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Similkameen Star 1912-04-24

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 «hp
*«_K./
_Nfs \a Domestic Coal-the*Princeton fuel is unbeatable.
In adversity be patient; in prosperity keep ' cool/
Capital and energy with brain  and muscle are proving the vast resources of Princeton district and will place the future beyond all doubt
or dispute—The payroll goes with industrial enterprise: Princeton gives promise of a large payroll city—Mines, smelters, manufactories.
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Vol.XllI.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24,-1912..
No. 17
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MINES AND MINING
Summit  Camp Receives   Attention  and  will, no
Doubt, Benefit.
Whipsaw  and  Siwash Creeks Show
Silver Lead in Promising
Ore Bodies.
Knight & Day, Whipsaw camp, are in
the Lucky Pair over 225 feet and have
now a total of over 450 feet of tunneling
besides open cuts. The main lead is not
far away and it is expected to reach it in
about another month or so of continuous
woik. There are about two feet of snow
in the gulches around Whipsaw arid the
Hope trail is expected to be open a
month earlier this year.
H. B. Brown of Hedley leaves for the
coast to make arrangements for a mineral
exhibit from the Similkameen. Mr.
Brown is an energetic believer in the
future ot tbe district and is deserving of
encouragement.
George Aldous was in Saturday from
Voigt camp where he has a mining contract. He has eight men working and
took out a couple more miners. The
woik is progressing favorably.
High grade galena ore in a three foot
vein has teen sjruck on the Inland Development company's mineral properties
on Siwash creek. This camp and vicinity
i^ attracting considerable attention ow:ng
to mineral deposits discovered.
Col. Robert Stevenson, the veteran
mine owner and prospector of Princeton,
district, arrived from Spokane last week.
He spent tbe past winter in negotiating
c-pital to acquire some of his mineral
properties and was successful in inducing
eastern men to visit this section. In
company with mining expert Jennings
and J. F. Rice' and F. Farrant he left
for Summit camp last Friday where he
has a silver lead proposition thai assays
high. This trip is not without difficulties at" this time of year as the snow ha3
not all distppeared. Everybody will
wish Col Sieyenson success in his efforts
to develop the camp and bring it to the
producing stage-,
PROSPEROUS PRINCETON
From the Province the following helpful publicity is clipped: ' The B. C.
Copper company of Greenwood has
bonded and is doing development work
kfa a group of copper gold claims at
Voigt camp on the east side of Copper
mountain, and it is stated is negotiating
many other propositions oi the same
slope. L- W. Shatford of Vancouver is a
leading shareholder in a company erecting a plant near Princeton for the manufacture of Po tland cemet.   The  build
ings will soon be completed, and a plant
is being installed. The ini.i_l output
will be 500 barrels daily. The Great
Northern has built a spur into the property at a cost of $60,000. Three chartered banks are doing business at Princeton, uhi.h is enjoving great  prospeiily.'
NEW HOTEL BUILDING
Plans for the new Great Northern ho_el
to take the place of the former structure
burned on March ist have been received
by Peter Swanson, proprietor, who will
erect a modern hotel in every respect.
The .building will be brick with steel
beams, two storeys, designed by Brese-'
man & Durfee, architects, Vancouver and
Victoria. There will be electric light,
hot and cold water and steam heat
throughout, besides lavatories and baths.
Tenders will be received by the architects and opened next month. The size
of the building is 100x100 and will cost
approximately $45 000 when finished and
furnished. Dell Young has the contract
for excavating the cellar, 55x100, and began work on Monday, jf
MARKS, IRISH COME_#__N
Monday night, the Tom Marks company, famed for its exposition of Irish
comic character and clever vaudeville,
presented ' The Peacemaker' to a full
house. This drama well portrays the
changeable, lovable, impetuous and
humorous Irish nature. Full of pathetic
interest and funny sketches, the audience
is moved from tearful feeling to spontaneous laughter. There was not a
character but showed proficiency in histrionic effect, and of course Tom Marks
is'a whole company in himself. Three
nights of clean aud clever entertainment
is sure to ingratiate the Marks company
with Princeton playgoers. Last night
'Hello, Bill,' and tonight Jerry the Tramp
closes an engagement that will live in the
memories of a fun-loving public. Matinee at 4 o'clock this afternoon.
EARLY MORNING FIRE.
The fire brigade received an early call
Friday morning and it is due to them
that a big blaze was averted, for the con
ditions were just right, the building and
those adjoining being highly combustible
wooden structures. The fire originated
in the kitchen of the restaurant run by
Mr. Rogers, and the building, owned by
Messrs Thomas and George Wardle, had
a narrow escape. Captain'Gellatly and
his fire laddies did excellent work in,
which they were assisted very much by
the high pressure of water from the
waterworks. The damage will probably
reach about $400, partially covered by
insurance.
LOCAL AND GENERAL
Hope  Trail   is Under  Snow
Near Summit Crossing
of Mountains.
Growing Showers "arid April Flowers
Brighten Hills- Oddfellows  "
Observe Anniversary.
Tames Malone returned yesterday fror
Arkanaas hot springs.
A large number of young people leavl
this afternoon to attend the dance at thf
Coalmont hotel tonighi.
_i_____^^,*ffgt*
;^Hope trail is to receive considerable
repairs and improvements this year and a
gang of four men went out last week to
begin work under foreman S. Spencer,
but-had to return on account of the snow.
Billy Knight came down from Whipsaw
camp last Thursday and goes to Hedley
with his orchestra for a grand ball to be
given by the gold millers.
Peter Swanson returned from the coast
last Wednesday.
Trapper Fitzgerald reports about five
feet of snow on the Hope trail at the
summit.
' Advertising is to business what steam
is to machinery—the .grand propelling
power.—Lord Macaulay, historian.
Wesley Cook, Jimmy Drummond and
Archie Black got up before daylight last
Sunday, grabbed their fishing rods and
ten pounds of pork chops, lo be used for
bait, and hit out for the streams abundant with fish. They went as far as
Roanie camp, and after spending the day
up to their necks in water returned home,
footsore, weary andsad, with three squaw
fish, one minnow and a warty toad.
Mjs. M. Shean-and son Roy arrived
from Colby, Wisconsin, last Thursday
Mrs. Shean is a sister ■ of Frank Wilns,
and will probably remain permanently.
Mrs. J. Gellatly arrived home Saturday
trom a visit to parents at  Innisfail,  Alta.
It is reported that grouse are being
killed out of season in this district. It
will certainly go 'hard' with the party ii
he is caught by the game warden.
' P. Swanson left on a short trip to
Montana yesterday.
. Mrs. H. Priest of Merritt is the guest of
Mr. and Mrs J.J. Priest.   ,
', G. L. Fraser and wife of Coalmontjvere.
in town Monday and attended the theatre
ih the evening.
Married—At Princeton, on Monday,
April 22, by the Rev. A. H Cameron,
Karl H. Morse to Miss Hazel M. Coffin.
