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Similkameen Star 1912-04-17

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Princeton coal is almost smokeless and sootless.
Cheer Up!
The Kettle Valley Railway will build through Princeton this  summer—Many men will be employed In the mines, mills, woods,
railroad construction and in the building of wagon roads this year—In the meantime just watch Princeton's smoke
Vol. XI1L
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1912.
No. 18
MINES AND WINING
Tulameen Gold & Platinum,
Limited, Name of
New Co'y«
Lead in Demand and Price Rising for
Bare Metals—Mining on
Siwash Creek.
F. Keffer was in town Friday returning
from Copper mountain, where he had
been on a periodical visit to Voigt camp.
He states that the work of the B. C. Cop-
pef* company is producing encouraging
results.
The improved mining condition is
causing a lively demand for mineral
claims that can show deposits of lead in
commercial quantities. There are already
known several very promising silver lead
claims in Princeton district.
The Inland Development company,
operating on Siwash creek, has staked a
dozen sections of land surrounding their
silver lead mineral claims.
Russell S. Bates of Spokane was in
town yesterday on mining business and
speaks optimistically of Princeton and
district. He expects to begin work on
Newton creek placers about the middle
of May or as soon as the snow is gone.
The recent discovery of manganese
iron carbonates on Fivemile is au indication of the varied mineral resources ot
Princeton district.
The prospectus of the Tulameen Gold
and Platinum company, limited, $500,000
capital, has been published. The officers
are: President, J. Clifford; general manager, E Earden Emmons; secretary, Elmore Meredith; directors, H. W. Kensit,
M. E ; A. Wickham, merchant; N. W.
Pirrie, metallurgist; Leonard C. Barnes,
practical miner; all of Vancouver.
Rare metal prospecting is very profit
able, but not one prospector in a hundred
knows the ore when he sees it. There is
no doubt there are many rare metal deposits in Princeton district as they occur
in peridotite and serpentine rocks, both
of which are common here. Prices for
rare metals are as follows: Platinum, $46
per Troy-oz.; osmium, £34; iijjdiuui, $64;
palladium, $54; rhodium, $155, and tan
talum-$5O0 per pound Troy.
giving employment to a force of skilled
workmen all winter. This store is one
of the handsomest in the interior of B. C.
Bert Irwin has eight men and a team
employed in the building propositions
which he has on hand. Tbe building
trade promises to be a busy one for him
this summer.
\ .Bf. McCaffiey is getting the foundations ready for his residence on Fenchurch
avenue.
Fred Stamper has put a fence around
his lot on Bridge street and is leveling
the.ground.
Orrin Allen's building, to be used for a
poolroom and tobacco emporium, is
nearing completion. The plasterers are
putting on the finishing touches.
Work on the addition to the Similkameen hotel has begun   and   when   com
pleted will make a handsome and commodious structure.
BUILDING NOTES
Kirkpatrick & Malone of the Tulameen
hotel have put in a stone, foundation to
their premises and otherwise improved/
the basement. It is their intention t_>
erect a large annex to the present buddy
ing, which will then make the Tulamee/.
the largest hotel in the Similkameen
valley.
J.   Knudson   is finishing up his large
contract with the A. E. Howse company,
EAST PRINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, April 15.—The B. C.
Portland Cement company started work
today on their stockhouse. The building
is to be 200 feet in length by 60 feet in
breadth.
W. Britton is doing assessment work
on his copper claims adjoining the United
Empire group
H   Innis of Keremeos is in town  for a
few days.
W. J. Budd is building two cottages on
Ninth avenue.
Ten carloads of machinery for the
Citnent factory are due to arrive any dav.
It is expected that the steel on the G. N
spur will be laid in time to save the long
haul from Princeton by wagon road.
Work on the Methodist church is well
advanced and the building should be
ready for the opening service by the end
of-the month.
CORRECTIONS
Intimation having been received of
errata in the article 'Reply to Imperialist'
Star now gladly makes corrections. The
mistakes were made without intent or
design by the 'intelligent compositor'
who, in the absence of a proofreader on
the staff, had no opportunity of correcting
until the edition had been published.
_Hri_njjrplan-tion .ytjl, we liope, be satis
factory to all concerrrejh In the fourth
paragraph, alter second sentence, the
words: 'The people are the church,'
were omitted, and the quotationfrom the
Enniscorlhy Echo should read 'August
l$J instead of June 3.
/The Coalmont Hotel company will
give a grand opening ball in their new
hotel on Wednesday, 24th inst.
B F. Snowden, brother of Jas. and
Claud Snowden, arrived from Mt. Vernon, Wash , last Saturday on a visit to his
brothers.
THE WEEKp GRIST
Deal   Progressing   for    Race
Track, Athletic and
Fair Grounds.
Victoria Day Celebration at Keremeos
—Government Telephone to
Suburban Home.
The athletic grounds and race track
deal with the owners is nearing comple
tion and soon Princeton will be uptodate
in the sporting arena and will also have
a fine recreation park. Frank Bailey
leaves tomorrow for Spokane to wind up
the deal and arrange with his partners to
put Princeton Heights on the m_rket at
an early date. / /
Posters are out announcing a big celebration at Keremeos Victoria day, May
24. Many interesting events — horSe-
racing, baseball and athletic sports—will
be pulled off. If a special train is put on
between Coalmont and Keremeos a large
crowd from this section will go and witness the sporty sports.
W. E. Welby writes from Keremeos
that he iffteiids running an auto tri-
weekly/^fcom that''place to Penticton,
leaving^Ceremeos Tuesdays, Wednesdays
and Saturdays at 5 p.m.
The telephone special wire to Hugh
Hunter's residence from town now puts
him in touch with the great throbbing
pulse bf the world.
R. H Carmichael, former manager of
the Eastern Townships bank but now of
the Bank t>f Commerce, is removing with
his family to Keremeos, where he will be
manager of a branch of the Bank of
Commerce., Mr. Carmichael gained a
large patronage for the E. T. through his
courteous/jand obliging management and
will, Ho/doubt, popularize the bank at
Kerepeys He and Mrs. Carmichael
carryW/th them the good wishes of many
friends/
COALMONT NEWS.
Coalmont, April 15.—A well attended
meeting called by. S. R. Tilson was held
in the large rdom of the Coalmont .hotel
on Monday/evening, April 8, for the purpose of organizing a' board of trade for
Coalmont It was decided to name1 Tne
club the Coalmont Commercial association. A committee, consisting of Dr. G
S. Jermyn, V. S., Messrs. D. .. Worgan,
A. T. Horswill, H. Blaisdell and:jJ%
Pringle, was appointed to draft resolutions regarding better train service, immediate repairs to streets,^ telephone
service, etc. It was decided that the
subscription to the club should be $1 entrance and 25 cents per month. S. R.
Tilson was appointed permanent chairman, and A. T. Horswill permanent
secretary-treasurer.   A committee, com
prising Edward N^ptark, J. E. Ryan,
and Dunlop was'gi^'en the task of drawing
up rules and^egulations for the government  oyVtte club.
