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Similkameen Star 1912-03-27

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 E-V
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Princeton coal only requires stovepipes cleaned yearly
God is Truth.
Manufacture of Portland Cement will begin this year in East Princeton—Smelter construction a necessity for Voigt camp, Copper mountain,
Whipsaw and Friday creeks—Princeton has electric light, waterworks, school, churches, hospital, an ideal Climate and clean, healthy situation.
Vol. XIII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27, 1912.
No. 13
MINES AND MINING
Coal Gives Good Results from
New System of Mining
and Handling.
Placer Mining Industry will   Have
Practical Men Engaged in
Gold Dredging.
The United Empire company are opening tip the copper ore deposits  on   their
-p.operty at Onemile.
The development of the silver-lead
mineral property on Siwash creek isgoing
ahead rapidly. A 50-foot tunnel has been
run with agang of six men, E Coley in
charge. Siwash creek is a tributary of
Fivemile and the present mining oper
ations are about eight miles from the
main line of the Kettle Valley road.
Since the Princeton Coal & Land com
pany installed new machinery and tipple
at their coal mine customers are highly
pleased with the fuel now supplied In
Oroville no other coal will be used.
Other towns in Washington will also use
it when rail connection is obtained.
W. S. Fry arrived Saturday last from
Vancouver and returned on Monday.
Mr. Fry is largely interested in placer
mining here and it is reported will shortly
begin actual'Tnining with a dredge.
E. B. /Emmons has placer dredging
leases il/Princetou district covering ten
miles on the Similkameen river, four
mi es on the Tulameen and a hydraulic
lease at the mouth of Friday creek. He
has formed a company, The Tulameen
Gold-Platinum and Diamond Co., Ltd.
The prospect of the early establishment
of direct railway communicatiOTi with
Vancouver via the Hope mountain route,
is stimulating mining development in the
Similkameen district, accoraing.to Ernest
Waterman of Princeton, general manager
of the Princeton Coal and 'Band company,
who, with A. Hickling, advisory director
of London, England, is at t e Hotel Vancouver. His company, owaing—three
square miles of coalland____t_-Prnn__ton,
lately _____r__r_plant capable of handling an output of 500 tons daily, mostly
supplied to the home market, but arrangements have been made to ship 300J
tons daily to Spokane over the Gre^y
Northern railway. The import duty is^B
cents per long ton.—Province.
»____       MM
D. A. McCaskill, mJLuJng operator, was
in town from Vancouver last week.
CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATION
The regular meeting of the Princeton
Conservative association was held in  the
court house at 8 o'clock on the evening
of 22nd inst.    A  resolution was passefi?
urging the immediate construction of the*
projected wagon road up Whipsaw creek
to the Knight and Day and Spencer
camp—silver-lead properties. The secretary was also instructed by resolution to
write Mr. Shatford and enquire at what
date he might be expected here, so that a
meeting of the association to which the
general public, irrespective of patty
affiliations, would be invited, and this
meeting arranged for in time to admit of
sufficient public notice being given of the
date of meeting.
A further resolution fixed the regular
future meetings of the association for the
third Friday in each month, at the court
house at 8 p.m. ■
LOCAL AND CENERAL
Spring Cleaning is in Order
Now—Social Events
on Tap.
Anthropology of Similkameen Indians
by ' Stratton Moir '—Team of
Horses Killed.
COALMONT NEWS.
Coalmont, March 23.—Considerable
pay dirt.is being encountered on Granite
creek, about _ mile from here; a number
of placer miners are at work, and a number ot claims have been staked. The
record is $150 for one wheelbarrow.
A building is under construction on
Main strea^-which will be occupied as a
printin<p-_tablishment. The paper will
con^n eight pages, and will/ue called
the Coalmont Courier. It \_dlf be edited
by Ed. Clark.
Dr. Jermyn, veterinary surgeon, is
locating at Coalmont. He will build a
residence on Fraser street.
Mr. McTavish, merchant; has made *hst
_C r-       *\&r
raise of a horse and rig./His  chief clerk
says he has not seen _i^i around the store
since.
^__*doctor and a clergyman  are locating
Ruddy is enlarging his restaurant.
The sawmill capacity is being increased.
EAST PRINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, March 25.—Work
started today or^the-Methodist church at
the corner of Seventh avenue and Portland street./j. A. Osborne has charge of
the work.y
W. T- Budd, manager of the B. C.
Portland Cement company, arrived on
Thursday.
The Cement company has put a force
of men to work stripping the lime quarry
on the hill above the cement factory.
It is expected that steel laying will
■ commence within the next ten days on
hnsG. N. spur.
E. N; Clark, a well known, newspaper
man of Merritt, passed through Princeton
on Thursday last on his way to Greenwood, where he has pujchased a plant
from Colonel Lflwery of the Ledge, with
which to establish a newspaperat Coalmont. The new paper is expected to
appear in about six weeks and will be
known as the Courier,
y Miss Thomas, late matron of the
Princeton hospital, went to the coast last
week, where she will visit relatives.
Chris McDonald was brought dowi_
from Tulameen last Wednesday and
taken to the hospital. He is suffering
from stomach trouble.
Ed. Tingley, road superintendent in
Yale district, was looking over busy
Princeton the latter part of last week.
Talking about elections, In? said 'Sunset'
MCrWmnl  n-lll    __t-_TTtg^__sp Vljs _i_p_ ._
but also his breath when, the result of the
poll is known.      \/    .
Judge Murphy was sa3'ing klahowya to
his many ttllicums in Princeton last week.
It is many a moon since the judge was a
visitor, but he is the same old judge who
tells the same old stories in the same old
way. He is devotinsf'most of his time to
'rawnching' nesu- Xnlameen. He reports
his banana trees rooking well
^_he article, 'Similkameen Indians,' in
this issue is from the prolific pen of
'Stratton Moir,' the pseudonym of Mrs.
S. L. Allison, the oldest tesident of this
district. The publication of her poem,
'InCow-Masket,' will be continued in
Star shortly, the first instalment of which
was well received by the public last fall
and which was copied in the Penticton
Press.
/Last Saturday night some bold, bad
ijtnen broke into, the G..__. station at
Keremeos, ana carriectoff 40 cents, three
Eastern Townships bank!" blatiTfchecks,
and a number of railway fare - tickets.
They left a jimmy behind in payment for
what they- had taken. The loss, although
a';bad one, will not stop Jim Hill from
building the V. V. & E. through Coquihalla pass within the next decade. These
holdups are becoming frequent, and the
Star will put on a nightwatchman to
guard the printing palace.
The Modern Woodmen of America will
give a grand ball in the I. O. O. F. hall
oh Friday 5. Admission, gentlemen,
$1.50, ladies free. Local Woodmen are
perfecting arrangemen s to make this the
ball of the season.   Everybody come.
: John Malone left Monday for Nelson
after spending a week in P[ince__S.!: I_8
will be home in time to plump for
McLean.
'■ J. T. Jackson of the ]ackson dairy had
the misfortnne tofjose a team of horses
last Thursday through breaking the
tongue of his milk wagon while comiflg,
down the steep grade from the Schisler
dairy ranch. One horse was killed on the
spot and the other had its back broken,
necessitating its being shot. The rig with
its contents was wrecked and Mr. Jackson
was pitched out and bruised considerably. Mr. Jackson has had a chapter of
accidents this winter in which he will
have the sympathy of all.