Don't forget the matinee this afternoon
and regular play tonight (Wednesday )
The race track and athletic grqunds
deal is accepted so far as the owners are
concerned on the terms of $1000 cash
and balance of $1400 in 6 and 12 months.
It is now up to the citizens to close the
deal and secure this needed .ground. A
meeting of intending subscribers is called
for Friday night in the court house to
cdnsfder the matter.
The anniversary of Oddfellowship will
be observed by Princeton Lodge, No. 52,
I.O.O.F., by a supper on Thursday evening next at the hall to whicli all Re-
bekahs and jddfellows are invited. The
anniversary" sermon will be preached
next Sutrnay at 7:30 p.m. by Rev.^T. A'.
Osborne in the hall. Everybody welcome.
BUSINESS ENTERPRISE
-Attention is directed to the advertisement of M. S. Wilson on the third page.
His new shop and store on Vermilion
avenue, next the postoffice, is stocked
.vith paints, oils, wall paper and all the
necessaries for painting, decorating and
making the 'house beautiful.' An inspection of his stock will repay anyone
contemplating a renewal of "the old or
■building anew. Mr. Wilson is expert
with the brush and his signs are models
of neatness and good taste. Consult hinl
and get his estimates.
PIONEER MINER-MERCHANT
FV P. Cook of Granite creek was in
Princeton on business yesterday and is
full of good cheer and hope for the whole
upper Tulameen district. He has great
faith in the precious metals and coal resources of that section and his judgment
is given weight by reasou of his pioneer
experience there. He has large interests
at Granite creek and Coalmont and
predicts an important centre as the result
of the enterprise of the Columbia Coal &
Coke Co. He states that the Coalmont
Courier will appear with its initial number in a week or two.
HOTEL  ARRIVALS.
At the Tulameen: J H Ward, Chicago;
F Sheel, Loomis, Wash; G J Brady, Victoria; W Dunlop, Muckilteo, Wash; C S
Jennings, F Fajjant, Robert Stevenson,
J F Rice, Spokane; J C Carruthers,
Nelson; Mrs-AC Felker, Hedley; CW
Pitts, Vancouver; F J Vallier, L W Val-
lier, Portland; G M Blackmunn, Shulus;
D Robertson, Tulameen; G Shea, T
Erickson, G S Jermyn and family, Coalmont; W Murrajr, Onemile; Mr and Mrs
A Clark, Penticton.
„A_tJthe Similkameen: J W Devine, A
Proctor, H Holmes, T Edwards, J H
Murphy, D J Mackenzie, Vancouver; A
Muir, Victoria; G^_jl3§gjd__i_,A_j_^wife|
T__Qal_v_J_E Hedley, Onemile; A D Legs',
L W Shievel, W Dunlop, Frank Pabillo,
C Cotterrell, F E Anderson and wife, J
Tuttle, N Huston, city; R Crysler, Coalmont; H Jackson, Phoenix; J C Carruthers, E D Mitchell, Nelson; J H
Jackson, Tulameen; F P Cook, Granite
creek; J D Newman, Princeton Heights;
Tom Marks and. wife, Perth, Ont; Phil
Gestel, North Pole.
 "V^"
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April 24, 1912.
EAST PRINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, April 22.—A number
of very prominent citizens of West
Princeton spent a very jovial evening
last Wednesday night at the home of
Mrs. J. A Os mine East Princeton, wife
of J A. Osborne, superintendent of the
B. C. Ce.nent Co. Amusements consisted of various kinds of games; also
music by organ and gramaphone The
guests were: Mr. and Mrs. Howse, Mr
Unsoeld.Mr. Stevens, Mr. and Mrs. Bell,
Miss Shepl.erd, Mr. and Mrs. Schisler,
Mhs Schisler, Mr. and Mrs. McDougall,
Mr. and Mrs. Willarson, Dr. McCaffrey,
Miss McC-tfLey, Miss Burpee, Miss Irwin,
Mr. B. Irwin, Mr. L. T. Joudry, Miss
Howell, Miss Knudson, Mr. N. Huston'.
Mr. D. McGurdy. At 12 o'clock lunch
.was served by Mr. and Mrs. Osborne, assisted by Mr. aud Mrs Hey wood of East
Princeton; after which they had a few
more enjoyable games. The guests re
turned home at 2 p m singing, ' We are
all jolly good fellows."
Mis. J. A. Osborne entertained a crowd
■of twenty-nine friends, all from East
Princeton, last Fri lay eyeuing. Many
•enjoyable games were indulged in; also
music and singing. Lunch was served at
midnight. A really jolly good time was
spent till about 2.30 a m., when all returned home.
Permissioli having been granted to
make the necessary changes in the public wagon road grading will commence
early in May.
FOR   SALE
CAMERAS
FILMS
AND  ALL
For sale lot  twenty-eight  (28),  block
nineteen (19), on Bridge street.   Addrei*
CHARLIE BURCH,
R F.D. No. 2       Ashland, Wisconsin
LIQUOR ACT, \ 910.
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
June next, application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police for the grant
of a license for the sale of liquor by retall.ijxwuj
upon the premises known as the Great Northern
_____ situate at Princeton, in the PrOTftfcG'"_t
■ British Columbia* upon the lands described as
Block 4, Lot 8, corner Bridge street and Harold
avenue.
Dated this 24th day of April. _9__"*■*
PETER SWANSON. Applicant.
PHOTOGRAPHIC
SUPPLIES
AT THE
PRINCETON
Drug and
Bookstore
GEO. G. LYALL, Manager.
Real Estate, Finance, Mines
The Door of   Opportunity is
Wide Open.
The 'West* affords many examples of fortunes
made from ground floor investments- Winnipeg,
Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver had a similar
beginning to that of Princeton. Fortunes have
been made in real estate from a very small inyest-
ment. Princeton, which includes East Princeton,
has undoubtedly the Best prospects of any town
on the map. Invest while the town is yet in its
infancy"and see prices steadily rise.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take _.,__. that George Laurie.-rFraser, of
Cca.mont, B. C, occupation mine manager, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lane's: Commencing at
a post planted at southeast corner of Lot 378.
thrnce running south 40 chains, west 60 chains,
north 40 chains, east 6) chains, to point of commencement; containing 24c acres, more or less.
1;   _   FRASER.
Ccal nont, B C, March 25, 1912.
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notiee
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
FOR SALE:
Lot on Bridge Street, within 100 yds. south of
Vermilion aV.
Townsite Welldo. Two railways—gold-platinum
placers, ore and coal, njining.
Ranch V/i miles west of Princeton. 192 acres,
$3,000.
Two lots  in Hedley, inside and corner.   Price
$200 and $250—Also in east addition op- Mr. Smiths
house.   Price $350.
Lot 6, block 24, house rents for $6 per mo., $600,
Agricultural land, near Coalmont, 80 acres, $1600
Claim in diamond belt, $500; locations made.