Thffpc-.office department is asking fo_
tenders to carry his majesty's mails from
the Coalmont dpppt to Granite creek and
Ttilameen daify^
The Coalmont Hotel company opened
their fine hotel last Saturday night and
-Manager Marcotte jratertained guests ift
celebration of t)rt_ occasion. The hotel
license has been granted and every de-
[ Continued on 4th page.
MARES COMEDY COMPANY
Considerable interest is manifest with
the theater going public in the approaching engagement at the I. O. O. F. hall of
Tom Marks and his excellent company
who will appear next-Monday night in
the funny comedy success, "His Irish
Honor " This comedy has met with the
greatest success throughout the country
and Mr. Marks' version of the comedy
has been highly commented upon by
both press and public. Besides being
built for laughing purposes, the comedy
contains a splendid plot, which will appeal to those who like clean, polite and
bright comedy. Many musical numbers
are introduced during the action of ihe
play and between the acts, which greatly
add to the attractiveness of the comedy.
REVISITS OLD LAND.
Rev. J. Williams preached a farewell
sermon Sunday night reviewing his
labors in this parish and pointing otit the
necessity for faithful service He related
some of the trials and disappointments
incidental to missionary work, pronounced his benediction upon all and
bade a kindly farewell to the congregation. Mr. Williams has been zealous for
the cause of the Anglican church and au
example of patient devotedness to the
spiritual welfare of his flock—withal big-
hearted and a friend of all in sorrow or
affliction. He sails for England May 3,
going first to. Vancouver and Estevan,
Saskatchewan, returning to Princeton
about the ist October.    Bon voyage.
RAILWAY POINTS.
It is reported that Hope and Midway
will be divisional points on the Kettle
Valley' railwav. The revised line wilf
follow Fivemile creek to its intersection
with the Similkameen river, thence to
Princeton, Coalmont and Tulameen, up
Otter creek to a point two miles from the
place where the Merritt "branch will tap
the main line.
Train service between Princeton and
Coalmont has been officially discontinued
until further notice.
A report is in circulation that the
V. V. & E. will shortly begin construction
from Coalmont westward to Hope, but
there is nothing to confirm it.
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April  17, 1912,
LOCAL AND GENERAL
Jas. Holden, superintendent Priuceton
Coal & Land Co., is making a business
trip to outside points.
T.J. McAlpin, superintendent for J.
Ritchie at Kaledeu, has resigned and is
coming to Princeton to reside.
It is lumored that Princeton will
shortly have, a moving picture show.
Local men are behind the enterprise.
J. Roylapce and j. H. Drummond,
backed by ._. C. Black an_Sv.* B. Cook,
of the leading financial institutions,
Princeton, chartered a special car last
Sunday and went up to see how Coalmont
looked by daylight. While there they
visited the big hotel, printing palace,
schoolhouse, mines, and in fact took in
everything but the jail. On the way out
the special had to stop until a couple of
slides were cleared. The return trip was
made in 34 minutes.
" Many followers of Ike Walton have
been out since the open season started
and some good baskets of the festive
.rout have been brought in. Up to the
present the Star has not heard of any fish
being caught over feet in length; but as
the season advances so will the anglers'
ifli3gtnati.nl.
This week Len Huston, manager of the
opera house, erected in prominent places
several large billboards.
• John Gulliford, jr., won, at the drawing
of the Rev. J. Williams, the organ which
g of Bell manufacture, and presented the
same to his sister Lillie.
Rev. J. A. Cleland of Penticton  was a
visitor of the Rev. J. Williams last   Mon
day.
Hans Lof has begun clearing ground
for J. A. Freeman, which will be sown
with grain. Mr. Freeman is branching
out into agriculture and grows a lot of
garden aud field produce.
Warren S. Stains, the genial lightning
presto change operator at the G. N
station, is leaving foe Paton, Iowa, to
visit his daughter, from there going to
Kansas City aud Portland, Ore. Many
fraternal and other friends wish him good
luck wherever he hangs up his hat. He
is succeeded by Archie Legg.
SIMllfeAMEEN fflI»H_____£^
PacK horses provided.   Apply C. M. SNOWDEN,
P O. Box 17, Princeton, B. C
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that George Laurie Fraser, of
Coalmont, B. C, occupation mine manager, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing at
a post planted at southeast corner of Lot 378,
tht nee running south 40 chains, west 60 chains,
north 40 chains, east 60 chains, to point of commencement, containing 240 acres, more or less.
O. L   FRASER.
Coalmont, B. C, March 25,1912.
CAMERAS j
FILMS
i
C AND  ALL
PHOTOGRAPHIC
SUPPLIES
AT THB
PRINCETON
Drug and
Bookstore
GEO. G. LYALL, Manager.
J
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   L.  CUMMINGS,  Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc. f
General Blacksmithing.
Carriage Build ng and  Repairs
All Work Neatly & Promptly
f Phone 28. Executed.
The Princeton
Livery sfcea
stables
N. HUSTON, Prop'r
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
I  SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., _>._._.., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, -   $8,000,000
THE SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
of The Canadian Bank of Commerce will receive deposits of $1 and
upwards, on which interest is allowed at current rates. There is no
delay in withdrawing the whole or any portion of the deposit. Small
deposits are welcomed. A234
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, to be
operated by any one of the number or by the survivor. A joint account
of this kind saves expense in establishing1 the ownership of the money
after death, and is especially useful when a man desires to provide for
his wife, or for others depending- upon him, in the event of his death.
J. D. ANDRAS, Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
^_^lf^^__f!LM^_^_f^^li^^^_^^^^y?
BANK OF MONTREAL
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ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL
R. B. ANGUS, Esq., President
Sir EDWARD CLOUSTON, Bart , Vice-President
H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., General Manager
Capital - - -       $14,887,570.00
Reserve and Undivided Profits   -  $16,855,185.36
SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTHENT
Deposits received from $1 upwards.    Ranching and Mining Business
given every attention
*?:V|| .BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits mav be made and withdrawn by mail.    Out of town accounts
receive every attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted
PRINCETON BRANCH B. L SMITH, Manager
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General Livery business carried on
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 5*"-
Regular meetings. 8 p
ra., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate  in
Thomas Block.   •' Oddfellows Hall."
Jas. Gellatly. P. Russell,
Noble Grand. Secretary
M ^_______________v___s_
eoyai Bank of Canada
CAPITAL	
RESERVE UNDIVIDED PROFITS,
),993,ooo
8,275,000
A General Banking Business Transacted
Interest allowed on savings accounts at higest current
1,.,   rates.'   Dratts and money orders sold on all  points.
PRINCETON BRANCH       G. M. K. MACLEOD, Manager
P. BURNS & Co.
FLESHERS   AND
FISH    DEALERS
Prime Beef, Pork,  Mutton.   Salmon,   Halibut,
flackerel, Herring.   Eggs, Butter, Lard
Largest Dealers in the West.
PRINCETON, B. C.
Linoleum, Etc.
Housecleaning is now the order of the day and is the most
convenient time to replace worn out Linoleum, Curtains, and
other house furnishings with new goods. We have just received a large consignment of Linoleum direct from Scotland
and have the best range of patterns in Princeton. Have a
look at it—the prices are right. We also have a splendid
range of Lace Curtains.
