permission to store 4,000 acre-feet, more or less, of
the said water in a reservoir at head of falls on
Red Creek.
SIMILKAMEEN POWER COMPANY, Ltd.
Dattd this 27th day of September, 1911.
NOTICE.
Similkameen division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ernest Waterman, of
Princeton, B.C.occupation mine manager,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1822 thence
south seven chains to the southwest cor-
of Lot 1822, thence west along the north
boundary of Lot 2049 to the high water
mark on the right bank of the Similkameen river, thence northeast along the
said high water mark to the point of
commencement and containing five acres
more or less. ERNEST WATERMAN,
Aue.25, igir.    Percy W. Gregory, agent.
NOTICE.
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Jobbing Work Promptly Attended to
WATER NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that an application will
be made under part V- of the 'Water Act. 1909,'
to obtain a license in the Ashcroft water division
of Yale District.
A The name, address and occupation ot the
applicant: Walton Hugh Holmes, Granite Creek,
B C-, in the District of Yale, preemptor. ■
B The name of the lake, stream or source is
Ward Creek.
C   The point of diversion is on Lot 520.
D The quantity of water applied for (in cubic
feet per second), four.
E The character of the proposed works:
ditches, flume or pipes.
F The premises on which the water is to be
used is pre-emption Lot 520, Record No. 329.
G The purposes for which the wa4$r is to be
used is irrigation and household,
H If for irrigation describe the land intended
to be irrigated, giving acreage. Bench on north
bank of Granite Creek, 160 acres.
J Area of Crown land intended to be occupied
by the proposed works, not any.
K *This notice was posted on the 16th September,
1911, and application will be made to the commissioner on the 23rd day of October, 1911.
L Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands
are likely to be affected by the proposed works,
either above or below the outlet.   None.
WALTON HUGH HOLMES.
Granite Creek.
Neat & Artistic Printing at Star Office
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick Logan, of Vancouver, B.C .occupation an agent, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following describ
ed lands j Commencing at a post planted about
16 miles west of Princeton, B.C., and about
ten miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary
of Granite creek, marked Frederick Logan's s w.
coiner, thence 8o chains east, 8o chains north, 8o
chains west, 8o chains south to point of beginning,
containing 640 acres, more or le_s.
FREDERICK LOGAN.
Sept. 23, iqii. Charles O  French, Agent.
' Yale land division, Yale district.
Take nctice that Thomas Wilson, of Vancouver
B.C., occupation a clerk intends to applj* for permission to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted about 16
miles west of Princeton, £ C., and about 10 miles
south of the Tulameen river a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked Thomas Wilson's n e
corner, thence 80 chains west, 80 chains south. 80
chains east, 80 chains north, to point of beginning, containing 640 acres more or less.
THOM.iS WILSON.
Sept. 23, 1911: Charles O. French, Agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Nathan P. Daugon, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation 1 builder, intends to apply
for|permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
16 miles west of Princeton, B.C., and about ten
miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked Nathan P. Daugon's
n.w. corner, thence 80 chains south, 80 chains
east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, to point of
beginning, containing 640 acres more or less.
NATHAN P. DAUGON.
Sept. 23,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that George Scharff, occupation a
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about 16 miles west of
Princeton, B.C., and about ten miles south of the
Tulameen river, a tributary of Granite creek, and
marked George Scharff's s.e. corner, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains south, 80
chains east, to point of beginning, containing 640
acres more or less.
GEORGE SCHARFF,
Sept. 23, iqii. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James M. Watson, of Vancouver, B C, occupation a contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands : Commencing at a post planted
about 16 miles west of Princeton, B.C., and about
eight miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of Granite creek, and marked James M,
Watson's n.w. corner, thence 80 chains south, 80
chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, to
point of beginning, containing 640 acres, more or
less. JAMES M. WATSON.
Sept. 22,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Enoch Wilson, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation faim hand, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following desciibed
lands : Commencing at a post planted about 16
miles west of Princeton, B.C., and about 8 miles
south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked Enoch Wilson's
n e. corner, thence 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east, 80 chains north, to place of
beginning, containing 640 acres, more or less.
ENOCH WILSON.
Sept. 22,1911. Charles O French, __.ge.nt_i
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Gorgon Cambell, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation teamster, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lauds : Commencing at a post planted about
16 miles west of Princeton, B C., and about eight
miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked Gorgon Cambell's
s w. corner, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west, to point of
beginning, containing 640 acres, more or less.
GORGON CAMBELL.
Sept. 22,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James F. Wilson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation a carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
16 miles west of Princeton, B.C.. and about eight
miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked J. F. Wilson's s.e
corner, thence 80 chains north 80 chains west, 80
chains south, 80 chains east, to pla^e of beginning, containing 640 acres more or less.
JAMES F. WILSON.
Sept. 22, iqii. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James Burlon, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation a teamst.r, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following describ
ed lands : Commencing at a post planted about
three miles southwest of timber limit No. 39.107,
on the east side of Roche iiver, and marked
James Burlon's n w. corner, thence 80 chains
south, 80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, to point of beginning, containing 640 acres
more or less. JAMES BURLON.
Oct. 2,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Alma Anderson, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation a widow, intends to apply lor
permission to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted one mile
southwest of timber limit No 39107. on the east
side of Roche river, and marked Alma Anderson's
s.w. corner, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west, to point of
beginning, containing 640 acres, more or less
__LMA ANDERSON.
Oct. 2, icii. Charles u. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that George A.Howell, of Vancou-
couver, B.C., occupation a builder, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands : Commencing at a post planted
one mile southwest of timber limit No. 39107, on
the east side of Roche river, and marked George
A. Howell's n.w. corner, thence 80 chains south,
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, to
poiut of beginning;"containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE A. HOWELL.