Mineral properties.
Water power.
Suburban acreage to lease.
Address:    J.M.WRIGHT,.
Princeton. B-C Canada.
COUNTY   COURT, YALE
a sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Wednesday,
8th day of May, 1912 at the hour of 2:30 o'clock in
the afternoon.   By command
HUGH  11U..TBR,
Registrar County Court.
fi
eopi Baith 01 Ciiiii
CAPITAL   ;,.^8   -       -       -       -
RESERVE UNDIVIDED PROFITS,
>,993,000
3,275,000
A General Banking Business Transacted
Interest allowed on savings accounts at higest current
rates.    Drafts and money orders sold on all  points.
PRINCETON BRANCH       G. M. K. MACLEOD, Manager
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., L.L.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, -   $8,000,000
THE SAYINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
of The Canadian Bank of Commerce will receive deposits bf $i and
upwards, on which interest is allowed at current rates. There is no
delay in withdrawing the whole or any portion of the deposit. Small
deposits are welcomed. A234
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, to be
operated by any one of the number or by the survivor. A joint account
of this kind saves expense in establishing the ownership of the money
after death, and is especially useful when a man desires to provide for
his wife, or for others depending upon him, in the event of his death.
J. D. ANDRAS,   Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
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1I__ OF MONTREAL
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ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL
R. B. ANGUS, Esq., President
Sir EDWARD CLOUSTON, Bart , Vice-President
H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., General Manager
Capital - - -       $14,887,570.00
Reserve and Undivided Profits   -  $16,855,185.36
SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTHENT
Deposits received From $x upwards.    Ranching and Mining Business
given every attention
BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits may be made and withdrawn by mail.    Out of town accounts
receive every attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted
PRINCETON BRANCH
B. L SMITH, Manager
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P. BURNS & Co.
FLESHERS   AND
FISH    DEALERS 1
Prime Beef, Pork,  Mutton.   Salmon,   Halibut,
nackeijel, Herring.    Eggs, Butter, Lard
Largest Dealers in the West
PRINCETON, B. C.
Linoleum, Etc.
Housecleaning is now the order of the day and is the most
convenient time to replace worn out Linoleum, Curtains, and
other house furnishings with new goods. We have just received a large consignment of Linoleum direct from Scotland
and have the best range of patterns in Ttinceton. Have a
look at it—the prices are right. We also have a splendid
range of Lace Curtains.
A. L. WHITE'S Furniture Store
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar  Shingles  $3.50 per M
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays, in tne Odd
fellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. WADDELL, Consul.
"   P. RUSSELL-.tClerk.'
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April 24, 1912
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
SPECIALS.
Before letting your painting or decorating see M. S. Wilson and get an esti
mate. He buys his paints direct from the
manufacturers and can give you close
prices. None but first class mechanics
will be employed and all work guaranteed.
D M. French, undertaker and funeral
director, has received a line of coffins
and caskets in a variety of sizes and
styles. They are the latest thing in
funeral fashion and look cosy and
inviting.    Orders promptly filled.
The regular quarterly meeting of the
Princeton board of trade will beheld in
the court house at 8 p m on Monday,
May 6.    A full attendance is requested.
You will be going into the hills soon
and will want a good comfortable saddle.
We have a good assortment to choose
from. Drop in and inspect our stock.
M. S. Wilson.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES. i
Methodist    church    service,   Sunday
April 28.   In   Oddfellows'   hall,   at  7:30
p.m. ; cement works at 11 a.m.
Presbyterian church services—Sunday!
school, 11 a.m.    Evening  service  in the/
court  house, 7:30.    Coalmont—Morning
s-eivice, 11 a.m.
Subject nest Suudav: 'The trial of
],esus Christ, illegal in six points and
contrary even to the spirit of the Talmud.'
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject for Sunday next: 'Probation After
Death.' We all. with open face beholding as in a gla-=s the glory of the Lord,
are changed into the same image from
glory (o glory, even as by tl e Spirit of
the Lord —II Corinthians 3:18.
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPKIKTO   S
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOHS, ETC.
Commercial.* Sampled Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
Great Northern
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
PRINCETON,
B.C.
Shnlikomcci Hotel
SIMMERS & WARDLE
PROPRIETORS
Large and New buildin?, well Furnished and Plastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station. .
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
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M. S. WILSON
—DEALER IN—
Wall Papers, Burlaps, House
Lining, Etc.
Paints, Oils, Varnishes and Stains
Brushes of all kinds. Hearth Rugs
and Decorative Brass Goods.
Try our Haple Leaf Paints and
you will be convinced that they are
the best on the Market. FULLY
GUARANTEED.
Estimates given on all classes
of Decorating
We purchase direct from the Manufacturer
and can give you close prices.
__*__5__5__.*__.__.*__ ___»__^^
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KARL H. MORSE
Ladies and Gents' Tailoring
CLEANING and PRESSING
Vermilion Aye. opp. Similkameen Hotel,
FOR SALE
TWO and one-half  acres   suitable   for
garden, in good state of cultivation;
cellar; house; on Similkameen river.
Price, $200 cash.   Apply to
WONG SING.
F. P. COOK
General Merchant
Miners' out„_e. ,§|
Princeton,   Granite Creek
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch,. Clock  and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given co- all
. Mail   Orders.
TO  CANADIAN   ARCHITECTS
Competition for New  University Buildings to
Be Erected at Point Grey, Near Vancouver, British Columbia
The Government of British Columbia invite
Competitive Plans for the general scheme and
design for the proposed new University, together
with more detailed Plans for the buildings to be
erected first at an estimated cost of $1,500,000.
Prizes of $10,000 will be given for the most
successful Designs submitted.
Particulars of the competition and plan of site
may be obtained on request from the undersigned.
The designs to be sent in by July 31st, 1912,
addressed to
THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
T. CLARK KING
Architect
. Graduate of the Art and Science Department
Kensington, London, Eng.
Member of the Alberta Architectural Association.
Plans and  Specifications  of Buildings   furnished  at reasonable rates.
Office : KING & GIBSON -
Vermilion Av. Princeton, B.C., Phone 18
D. R. BOUCHER
ARCHITECT
Coalmont, B.C.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,    -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
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TULAMEEN, B.C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Centre
irs.L J. leiRticrsofi
PRORIETOR
"MODEL"
mm stable
PRINCETON, B. C.
General.Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs—Good   Roadsters—
;   Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
BROOMFIELD S GARRISON
Notice to Delinquent Co-owner.
ToT, C- REVELY-Take notice that unless,
you do pay, within gi days from the date hereof,
the sura of $231.95, being your proportion of the
expenditure required for the years IQ03-4-5-6-7-8-Q
io-u by Section 24 of the Mineral Act, upon' the
Transvaal Fraction Mineral- claim situated on
Copper Mountain in the Similkameeu Mining
Division, together with interest and all costs of
this notice, to the undersigned your co-paitner
in the said claim, your intriest in ihe said claim
shall become vested in the undersigned who ha .
made the required expenditure.