A. L* WHITE'S Furniture Store
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar  Shingles $3.50 per M
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays, in tbe Odd
fellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL, Clerk.
"NT
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April 17, 1912
IHE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Presbyterian church services —Sunday
school, ir am. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
s.ivice, 11 a.m.
Subject next Sunday night: '"The
World." 1—Creation,in general 2—As
a realm of rati nal and moral action.
3—As a sphere of evil
Methodist church service, Sunday,
April 21." In Oddfellows' hall, at 7:30
p in. ; cement works at 11 a.m.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject for Sunday next : 'Doctrine of Atone
ment.' To him that overcometh will I
grant to sit with me in my throne, even
as I also overcame, and am set down with
my Fatherin his throne.—Revelation 3:21
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton 1
"jrKNUKON^"!
Contractor    and    Builder j
si__n_.i_.ee_ lines
SUMMERS & WARDLE
■PROPRIETORS
Large and New buildiii:-, well Furnished aud Plastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
Grcollwrtherii
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cig .rs
PRINCETON,
B.C.
sE__^___l
Estimates Famished—Cem3nt, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
Westwood & Brooke
POULTRY FARM
PRINCETON, I British Colombia
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PKOPRIKTO- S
Modern in Equipment and
In AH Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOriS, ETC.
Commercial M Sample _* Room s
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
F. P. COOK
General Merchant
Mliiers9 outfitter p
Princeton,   Granite Creek
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All  Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given  co   all
Mail   Orders.
_eal isfaie, Mines
fl
Do you want to Invest
Ground floor price?
Double your money inside of one year
TWO 10
" SPOKESMAN "
This While Leghorn male bird won 2nd pr:zt
Spokane P. iittiv Miow 1011. .ilr.o headed 2nd
p iz.- pen ;.t same slum-. He 1-i sired by ist piizt
« inner al. Spt-kane Pou'tn Show, iqii. which
also won shape and col if specials at same show.
Al .) was'1st prize winner at Seattle in iqio
We a e in.w booking orders for Kgg S_tiil£S
and _>i ward same when itquired by cu .omeis'
I'k. No. 1—0::r selected prize winning stock,
S.S p r st tliiu of 15 eggs.
Pen No. 2—A choice pen that will produce
winners .and layers. $3 per setting of 15 eggs.
Pkn Xo. 3 —A sp einlid utility pen fjr egg pro-
- duction   $■ 50 per st tting or 15 egg-.
Book yi tir orders earl v. T -rmscash with order.
Ad.r_5s:   PRINCETON  B C
COUNTY   COURT,  YALE
_ sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
1 eld at the Court House, Pr nceton, Wednesday,
8.h 1 ay of May. 1912 at the hourof2 ;o o'clock in
the afternoon.   By command
HUGH   IIUNTBR.
Kegistiar County Court.
Adjoining,
one fronting on Bridge street, corner of
T.ipton avenue, and the other
facing Tap'.on avenue. House,
woodshed and cellar. House
rents for $7 per month.
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLOMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
T.. CLARK KING
Architect
Graduate of the Art and Science Department
Kensington, London, Eng.
Member of the Alberta Architectural Association.
Plans and  Specifications  of Buildings   furnished   at reasonable rates.
Office : KING & GIBSON
Vermilion Av. Princeton, B.C.,  Phone 18
D. R. BOUCHER
ARCHITECT
Coalmont, B.C.
K. C. E
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,    -     B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
1
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Half cash,   balance   equal in-
•stal .'.euls 6 and :2 months
Locat'o .   suitable   for   Store,
Boarding Hou^e, etc.
WRIGHT
:.
Real Estate, Finance a„_ Mines *\*
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PRINCETON,  B. C. ..
I
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TULAMEEN, B. C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Centre
[Nrs.E.J.Hcn(_cr$«ii
t* PRORIETOR
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"MODEL"
UVEPY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs—Good   Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
HHOOMriElD & GARRISOIN
Notice to Delinquent co-owner.
TO  CANADIAN   ARCHITECTS
KARL H. MORSE
Ladies and Gents' Tailoring
CLEANING and PRESSING
Vermilion Ave. opp. Similkameen Hotel,
Competition for New  University Buildings io
Be Erected at Point Orey, Near Van-
couver, British Columbia
The Government of British Columbia invite
Competitive Plans for the general scheme and
design for the proposed new University: together
with more detailed Plans for the buildings to be
erected fir.-it at an estimated cost of $t 500,000.
Prizes of $10 000 will be given for the most
successful Designs submitted.
Particulars of the competition and plan of site
may be obtained on request from the undersigned.
The designs to be sent iu by July 31st, 1912,
addressed to
the; minister of education,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
To T, C. REVELY—Take notice that unless
you do pay, within 91 days from . the date hereof,
the sura of $231.95, being your proportion of the
expenditure required for the years 1003-4-5-6-7-8- Q
lo-i 1 by Section 24 of the Mineral Act, upon the
Transvaal Fraction Mineral claim situated on
Copper Mountain in the Similkameeu Miuing
Division^together with interest and all costs of
this notice, to the undersigned your co-pat tner
in the said claim, your int_est in ihe said claim
shall become vested iu the undersigned wh'v has
made the required expenditure.
A. E. HOWSE.
Dated this 29th day of January, 1912.
Pi*g&®t
scavengers
JOHNSON & REHN
Work promptly attended to. Town
health regulations complied with ; lawful
sanitary conditions in force. Orders may
be left at C. Willarson & Co's.
——-
'■  " ' ■ ^—Ll
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April  17, 1912,
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. II. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton   Printing arid. Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $5.25
Payable in Advauce,
ADVERTISING RATES :
Land Notices," 60 days, $7.5. each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
X,egal Advertising, 12 cents per line,_st insertion,
8 ceuts per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses," $5 each.
Advertisements by contract,$1 perin. per month.
■  Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for-advertising should be delivered not
■ later than Monday.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Now that there is a probability
of Princeton acquiring athletic
grounds and racetrack it would te
advisable for citizens to consider
-the necessity for holding fall fairs.
At these now popular exhibitions
held in all the principal towns in
the province, opportunity is given
for display of products and for the
disposal of cattle and horses or other
stock to buyers for outside demand.
The incentive derived from fairs has
been abundantly proven in the
eastern and western provinces to
have a decidedly beneficial result.
A healthy competition in raising
swift and strong horses, beef and
dairy cattle, egglaying and table
poultry, sheep and   hogs^ will   not
bnt beget a spirit aiming at excellence in every branch of agriculture.
In face of the assertion of croakers
that this is not an agriculture district there is yet a vast field of unexplored and untried resources pertaining to agriculture which are
open to anyoue with brains and
courage. For the raising of horses,
cattle and sheep there is no better
grazing or climate in the world and
with the introduction of scientific
dry farming and fruit culture the
possibilities are unlimited. A line
of agitation for fairs could be
initiated by the board of trade and
the government money grant ob
tained to that end.
thus aiding in a practical way the
object to be attained. As a starter
$20 is promised for prizes to be
■awarded exhibitors. Who will help?