Oct 2. iqii. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Francis T. Reid, of Vancouver,
B.C , occupation a book-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the followingdescribed lauds : Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles southwest of timber limit No. 39.107, on
the east side of Roche river, and marked Francis
T. Reid's s w. corner, thence 80 chains north, 80
chaius east, 80 chains soulh, 80 chains west, to
point of beginning, containing 640 acres, more or
less. FRANCIS T. REID.
Oct. 2, iqir. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Cory Keamster, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation a" clerk,intends to apply for permission to puichase the following described
lauds: Commencing at a post planted one mile
west of the northwest corner of timber limit
No. 36,827, and marked Cory Keamster's n.e. corner, thence 80 chains west, 80 chains south, 80
chains east, 80 chains north, to point of beginning,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
CORY KEAMSTER.
Oct. 4, 1911, Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Harry M. Bayford, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation an electrician, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands: Commencing at a post planted
about one mile west of the northwest corner of
timber limit No. 36,827, and marked Harry M.
Bayford's n.w. corner, thence 80 chains east, 80
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north, to
point ot beginning, containing 640 acres more or
less. HARRY M. BAYFORD.
Oct. 4, iqii, Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James H. Graham, of Vancouver, b.c., occupation a clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described
lands: (commencing at a post planted about 15
miles south of Princeton, b c, and one mile west
of the Similkameen river, and marked James H.
Graham's n.w, corner, thence 80 chains east, 80
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north, to
point of beginning, containing 640 acres more or
less. JAMES H. GRAHAM.
Oct. 4,1911. Charles O. French, Agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick H. Corby, of Vancouver, B c,occupation a teamster, intends toapply for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands: commencing at a post planted
about 15 miies south of Princeton, b-C, and one
mile west of the Similkameen river, and marked
Frederick H. Corby's s.w. corner, thence 80 chains
east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, to point of beginning, containing 640 acres,
more or less. FREDERICK H. CORBY.
Oct. 4,1911, Charles O. French, Agent.
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
NOTICE.
Take notice that I, C. O. French, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum in Kamloops division of
Yale district as follows :—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of lot 1520 and marked
C. O French, S.W. corner, thence 60 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 60 chains west,
thence 80 chains south, to point of commencement.
C.O.FRENCH.
Dated September 18th, 1911. Locator.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, J. B. Wood, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply to the Chief Commissiouer
of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described lands,
to wit :—Commencing at a post planted at the
N.W. corner of Lot 388 and marked J. B. Wood's
N.E. corner, thence 80 chains south, thence 80
chains west, thence 80 cnains north, thence 80
chains east, to point of commencement.
Located 14th September, 1911.
J. B. WOOD, Locator.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910.
■^OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
■t .   December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Similkameen Hotel, situate
at Princeton, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th Day of October. 1911.
GEO. E. WARDLE
CHRISTOPHER SUMMERS
JAMES WALLACE.
■\JOT_CE is hereby given that, on the first day of ,
sjj December next, applicatioh will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Tulameen Hotel, situate
at Princeton, in tbe Province of British Columbia.
Dated this~12th day of October, 1911.
, KIRKPATRICK & MALONE.
■NJOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
■*• ~ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Great Northern Hotel,
situate at Princeton, in the Province of British
Columbia,
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
P. SWANSON.
■^OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
■"-^ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial ' olice for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Otter Flat Hotel, situate
at Tulameen, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
MRS. E. J. HENDERSON.
■^OTICE is hereby given that; on the first day of
L ~ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Granite Creek Hotel, situate at Granite Creek in the Province of British
Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
H. GOODISSON.
NJOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
1 ~ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Allison Hotel, situate at
Allison, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
G. GOLDSBOROUGH.
I^OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
s £ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for the
grant of a license for the sale of liquor by wholesale in and upon the premises known as The Nelson Brewing Co., situate at Princeton, B.C., upon
the lands described as Lots 1,2.3, and the property
is on 23, 24, Vermilion Avenue.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
THE NELSON BREWING CO.,
per Aug. Thomas.
^OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
A~ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Coalmont Hotel, situate at
Coalmont, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
COALMONT HOTEL CO., LTD.
L. N. Marcotte, Manager.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910.
Notice is hereby given that, on the first day of
December next, application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police for the transfer of the license for the sale of liquor by retail in
and upon the premises known as the Tulameen
Hotel, situate at Princeton, B.C., from Kirkpatrick & Barnes to Kirkpatrick & Malone, of British
Columbia,
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
KIRKPATRICK & BARNES,
Holders of License.
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE,
Applicants for Transfer.
 8
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November 8, 1911,
$Vl _85^—
PR1N
TON
According to the laws of industrial progress and the experience of founders of western towns,
there must be a tangible, genuine basis on which to establish the future city. No amount of
coaxing can bring blood out of a stone, nor can the greatest scientist extract sunbeams from a
cucumber. Every man makes his own destiny==his own fortune==nothing comes by so-called
good luck.   The door is wide ajar for all who have pluck and a little capital.    Investigate Now!
I
Princeton
^
•%
With Its Unequalled Mineral Resources
Its  Healthful Climate and Pretty Site
<_
Is destined to be the Largest City in the Interior of British Columbia.
Five hours' run to Vancouver when the V., V. & E. is finished.
1
Your Opportunity Is NOW!
CHOICE LOTS FORISALE
And to Suit All Requirements
Enquire of
ERNEST WATERMAN
Manager for
Princeton Coil & Liifl Co
_____i__ii

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