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Similkameen Star 1913-05-09

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 I
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¥
Immense water powers waiting for \ harness.'
Glcs. your mental eye to evil: Think good; * make good/
14th Year   No. 19
PRINCETON, B.C., FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1913.
PER YEAR : $2 Casta
Single Copy, 5c.
\1
The man who wavers is wrecked: Buy home land
fa.
MINES AND MINERALS
Silver-Lead in Demand—Big
Ore Reserve for B.C.
Copper Co.
For variety of minerals Princeton
district can successfully challenge and
compete with the world. From ' diamonds, platinum and tin almost the
whole gamut of the mineral family
can he run. Ore containing radium
may be found here, but the elusiveness
of this exceedingly valuable and useful substance causes enormous cost.
Some philanthropic millionaire could
not make better use of a portion of
his surplus in the interests of science
than by investigating radium possibilities here.
The British Columbia Copper company has a greater reserve of ore in
sight in its properties in the Copper
mountain region of British Columbia
than ever before, according to a re-
. c'ently issued statement by Newman
Erb, president of the company, in connection with the announcement that
more extensive development and operation is planned for the coming summer than at any time in the corporation's previous history. 'We now have
approximately 1,000,000 tons of ore
blocked out in our different mines
more than at any one time before,'
said President Erb in a report from
New York. 'Assays show an average
value of 1 5-10 per cent, copper, the
highest values for an extensive quantity of ore ever reported from the
mines.'
T. J. Corwin has been obliged to
suspend placer drilling operations for
the present owing to breakdown of
machine. High water on the Similkameen may soon be expected when
prospecting will have to be temporarily closed down.
Inquiries for silver-lead ore are
plentiful and there is no hesitation on
the part of investors to purchase
where there is sufficient development
to prove body in commercial quantity.
There is no doubt that the Similkameen district will be a large producer
of this ore which with the basic metals, also runs high in gold. Capital
and muscle, brain and brawn are the
ingredients necessary to make mines
when the existence of ore in place has
been discovered. A thorough investigation of the Similkameen silver-lead
deposits by the accredited agents of
bona fide mining companies cannot
fail to be beneficial to the investor as
well as the prospector and mine owner. More capital means developed
mines and wealth producing industry.
E. P. Wheeler expects to be in
Princeton this month on his way to
the Friday creek bornite mineral
properties.
Charlie Lambert is working on his
placers on Granite creek.
C. R. Briggs inspected the gypsum
deposits at Granite creek when he was
here two weeks ago.
The Princeton.Coal and Land Co. is
running with a small force now the
season for domestic coal being about
over.     The   winter   demand   for   this
fuel was good.
Wm. B. Dornberg, mining man, arrived in Rossland on Wednesday from
Spokane, on a visit to his Rossland
friends. Mr. Dornberg is operating
some claims in the Summit Camp in
the Similkameen mining division. The
government has started to build a
waggon road into the camp, which will
make it easier to get in supplies. He
and associates are running a 700 foot
crosscut to tap the ledge, and about
half of it is completed. The ledge has
two feet of ore on the footwall that
goes $125 to the ton and a foot of ore
on the hanging wall that assays $100
to the ton. The ledge is from eight to
twenty feet in width and has been
drifted on for 150 feet. Where the
drift ends the ore is of a better grade
than where it was started. Charles
Connell, the veteran prospector of this
city, has some claims that abut those
being operated by Mr. Dornberg. There
^are many other promising properties
in the camp, which promise to become
shippers when railway transportation
is furnished.—Rossland Miner.
McRae Bros, are working on their
properties on Kennedy mountain.
W. B. Marks, whose dancing class
closed last week, left on Wednesday
for the Tulameen district, for the purpose of carrying out his usual annual
assessment on several promising mining claims he possesses in that coming
mining centre.—Phoenix Pioneer.
J. M. Short, recently in this section on
a mining visit, was seriously wounded in
a train holdup last week. Mr. Short is
interested in Leadville camp.
J. F. Coats, of Spokane, was in town
last Monday after visiting mineral pro
perty on Copper mountain in behalf of
Spokane people.
DEFINING A FISSURE.
Editor Star:—Sir: I have a letter
written by a mining engineer stating
that a fissure vein is most likely to
be narrower at depth than at the surface. He gives as proof for this assertion that resistance is less at the
surface and that fissures for that reason are nearly always largest at the
surface and not the reverse as the untrained usually have it.