A. E. HOWSI5.
Dated this 29th day of January, 1912.
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
Scavengers
JOHNSON & REHN
Work promptly attended to. Town
health regulations complied with ; lawful
sanitary conditions in force. Orders may
be left at C. Willarson & Co's.
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April 24, 1912,
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. H. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advauce,
ADVERTISING RATES :
Land Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st Insertion,
8 cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 perin. per month.
Copy for publication as re ading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Monday.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
The greatest marine disaster in
history, which recently carried
some sixteen hundred souls with
what was vaunted to be a well
nigh unsinkable ship to the bottom
of the Atlantic, has cast a terrible
gloom over the whole world. Beneath the icy cold wave dear ones
have found a last resting place,
bringing sorrow and mourning to
many homes. It is no use to find
fault and denounce now that the
thing has happened. To avoid
future disasters of the kind mentioned nothing but collision proof
ships can make navigation among
icebergs at all safe. In the absence
of a perfectly safe ship the next
best thing is to steer clear of lurking
dangers and out of the zone of ice
bergs altogether. This would mean
a sacrifice of speed for safety, but is
it not time that the craze for swift
travel both by sea and land should
be curtailed and if necessary legislation enacted safeguarding life and
property ? The British board of
trade has promised searching enquiry into the catastrophe and
every board of trade throughout the
empire can assist by resolution in
demanding greater care in the
navigation of these ocean greyhounds. Our advice is to 'slow
down' for the sake of helpless
women and children—if men must
travel at a crazy speed they should
go without the innocent and helpless ones.
The great political struggles now
going on in Britain and Continental
Europe, the civil war in China, the
conflict between Turkey and Italy
and the great labor strikes impending and actual are indicative of the
spirit of the age—progress. It is
an eternal law that change and progress shall vitalize the whole
economy of mortal man. Tbe
moment he becomes stagnant, inert,
incapable of ever needed reform,
that moment he tends toward
savagery, oblivion, death. It is a
healthy sign when a nation is
stirred, it may be with revolutionary thoughts and deeds, for it is
owing to these that improvement
and reform are initiated and eventually incorporated in the statutes of
the country. Any movement that
will give to the people of any country unrestricted self-government is
in line with progress. In the
multitude and not the few nobility
and rich or any religious sect or
creed is safety and equal rights.
The majority, the people, must
govern if contentment and prosperity are to be encouraged. In
Canada, under democratic government, peace and plenty are the
rule. The spirit of militarism, of
pomp and ceremony finds 1 .ast encouragement in the atmosphere of
democracy, therefore Canadians
will ever sympatize with the
struggles of any people looking to
autonomy such as is enjoyed in
free Canada.
As the season approaches for
forest fires and the consequent menace to towns, life and homes, every
precaution should be taken now to
prevent any possible outbreak.
During the winter considerable
tree falling and firewood cutting
has been going on and thoughtless
persons have strewn the ground
with tree tops and limbs leaving these
as a ready prey to the carelessness of
some camper or smoker. Whoever
is charged with the duty of enforcing the fire regulations should immediately see that all  inflammable
refuse of woodcutters be disposed
of, thus obviating a source of much
danger. Along highways woodcutters have taken standing timber
on the road allowance leaving limbs
and tops scattered all around waiting only for a few da3-s hot sun and
the match or cigar stub to start a
conflagration. The attention of
the authorities is directed to these
dangerous conditions so that early
action may be taken to avert and'
remedy ail danger of fire.
April 17, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE
Humility and modesty are fairer than
the handsomest face.
Money or estate acquired by lying or
dishonesty will take wings and fly away
in dissipation or disaster.
Some get-rich-quick people try to
attain their object by eluding payment of
honest debts and robbing the other fellow
of the use of his own money. Cash dealing makes friends and a good reputation
No young woman should enter the
married state who cannot boil cabbage,
and no young man should marry who is
not willing to allow his wife a purse
and more than half her own way—otherwise, there will be squalls.
No person should give advice who is
not willing to receive it.
Liberty, how the child craves it. The
spirit of liberty is born with us and thus
it is self government is every people's
pride.
Peace of mind promotes health and
long life—pursue peaceful paths.
Every appeal to impatience is an opportunity to practice patience.—Drummond.
*l***********l*4*******^^
THE MAN WHO CAN FORESEE
THE TOMORROW OF
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EAST PRINCETON
WILL MAKE MONEY BY INVESTING THERE
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
A riODEL CITY
Water system.
Electric light.
Cement walks.
Natutal parks.
Nicely wooded.
Fine garden soil.
Athletic grounds.
Excellent drainage.
No danger from overflow.
Can have fine sewer system.
.   Wide streets and lanes.
Local aud long distance phone system.
Natural centre, ranching country, fruit growing. Huge deposits ot copper, gold, silver, platinum and other minerals. Has
big water power development. Lots in such towns as Grand Forks, Kamloops, Blairmore, Alta., Baker, Wash., are worth 5 times
what is  being   asked at East Princeton and the payroll is not as large.
FREE CEMENT walks with each lot sold—cleared streets.    Water main to be laid in streets this summer.
BUSINESS LOTS $450 up : Terms 10 p.c. cash, 5 p.c. per mo. Residence lots, $200 up : Terms, 10 p.c. cash, $10 per mo.
7 p.c. on annual balances.    {% of all lots are to be reserved) for future sale.     Get full particulars at once.
C. R. BRIGGS, Gen. Agent, 6I5 Hastings W., Vancouver. D. G. McCURDY, Resident Agent, East Princeton, B.C.
A PAYROLL CITY NOW
Furnished by the B C. Portland Cement
Co.: Cement, Lime, Bricks.
United Empire Co. : Coal and Copper.
Princeton Coal & Laud Co. : Coal.
Princeton Lumber Mills Co. ; Sawmill.
B.C. Copper Co. : Copper.
The Platinum-Gold Fields Co.: Placer
Mining.
One thousand men will be employed
inside of year.
A RAILROAD CENTER
The Kettle Valley railroad, which will
soon be the main line of the C.P.R. sjrs-
tem, brings Vancouver 300 miles nearer
Winnipeg, passes through the townsite.
Final survey is now being made.
The Great Northern has tracks on two
sides of the townsite and will soon be H>*
finished to Vancouver. These two roads . ,>
give transportation in all directions from
East Princeton.
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SH_V
THOMAS BROS. I
Come and  get our CASH m
PRICES.     We will give you |
great reductions m
Boys' and Children's  BOOTS AND SHOES H
Boys' and Children's STRAW HATS H
Boys' and  Children's SAILOR HATS H
J !__.