In a district teeming with mineral resources there should be no
reluctance on the part of mine
owners, prospectors and the average
citizen toward contributing to the
establishment of a permanent exhi
bition of coal, ores, and minerals
generally in Princeton. For the
interest of visitors and prospective
investors nothing could prove more
seductive or enticing than a sumptuous array of beautiful and valuable ores. If Princeton is to keep
abreast of other progressive mining
towns it must become the nucleus
of information and practical demonstration of its rich mineral resources.
For tbe best exhibition of minerals
only raise the standard di breeding J prizes could be offered to the owner
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
With the completion of the Onemile
road through to Nicola it' means a saving
of sr me 15 miles and will permit of pas-
'sengers leaving here in the morning by
auto and arriving the same day in Vancouver. This route is bound to become
a great favorite during construction of a
direct line or two of railways via Coquihalla pass to the coast.
A telephone at the station is about to
be installed, thanks to the board of trade,
ft will be a great convenience.
• G. L. Fraser, manager of ihe Columbia
Coal and Coke company, was in town
Monday.
Road work has begun andseyeral gangs
are repaiiing and improving in and
around town.
John J. Malone arrived from Nelson
Sa urday and will be here about a month.
Jack McDonald saw 45" deer browsing
on Sunday morning at the mouth of
Ashnola creek.
W. C. Lyall of Hedley spent Easter
with his family here.
Miss Burpee, teacher, visited home at
Penticton during Easter holidays.
Charles E. Mink will be in Princeton
Wednesday, April 24, afternoon, and will
give a shooting demonstration with shotgun, rifle and pistol, besides answering
any questions regarding the New Dominion ammunition.
Gilbert Blair of Vancouver arrived
Friday. He is interested in platinum
propositions in this section.
COALMONT NEWS.
From ist Page.
partment of this fine hostelry is now open
to the public.
The Columbia Coal & Coke company
are busy putting in raises from their main
drifts to the surface on the coal seam,
where an engine and fan will be installed
for ventilation purposes
About $10,000 will be spent on the
Coalmont streets this summer.
The printing office is about complete
and the Coalmont Courier will soon make
its debut
HOTEL   ARRIVALS.
At the Tulameen: Cal C Tilley, Oroville; E N Clark, D Gatlernow, Bobby
Morris, Coalmont; Evan Thomas, Hugh
Finuegan, Fivemile; Gilbert Blair, J M
Wright, A G Arnold, Vancouver; Alex
McMillan, J McLeod, Copper Mountain;
J J Malone, Nelson; H Comber, Phoenix;
Claud Rothwell, Ashnola; W P White,
Spokane; Jim Beatlie, Dellton.
At the Similkameen: F Keffer, D
Clark, A C Mackenzie, Greenwood; E
Riste, Oroville; W"F Bissett, Montreal;
F W Purcell, St Paul; L S Petrie, ]
Williams, Mike London, city; Dan Sanders, Geo Duffy, Ole Bergason, Fivemile;
H Holmes, Coalmont; T Cameron, Vancouver; F Pritchard, Nelson; E P Rice,
O Olesen, Voigt Camp; J A Clelaud,
Penticton; A R Banks, Tom Marks Co
Conttacts have been let for an additional 25 miles of grading on the Kettle
Valley railwav west of Carmi. C. H.
Williams & Co. secured a six mile contract; Milligan & Dussault, nine miles,
and Porter & Connelly, ten miles. The
work is to be pushed rapidly.
*****4**4******Z*****Z**^^^
THE MAN WHO CAN FORESEES
THE TOMORROW OF
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WILL MAKE MONEY BY INVESTING THERE
tit    NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
A riODEL CITY
Water system.
Electric light.
Cement walks.
Natural parks.
Nicely wooded.
. Fine garden soil.
Athletic grounds.
Excellent drainage.
No danger from overflow.
Can have fine sewer system.
Wide streets and lanes.
Local and long distance phone system.
A PAYROLL CITY NOW
Furnished by the B C. Portland Cement
Co.: Cement, Lime, Bricks.
United Empire Co. : Coal and Copper.
Princeton Coal & Land Co. : Coal.
Princeton Lumber Mills Co. ; Sawmill.
B.C. Copper Co. : Copper.
The Platinum-Gold Fields Co. I Placer
Miuing.
One thousand men will be employed
iiiSde of year. '
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A RAILROAD CENTER
The Kettle Valley railroad, which will   *4*
soon be the main line of the C.P.R. sys-   *».*
tern, brings Vancouver 300  miles nearer
Winnipeg,  passes  through the townsite.
Final survey is now being made.
The Great Northern has tracks on   two
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sides of the  townsite  and  will soon be  v<>*
These two roads  4. >
give transportation in all directions from
finished to Vancouver
give transportal
East Princeton.
Natural centre, ranching country, fruit growing. Huge deposits ot copper, gold, silver, platinum and other minerals. Has
big water power development. Lots in such towns as Grand Forks, Kamloops, Blairmore, Alta., Baker, Wash;, are worth 5 times
what is   being   asked at East Princeton and tbe payroll is not as large.
FREE CEMENT walks with each lot sold—cleared streets.    Water main to be laid in streets this summer
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BUSINESS LOTS $450 up : Terms 10 p.c. cash, 5 p.c. per mo.      Residence lots, $200 up :   Terms, 10 p.c. cash,  $10  per mo. ♦♦<►
7 p.c. on annual balances.    {%. of all lots are to be reserved) for future sale.     Get full particulars at once.
C. R. BRIGGS, Gen. Agent, 6I5 Hastings W., Vancouver.
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D. G. McCURDY, Resident Agent, East Princeton, B.C.     ♦}►
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April 17, 1912
[^   THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
.*_-
2_ O-vl.        <2-
U*A*J*&
5-
THOMAS BROS.
Come and get our CASH
PRICES. We will give you
great reductions
Boys' and Children's BOOTS AND SHOES
Boys' and Children's STRAW HATS
Boys' and  Children's SAILOR HATS.
A large assortment of up=to=date Dress
Goods and Prints to select from
Bedsteads, Mattresses, Bed Springs and
Cots at very reasonable prices
See our large cans! of   Evaporated flilk,
two cans for 25 cbnts
Thomas Bros. General Merchants
PRINCETON, B. C.
Plumbing and Healing, Sheet Metal
^^J- WOPfc, Tinsmiliilng  ft
Shop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St., in ' Murdock's blacksmith shop'
I    DIGNAN & ATKINif  '
PRACTICAL WORKMEN—PROPRIETORS
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
!%:~&__>|^_:_;$^
A
CARLE
I Headquarters for Groceries, Vege=
I tables and Provisions
Y .  _££
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I Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Cranberries
4
X ORDERS PROHPTLY ATTENDED
I O.   H.    CARLE,    THE   GROCERYMAN
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TVVVVV\HryVVVVvW%H«% »^ ^******-(***
THE SIMILKAMEEN INDIANS
The Medicine Man and His Remarkable Cures. /
V
BY   MRS.   S
AUJSON.
Read  the advertisements carefully then make  your
purchases==No reason now to send away.
[Continued from last week.]