I am not an M. E. still this is not
the first time I have taken up a question of this sort. There is no argument necessary in this matter; the
man has some motive other than to
display his knowledge of geology and
I cannot let it go unanswered. That
assertion will not apply in this belt.
As proof, in the first place, this belt
is sedimentary, but there are a num-
ber of igneous dikes cutting if. 'Sedi-
ment_7 we all kuoW, WW- laid down
after the cooling of the earth's crust,
therefore, these rents which are now
filled with ore, could not have occurred by the cooling and contraction
of the rocks, which generally leaves
a series of gash veins, if anything, of
value.
This belt is two and a half miles
wide and over three miles long. The
east side of the belt rests on volcanic
breccia and has a dip of 50 to 70 degrees to the southwest and a strike of
N. 20 W. On the west side they rest
on volcanic ash and plutonic rocks
and in this area there are large floors
of andesite porphry and other igneous
Continued on page 2-
TOWN AND DISTRICT
Final Touches to Cement Factory—Lacrosse and Base
Ball Games.
The Keremeosians are going to entertain their guests royally on the 24th,
Victoria Day. Everybody with his mo-
therinlaw will be there to fail for their
respective baseball and lacrosse teams.
An effort will be made to pull off a
baseball match between Princeton and
Hedley in the near future. There are
a lot of veteran and raw sphereshooters
and batters around bnt some of them
have got stiffneck and sorespot. Play
ball !   What is the matter, you fellers ?
Dr. Jackson, dentist, arrived in town
Wednesday and will be here a few days.
R.C. mass was conducted by Rev. Fr.
Choinel at the residence of J. W. Kansky
on May 8.
Lacrosse dance tonight in the Thomas
hall. Jog your memory about it and be
there with your best friend.
A grand annual ball will be given by
the Coalmont bachelors of ' Saints' Rest'
on Monday, May 12, 1913, at the Coalmont hotel. All are cordially invited
to attend. Bring your best girl along
and as many more as possible. Princeton orchestra will be in attendance. Supper and dance free. Yours for a big
time. Committee : W. Abson, F. Law-
ney, Ed. Pringle, Wes. Rossiter, T. F.
Whiteman. P.S.—Don't forget the date.
—Com.
In East Princeton S. S. Knill and
family, Miss Ernmerson and R. Nottingham, all of Vancouver, arrived last week
and will* make East Princeton their
home.
At the cement plant the crusher and
motors have all been put in place and
the electricians are now wiring up the
factory. The track to the shale bed is
completed and tbe lime quarry opened
sufficiently to supply the factory.
Mrs. J. G. McDonell, of Vancouver,
is visiting her relatives, G. G. and the
Misses Lyall.
OBITUARIES.
The death of Henry N. Rogers, late
provincial constable, on Sunday, 4th inst.,
was not unexpected, deceased having
been ill with typhoid fever for several
weeks. Deceased was born iu England
and had resided iu Cauada for ten years.
He was of pleasing disposition and won
manv friends. The funeral on Tuesday
was conducted by Rev. W. H. Mayers,
there being a large attendance. Floral
offerings from Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Waterman, Hotel Princeton, D. M. French and
J. Swansborough w.re placed on the
handsome casket.
The death by drowning on Wednesday
last of James R. McLean, brother of W.
A. McLean, removes one who was well
known in this section, having been engaged in mining and other contracts and
as foreman. Of a bright and intellectual
personality, the deceased made many
friends. The funeral today was largely
attended. Service was conducted by
Rev. W H. Mayers. A beautiful wreath
of flowers presented by Mrs. P. Swanson ,
was placed on the coffin. Star extends
sympathy, along with many others, to
relatives. The pallbearers were brethren
of the Masonic order and the beautiful
coffin was procured from the undertaking parlors of D. M. French.
DEALING OUT JUSTICE.
J. R. Campbell, a former enterprising
and respected citizen of Princeton, has
been gazetted a justice of the peace in
the town of South Ft. George. The
Herald of that place says : 'Justice of the
Peace Campbell disposed of seven cases
this week. A case of a man carrying a-
gun was punished by a fine of #15. In
this instance the Justice took occasion to-
tell the prisoner that in this country it
was altogether unnecessary to pack concealed weapons.' Mr. Campbell evidently knows law and administers it without
fear or favoritism.