A large assortment of up=to=date Dress M
Goods and Prints to select from
Bedsteads, Mattresses, Bed Springs and g|
Cots at very reasonable prices ||
See our large cans of   Evaporated flilk, H
§1
two cans for 25 cents WI
Thomas Bros. General Merchants 1
PRINCETON, B. C. II
Pluming and Mealing, Sheet Metal
|    worh, Tinsmiihing
Shop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St., in 'Ivlurdock's blacksmith shop'
I      DIGNAN & ATKIN
PRACTICAL WORKMEN—PROPRIETORS
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
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CARLE
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Headquarters for Groceries, Vege= '§
tables and Provisions I
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Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Cranberries   f
ORDERS   PROriPTLY   ATTENDED X
  I
O.   H.    CARLE,    THE   GROCERYMAN   |
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Read  the advertisements carefully then make  your
purchases«No reason now to send away.
THE SIMILKAMEEN INDIANS
Y MRS. S _,. A_,I,ISON.
[Continued from last week.]
Immediately after the funeral takes
place the encampment is moved lest the
spirit of the deceased should revisit it;
then the friends go about enquiring into
the dead man's debts, which are promptly
paid, no matter how long standing they
are; the near relatives cut their hair,
shave their eyebrows and go about singing a low wailing chant, in which the
name of the deceased is very prominent.
Jne strange custom is that a widow or
widower is forbidden to eat meat or certain vegetables for a month, and must
wear quantities of spruce brush inside
their shirts next their skin. This, I am
told, is done to ward off the evil spirit
now set free by the death of its victim
and ready to pounce on a fresh one. It
is considered shocking for a widow to
smoke for a month after the death of her
husband. I was recently told of a death
of a woman through neglecting these
precautions, so that this superstition at
any rate survives. A widow or widower
invariably takes another spouse within
three months. Carved figures, representing the deceased, were frequently
placed upon their g:aves; these figures
were clothed in their garments which,
when faded, were renewed.
Panmhalifitn \ys\s npypr known amongst
the Similkameens, though at some of the
'potlatches' a live dog was torn to pieces
and devoured. This practice is now
quite given up; but about ten years ago,
while living on the Okanagan lake, I
observed a dog with a thong tied round
its nose and the nose attached to one hind
leg, drawing the body of the dog into an
uncomfoi table position ; on enquiring he
reason I was told that there was io be a
potlaJci_and the dog"-^__fgeUing_.ready
for that; they w.Ve ashamed to say that it
was to be eaten. This was the last time
I have observed anything of the kind.
The Indians were th"n in a state of wild
excitement over Chief Joseph's troubles
across the line and were holding nocturnal war dances, and _• r the time-being
liad gone back to a good many of their
savage customs. Belief in the imtnor
talityofthe soul prevails and the departed spirit, in some cases, is supposed
to take np its abode in some bird Or animal; and they are particularly afraid of a
white owl on that account. There is a
small owl which is supposed to give
warning of impending death by sitting
on a tree and calling, 'I come for you,
for you.' Also when a coyote or dog
howls in a peculiar manner it is said to
denote death The rattle of a rattle
snake is considered both a preventive
and cure for headache. Eating the heart
of a bear inspires courage. Certain herbs,
also dried toads and snakes, Tiave occult
virtues.
Some of the old women have great
skill in brewing love potions, which are
in great request. A lock of a person's
hair in the hands of certain wise women
gives the possessor control over the person from whose head it is severed.
In the mountains there is a certain
stone much venerated by the Indians; it
is said that striking on it will produce
rain. Two years ago there was a bet between a Christian Indian named Wican
and one of the few. remaining heathens
about the striking of this stone; and it
was agreed that if rain followed the
Christian should ride in the rain without
any clothes on. As the weather was fine
and the sky couldless Wican did not
hesitate to agree to the heathen's terms;
the stone was struck with a scoff at old
traditions; shortly after the wind rose,
the sky became overcast and rain followed—not a little, but a week of steady
down   pouring   rain.    The old heathen
was triumphant and held the Christian
to his wager. There is a place near
Keremeos where some large' stones stand
(possibly hurled down from the mountains by some earthquake) of which the
Indians relate that some of their enemies
coming to attack them were by the power
of one of their doctors turned to stone.
There are numerous other stories that
the old men are fond of relating while
Sitting round their camp fires. One
particularly struck me, because the
Chinese, whom these Indians greatly resemble, tell a similar story of the mountains of Thibet. It is said that in the
mountains there live certain huge men;
these men are so large that a deer hung
by its neck in their belts look no larger
than a chicken would do in an ordinary
man's; the earth trembles as it echoes'
their tread; they resemble white men
with long beards, and seem to be kindly
in disposition. They are sensitive to
pain and shed tears for a mere nothing;
one of their favorite amusements is catching fish. An Indian affirms that he wus j
once made a prsoner by these big men,
and although they kept a close watrh
on him he was petted and kindly treated.
Buckskins, which the Indians are experts at tanning, formerly formed their
chief supply of clothing; both men and
women were clad from head to heel in
buckskin. These clothes were, durable
and variously ornamented. Beads obtained in trade from the whites, or dved
horse hair, or porcupine quills were
used; the horse hair was dyed with ochre
and roots; these garments looked remarkably nice. For shoes they used
moccasins.
The following process was employed in
tanning: The deer's hide was first soaked
in the river till the hair could easily be.
s:iaped off; it was then stretched over _
pole and scraped with a bone in the
shape of a chisel, till the hair was removed; the skin was then beaten with a
round stone till the fibre was thoroughly
broken; it was then rubbed with a mix-
lure Of deer's brains and wood ash, afier
which it was thoroughly manipulated till
partially dry; a pit was then dug. in
.which a smouldering fire was started; a
frame of poles was erected round the pit,
the skin wrapped round the poles, and a
slow, steady smoke kept up for some
days; when remoyed the skin was once
more thoroughly manipulated, after"
which it was ready for use. It is a tedious,
process to make a good article, as it requires no end of elbow gVease.
Tobacco pipes are made from a soft
greenish grey stone; this stone forfiis an
article of trade—the neighboring tribes
valuing it highly; it is known lo them as*
'Similkameen stone.' Red and yellow
ochre is dug out of a cave or cleft in the
bluffs of the Tulameen river. The word
tulameen means red earth. This is used
both as paint and for dye. Buckskins
are often painted with it, and the young
girls, when arrived at a marriageable age,
have a strange custom of painting their
faces with it. The marriage tie among
these Indians is not particularly binding
or sacred; a wife generally could be purchased for a certain number of cows,
horses or blankets—according to the
valuation of the woman. If the husband
or wife tire of each other the purchase
money or its equivalent was returned by
the woman's father or guardiau; the
parties were then free to contract another
matrimonial alliance; or if both parties
were agreeable wives were swapped and
very often boot given.
[To be continued.]
SIMILKAMEEN «ni^2 _£__£!
PacK horses provided.   Apply C. M. SNOWDEN,
P. O. Box 17, Princeton, B. C.
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS
WATER BRANCH
In the matter of the Board of Investigation created by Part III. of the "Water
Act" for the determination of water
rights existing on the 12th day of March,
.1909; and in the matter of the following
creeks in the Similkameen Water District:
Alder creek.