In one case, where the patient was consumptive, the doctor worked by suction,
that is to say, he sucked a certain part of
the patient's chest till he had made a
hole through which he sucked portions
of the diseased lungs and quantities of
clotted blood, varying the operation by
endeavoring to draw the evil one from
his patient by dancing and singing.
Some white men who were present during the climax of his struggle with the
evil one left the house in perfect horror;
they said that the doctor was so terribly
in earnest that it seemed impossible to
doubt that he was indeed fighting with
some unseen and powerful adversary
Some of the doctors claim' to be clairvoyants also; if anything has been stolen
they say that they can by touching something that has been near the stolen
article, find out the thief. They also
claim to have the ability to extract toads
and other horrors from the bodies of their
patients. Setting the mysterious part of
the doctors aside, the* have really some
valuable medicines. I have seen people,
apparently in the last stage of consumption, cured by them and it seems a pity
that they should have taken so much to
'white men's' medicine, but as alcoho
forms a basis for most patent medicine,
it is easily  understood.
For blood spitting they n;ea decoction
of the fibrous roots of the spruce; for
rheumatisji the root of the soap berry
(a plant from the berry of which the
I 5} JJ,ebine is made) while the berry itself is
considered an excellent stomatic. A decoction of swamp poplar bark and spruce
roots is used for syphilis. The bark of
ithe wild cherry is considered very
strengthening for women while nursing
infants, also tansy root is much esteemed.
The wild cherry is an especial favorite
both as a tonic and expectorant, and is
considered good for consumptives. There
is a plant resembling the anemone, the
root of whic when bruised makes a
poweiful blister; another resembling a
geranium, the root of which will cure
ringworm or heal an old sore very
quickly. The inner bark of the pine is
eaten freely in early spring when the sap
is rising; nettle is used for physic, also
for a hair wash, it renders the hair soft,
thick and glossy. - Wild strawberries are
uesd as an astringent. It would fill a
volume to enumerate all the different
herbs used for medicine aud magic by
the Similikameens.- Their chief panacea
for all ills is the sweatbath. This is
nothing more than a hole dug in the
ground and covered by a conical roof
formed of green branches and earth; s
small aperature is left in the side for the
bather to crawl into; a fire is built outside
and a nntnher of stones heated; these
when sufficiently heated, are placed in
the sweathouse.the bather then crawls in,
taking with him a small kettle of water;
closing the orifice he drops the water
gradually on the hot stones till the house
is filled with steam and heat; this he endures as long as possible; when he can
stand it no longer he rushes out and
plunges into the cold river; the performance is repeated three or four times, according to taste.
When the doctor cured his patient he
was paid in blankets, horses or cattle,
according to agreement; but when unsuccessful he often had to pay for it with his
li e. The doctor is often employed as
mediator between the living and the
dead; that is to say, when an offended
ghost disturbed its late friends by un
seemly scratchings and knockings, the
doctor was employed to enquire into the
matter, and having ascertained the cause
from the perturbed spirit, informed those
whom it. might concern—the general
cause of trouble between the living and
the dead being some neglect or slight to
their memory; to appease the poor wandering spirit it was often necessary to exhume it9 late habitation. -The disinterred
bones were then carefully gathered together, each relation in turn lifting a
bone from out the mass ot corruption
and placing it as nearly as possible iu its
proper place on a cleean ne\v robe or
blanket; the head being placed at the
top, the rib bones in the middle, and the
feet at the foot; clean new clothes were
then laid on the bones; the old weapons,
if in good condition, restored to place;
the whole being once more wrapped up
and laid in the tomb. During this operation the chief actors had their noses and
ears stuffed with sweet scented grass.
When an Indian died he was laid out in
state on a couch of skins; everything put
on the body was new; his bow and arrows
were laid at his side along with hi .knife;
his friends then assembled round him to
feast—a portion of the feast reserved for
him was bu-.ned, as also certain gifts and
offerings, such as calico and clothing—-
when the feast was over his friends advanced and, taking his hand, bade him
farewell.
There was rather an amusing story
current some years ago bf a young man
who bore little good will to a deceased
chief, expressing an uncomplimentary
wish while shaking hands with his corpse,
when to the horror of those present and
the young man in par icu.lar, by some relaxation of the muscles the dead man's
hand closed on that of the living man,
who tugged in vain to free hiinselt from
the vicelike grasp, and had finally to be
released by his friends forcing open the
dead chief's hand. The young man was
so terribly frightened that he afterwards
dwindled to a mere .skeleton, and the
doctor had hard work to chase away the
evil spirit that quitting the chief corpse
had fastened on him. I
[To be continued.]
REPLY TO 'IMPERIALIST'
(Concluded from last w< ek )
Th»n I notice ,that 'Imperialist' tries
the old Nationalist trick of trying to
make out that all the opposition to home
rule comes from the members of the
Orange association. His statement in
this respect is a mean contemptible falsehood. Sir Edward Carson, the leader of
the Irish Unionists, is not an Orangeman;
neither is Bone r Law, the leader of the
Unionist parly in the British house.
The Unionist party is a unit in its oppo
sition to home rule, and a majority'of its
members do not belong to the Orange
association. The Protestants of Ireland
are not all Orangemen and they are almost to a man against home rule'. True,
there are a few, who for place or power,
have placed party before principle and
are supporting it. But even the sacred
circle of the twelve contained a Judas.
Presbyterians to the number of 50.000,
representing 562 congregations, gathered
recently in Belfast and unanimously
passed a resolution denouncing home
rule. And these Presbvterians in Ulster
alone t_imber.42T^566. The Episcopalians
come next with a membership of 366,171,
and through their bishops and the primate of Ireland they have announced
their opposition to the home rule
measure. The Methodists in Ulster
number 48,490, and they have joined
hands with the Presbyterians and the
Episcopalians in opposition to home rule.
Then  the   Nonconformist   preachers of
[Continued on 7th page.
_iig%Tt_i_i
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April  17, i9*2»
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS
WATER BRANCH
,. In the matter of the Board of Investigation cieated by Part III. of the "Water
Act" for tne determination of water
rights existing on the 12th day of March,
1909; and in Che matter of the following
creeks in the Similkameen Water District:
Alder creek. \
* Alkali lake.
Apex: creek.
Ashnola river.
Atwood creek.
Ache-ghip-Flat creek
A-tsi-Klak creek.
Asquatic creek,
j Armstrong creek.
Buckhorn creek.
Bench stream.
Bromley creek.
Baker creek.
Bear creek. 	
Bear lake.
Beaver creek.
Beaver lake.
Bitter creek.
Blue Joint creek.
Blue lake.
. Boswell creek.
Boulder creek.
Boundary creek.
Brodhagen creek.
Bunch Grass Field spring.
Big Rock creek.
Blind creek.
Brown creek.
Buchanan creek.
Bull creek.
Boomerang creek.
Blythe creek.
Causten creek.
Camp creek.
Canyon creek.
Canyon lake.
Cannier ek.
Cedar creek.
Cedar lake.
Christina lake.
Christina creek.
Clearwater lake-.
Clearwater creek.
Clark creek.
Colchester creek.
C«ld creek.
Conkte creek.
•  Copper creek.
Cougar creek.