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
P. Swanson, of the hotel Princeton,
has been recently at Billings, Mont., and
Spokane on a visit.
The Labor Commission held a sitting
in Princeton on the 8th inst. Witnesses
sworu were W. C. McDougall, E. Waterman and H. Hunter. The evidence did
not disclose any labor grievances in this
section. The commissioners are : H. G.
Parson, chairman, Golden; J. A. McKel-
vie, Vernon; R. A. Stoney, New Westminster; J. Jardine, Esquimalt.
The importation of a German coach
stallion by local horse fanciers marks a
big step forward in the improvement of
the equine race in this section. This
stallion has won many prizes iu the states
and is uptoday in style, action and symmetry—a genuine beauty, and gentle as
a kitten. Next week a full description
and pedigree will be published : mean*
time see the horse at Huston's stables.
. A. L. White has received a carload of
new furniture which should be seen to
be appreciated and it is going at prices
that invite.
At the convention of the Ontario
Retail Grocers' Association it was
stated that the high cost of living was
partly due to the expensive manner
in which goods are put up. Elaborate
bottles and expensive packages, it
was said, were of no real use and tended to increase considerably the cost of
foodstuffs.
<In accordance with the wish of the
late General William Booth, the Salvation Army is about to extend its
work to the colored people of the
Southern States; Miss Eva Booth,
Commander in the IJnited States,, has
appointed Adjutant James N. Roberts
of Boston to take charge of this work.
The population of New York City is
5,332,000 according to the figures of
the Health Department. The official
census of 1910 made, the population
4,766,883.
■■'-'"
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 §
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
DEFINING A FISSURE.
From   Page 1.
'ro__s,"-_s will be seen b^___erence to
the gbvernment field geologists' report of 1911.
So these fissures were effused by the
powerful activity of .uliaiii- gases. Is
it ■ not ■ 1 _ra__inaMe lu- SxpeciL larger
rents in the rocks near the site of
power than thousands of feet distant.
I taboo the rest of his letter. Such
men as this M. E. should read T. A.
Richard's guide to technical*" writing
from which I copy .aiuexample, dissected by Mr. Rickard and summed up
as 'exuberant verbosity.' But first let
mo generalize a little farther:
.Immediately after those terrific outbursts the filling of the fissure began
and the minerals now in them were
carried in fumes from the internal
furnace beneath or at the site of action. Now here is a geologist's description of the same thing:
'These ores are due to effects of a
reduction  in   £__e temperature  of the
■JiithefEcT liquified~~hydrojJl 'Uluiiic -gfftu-
tions and their consequent regular
precipitation.' These solutions, it is
further stated, presumably for the
guidance of those who wield the pick,
'ascend in the form of metallic super -
heated vapors which combined evfent-
iratty wllh—ebullient _L.am—to—form
other aqueous solutions, causing gey-
secijke discharges at the sunac'e7-__id-
ed by SuUCerranean and irrepressible
pressure.' At the same time certain
'dynamical forces' were very busy indeed and 'eventuated in the opening of
fissures,' of which a miner can only
regret that they did not swallow the
^author.
Yours truly,
J. C. REILLY.
Leadville, April 25, 1913.
FREE!
eautiful
Pocket Wallets
With Billfold and Card Case
R. Christie, C.E., is surveying land for
A. Laidlaw on the Roche and Cambie.
rapidly   with   rains and
Rivers  rising
warm weather.
The street cleaning is in   line with civilized methods.    Good work.
May   showers,   June    weddings,  then
harvest da3-s.
SPECIALS.
REFRIGERATOR For Sale-
as new.    Mrs. W. D. YOUNG.
■As good
Dissolution of Partnership.
Take notice that Alexander D Broomfield and William S Garri .on have this
day dissolved the partnership formerly
existing between them at Princeton in
the Province of British Columbia, and
that the livery business carried on under
the firm name of Broomfield aud Garrison will be carried on hereafter by William S. Garrison,who will be responsible
for all debts contracted by the firm and
to whom all accounts owing the firm are
payable.
Dated, April 30, 1913.
A  D. BROOMFIELD,
W. S. GARRISON.
.1 Witness: K. C. Br.wi?.