Alkali lake.
Apex creek.
Ashnola river.
Atwood creek.
A che-ghip-Flat creek.
A-tsi-Klak creek.
Asquatic creek.
Armstiong creek.
B uckhorn creek.
Bench stream.
Bromley creek.
Baker creek.
Bear creek.
Bear lake.
Beaver creek.
Beaver lake.
Bitter creek.
Blue Joint creek.
Blue lake.
Boswell creek.
Boulder creek.
Boundary creek.
Brodhagen creek
Bunch Grass Field spring.
Big Rock creek.
Blind creek.
Brown creek.
Buchanan creek.
Bull creek.
Boomerang creek.
Blytbe creek.
Causlen creek.
Camp creek.
Canyon creek.
Canyon lake.
Carmi cr ek.
Cedar creek.
Cedar lake.
Christina lake.
. Christina creeljj^^
TTlearwater lake.
Clearwater creek.
Clark creek.
Colchester creek.
Cold creek.
Conkle creek.
Copper creek.
Cougar creek.
Cyclops creek.
Cawaher creek.
Coldstream creek.
Coldwater creek.
Chain lakes.
Coteay creek.
China creek.
Chinpatlin creek.
Cranberry creek.
Cranberry creek, south fork of.
Curry creek.
Conklin creek.
Canon creek.
Colvs creek.
Chandler creek.
Croscut brook.
Dauphin lake.
Deadeye creek.
Dead wood creek.
Deadman gulch.
Deadman lake.
Deep creek.
Deer creek.
Daly gulch.
Douglas creek.
Dominion creek.
Dog lake.
Duck lake.
Damfino creek.
Eholt creek.
Eighteen-mile creek.
Eighteen mile creek, branch of.
Elkhorn creek.
Eleven-mile creek.
Frena creek.
Fair creek.
Farleigh lake.
Fi'fteen mile creek.
Fisherman creek.
Fisherman creek, west branch.
Five-mile creek.
Fons Perenius spring.
Fourth July creek.
Fourth  July   creek,   unnamed   tributary of.
Fraser creek.
Flatt creek.
F-.-1-1-" cre~k.
Fish lake.
French creek. -
Farrel creek.
Gerald creek.
Goat creek.
Little Goat creek.
Gold creek.
Gold Hill creek.
Green lake.
Gibbs creek.
Gloucester creek.
Gilpin creek.
Graveyaid creek.
Glover creek.
Granite creek.
Gregoire creek.
Gold Drop creek.
Harrison creek.
Haussener creek.
Hardy creek.
Horse creek.
Havnes creek.
Hester creek.
Hamilton creek.
Hell creek.
Henderson Sawmill creek.
Henry creek.
Hewlitt creek.
Hornet creek.
Hughes creek.
Hulme creek.
Hydraulic creek.
Ingram creek.
Ingram creek, east fork.
Incameep creek.
Irrigation creek.
Italy creek.
Inglatn creek.
Iron creek.
Joshua creek.
James creek.
Jolly Jack creek.
Jim creek.
Keogan creek.
Kepler creek.
Keremeos creek.
Keremeos creek, south fork.
Keremeos creek, west fork.
Kilpoola lake.
Kuslas Kein-ska sken creek.
Kelly creek.
Kettle rive..
Kettle river, north fork.
Kettle river, east branch of north fork
Kettle river, west branch of n.rth fork
Kettle river, west fork.
Kettle river, east fork of west fork.
Kingston creek.
Knappen creek.
Kearns creek.
Lime Kiln lake.
Lind creek.
Little Volcanic creek.
Lost Horse creek.
Lime creek.
Line creek.
Lynch creek.
Loon lake.
Lome lake.
Long Joe creek.
Long lake
Lost creek.
Little creek.
Little chief creek.
Marama creek.
Manuel creek.
Marks creek.
Marron creek.
Marron lake. ■
May creek.
Meadow creek.
Milligan creek.
Mollie Pritchard creek.
Moody creek.
Mother Lode creek.
Murphy creek.
Myers creek.
Myers creek, tributary of.
Meyers creek.
Maloan creek.
McCraie creek.
McCarren creek.
McConnell creek.
Mclntyre creek.
Mill creek.
Mulligan creek.
Maida creek.
Murray creek.
Murray gulch.
McRae creek.
Munroe creek.
McCuddy creek.
Mica creek.
Mohr creek.
Mud creek.
McFarlane creek.
Nogi creek.
Nine-mile creek.
Nicholson creek.
Napoleon creek.
N'Kam-ri-no creek.
N'Kam a-hi-nat-no creek.
N'Kam-eep river
Norwegian creek
Namless creek.
Okanagan river.
C1i"t -:>-er.
Oro Fino creek
Omellette creek
Old Tom creek
Osoyoos lake
Overton creek
Ontario creek
Paik rill
Pass creek
Pass creek, south fork .
Porter creek
Prather creek
Parker creek
Prairie creek
Pathfinder creek
Prior creek
Providence creek
Quillette creek
Quartz creek
Rat lake
Reed creek
Rice creek
Riddle creek
Rock creek
Rock creek, south fork
Round lake
Ruby creek
Ruckle creek
Richter creek
Rocky creek
Rattler creek
Sand Bank cteek
St. Anne creek
Sand creek
Sandner creek
Savage creek
Sawmill creek
Sawmill lake
Sheep creek
Sheep creek, west fork
Schwartz creek.
Second creek
Schillings creek
Shingle creek
Schumaker creek
Shuttleworth creek
Shuttleworth creek, lake at head of
Stray Horse creek
Smuggler spring
Similkameen river
Similkameen river, south fork
Six-mile creek
Sixteen-mile creek
Sken Kani Ske-Noo-Ske-Tan creek
S_ibbi_£to_ ere- k
S'ate cieek
Sitiith cre< k
Str < y Horse lake
Sultan cretk
Sunset creek
Susap c eek
. u«ap ceek, north fork
Sutherland cieek
Spring gu'ch
Spring creek
smelter lake
Stirling cietk
Strawberry creek
split cieek
gummit lake
gumrnit creek
snow oall ci eek
gtashla-Valentka creek
Stewart cretk
Sn wshoe cref k
Siiehumption creek
Stevenson creek
scot McRae creek
gnu Hse-tse- pas Kan creek
Snit-' e-Nate-Tan creek
semple creek
Sixteen-mile creek
Stuart creek.