Cyclops creek.
Cawaber creek.
Coldstream creek.
Coldwater creek.
Chain lakes.
Coteay creek.
China creek.
Chinpatlin creek.
Cranberry creek.
Cranberry creek, south fork of.
Curry creek.
Conklin creek.
Canon creek.
Colys creek.
Chandler creek.
Croscut brook.
Dauphin lake.
Deadeye creek.
Deadwood creek.
Deadman gulch.
Deadman lake.
Deep creek.
Deer creek. —
Daly gulch.
Douglas creek.
Dominion creek.
Dog lake.
Duck lake.
Damfino creek.
Eholt creek.
Eighteen mile creek.
Eighteen-mile creek, branch of.
Elkhorn creek.
Eleven-mile creek.
Frena creek.
.  Fair creek.
.   Farleigh lake.
Fifteen mile creek.
Fisherman creek.
Fisherman creek, west branch.
Five-mile creek.
Fons Perenius spring.
Fourth July creek.
Fourth  July   creek,   unnamed   tributary of.
Fraser creek.
■ Flatt creek.
Franklin creek.
Fish lake.
French creek.
Farrel creek.
Gerald creek.
Goat creek.
Little Goat creek.
Gold creek.
Gold Hill creek.
Gretn lake.
Gibbs creek.
Gloucester creek.
Gilpin creek.
Graveyatd creek.
Glover creek.
Granite creek.
Gregoire creek.
Gold Drop creek.
Harrison creek.
Haussener creek.
Hardy creek.
Horse creek.
Haynes creek.
Hester creek.
Hamilton creek.
Hell creek."
Henderson Sawmill creek.
Henry creek.
Hewlitt creek.
Hornet creek.
Hughes creek.
Huline creek.
Hydrauliccieek,—
Ingr__Tcfeek.
Tngram creek, east fork.
Incameep creek.
Irrigation creek.
Italy creek.
Inglam creek.
Iron creek.
Joshua creek.
James creek.
Jolly Jack creek.
Jim creek.
Keogan creek.
Kepler creek.
Keremeos creek.
Keremeos creek, south fork.
Keremeos creek, west fork.
Kilpoola lake.
Kuslas Keiti-ska sken creek. -
Kelly creek.
Kettle river.
Kettle river, north fork.
Kettle river, east branch of north for
Kettle river, west branch of n.rth for
Kettle river, west fork.
Kettle river, east fork of west fork
Kingston creek.
Knappen creek.
Kearns creek.
Lime Kiln lake.
Lind creek.
Little Volcanic creek.
Lost Horse creek.
Lime creek.
Line creek.
Lynch creek.
Loon lake.
Lome lake.
Long Joe creek.
Long lake
Lost creek.
Little creek.
Little chief creek.
Marama creek.
Manuel creek.
Marks creek.
Marron creek.
Marron lake.
May creek.
Meadow creek.
Milligan creek.
Mollie Pritchard creek.
Moody creek.
Mother Lode creek.
Murphy creek.
Myers creek.
Myers creek, tributary of.
Meyers creek.
Maloan creek.
McCraie creek.
McCarren creek.
McConnell creek.
Mclntyre creek.
Mill creek.
Mulligan creek.
Maida creek.
Murray creek.
Murray gulch.
McRae creek.
Munroe creek.
McCuddy creek.
Mica creek.
Mohr creek.
Mud creek.
McFarlane creek.
Nogi creek.
Nine-mile creek.
Nicholson creek.
Napoleon creek.
N'Kam-ri-no creek.
N'Kam a-hi-nat-no creek.
N'Kam-eep river
Norwegian creek
Namless creek.
Okanagan river.
Olalla' river.
^_v^V
iSfffli.
Oro Fino creek
Omellette creek
Old Tom creek
Osoyoos lake
Overton creek
Ontario creek
Paik rill
Pass creek
Pass creek, south fork
Porter creek
Prather creek
Parker creek
Prairie creek
Pathfinder creek
Prior creek
Providence creek
Quillette creek j
Quartz creek
Rat lake
Reed creek
Rice creek
Riddle creek
Rock creek "a"","0»y»-*
Rock creek, south fork /*v<**J~^
Round lake
Ruby creek -
Ruckle creek
Richter creek
Rocky creek
Rattler creek
Sand Bank'creek
St. Anne creek
Sand creek
Sandner creek
Savage creek
Sawmill creek
Sawmill lake
Sheep creek
Sheep creek, west fork
Schwartz creek.
Second creek
ScLillings creek
Shingle creek
Schumaker creek
l_3huttleworth creek
Shuttleworth creek, lake at head of
Stray Horse creek
Smuggler spring
Similkameen river
Similkameen river, south fork
Six-mile creek
Sixteen-mile creek
en Kani Ske-Noo-Ske-Tan creek
^Skibbingtou ere. k
Slate ci eek
Srhith cret k
Str i y Horse lake
Sultan creek
Sunset creek
Susap c-tek
Susap ct eek, north fork
Sutherland creek
Spring gulch
Spring creek
Smelter lake
Stirling creek
Strawberry creek
Split ctetk
Summit lake
Summit creek
Snowball cieek
Stashla-Valentka creek
Stewart creek
S_ wshoe ere* k
Suehumption creek
Stevenson creek
Scot McRae creek
Snit Hse-tse-pas Kan creek
Snit-I. e^Naie-Tari-creek
Semple creek   i
Sixteen-mile creek
Stuart creek,
Tayior creek
Ta> lor lake
Teslalinda creek
Texas creek
Thret Spring creek
Tinhorn creek
Togo creek
Tom creek
Tom Tit creek
Trout creek
Trout lake
Twenty-mile crees;
Twenty-two-mile crek
Twenty-two mile creek, east fork
Twin creek
Twin creek, east fork of
Twin creek lakes
Twin creek, creek running into
Tea river
Troy creek
Trapper creek
Trail creek
Ten-mile creek
Thirty two-mile creek
Twilight creek
Tug-ul-nuit lake
Upper Clear lake
Upper Keremeos creek
Victoria creek
Volcanic creek
Vaseauxlake
Verde creek
Wallace creek
Wallace lake
Ward lake
Whites creek
Wild West creek
Williamson creek
Wilson creek
Wiseman creek
Woodworth lake
Wolf creek
Wolf lake
White lake
White lake creek
Wilkinson creek
Waddel creek
Wolverine creek
Williams creek
Wartinan lake
Wood creek
West Fork lake
Yellow- lake
Young creek
Unnamed Springs and Stieams
Lake situate one mile north of Fairvie w wagon
road about uiue miles from Keremeos.
Lake on scuth line of sub-lot 7, lot 2710.
Spring on lot 667 (S)
Small creek on the Florence mineral claim
Creek on sub lot 16 of lot 2613
Small creek about fourteen miles west of
Penticton
Spring three-quarters of a mile northwest of
south boundary of lot 538. group 1. township 72.
Small unnamed lake on lot 973 (S)
Spring on lot 2138
Small Creek running from west ove.- southwest
portion Stem Winder mineral claim
Spring on Smuggler mineral claim
Small unnamed creek one mile and a half
south cf Tinhorn creek
Small unnamed creek about one mile and a
half north from Golden Gate Hotel, Fairview
- Spring rising on the Eureka mineral claim
Spring on lot 2456
Unnamed stream rising lot 1297 ( .)