Princeton has always been cleanly and
healthy as a town. It is in order now to
bring out the rake and shovel and the
man behind the hoe will do the rest.
Take a day off and wash the face of the
town—it will pay.
RAILWAY POINTS.
The line of the Kettle Valley railway is
now being located by two parties in the
field at Fivemile and Otter valley respectively.
The Great Northern  railway  company
has   lej.  the   contiact   for  building  the
brau<fh/froni   Wenatchee to  Pateros  to
jgfatjme   &   Co.      The  line  is    already
graded  from   Oroville  to Pateros and is
waiting for the^&el.
-~_?  _. _^->
, J J. Warr^riT {_____efif of the  Kettle
Valley 5-__\vay coaipany, recently stated/
thaj«_ails would be laid to Princeton iu .
-^ear from now.    To do this the dirt must
fly some.
The C. P. R , it is stated in the press,
will build from Penticton to Oroville in
the immediate future.
BUILDING NOTES
J. Knudson has his big^ptitfact for the
A..E. Howse company's store well on the
way to completion.
Wilson Bros, have the cojrffact .or
building E- Bajay-5^_f*s hou§^and have
eight men employed on construction.
J. W. Kansky is erecting a residence
on Halliford avenue.
, M. Lundgrin is building a house for
himself on the halt 1<_ formerly owned
by Mr. Slattery, next to Dr. Whillans'-
house.
New buildings are rising in all parts of
the residential section. In a later issue
a list of all will be published.
THE PIE SOCIAL.
. The. Ladies' Hospital Auxiliary lived;
up to their usual record and gave the
public full value for their money last-
Friday night. The pies went all the,
same 'hot cakes,' the autioneer disposing
of them in 'short metre.' When-pies are
pfit vfnder the 'hammer' something must
break-away, and so it came about that
there were not enough pies to go around/
The ladiefe are pleased with the result,,
the sum realized being $51. The piano
solo by Miss Irwin, singing by Mrs.
Waterman and dancing by Miss Annie-
Cunningham to the bagpipes played by
W. Forsyth were all ' enjoyed and applauded. The dance, music was given by,
Mrs. Wilns and Eric Anderson.
 f
	
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
March 27, 1912.
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TBE WEEKLY GRIST
R. Cawston of Keremeos has purchased
two carloads of lumber from the Tulameen Lumber company. This company
has a large mill, complete in every detail
for manufacturing lumber. See advt. in
Star shortly.
Auction sale on Friday, March 29th,
2:30 p. m. Household effects of H. T.
Allen will be sold by Avery & Ave-y on
above date Good opportunity to secure
a good bargain.
G. W. Hodgson of Merritt, railroad
contractor, was in town Thursdav.
C. V. Semerad is making good progress
with his new hotel at Fivemile.
Billy Summers reports about three feet
of snow on Siwash creek, due to its
altitude. ~^*2*-
Jackson & Wenrick, Tulameen Truck
and Dray stables, have opened at Coal
mont with new equipment and are pre
pared to fill all orders promptlv and with
satisfaction.
A smoker will be given by the Black
Knights r-n Monday, April 15 For a
real good time and genuine amusement
you should be there.
R. Gregor of Oroville was in town last
week and reports the outlook bright in
that section. He ships considerable hav
and supplies to Princeton.
The dance at Kereme s last Friday
night was a huge success, over 75 couples
being present, many coming from Penticton, Hedley, Oroville and Princeton
Professor Knight's orchestra furnished
the music. Those present from Princetcn
were Mr. and Mrs. ]. Snoftrden, Mr. and
Mrs. Neil Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. W.
Garrison, Miss Marrs, Claude Snowden,
A. E. McCoun, and Be;t Irwin. The
Princeton contingent vote the dance one
of the most enjoyable ever held in the
valley.
Miss   E.   H    McQueen   of  Coalmont
attended the hospital social aud spent the
"c^ek end in Prince.on.
.l'he coal now produced by the Princeton Coal and Land company by the new
■s/stem is giving every satisfaction.
cash, balance in equal instalments, 6 and
12 months. Apply J. M. Wright,
Princeton, B. C.
For Sale—A dandy 'batching' outfit.
Ask the operator Great Northern station.
FOR SALE—Old newspapers, 25 cents
per bundle of 100. Suitable for underlying carpets.   Star office.
Blue print maps by F. W. Groves
P.L.S., showing mineral claims on Cop
per and Kennedy mountains and Voigt
camp.   Price #2.   Apply at Star office.
FOR SALE—Two timber limits on the
Similkameen river, near Saturday and
Sunday creeks. For terms and price
write J. M. WRIGHT, Princeton, B.C.
Get a view of your ranch, house or
mining claim from Priest with his new
8x10 camera.
FOR SALE
TWO and one-half  acres   suitable   for
garden, in good state of cultivation;
cellar; house; on Similkameen river
Price, #200 cash.   Apply to
WONG SING.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000 REST, -   $8,000,000
FARMERS'   BUSINESS
The Canadian Bank of Commerce extends to Farmers every facility
for the transaction of their banking1 business including1 the discount and
collection of sales notes. Blank sales notes are supplied free of charge
on application.
BANKING   BY   MAIL
Accounts may be opened at every branch of The Canadian Bank of
Commerce to be operated by mail, and will receive the same careful
attention as is given to all other departments of the Bank's business.
Money may be deposited or withdrawn in this way as satisfactorily as
by a personal visit to the Bank. A231
J. D. ANDRAS,  Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
SPECIALS.
FOR SALE—Stallion, five years old
Clydesdale, weight 1600 pounds. Apply
to\August Carlson, Princeton, B. C.
A fine opportunity to secure a good
musical nstrument—a drawing for an
organ in good repair will be held on
Easter Monday. Tickets for sale by Rev.
J. Williams.*
F,OR SALE—Two lots adjoining, one
fronting on Bridge street corner of Tap-
ton avenue and   Bridge  street,   and  the
other   facing   Tapton   avenue.     House, |
woodshed and cellar.    Price, $1000;   half
jKWtiPt. 4*Z**t*<> a
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BANK Of MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL
R. B. ANGUS, Esq., President
Sir EDWARD CLOUSTON, Bart , Vice-President
H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., General Manager
Capital - - -       $14,887,570.00
Reserve and Undivided Profits   -  $16,855,185.36
SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTHENT
Deposits received from $i upwards.    Ranching and  Mining Business
given every attention
BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits may be made and withdrawn by mail.    Out of town accounts
receive every attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted
PRINCETON BRANCH B. L SMITH, II
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A   PRINCETON BRANCH B. L SMITH, Manager    %
Y*i**x**x**\**i**i**i**i**i**x*^^ 4
KARL H. MORSE
Ladles and Gents' Tailoring
CLEANING and PRESSING
Vermili.n Ave. opp. Similkameen Hotel,
Royal iiih ol ciiiii
CAPITAL -       $6,993,000
RESERVE UNDIVIDED PROFITS,   $8,275,000
P. BURNS & Co.
FLESHERS   AND
FISH    DEALERS
Prime Beef, Pork,  Mutton.   Salmon,   Halibut,
flackerel, Herring.   Eggs, Butter, Lard
Largest Dealers in the West
PRINCETON, B. C.