Tayior creek
Taylor lake
-restalinda creek
Texas c reek
Three SJ ring creek
Tinhorn creek
Togo creek
Tom creek
Tom Tit creek
Trout creek
Trout lake
Twenty-mile creeK
Twenty-two-mile crek
Twenty-two mile creek, east fork
Twin creek
Twin creek, east fork of
Twin creek takes-
Twin creek, creek running into
Tea river
Troy creek
Trapper creek
Trail creek
Ten-mile creek
•jShirty two-mile creek
Twilight creek
Tug-ul-nuit lake
Upper Clear lake
Upper Keremeos creek
Victoria Creek
Volcanic creek
Vaseauxlake
Verde creek
Wallace creek
Wallace lake
Ward lake
Whites creek
Wild West creek
Williamson creek
.Wilson creek
Wiseman creek
Woodworth lake
Wolf creek
Wolflake
White lake
White lake creek
Wilkinson creek
Waddel creejc
Wolverine creek
,W-Uianis creek
Wartman lake
Wood creek
West Fork lake
.. 011 ,~- i«i_«.
V. . ..u c-     1c
April 24, 1912,
Unnamed Springs and Streams
Lake situate one mile north of Fairview wagon
road about nine miles from Keremeos.
_.ake on scuth line of sub-lot 7, lot 2710.
Spring on lot 667 (S)
Small creek on the Flore_-5 mineral claim
Creek on sub lot 16 of lot 2613
Small creek about fourteen miles west of
Penticton
Spring three-quarters of a mile northwest of
south boundary of lot 538. group 1. township 72.
Small unnamed lake;on lot 973 (S)
Spring on lot 2138
Small creek running from west ove»* southwest
portion Stem Winder mineral claim
Spring on Smuggler mineral claim
Small unnamed creek one mile and a half
south of Tinhorn creek
Small unnamed creek about one mile and a
half north from Golden Gate Hotel, Fairview
Spring rising on the Eureka mineral claim
Spring on lot 2456
Unnamed stream rising lot 1207 (S)
Unnamed stream flowing through lot 1738
Small stream on tht Fairview townsite
Spring on Pre-emption record 2517
Small stream near south end of Pre-emption
record 2944
Small creek on northeast corner ot lot 351.
Spring on section 31, township 49
Spring near west boundary of Pre-emption
recotd 125 (S)
Spring near noitheast corner oflot 282, group x
Spring on lot 454 (S)
Small stream on Blue Diamond mineral claim
Stream coming dowu mouutaln in front of _awe
homestead
Spring rising in northwest J£, section 24,
township 28
Small spring on southwest portion oflot 513
Spring on 1 ittle Frank mineral claim.
Stream flowing through No. 3 mineral claim.
Undergiouud creek 011 Victoria mineral claim
Spring  creek  about  the  center of the Grey
Eagle mineral claim.
'Small spring on lot 2531
Small unnamed creek rising on Pre-emption
record 4613
Spring rising on Pre-emption record 76 (S)
Small spring on wagon road between Boundary
alls and second bridge below Anaconda.
Small spring situated on lot 515, township 67.
Small lake on Pre-emption record 238 (S)
Small stream and spring situate on lot 27 (S)
Small unnamed creek on the northeast % section 28, township 47
Spring on lot 177
Spring on lot 261, section 33, township 55
Spring near easterly end of New York mineral
claim
Small creek running in'o Myers flat and rising
on ")ro Fino mountain
Stream rising on Barnes & Ironsides mineral
claim in Greenwood camp
Stream rising on Apex mineral claim
Three small la_es si'uated on east side of
Okanagan lake and twelve miles below Mission
cretk
Spring on Comet mineral claim
Unname ! stream running alongside road that
_6r_ers lot 900
Spring and unnamed creek on lot 191 group 1
Spi ing or ereek on lota 2834 and 280, townf hip
89
Small creek running southeast from Maple
I.eaf mine
Small spring on St. Maurice mineral claim
Unnamed stream running through Missing
Link No. 2 mineral claim
Springs on lots 337 and 374 (S)
Unnamed spring on Pre-emption record 628
Small stream half a rcile southwest of southwest corner oflot 3334
Spring about 42 chains north oflot 3205, group 1
Spring situate near centre of the northwest Jf
section 13, township 28
Spring near south line of lot 907 •
Unnamed spring on or near Preemption record
4037
Sinai 1 spring or stream on lot ^49
Spring on Pre-emption record 4774
Unnamed small stream flcwing from spring on
lot 380
Spring on lot 471
Spring sit-ated about the centre of north line
of lot 668 (S)
Small lake near southeast corner of Pre-emption
67 (S)
Small creek on Pre-emption record 2986
Small lake situated on Pre-emption record 2773
Small unnamed lake or slough near east line of
lot 500, Osoyoos
Urnamed slough near lots494 and 493, group 1,
Osoyoos
Spring on lot 334
Spring on lot 1359
Springs near northeast cornerk>f lot 365
Springs on lot 2394
Spring near centre of lot $0
Stream running out of Loon lake
Spring on lot 3009, group 1, Osoyoos
Small creek flowing into Kettle river, five miles
south of Grand Forks -
Small stream about six miles and a half south
of Eholt
Creek or springs on lot.494
Spring on Colville reservation
Spring on reserve
Spring into Norwegian creek
Creek on lot 908
Stream running through sub lot 3203 of lot
2710
And all named springs, streams, creeks, ponds,
gulches and lakes tributary to or in the vicinity
of the above named streams
Take notice that each and every person, partnership, company or municipality who, on the
said 12th day of March, 1909, had water rights on
any of the above mentioned creexs, is directed
,to forward on or before the 19th day of .pril,
1912, to the Chief Water Commissioner at the
[Parliament Buildings at Victoria, a memorandum
of claim in writing as required by section 28 of
the said act as amerded. Printed Jorms for such
memorandum (form No. 19) can be obtained
from any of the Water Commissioners in the
province;
And ta_e notice that the said board of investigation intends to proceed to tabulate such claims
on or about the 31st day of May, 1912.
After the claims have been tabulated by the
board, notice will be given of the places and days
on which evidence and argument will be heard
at local points.
Dated at Victoria this 28th day of February,
1912.
J. F. ARMSTRONG,
Chairman.
Advertise HI Prefer
m*^m*m^4
April 24, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
The Princeton
Livery greed
stables
N. HUSTON, Prop'.
General Livery business carried on
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   L.   CUMMINGS,   Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc.
General Blacksmithing.
Carriage Building and  Repairs
All Work Neatly & Promptly
Phone 2S. Executed
"J.'KNUDSON I
Contractor    and   Builder
I
_4_feMHH)t
__^__P^_IB_l*^___«_^_n_8_i
30L..iH_Jil
___f__HP_!
.■_____>B1e_-_"
Estimates Famished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
Westwood & Brooke
POULTRY FARM
PRINCETON, - British Columbia
I SPOKESMAN"
This White Leghorn male bird won 2nd prize
Spokane Poultrv show, ign. __,lf_o headed 2nd
priz_ pen _»t same show. lie Is sired by ist prize
winner at Spokane Pou'tr} Show, 1911, which
also won shape and color specials at same show.
Also was ist prize winner at Seattle in 1910.
We are now booking: orders for Kgg Settings,
and forward same when required by customers
Pen No. i—Our selected prize winning stock,
$5 per setting of 15 eggs.