Unnamed stream flowing through lot 1738
Small stream on tht Fairview townsite
Spring on Pre-emption record 2517
Small stream near south end of Pre-emption
record 2944
Small creek on northeast corner of lot 351.
Spring on section 31, township 40
Spring near west boundary of Pre-emption
record 125 (S)
Spring near northeast corner oflot 282, group 1
Spring on lot 454 (S)
Small stream on Blue Diamond mineral claim
Stream coming down mouutaln in front of Lawe
homestead
Spring rising in northwest y*. section 24,
township 28
Small spring on southwest portion oflot 513
Spring on I ittle Frank mineral claim.
Stream flowing through No. 3 mineral claim.
Underground creek ou Victoria mineral claim
Spring creek about the center of the Grey
Eagle mineral claim.
Small sp. ing on lot 2531
Small unnamed creek rising on Pre-emption
rt cord 4613
Spring rising on Pre-emption record 76 (S)
Small spring on wagon road between Boundary
'alls and second bridge below Anaconda.
Small spring situated on lot 515, township 67.
Small lake on Pre-emption record 238 (S)
Small stream and spring situate on lot 27 (S)
Small unnamed creek on the northeast _( section 38. township 47
Spring on lot 177
Spring on lot 261, section 33, township 55
Spring near easterly end of New York mineral
claim
Small creek running into Myers flat and rising
on Oro Fino mountain
Stream ris'ng on Barnes & Ironsides mineral
claim in Greenwood camp
Stream rising on Apex mineral claim
Three small laRes situated on east side of
Okanagan take and twelve miles below Mission
creek
Spring on Comet mineral claim
Unnamed stream running alongside road that
borders lot 900
Spring and unnamed creek on lot igr, group t
Spring or ereek on lots 2834 and 280, township
89
Small creek running southeast from Maple
Leaf mine
Small spring on St. Maurice mineral claim
Unnamed stream running through Missing
Link No. 2 mineral claim
Springs on lots 337 and 374 (S)
Unnamed spring on Pre-emption record 628
Small stream half a mile southwest of southwest corner of lot 3334
Spring about 42 chains north oflot 3205, group 1
Spring situate near centre of the northwest ^
section 13, township 28
Spring near south line of lot 907
Unnamed spring on or near Pre-emption record
4037
Small spring or stream on lot ^49
Spring on Pre-emption record 4774
Unnamed small stream flowing from spring on
lot 380
Spring on lot 471
Spring sit-ated about the centre of north line
of lot 668 (S)
Small lake near southeast corner of Pre-emption
67 (S)
Small creek on Pre-emption record 2986
Small lake situated on Pre-emption record 2773
Small unnamed lake or slough near east line of
lot 500, Osoyoos
Unnamed slough near lots 494 and 493, group 1,
Osoyoos
Spring on lot 334
Spring on lot 1359
Springs near northeast corner oflot 365
Springs on lot 2394
Spring near centre oflot .580
Stream running out of Loon lake
Spring on lot 3009, group 1, Osoyoos
Small creek flowing into Kettle river, five miles
south of Grand Forks
Small stream about six miles and a half south
of Eholt
Creek or springs on lot 494
Spring on Colville reservation
Spring on reserve
Spring into Norwegian creek
Creek on lot 908
Stream running through sub lot 3203 of lot
2710
And all named springs, streams, creeks, ponds,
gulches and lakes tributary to or in the vicinity
of the above named streams
Take notice that each and every person, partnership, company or municipality who, on the
said 12th day of March, 1909, had water rights on
any of the above mentioned creexs, is directed
to forward on or before the 19th day of _pril,
1912, to the Chief Water Commissioner at the
Parliament Buildings at Victoria, a memorandum
of claim in writing as required by section 28-of
the said act as amerded. Printed torms for such
memorandum (form No. 19) can be obtained
from any of the Water Commissioners in the
province;
And taKe notice that the said board of investigation intends to proceed to tabulate such claims
on or about the 31st day of May, 1912.
After the claims have been tabulated "by the
board, notice will be given of the places and days
on which evidence and argument will be heard
at local points.
Dated at Victoria this 28th day of February,
1912.
J. F. ARMSTRONG,
:"* Chairman.
Advertise and Prosper
xj
April 17, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
REPLY   TO  'IMPERIALIST.'
From 5th Page.
London met recently and did exactly as
the Princeton Loyal Orange lodge did,
passed a resolution of sympathy with the
Irish Protestants in the gallant fight they
were putting up to preserve their civil
and religious liberties. And before the
fight is over, every Protestant in tbe old
land worthy of the name will be found
backing up the men of Ulster in their
fight to keep Ireland from being turned
into a Papal preserve.
Now, a few words as to the Belfast
meeting which 'Imperialist' so grossly
misrepresents Mr. Churchill thought
he would play a smart political trick on
the men of Ulster. He would arrange
for a home rule meeting in the heart of
Belfast, and if there was no opposition he
would go back to England and Scotland I
and say that the feeling in Ulster against
home rule had died down. If there was
any opposition then he would do as Ttn
perialist' has done, make a great noise
about free speech. The p'ace he chose
for his meeting was Ulster hall, a build
ing dedicated to the cause of the union,
and from the platform of which his
father, Lord Randolph Churchill, delivered his famous speech against home
rule, in which he said, 'Ulster will fight,
and Ulster will be right.'
Let me quote from an editorial in the
Vancouver Province regarding the meeting: 'The men of Ulster won d have had
no objection to Mr. Redmond or any of
his colleagues holding a meeting ixi Belfast. Mr. Redmond has, during all his
political life, been a member of the
party which he is now the leader and his
course has been clear, frank und consistent. But they did object to Mr.
Churchill, because they regarded hitn as
a renegade, as a political opportunist
who has abandoned . convictions which
he still holds to be true, for principles
which he does not regard, but whirh
■ have gained for him political advancement. He had been faithless to the
traditions of his family, not through conviction, but through self interest. And
they regarded his action in insisting upon
speaking on this occasion and on' this
subject in the center of Unionist senti.
ment in Ireland as a wanton insult lo the
population and as a deliberate attempt to
cteate trouble and arouse ill feeling.'
But the men of Ulster called his bluff.
They said he would not speak in Ulster
hall, nor in any hall in Belfast if they
could help it, and they kept their word.
Promises of money and eveu of titles
could not procure a hall, and Mr.
Churchill was compelled to speak outside
of Belfast in a tent erected for the occa
s on and to an audience that was com-
pjsed almost entirely of Roman Catholic
Nationalists. After the meeting he
sneaked out of the city by a back way
and got back to London as fast as he
could.
If 'Imperialist' can extract any satis
faction out of the Belfast meeting he is
doing more than the Nationalists themselves have done, because they have
already realized the fact that the meeting
has proven a boomerang and has shown
to the people of England and Scotland
the very thing that John Redmond didn't
want them to know, viz , 'that the opposition in Ulster to home rule is as strong
and determined as ever.'