A General Banking Business Transacted
Interest allowed on savings accounts at higest current
rates.   Drafts M_d money orders sold on all points.
PRINCETON BRANCH       G. M. K. MACLEOD, Manager
0 t^^^^^^i^-^^^^A^-^^^^*^^^^VN*^^^^M»
MM^fV^M^^MM^-M^V^^M^MAAAAA^^^^
ROCKERS
More comfort can be obtained from a rocking
chair for the amount invested than from almost any other article of furniture. Knowing
this, we keep a good assortment and can supply either the low priced article or tbo. e upholstered in genuine leather. Inspection ii.vittd
I  A.   L. WHITE'S   FURNITURE   STORE
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar Shingles $3.50 per M
TWTODERN WOODMEN
iV1 OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays, in the Odd
fellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL, Clerk.
March 20, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
i
A.
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THE SIMILKAMEEN INDIANS ;
	
Their Advent Into this District was
on Avenging Warpath.'
[Originally    written    for   tho   Anthropological
Society, London, England.]
The following interesting paper on the
origin of the Similkameen Indians, their
anthropology and history, has been
kindly loaned Star for publication by it?
*_uthor, Mrs. S. L. Allison. Living for
about a half century in Princeton district
Mrs. Allison has had exceptional facilities for knowing the habits of the aboriginal tribes who were the sole inhabitants in the early days prior to the advent
of goldhnnters and homeseekers :
Tradition relates that the tribe of
Indians at present occupying the Simil-
_kameen valley came there about 150
years- ago on the warpath from Chila-
cotin, accompanied bv their wives, and
decked in ttfeir paint and feathers crossed
the Fraser river to avenge a wrong (the
death of a chief) inflicted on them by the
Shuswaps of the Bonaparte and
Thompson.
Penetrating too far into the interior,
the winter suddenly set in, they found
their retreat cut off and themselves
hemmed in by their enemies. They
were, however, in a country abounding
in game of all kinds which, together
with the long black lichens that depended
from the pi__~tre_«r_ifforded them ample
sustenance
Establishing themselves in the upper
valley of the Similkameen they manfully
faced the rigors of the winter and bravely
held their own ag .inst their foes. Making friends with the Spokans (who admired the lairu(__i ol lll.lr WOmen) they
irit___i__rvied with that tribe and increased
in numbers for many years till, in common with all the neighboring tribes,
thay were nearly obliterated by that
dire scourge, smallpox.   Since that time
civilization ha5"_early* finished the  work
begun by smallpox, viz ,  the extinction
of the tribe.   Whether this is due to the
entire   change   that   has taken place in
their food and manner of life it is hard to
say; but I know from personal experience
that the Similkameen  Indians of today
are totally different, both  physically and
mentally, from what they were  thirty or
even   twenty    years   ago.    Though   the
women   are   of  small   stature (possibly
from the custom of marrying them before
they have attained their full growth) the
men men average five feet six  inches  in
height; their frames are  lithe  and  mus
cular; their movements quick and  graceful.    In complexion they are very light,
being more of the yellow paleness of the
Chinese than the copper color of the  red
Indian, and like the Chinese  they   have
small hands and feet.    Their  hair varies
fromjet"T___tT__r__d brown, and in some
case's there is just a glint  of gold in it;
many   of  them   have   a   kink  or wave
almost amounting to a,cji_______eirlocks
of which they are very proud.    Formerly
-enduring    and
fatigue.
Right Prices in the Right Place
THOMAS BROS.
KEEP 4 FRESH STOCK GROCERIES
Spring Goods Arriving
|t BOOTS, SHOES, CLOTHING
We aim to serve our customers with
the best and give satisfaction
" -_i------—. I    -I       I.      I llll     »-.,..  ,, ,1 I ,
THOMAS BROS.
Ye   Olde   Firm   of   Princeton
Westwood & Brooke
POULTRY FARM
PRINCETON, - British Colombia
Plumbing and Heating, Sheet Metal
wont, Tinsmithing   |
Sliop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St., in ' Ivlurdock's blacksmith shop'
DIGNAN & ATKIN
PRACTICAL WORKMEN—PROPRIETORS
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
" SPOKESMAN"
This White Leghorn male bird won 2nd pnze
Spokane Poultrv show, 1911. .ilso headed 2nd
prize pen at same show. He Is sired by ist prize
winner at Spokane Poultry Show, 1911, which
also won shape and color specials at same show.
Also was ist prize winner at Seattle in 1910
We are now booking orders for Kgg Settings,
and forward same when required by customers
Pen No. i—Our selected'"prize winning stock,
$5 per setting; of 15 eggs.
Pen No. 2—A choice pen that will produce
winners and layers, $3 per setting of 15 eggs.
Pen No. 3—a sp endid utility pen for egg production, $1 50 per setting of 15 egg^.
Book your o -ders earl v. Terms cash with order.
Address:   PRINCETON, B. C.
J. KNUDSON
Contractor   and   Builder
tfiey   were   Hardy   an'
capable   of   sustaining    great
Before there was any regular means of
transport over the  mountains  lying  be-
tweefa Hope on the Fraser and the Simi^
kameen, the Indians used to be employecj|
to pack pujvisions oyer  on^heir  backs|
Their packs were suspended bv means o:
a band or strap  passed  over  their  fore
heads, and I have known some of then
pack three sacks of flour  (150  pound,s}Jf
on their back while traveling  on  snow-
shoes for a distance of sixty-five  miles
over a rough mountain road, with a depth
of twenty-five feet of snow on the summit of the Hope  mountain  over which
the trail ran.
Sometimes a whole family would start
( ut on one of their packing expeditions,
Co_tinued on page 5,
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V     ***}£.**** %.*********** .'%*'****•) M-^M ******* m J J-        JL     V.    MLMM V
BUY VOIR SUPPLY
Of Potatoes, Apples and
Vegetables, Etc., From
O. H. CARLE
THE GROCERYMAN
PRINCETON, B.C.
<&&<<**i<**i<<**i<<<<<*<<^^
Read  the advertisements carefully then make  your
purchases==No reason now to send away.
Estimates Famished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
*± "
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   L.   CUMMINGS,   Proprietor
.V. 000000
Horseshoeing, Etc*
General Blacksmithing.
Carriage Building and  Repairs
Aw, Work Neatly & Promptly
I  Phone 28. Executed.
The Princeton
Liverg \ Feed
si_t.es
N. HUSTON, Prop'r
General Livery business   carried on
Horses for hire, single or double.    Wood
or   coal   delivered   on   shortest   notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed. ^§9
.;__ «__.,_Y<
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=—=
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^&¥^r^
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
March 27, 1912,
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. H. WRI _HT)
PUBLISHED BVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advauce,
ADVERTISING RATES:
Land Notices, 60 days, $7-50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
Legal Advertising, 12cents per line, 1st insertion,
5_ •pents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 per in. per month.
dopy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later tha.u Monday.
THE ELECTIONS.
Tomorrow will settle the question
o'&the McBride railway policy, that
being the issue upon which appeal
was made to the electorate. Reviewing the whole province it is
■difficult to see where a single Liberal or Socialist will be returned.
Neither John Oliver nor H. C.