Pen No. 2—A choice pen that will produce
winners and layers, $3 per setting of 15 eggs.   ,
Pen No. 3—a sp emlid utility pen for egg production. $1 50 per setting of 15 ^ggs.
Book your orders early. Termscash with order.
Address:    PRINCETON, B. C.
PRINCETON    LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
[Regular meetings. 8 p
_ '        m.f Thursd avs,
Sojourning brethren welcome.     Hall situate   in
Thomas Block.   " Oddfellows Hall."
Jas. Gellatly. p. Russell,
Noble Grand. Secretary
V*
TWELVE YEARS AGO.
(From The Star 1900.)
After many vexatious delays the Siar
is ready to shine over its own little world,
the already famous Similkameen valley.
[Vol. I, No. 1, was issued Saturday
March 3tst, 1900 —Ed.]
Mark Huston and the Snowden boys
returned from the Kootenays last week.
They are'the owners of some of the best
prospects on Copper mountain, and intend
developing them thoroughly this summer.
Hon. E. Dewdney left for Victoria on
the last stage and will teturn on the 15th
of April.
Geo. Aldous and ]im Slater left for 20-
Mile   creek   to start  work on the No. I
claim.
— .{
EXPLOSIVE  « DOHTjyof*'*,
Don't put explosives in hot water.
Don't allow explosives to come in contact with steam, or try to thaw it by
holding over or putting near steam of
any kind. You will melt out part of the
efficiency.
Don't leave explosives exposed to direct
rays ot ihe sun.
Don't stand explosives in front or near
a fire.
Don't pjt explosives in, oven, or close
to a stove or steam boiler.
Don't stand cartridges on end when
thawing.   .
Don't put explosives ou shelves or anything else directly over steam or h't
water pipes, or over heated metal suiface.
Don't heat a thaw house with pires
containing live steam if excessive heat
can be obtained.
Don't keep any detonators (caps) or
electric fuses in the thaw house, or main
storing magazine.
Don't let detonators get damp or they
become useless.
. Don't fail to sweep out your thaw house
and keep the floor clean of grit.
Don't lake explosives in or near a
blacksmith's shop, or near a forge on open
work
Don't allow jour thaw house to get
warm' r than 100 deg. Fall.
Don't allow thawed explosives to re
main exposed to low tempeiature for any
length of timi . Load and fire shots as
soon as "possible, for it cartridges are re
chilled cr fr. zen when fired, they will
not gue b st results
Don't thaw more explosives at a tin e
than you will use promptly.
Don't make up fuses and primers in
tl:aw honse
Don't fool with high explosives.
♦!♦ " A
An Eye Opener|
THE APRIL ROD AND GUN
Once more Rod and Gun iu Canada is
out with a special spring fishing number
—the April issue—and as. usual there is
something io interest fishermen in ever}-
province of the Dominion The Be:.
Easy Fishing Club's Canadian Outing on
the French River is the opening numbe.'
and, believe us, it is a good one, illustra
ting the fine sport indulged in by a party
of American sportsmen who answered the
call of the wild iu Algonquin park. In
this story it was not the big fish that got
away as is evidenced by reproductions of
photographs taken by the 'official phpto-
grapher' who accompanied the party, one
of which, 'I love my best girl but O you
Muscallonge,' has been utilized as a cover
cut. Of exceptional interest also is the
account of a fishing trip through Tusket
lakes, Nova Scotia. In the Game Conservation Department the pump or repeating shotgun is d scussed from various
standpoints and under the heading of the
Culture of Black and Silver Foxes a
second instalment entitled 'Heredity' is
published. Other articles are in keeping
with the character of a special fishing
number of this Canadian magazine which
is published by W. J. Taylor, Limited,
Woodstock, Ont.
i
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to the good mechanics is our showing of tools of all description.
And they are good tools. They are the kind that will become like
old friends to you. They will last and stay and work for you for
years and years, and help you earn your daily bread. Therefore,
they are more reasonable 111 price than others—quality considered.
And so it is with all kinds of Hardware, and for that matter with
all kinds of merchandise, irrespective of what it is called. You want
the best, don't you ? That ought to bring you here—for the least
skillful buyer can come here and be sure that what he or she buys is
good—because we make it good.
That is one of the reasons that customers are coming to us in
constantly increasing numbers; and it will pay you too—to get
acquainted with us—pay in quality—in service—aud in money saved.
New arrivals at our Store this week
ONE CARLOAD BUILDERS' HARDWARE
Get our prices on nails, locks, glass, windows, building paper, tar
paper, roofing, paints, brushes, etc , etc.
New Shipment Men's Perfection Brand Clothing
BOYS AND CHILDREN'S  CLOTHING
Ask our clerks to show you our new suits for boys from 7 to 14
years of age at $3.50, $4, $4.50 per suit. They are unmatchable values.
New Shipment of Summer Silks
in the most beautiful colorings and exquisitely tasty patterns at
40 cents, 50 cents and 60 cents pet yard.
Get the Habit of trading at Howse's—it will save you money.   -
The A. E. HOWSE CO, Ltd
PRINCETON, B. C.
Y
KING & GIBSON
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
*A^4**B**BB*B*\******B********************
^B************^**^4^B******^**^*******>**4r
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE : Vermilion Ave., near Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
Y
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__
*^^4*f*4^4i**4i**4i**4l**4i**4^4^^
I    The Town of #pporiiniiy   J
The rails have been laid into the town and Coalmont is now the new
terminus, the base of operations for the next forty miles of railway
building.
Before six months have passed there should be a payroll in Coalmont of
between 350 and 400 men : This means population, which naturally
means good business.
IF YOU ARE WISE YOU will invest in a little Coalmont real estate
now while the choice is still good.
Don't let this opportunity slip along with the others which have got
past you. Write for our circular and price list; a post card will bring
it to you.    There are still some 50-foot lots left
Two blocks from the centre of town at only
$225, $55 cash, bal. in 18 months to suit.
Williamson  & Turner
AGENTS, COALflONT,  B.C,
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
April 24, 1912,
.3
^r^
PRINC
TON
According to the laws of industrial progress and the experience of founders of western towns,
there must be a tangible, genuine basis on which to establish the future city. No amount of
coaxing can bring blood out of a stone, nor can the greatest scientist extract sunbeams from a
cucumber. Every man makes his own destiny==his own fortune==nothing comes by so-called
good luck.   The door is wide ajar for all who have pluck and a little capital.    Investigate Now!
*__*-
*i
Princeton
1
*i
With Its Unequalled Mineral Resources
Its  Healthful Climate  and Pretty Site
*
Is destined to be the Largest City in the Interior of British Columbia.
Five hours' run to Vancouver when the V., V. & E. is finished.
1
Your Opportunity Is NOW!
CHOICE LOTS FOR SALE
And to Suit All Requirements
Enquire of | ERNEST    WATERMAN [Managerfor
Princeton coal & Mi o
Y'
1
Jm
JIT""-    ' "T"

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