Just a word in conclusion as to the
loyalty and imperialism of John Redmond
and the Nationalists. Nationalist speakers and papers do not disguise the fact
that their ultimate aim is the complete
separation of Ireland from England, and
that if they accept home rule it is simply
the first step towards the goal of inde-
to prove my statement:
John Redmond is reported in the Irish
Daily Independent of December 9, 1895,
as follows: 'Ireland for the Irish is our
motto, and the consummation of all our
hopes and aspirations is, in one word, to
drive English rule sooner or later bag
and baggag; from our country.'
And again, the Freeman s Journal of
October 13th, 1910, reports him speaking
at Buffalo as follows (referring to such
concessions as a parliament at Dublin):
'Such value as they possess is to be found
in the fact that they strengthen the arm
of the Irish people and push on to the
goal of national independence.'
John Dillon said: 'Tbey would never
have in Ireland a really prosperous and
happy land until English rule is swept
clean out  of it '—Cork Examiner, Sep'.
30, 1905
Sir  Thomas  H.   G.   Estnonde,   M. P.,
said: 'If I did not think I was working
for the establishment of a free and independent Ireland I would not remain in
public life for twenty four hours.'—En-
niicorthy Echo, Dec  28. 1906.
David Sheehy, M. P., said: 'Ireland
was determined to carry on the struggle
until the right of Ireland to be an independent nation was acknowledged.'—
Drogheda Independent, Jet. 13, 1906.
The Enniscorthy Echo (Nationalist)
said on June 3, 1910: 'It is the first duty
of an Irishman to be seditious to
England.'
The Connacht Champkn (Nationalist)
said on June 3 1910. 'What we desire is
not home rule, but complete separation
We want to be as free to control our own
affairs as Denmark or Holland.'
And your readers will remember the
Irish Transvaal brigade, made up of
Nationalists and Home Rulers, who
fought against the Can .dian and British
soldiers in South Africa. They will also
remember the action of the Nationalist
members of the house of commons in
cheering whenever a British loss or re
verse was announced. Thev will also
remember the absolute silence of John
Redmond and his band of 'real imperialists' upon the occasion of the death of
Ring Edward. Not one word of regret
expressed by any of them at the great
loss sustained by the empire on the death
of one of its most illustrious kings. If
this is the kind of loyalty that 'Imperialist' and the Home Rulers stand for all
well and good, -t is their privilege to do
so. But I want 'Imperialist' to distinctly
understand that the members of the
Orange'association stand for a different
kind of loyalty altogether. They have
pledged themselves to do their utmost to
uphold the integrity of the empire. They
are imperialists in ihe true sense of the
word and have done their part in helping
to cement the different parts of the empire together. They will always be
found ready to do their share in defending the king and the empire, and unlike
the friends of 'Imperialist' they will
never be found consorting with Britain's
enemies.
In conclusion, Mr. Editor, I have to
thank you for the insertion of this letter,
and in justice to your readers and myself
I trust that if 'Imperialist' makes any,
reply you will compel him to do so over
his own signature, the only honorable
and fair way that any man should con
duct a newspaper correspondence.
Yours truly,
J. W. WHITELY,
Provincial Organizer.
Orange Association.
Vancouver, March 20, 1912
[Both sides, from the Conservative and
Liberal viewpoints, having been presented
oa home rule for   Ireland,   the   contro-i
pendence.    Let   me   quote   irom a  few . ., „      , „„ ._„ i„.„„o
Ct .-      1- *       __         _        _                j .cr .v is now ended so tar as tne columns
Nationalist  members  of parliament and versy is uuw asasa
from some of the Nationalist newspapers of the Star are available.—Ed,]
* .t^-*;-**-^;^ ♦> ♦> H II♦>♦>♦>♦♦♦ I
___ __
An Eye Opener
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to the good mechanics is our showing of tools of all description.
And they are good tools. They are the kind that will become like
old friends to yon. They will last and stay and work for you for
years and years, and help you earn your daily bread. Therefore,
they are more reasonable in price than others—quality considered.
And so it is with all kinds of Hardware, and for that matter with
all kinds of merchandise, irrespective of what it is called. You want
the best, don't you ? That ought to bring you here—for the least
skillful buyer can come here and be sure that what he or she buys is
good—because we make it good.
That is one of the reasons that customers are coming to us in
constantly increasing numbers; and it will pay you too—to get
acquainted with us—pay in quality—in service—aud in money saved.
New arrivals at our Store this week
ONE CARLOAD BUILDERS' HARDWARE
Get our prices on  nails, locks, glass,  windows, building paper, tar
paper, roofing, paints, brushes, etc , etc.
New Shipment Men's Perfection Brand Clothing
BOYS AND CHILDREN'S  CLOTHING
Ask our clerks to show you our new suits for boys from 7 to 14
years of age at $3 50, $4, $4 50 per suit. They are unmatchable values.
New Shipment of Summer Silks
in   the   most beautiful   colorings  and  exquisitely  tasty  patterns at
40 cents, 50 cents and 60 cents pet yard.
Get the Habit of trading at Howse's—it will save you money.
The A. E. HOWSE CO, Ltd
PRINCETON, B. C.
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KING & GIBSON
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
_:_:_:_:_:_:_:_:_;_;_;_:_:_:_:♦
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
<_:_x_;_:_;_;_:_:_:_^^^
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The Town ot opportunity
The rails have been  laid  into  the town and Coalmont is now the new
terminus,   the  base  of operations for  the next  forty miles of railway
building.
Before six months have passed there should be a payroll in Coalmont of
between   350  and  400  men : This  means population, which naturally
means good business.
IF YOU ARE WISE YOU will  invest in a little Coalmont real estate
now while tbe choice is still good.
Don't let this opportunity slip  along  with  the  others  which have got
past you.    Write for our circular and   price list ; a post card will bring
it to you.    There are still some 50-foot lots left
Two blocks from the centre of town at only
$225, $55 cash, bal. in 18 months to suit.
Williamson  & Turner
AGENTS, COALflONT,  B. G
___
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M ■■»,,;.    M.pJ!»IJI)ip:l
8
THE     SIMILKA M£__f£ N     STAR
April  17, 1912,
_.
PR1NC
TON
___«_
According to the laws of industrial progress and the experience of founders of western towns,
there must be a tangible, genuine basis on which to establish the future city. No amount of
coaxing can bring blood out of a stone, nor can the greatest scientist extract sunbeams from a
cucumber. Every man. makes his own destiny==his own fortune==nothing comes by so=called
good luck.   The door is wide ajar for all who have pluck and a little capital.    Investigate Now!
1
Princeton
1
I
With Its Unequalled Mineral Resources
Its  Healthful Climate and Pretty Site
*
Is destined to be the Largest City in the Interior of British Columbia.
Five hours' run to Vancouver when the V., V. .& E. is finished.
XV
-V     J-.'V*
^
Your Opportunity Is NOW!
CHOICE LOTSi FOR ISA LE
And to Suit All Requirements
Enquire of | ERNEST    WATERMAN I Manager for
PrmedoB Coal i mi Co
&Hi
jr^-^
. ;,»!._____»-

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