Brewster, Liberal leaders, are likely
to be returned and the Socialists
have very little chance of electing
more than two out of nineteen can
didates. Of the twenty Liberal
candidates there is a woeful deficiency in calibre and experience,
only two, John Oliver and Ralph
S-iiith, ranking as parliamentarian
or legislators, the remainder being
featherweight adventurers in the
political  ___g.    Personal  influence
and reasons alone might elect either
of the Liberals named, their opposition to a progressive railway
policy is sure to condemn them in
the estimation of an intelligent
electorate. Therefore, it would not
be at all surprising if after the result of the polls there should not be
a Liberal left to tell how it happened. Nine Conservatives are
already elected by acclamation,
leaving thirty one seats to be contested tomorrow.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
The irregular mails arriving over
the V. V. & E. are a source of much
annoyance and inconvenience to the
public. Some days the mail is very
light and lean, followed by  the  fat
will adopt a more peaceful attitude
and save himself terrific humiliation
from Canada's navy. /
Now it is spring, gentle spring. The
meadow larks and robins have arrived
and the swallow is due in a few days.
Last Thursday the sun crossed the lineal'
and congested one, making the ser^U^rim, did . <^otjJ=5^^_t-»~'->~
lyoniomfueTulameen and Similkameen rivers the icy chain is being thawed.
vice very unsatisfactory, depriving
the public of their rights and
money's worth. The fault lies
chiefly with the P. O. inspector,
who apparently has outlived his
usefulness, having been in the service some thirty years. He ought
to be retired, but as long as he has
boss Kelly for a friend and backer
it is quite likely he will be nursed
in his senility even if the public
suffer.
Strained relations between Britain
and Germany are the result of
jealousy and arrogance on the part
of the despotic Kaiser. If he wi 1
accept a foiendly tip from  Star  he
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
. -Mrs. E- J. Henderson/, Mrs. Kirk, Miss
E. Blaisdell, and Charles Henderson of
Tulameen were doing Easter shopping in
Princeton last  Friday.
Clarence Smith off Merritt, colored,
IT4 pounds, wants to/ box with anyone,
weight up to 135 pounds.
W. S Stains, the eve    courteous and
obliging operator at the railway stati
is leaving for 'Sanamyland' at  the end
the month.    Mr. /Stains has  made  mani
friends here and/has proven  an  effick
employe. /
March 27, 1912
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
It looks as if spring has really sprung.
The small boy has his marbles out. .
Mcse Burns, better known as 'Mose the
mucker,' left yesterday for the Boundary
district to vote for Comrade George
Heatherington. Mose is a good Socialist
—'he toils not, neither does he spin.'
Subscribers who do not receive the Star
will confer a favor by letting the management know. The paper is checked
over and mailed every week, and if it
does not reach its destination it is not the
fault of this office.
J. Richmond Craig, Presbyterian missionary student, will preach next Sunday
his  farewell  sermon,  the subject being
invitations to a farewell party to be held
in the court house on Friday evening. R.
G. Stewart is appointed to this field to
succeed Mr. Craig.
G. H. Aston, the cons'able shot by
desperadoes last week on ihe steamer
Okanagan near Peachland, is still in a
precarious condition but it is hoped he
will recover.
G. H. Whitetnan, of the Princeton
Coal and Land company, left for England
on Monday, being summoned by serious
illness of Ms mother.
Wilson ^and/James,   the   robbers  who
ble   Aston,   were caught by
stables  Seeley  and   Ramsey,
ank.     The   prisoners   were
Kelowna,   ivj_ere  they will be
Sing is selling out and will leave for
China to start another revpttition or help
to keep law and order-ili the new republic.
HOTEL   ARRIVALS.
At the Tulameen—Judge Murphy, Ed.
Tinglev, Mrs. E. J. Henderson, Mrs. E.
Kirk, Miss E. Blaisdell, Tulameen; J. E.
McNeil, Granite creek; E. F. Voigt,
Voigt camp; A. Johnson, Fivemile; J A
Turner, G. E. Malcolm, R. McMaster,
W. C. Fry, D. A. McCaskiU, James A.
Black, Vancouver; C. A. Duncan, F. McLean, Coalmont.
At the Similkameen—P. Henderson,
V. D. Doty, G. H. Jernberg, Vancouver;
R. Carew, Kettle Valley railway survey;
B. E. Green, H. H. Stuart, B. L. Smith,
Spokane. G. H. McKamev, G. But! .rfield,
Chas. Cooper, C. D. Goepel, H. Rickel-
son. Nelson; J. E. Leckie, Cobalt; B. S
Swanson, Marcus; W Summers, Siwash
camp; R. Gregor, Oroville; Mr. and Mrs.
R. H. Carmichael,  city;   R.   Read,   Neil
'Farewell.'    Mr. Craig ia  issuing  formal   Mclsaac, Phoenix; Dr Jackson, Penticton.
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<<M£.->j4**-**.Hj-^^
WW'
THE MAN WHO CAN!
THE TOMORROW OF I
EAST PRINCETON
WILL MAKE MONEY BY INVESTING THERE
f NOW IS THE TIME TO BU#      I
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A riODEL CITY
Water system.
Electric light.
Cement walks.
Natural parks.
Nicely wooded.
Fine garden soil.
Athletic grounds.
Excellent drainage.
No danger from overflow.
Can have fine sewer system.
Wide streets and lanes.
Local and long distance phone system.
|A PAYROLL CITY NOW
Furnished by the B C. Poitland Cement
Co.: Cement, Lime, Bricks.
United Empire Co. : Coal and Copper.
Princeton Coal & Land Co. : Coal.
Princeton Lumber Mills Co. ; Sawmill.
B.C. Copper Co. : Copper.
The Platinum-Gold Fields Co.: Placer
Mining.
One thousand men will be employed
inside of year.
A RAILROAD CENTER
The Kettle Valley railroad, which will
soon be the main line of the C.P.R. system, brings Vancouver 300 miles nearer
Winnipeg, passes through the townsite.
Final survey is now being made.
The Great Northern has tracks on  two
sides of the townsite and  will soon he $&
finished to Vancouver.    These two roads **>
give transportation in all directions from 4V
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East Princeton.
Natural centre, ranching country,   fruit  growing.    Huge  deposits  ot copper,   gold, silver, platinum and other minerals.    Has
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big water power development.    Lots in such towns as Grand Forks,   Kamloops,   Blairmore,  Alta., Baker, Wash., are worth 5 times   *r
what is  being   aSked at East Princeton and the payroll is not as large. .*+*
FREE CEMENT walks with each lot sold—cleared streets.    Water main to be laid in streets this summer.
BUSINESS LOTS $450 up.: Terms 10 p.c. cash, 5 p.c. per mo.      Residence lots, $200 up :   Terms, 10 p.c. cash,
7 p.c. on annual balances.    {% of all lots are to be reserved) for future sale.     Get full particulars at once.
C. R. BRIGGS, Gen. Agent, 6I5 Hastings W., Vancouver. D. G. McCURDY, Resident Agent, East Princeton, B.C.      ♦!♦
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10  per mo. A
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THE SIMILKAMEEN INDIANS.
From 3rd page.
the children as well as their parents each
taking a 16a3 and'' accomplishing the
journey in six or eight days, accordiug to
the state of the road; and this in the
depth of winter. If an unusually violent
snowstorm overtook an Indian while
traveling in the mountains he would dig
a hole in the snow, cover lllt__m_ with
his.blan_.l _iul "all.w himself to be
^nowed up. Here he would calmly sleep
till the storm bad passed, then he would
proceed on his journey.
The Similkameens are not flood run-
ners, though I have known some of them
when sent on a message to keep up a
steady jog trot for ten hours and cover a
long stretch, but they are not by any
means swift footed, nor do they develop
pedestria .ism. Thev are born horsemen.
As soon as a child can sit" alone Jit is
placed on horseback; indeed before that
it becomes familiarized wiih horses—for
while a child is still___und on a ' papoose
stick," it is hung by a strap to the pommel of its mother's saddle, and away it
goes flying with her over the bunch grass
hills. Thus they make good riders with
firm, easy, graceful seats.
As they depend on hunting for a large
portion of their food they are, of course,
good shots. They now use the same
weapons as the \.hite settlers—guns and
rifles. Formerly they used bows and
arrows, lariats and snares. Deer were
often snared. Two saplings growing in a
convenient spot on either side of a deer
run were selected and bent down and a
noose suspended between their tops; the
d.er were then driven down the run by
men and dogs. The frightened animals
bounded heedlessly along till they came
to the snare, where they were quickly involved in the noose, releasing in their
struggles the bent saplings which, springing into their natural position, hung the
deer thus caught At regular times in
the autumn the whole tribe would assemble, and scoi|rin. the country for
milpg^.yjjli lifrsir d____ vypnlrl drive large
herds of deer into some mountain cul de
shc where the hunters wiin th'e.r bows
anTTarrovvs were stationed before hand
ready for the wholesale slaughter of the
bewildered creatures. Deer were- often
pursued on horseback and lassooed with
a strong reata. _ have been told by an.
old man o_"the tribe that the sharp horns'
.of the mountain goat fixed on shafts of
hardwood were formerly used as spears
both in hunting and warfare, as also
stone knives and hatchets. I have se°n
the rude flint anowheads used in past
times, also a stone chisel. Some ten or
twelve years ago an old Indian, who was
in need of an axe but too poor to buy-
one, made himself a very serviceable axe
of s one, the same, he said, as his father
had used. /• t     J
[To be continued.]   £_sV&-' f
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
Water Rights  in   the Railway Belt
YALE WATER DISTRICT
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
_* Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given to  all
Mail  Orders.
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 53.  ,
^Regular meetings. 8 p
 '       m., Thursdavs,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate  in
Thomas Block.   *' Oddfellows Hall."
Jas. Gellatly. p. Russell,
Noble Grand. Secretary
"^"OTIC-cC is hereby given that any person,
■L^ partueiship, company, or municipality
haviug any claim to water rights in the Railway
Belt may file with the Chief Water Commissioner
at the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, a statement of claim to water privileges on a printed
form (No. 50), which can be obtained from the
^Sat r Comm issioners ai New Westminster, Yale,
A^sroft, Kamloops, Revelstoke and Golden, or
from the Chief Water Cr mmissioner.
Evidence will be heard at local points as soon
as the claims have been examined and tabulated,
and notices will be published in the British Col
umbia Gazette aud lo_al papers of the place and
date when each stream will be.dealt with. Objections may be filed with the Chief Water Commissioner. The following strea::.s are supposed
to be wholly or partially wi thin the Railway Belt
in the Yale Water District:
American creek
Anderson river.
__n_.erson creek.
Boston Bar creek.
Black Cauon.
Beaver lake.
Butter creek.
Boothroydsflat.
Coquihalla river.
Carry creek
Chilliwack river.
Chilliwack lake.
China Bar creek.
Cisco creek.
Dewdney creek.
■ Emory Bar creek.
Eagle creek
Kmoiy creek.
Four-mile creek.
Five-mile creek.
Fraser river.
Fort Dallas creek.
Gordon creek.
Garnet creek.
Gcose lake.
Harrison like.
Hunter creek.
Hanati creek.
Tsobelle creek.
Jones lake.
Jul j' creek.
Jackass Mountain creek.
Kelly creek.
Kawkwa lake.
Kanaka Bar creek.
I.ytton creek.
Lauder crer-k.
Mineral lake.
Murray lake.
Muddy lake.
Murderers __r_r creek.
!   Nahie creek.
Nohomeen creek.
I  Nahatlatoh lake.
■ Nahatlatch river.
Niger ere. k.
Nicolum river.
Nesaquack ceek.
Nikaia creek.
Pierre cieek.
Quoieek creek.
Ruby creek.
Rodick creek.
Railroad creek.
River creek       v \'Cxt
Rocky gulch.
Stryen creek.
Salmon river.
Spuzzum creek.
Sawmill creek.
Silver creek,
Skuppa creek.
Siwash creek.
Siwash creek north fork
Siwash creek, scuth fork.
Sleese creek.
Samallow river.
Skagit river.
Schkam creek.
Seven-mile creek.
Spring creek.
Sucker creek.
Sorrell Springs
Siska creek
Skussy river.
Tamihy creek.
Tulameen river.
Tulameen river, west fork.
Tulameen river, south fork.
Texas creek.
Trafalgar Bar creek.
Uz-vi-hoos river,
Unknown creek.
Waleach creek.
Yale creek-
Stream rising two miles west of Keefers.
Small stream at Spuzzum
Stream through station yard, North Bend.
■ Stream at Camp 16, N.W. ~%, Sec. 34, Tp. q.
Stream through S.E }£, Sec 30, Tp. 1 _  R.26.
r Stream half a mile west of C.P.R station at
Yale.
Stream west of C. P. R. coal bunkers at North
Bend.
Springs in Tp. 14, R. 27, on east side of Cariboo
Road.
.Statements of claims may also be filed to water
in any unnamed spring, stream, creek, pond,
gulch, lake, or other source of water supply, in
the vicinity of any of the said creeks, etc.
Dated February 14th, iq.2.
W. R   ROSS,
Minister of I*ands.
'PERFECTION'
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is the name of the make of the
MEN'S CLOTHING
we have just received—and it is all that the narre implies.
It is perfect in workmanship; perfect in style; perfect in fit.
Besides, it is reasonable in price.
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$8.50 TO $25 PER SUIT        1
Between these two price extremes we show, the choicest
effects in Fancy Tweeds, Worsteds, Diagonals and Serges.
The colorings include stylish Greys, Browns, Tans, Navy
Blues and Blacks, in a great variety of patterns.
It is no longer necessary for the men who count, nor the
men who care, nor those who have a just pride in their appearance, to pay the excessive prices usually demanded for
made-to-measure clothing, for our " Perfection Brand"
Clothing is just as smart and distinctive as the best custom
tailor can fashion, and embodies many original style touches
found in no other line of clothing in the market.
And we can fit the man who tips the scales at 250 pounds
as well as the one who weighs only 125 pounds! "Why not
you?     Indeed—Why Not?
Get the Habit of buying
will save you money.
your clothes  at  Howse's—it
The A. E. HOWSE CO, Ltd
PRINCETON,^. C.
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KING & GIBSON
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
BB*B**4**BB*B**BB*4>**4>***A**BB*B**bS*B*BB**
**4^*~**B**B********4l**4l**4r**4t**4i**<•**4"**
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
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OFFICE : Vermilion Ave., near Station
Y
PRINCETON, B.C. X
•*z**z**z**z<<<<<*<<**.******<^
The Town oi opportunity f i|
The rails have been  laid   into  the town and Coalmont is now the new
terminus,   the  base  of operations for  the next  forty miles of railway
building.
Before six months have passed there should be a payroll in Coalmont of
between   350   and  400   men : This   means population, which naturally
means good business.
IF YOU ARE WISE YOU will invest in a little Coalmont real estate
now while the choice is still good.
Don't let this opportunity slip along with the others which have got
past you. Write for our circular and price list ; a post card will bring
it to you.    There are still some 50-foot lots left
Two blocks from the centre of town at only
$225, $55 cash, bat. in 18 months to suit.
Williamson  & TurnerllSl
AGENTS, COALflONT,  B.C
 .—UJIIIJ_I.JP   .
1 1
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS
WATER BRANCH
In the matter of the Board of, Investi-.
gation created by Part III. of the "Water
Act"   for   the   determination   of   water
rights existing on the I2lh day of March,
1909; and in the matter of the following
creeks in the Similkameen Water District:
Alder creek.
Alkali lake.
Apex creek.
Ashnola river.
Atwood creek.
Acheghip-Flat creek.
A-tsi-Kiak creek.
Asquatic creek.
Armstrong creek.
Buckhorn creek.
Bench stream.
Bromley creek.
Baker creek.
Bear creek.
Bear lake.
Beaver creek.
Beaver lake.
Bitter creek.
Blue Joint creek.
Blue lake.
Boswell qreek.      ''.'-if
Boulder creek.
Boundary creek.
Brodbagen creek.
^JBunch Grass Field spring.
Big Rock creek.
Blind creek.
Brown creek.
Buchanan creek.
Bull creek.
Boomerang creek.
Blythe creek.
Causten creek.
Camp creek.
Canyon creek.
Canyon lake.
Carmi cr ek.
Cedar creek.
Cedar lake.
Christina lake.
Christina creek.
Clearwater take.
Clearwater creek.
Clark creek.
Colchester creek.
Cold creek.
Conkle creek.
Copper creek.
Cougar creek.
Cyclops creek.
Cawaher creek.
Coldstream creek.
Coldwater creek.
Chain lakes.
Coteay creek.
China creek.
Chinpatltn creek.
Cranberry creek.
Cranberry creek, south fork of.
Gurry creek.
Conklin creek.
Canon creek.
Colvs creek.
Chandler creek.
Croscut brook.
Dauphin lake.
Deadeye creek.
Deadwood creek.
Deadman gulch.
Deadtnan iake.
Deep creek.
Deer creek.
Daly gulch.
Douglas creek.
Dominion creek.
Dog lake.
Duck lake.
Damfino creek.
Eholt creek.
Eighteen-mile creek.
Eighteen-mile creek, branch of.
Elkhorn creek.
Eleven mile creek.
Frena creek.
Fair creek.
Farleigh lake.
Fifteen mile creek.
Fisherman creek.
Fishernian creek, west branch.
Five-mile creek.
Fons Perenius spring.
Fourth July creek.
Fourth  July   creek,   unnamed   tribu
tary of.
Fraser creek.
Flatt creek.
Franklin creek.
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
Fish lake.
French creek.
Farrel creek.
Gerald creek.
Goat creek.
Little Goat creek.
Gold creek.
Gold Hill creek.
Green-lake.
Gibbs creek.
Gloucester creek.
Gilpin creek.
Graveyaid creeks'
Glover creek.
Granite creek.
Gregoire creek.
Gold Drop creek.
Harrison creek.
Haussener creek.
Hardy creek.
Horse creek.
Havnes creek.
Hester creek.
Hamilton creek.
Hell creek.
Henderson Sawmill creek.
Henry creek.
Hewlitf creek.
Hornet creek.,
Hughes creek.
Hulme creek.
Hydraulic creek
Ingram creek.
Ingram creek, east fork.
Incameep creek.
Irrigation creek.
Italy creek.
Inglam creek.
Iron creek.
Joshua creek.
James creek.
Jolly Jack creek.
Jim creek.
Keogan creek.
Kepler creek.
Keremeos creek.
■Keremeos creek, south fork.
Keremeos creek, west fork.
Kilooola lake.
Kuslas Kein-ska sken creek.
Kelly creek.
Kettle river.
Kettle river, north fork.
Kettle river, east branch of north fork
Kettle river, west branch of north fork
Kettle river, west fork.
Kettle river, east fork of west fork.
Kingston creek.
Knappen creek.
Kearns creek.
Lime Kiln lake.
Lind creek.
Little Volcanic creek.
Lost Horse creek.
Lime creek.
Line creek.
Lynch creek.
Loon lake.
Lome lake.
Long Joe creek.
Long lake
Lost creek.
Little creek.
Little chief creek.
Marama creek.
Manuel" creek.
Marks creek
Marron creek.
Marron lake.
May creek.
Meadow creek.
Milligan creek.
Mollie Pritchard creek.
Moody creek.
Mother Lode creek.
Murphy creek.
Myers creek. ,.
Myers creek, tributary of.
Meyers creek.
Maloan creek.
McCraie creek.
McCarren creek.
McConnell creek.
Mclntyre creek.
Mill creek.
Mulligan creek.
Maida creek.
Murray creek.
Murray gulch.
McRae creek.
Munroe creek.
McCuddy creek.
Mica creek.
Mohr creek.
Mud creek.
McFarlane creek.
Nogi creek.
Nine-mile creek.
Nicholson creek.
Napoleon creek.
N'Kanirri-no creek.
N'Kam a-hi nat-no creek.
N'Kam-eep river
Norwegian creek
Natnless creek.
Okanagan river.
Olalla river.
Oro Fino creek
Omellette creek
Old Tom creek
Osoyoos lake
Overton creek
Ontario creek
Park rill
Pass creek
Pass creek, south fork
Porter creek
Prather creek
Parker creek
Prairie creek
Pathfinder creek
Prior creek
Providence creek
Quillette creek
Quartz creek
Rat lake
Reed creek
Rice creek
Riddle creek
Rock creek
Rock creek, south fork
Round lake
Ruby creek
Ruckle creek
Richter creek
Rocky creek
Rattler creek
Sand Bank creek
St. Anne creek
Sand creek
Sand ner creek
Savage creek
Sawmill creek
Sawmill lake
Sheep creek
Sheep creek, west fork
Schwartz creek.
Second creek
ScLillings creek
Shingle creek
Schumaker creek
Shuttleworth creek
Shuttleworth creek, lake at head of
Stray Horse creek
Smuggler spring
Similkameen river
Similkameen river, south fork
Six-mile creek
Sixteen-mile creek
Sken-Kam Ske-Noo-Ske-Tan creek
Skilibiugton cretk
Slate cieek
Smith creik
Stray Horse lake
Sultan crefk .
Sunset creek
Susap c-eek
Susap cieek, north fork
Sutherland cieek
Sprng gulch
Spiing creek
Smelter lake
Stirling cieek
Strawberry creek
Split creek
Summit lake
Summit creek
Snowball-! eek
Stashla-V'alentka creek
Stewart cretk
Sn wshoe cre< k
Snehumption creek
Stevenson creek
Scot McRae creek
Snit Hse-tse-pas Kan creek
Snit-I.e-Nate-Tan creek
Semple creek
Sixteen-mile creek
Stuart creek.
Tayior creek-
Taylor lake
Testalinda creek
Texas c reek
Three Sjring creek
Tinhorn creek
Togo creek
Tom cieek
Tcm Tit creek
Trout creek
Trout lake
Twenty-mile creeK
Twenty-two-mile crek
Twenty-two mile creek, east fork
Twin creek
Twin creek, east fork of
Twin creek lakes
Twin creek, creek running into
Tea river
Troy creek
Tiapper creek
Trail creek
Ten-mile creek
Thirty-two-mile creek
Twilight creek
Tug-ul-nuit lake
Upper Clear lake
Upper Keremeos creek
Victoria creek
Volcanic creek'
Vaseaux lake
Verde creek
Wallace creek
Wallace lake
Ward lake ?*____
Whites creek
Wild West creek
Williamson creek
Wilson creek
Wiseman creek
Woodworth lake
Wolf creek
Wolflake
White lake
White lake creek
Wilkinson creek
Waddel creek
Wolverine creek
Williams cf eek
Wartman lake
Wood creek
West Fork lake
Yellow lake
Young creek
March 27, 1912.
Unnamed Springs and Streams
I«ake situate one mile north of Fairview wagon
road -about nine miles from Keremeos.
Lake on scuth line of sub-lot 7, lot 2710.
Spring on lot 667 (S)
Small creek oh the Florence mineral claim
Creek on sub lot 16 of lot 2613
Small  creek  about  fourteen    miles  west  of
Penticton
Spring three-quarters of a mile northwest of
south boundary of lot 538. group r. township 7_.
Small unnamed lake on lot 973 (S)
Spring on lot 2138
Small creek running from west ove." southwest
portion Stem Winder mineral claim
Spring on Smuggler, mineral claim
Small  unnamed  creek  one   mile  and a half
south of Tinhorn creek
Small unnamed creek about one mile and a
half north from Golden Gate Hotel, Fairview
Spring rising on the Eureka mineral claim
Spring on lot 2456
Unnamed stream rising lot 1297 (S)
Unnamed stream flowing through lot 1738
Small stream on tht Fairview townsite
Spring on Pre-emption record 2517
Small stream near south end of Pre-emption
record 2944
Small creek on northeast corner of lot 351.
Spring on section 31, township 49
Spring  near west boundary  of Pre-emption
record 125 (S)
Spring near northeast corner oflot 282, group 1
Spring on lot 454 (S)
Small stream on Blue Diamond mineral claim
Stream coming down mouutalD in front of _awe
homestead
Spring   rising  in   northwest   lX,  section   24,
township 28
Small spring on southwest portion oflot 513
Spring on I ittle Frank mineral claim.
Stream flowing through No. 3 mineral claim.
Underground creek on Victoria mineral claim
Spring   creek  about  the  center of the Grey
Eagle mineral claim.
Small spring on lot 2531
Small unnamed creek rising on Pre-emption
record 4613
Spring rising on Pre-emption record 76 (S)
Small spring on wagon road between Boundary
■alls and second bridge below Anaconda.
-Small spring situated on lot 515, township" 67.
Small lake on Pre-emption record 238 (S)
Small stream and spring situate on lot 27 (S)
Small unnamed creek on the northeast J^ tec-
tion 28, township 47
Spring on lot 177
Spring on lot 261, section 33, township 55
Spring near easterly end of New York mineral
claim
Small creek running into Myers flat and rising
on Oro Fino mountain
Stream rising on Barnes & Ironsides mineral
claim in Greenwood camp
Stream rising on Apex mineral claim
Three  small la_es situated  on ea*_  side  of
Okanagan lake and twelve miles below Mission
creek
Spring on Comet mineral claim
UnnameJ stream running alongside road that
borders lot 900
Spring and unnamed creek oh lot 191. group t
Spi ing or ereek on lots 2834 aud 280, township
89
Small creek running  southeast  from Maple
Leaf mine
Small spring on St. Maurice mineral claim
Unnamed * stream running  through   Missing
Link No. 2 mineral claim
Springs on lots 337 and 374 (S)
Unnamed spring on Pre-emption record 628
Small stream half a mile southwest of southwest corner oflot 3334
Spring about 42 chains north oflot 3205, group 1
Spring situate near centre of thi northwest -%
section 13, township 28
■   Spring near south line of lot 907
Unnamed spring on or near Pre-emption record
4037
Small spring or stream on lot f49
Spring on Pre-emption record 4774
Unnamed small stream flowing from spring on
lot 380
Spring on lot 471
Spring sitvated about tbe centre of north line
of lot 668 (S)
Small lake near southeast corner of Pre-emption
67 (S)
Small creek on Pre-emption record 2986
Small lake situated on Pre-emption record 2773
Small unnamed lake 01 slough near east line of
lot 500, Osoyoos
Unnamed slough near lots 494 and 493, group 1,
Osoyoos
Spring on lot 334
Spring on lot 1359
Springs near northeast corner oflot 365
Springs on lot 2394
Spring near centre oflot 380
Stream running out of Loon lake
Spring on lot 3009, group 1, Osoyoos
Small creek flowing into Kettle river, five miles
south of Grand Forks
Small stream about six miles and a half south
of Eholt
Creek or springs on lot 494
Spring on Colville reservation
Spring on reserve
Spring into Norwegian creek
Creek on lot 908
Stream running through  sub lot 3203 oflot.
2710
And all named springs, streams, creeks, ponds,
gulches and lakes tributary to or in the vicinity
of the above named streams |
Take notice that each and ;eyery person, partnership, company or municipality who, on the
said 12th day of March, 1909. had water rights on
any of the above mentioned creeKs, is directed
to forward on or before the 19th day of _pril,
1912, to the Chief Water C$nmissioner at the
Parliament Buildings at Victoria, a memorandum
of claim in writing as required by section 28 cf
the said act as amended. Printed iorms for such
memorandum (form No. i9J can be obtained
from any of the Water Commissioners in the
province;
And taKe notice that the said board of investigation intends to proceed to tabulate such claims
on or about the 31st day of May, 1912. ■■•
After the claims have .been tabulated by the
board, notice will be given of the places and days
on which evidence and argument will be heard
at local points.
Dated at Victoria this 28th day of February,
J. F. ARMSTRONG,
Chairman.
Advertise and Prosper
A
m
March 27, 1912
/
_ \*£  ^0"
M^^^Jjf^* IMILKAMEEN   STAR
SPRING POETRY
This is the season of mud and slush/
When the spring poet begins to gush;
Of budding trees and spronting grass
He snorts and brays like a demented ass.
I can write poetry by the yard.   Here
is as far as I dare goon the spring bonnet.
Put on your new Easter bonnet,
I With spring flowers upon it;
*   *   *
We'll send Old Dobbin to the green fields.
—Star Devil.
PRINCETON BAND
The public meeting held in the court
house on the 20th inst. to consider band
matters was presided over by C Willarson, who was elected president for the
year, when the following statement,
audited by ]. Knudson and E. Anderson,
was presented:
RECEIPTS
Total donations $ 96 50
Playing on July i    48 75
Playing on July 12     15 06
Concert on August 19    44 25
Members dues     15 73
TO RENT
A well equipped and stocked- farm,
situated eight miles from the town of
Princeton, B. C. Good house and farm
buildings. A married man with family
preferred. For further particulars inquire of S. R. GIBSON,
Princeton, B. C.
Similkameen Hotel
SUMMEKS it WMNJE
PROPRIETORS
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
Large and New building, well Furnished and Plastered; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
Total .' $220 25
EXPENDITURES
Music $ 10 15
Rent    20 00
Instruments  174 10
Printing       3 50
Paid players' wages       6 00
Sundry      6 75
Total g^ft. $220 50
S. R. Gibson a^fclressed the meeting,
outlining his plan of action for the three
months, the time for which he had agreed
to conduct and instruct the band, and
calling attention of merchants and citizens towards giving the band necessary
support.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject for Sunday next: 'Reality.' Thy
kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and
thy dominion endureth throughout all
generations—Psalms 145:13.
Presbyterian church services —Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
service, n a.m.
Subject next Sunday:    'Farewell.'
Methodist church service, Sunday,
March 31. In Oddfellows' hall, at7:30
p.m. ; cement works at n a.m.
Anglican church services for Palm
Sunday, March 31, at Princeton: 11 a.m.,
matins, holy communion and sermon.
Subject, 'The day of triumph.' 7:30
p in., evensong and sermon. Subject,
'The solitude of sin.' Special services on
Thursdays and Good Friday.
I
EASTER
C
Post Cards I
also a new
line of . . '.
I COMICS
*
_
c
at the
PRINCETON
Drug and
Bookstore
GEO. G. I.YAIX, Manager.
T. CLAWC-KINQ
Graduate of the Art and Science Department
Kensington, London, Ens-
Member of the Alberta Architectural Association.
Plans and  Specifications  of Buildings  furnished at reasonable rates.
Office : KING & GIBSON
Vermilion Av. Princeton, B.C., Phone 18
Great Northern
—Hotel—
O. R. BOUCHER
ARCHITECT
Coalmont, B.C.
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
PRINCETON,
B.C.
•********4*******B***********B**B**B********4**B**B4*BB*BB*4^
y&KK*'"A™/vv.*************%H«^«w/vvVyyvv
1   ...Hotel...   I
A osier | noi {
TULAMEEN, B.C. \
X Good Fishing, Boating £
£ Mining Centre $
I Mrs. E. J. Henderson f
y PRORIETOR V
y *
Y
_:
"MODEL"
" muut.L "       /
LIVERY STAJHE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety  of   Rigs—Good   Roadsters-
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
BROOMFIELD _ GARRISON
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIKTOkS
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments I!
BATH ROOnS, ETC.
Commercials Sample _*Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
Real Estate, Finance, Mines
The/Door of   Opportunity is
Wide Open.
The ' West' affords many examples of fortunes
made from ground floor investments. Winnipeg',
Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver had a similar
beginning to that of Princeton. Fortunes have
been made in real estate from a very small investment. Princeton, which includes East Princeton,
has undoubtedly the best prospects of any town
on the map. Invest while the town is yet in its
infancy and see prices steadily rise.
FOR SALE:
Notice to Delinquent co=Owner.
T"T, c ppyn-TV—Take notice that unless
you do pay, wifRin 91 days from the date hereof,
the sum of $231.95/being your proportion of the
expenditure required for the years 1g03_-5.6-7.-Q
10-11 by Section 24 of the Mineral Act, upon the
T___S___>«4Jraction Mineral claim situated on
Copper Mountain in the Similkameen Mining
Division, together with interest and all costs of
this notice, to the undersigned your co-paitner
in the said claim, your interest in the said claim
shall become vested in the undersigned who has
made the required expenditure.
A. e HOWSE.
Dated this 29th day of January, ion;—~
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
Lot on Bridge Street, within 100 yds. south of
Vermilion av.
Townsite Welldo. Two railways—gold-platinum
placers, ore and coal mining.
Ranch 1J6 miles west of Princeton. 192 acres,
$3,000.
Two lots in Hedley, inside and corner. Price
$200 and $250—Also in east addition op. Mr. Smiths
house.   Price $360.
Lot 6, block 24, house rents for $6 per mo., $600,
Agricultural land, near Coalmont, 80 acres, $1600
Claim in diamond belt, $500; locations made.
Mineral properties.
Water power.
Suburban acreage to lease.
Address:    J.M.WRIGHT,
S_f  j Princeton, B.C.. Canada.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that George Laurie Fraser.
of Coalmont, B. C, occupation mine
manager, iutends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of lot 378, thence
running south 40 chains, west 60 chains,
north 40 chains, east 60 chains to point
of commencement, containing 240 acres
more or less. G. L. FRASER,
Coalmont, B. C , Jan. 24, 1912.
F. P. COOK
General Merchant
Miners' Outfiiter
Princeton,   Granite Creek
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
Dressmaking & Millinery
MRS. Q. H. TURNER
French Block, Bridge Street
Orders Promptly Attended To
STAR
JOB l-iNTLRY
DO YOU WANT ■
Letterheads
Billheads
Meal Tickets
Milk Tickets
Printed Envelopes
Visiting Cards
Ladies', Gent's, Misses'
Business Cards
Posters
Dodgers, Dates
Statements
Invitations
Wedding and Ball
Ball Programs
Bills of Fare
Butter Wrappers
Letter Circulars
Memos.
Cotton Signs
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY!
STAR QUICK PRINT
TO CANADIAN   ARCHITECTS
Competition for New  University Buildings to
Be Erected at Point drey, Near Vancouver, British Columbia
*• ■
The Government of British Columbia invite
Competitive Plans for the general scheme and
design for the proposed new/university, together
with more detailed Plans for the buildings to be
erected first at an estimated cost of $1,500,000.
Prizes of $10,000 will be given for the most
successful Designs submitted.    ■
Particulars of the competitjon and plan of site
may be obtained on request; from the undersigned.
The designs to be sent in by July 31st, 1912,
addressed to
THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Scavengers
JOHNSON & REHN
Work promptly attended to. Town
health regulations complied with ; lawful
sanitary conditions in force. Orders may
be left at C. Willarson & Co's.
—*
____iil
 —:—
	
M
8
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
March 27, 1912*
PRINC
TON
___S_S
According to the laws of industrial progress and the experience of founders of western towns,
there must be a tangible, genuine basis on which to establish the future city. No amount of
coaxing can bring blood out of a stone, nor can the greatest scientist extract sunbeams from a
cucumber. Every man makes his own destiny==his own fortune==nothing comes by so-called
good luck.   The door is wide ajar for all who have pluck and a little capital.   Investigate Now!
1
1
Princeton
With Its Unequalled Mineral Resources
Its  Healthful Climate and Pretty Site
*
Is destined to be the Largest City in the Interior of British Columbia.
Five hours' run to Vancouver when the V., V. & E. is finished.
1
Your Opportunity Is NOW!
CHOICEi LOTS FOR SALE
And to Suit All Requirements
Enquire of | ERNEST    WATERMAN I Manager for
P_ieicefc§g_ cool & Hi! c»
W
__*_=

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