Y011NAUE
IN Gill
Will be stamped on the
Wallet for 50c.
Send your Name and Address, and
50c. to cover cost of gold stamping,
mailing, etc., and we
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD JOHN AIRD
General Manager Assistant General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000
REST, $12,500,000
WILL SEND YOU FREE
A BEAUTIFUL WALLET
Send Today
B.C. REGALIA &
■    NOVELTY CO'
532 Pender,   W.,  Vancouver, B.C.
ADVERTISING NOVELTIES
COMMITTEE BADGES
SOCIETY REGALIA
MENDING TISSUE, Etc.
H. E. McGILLIVARY, Prop.
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc.
General Blacksmithing.
carriage Building and  Repairs
Ali, Work Neat_,y & Promptly
Phone 28. Executed.
FRANK BAILEY, M.C.M.I.
Mining Engineer
Seventeen years' experience in
British Columbia.
TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES
Issued by The Canadian Bank of Commerce enable the traveller to
provide himself with funds without delay at each point of his jourrtey in
a convenient yet inexpensive manner. They are issued payable in every
country in the world in denominations of
$10,   $20,   $50,   $100,   $200
with the exact equivalent in the moneys ofthe principal countries stated
on the face of each cheque. They are economical, absolutely safe self-
identifying- and easily negotiated; s 3
J. D. ANDRAS,  Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
YAL BANK
OF CANADA    I
Incorporated in 1869
Head Office—Montreal, Que.
CAPITAL   PAID   UP—$11,500,000.
Reserve-$ J 2,500,000 Total Assets-$ 175,000,000
A General Banking isjsiness Transacted  Savings Departments
in Connection.   Accounts of Out of Town Customers
Receive Careful Attention.
J. C. ROBERTSON, Manager Princeton Branch
&****-*/•
^#J__.__i__________^^^
BOX 102
PRINCETON, B.C.
_ Towisne
Come and make'your choice now.
Lots selling from $25.00 to $100.00
Fire,   Life  and  Accident
Insurance
s.
m
.SB.
_3.1
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^\
S9j
5^.
Pm Burns *& Co* Ltd*
High Grade Meats of all
Kinds, Always on hand.
Fish,    Eggs     and  Poultry.
Try Our Honte-Made  Sausage
The Best in the World
P. Burns & Co. Ltd„
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WWVWf 1 WWWffWWWWWWWW WWffflrfW*^
MoLean &. Russell
Princeton
SPRING
GOODS
We have just opened up our Spring Stock of LINOLEUM and now have a-.
fine range of entirely new patterns. The designs are altogether different from
anything we have had before and are strictly the latest on the market.       •■:>■;
If you are contemplating a purchase of the above goods it will certainly
be to your advantage to see our stock before placing your order.
A. L Whites furniture store
STAR, QUICK PRINTERY
v
■■
mm y, 1913
IHE     SIMILKAMEEN
**_&
&***Z**Z**Z**Z*<<*4>^
I BANK Or MONTREAL I
**4 ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL A
*> R. B. ANGUS. Eso.. President ♦
^ H. V. MEREDITH, Esq . G.NERA. Manager. ***
^♦Rt. Hon. Lord Strathcona and MountRoyal G. C. M.G., G.C.V.O, Hon. Pres.^
1
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Capital $16,000,000.00
Reserve and Undivided Profits   -   $16,000,000.00
SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTflENT
Deposits received from $i upwards.   Ranching and Mining Business
given every attention
BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits may be made and witHdrawn by mail.   Out of town accounts
receive every attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted
PLATINUM IN B.C.
By FRANK BAILEY, M. E.
[Continued from last week.]
g-    PRINCETON BRANCH B. L SMITH, Manager     J
*** *z**z**z**z**z**z**z*^*^**>^^ *l*
House CteitH
YOU WANT ROOMS PAPERED AND PAINTED ?
Call and Examine our New Stock of
Artistic wan papers, Burlaps, Etc
i
m
Close
s__
Inspection 1
q
Invited |
s
CHURCH'S   ALABASTINE     |
The only Permanent Wall Finish' I
The most complete line of Paints, Oils,
Brushes and  Painting Supplies in the 5imil= S
kameen.     Estimates Furnished.
MAX S. WILSON
SH_ass__i________^_______*i___.
The poor man's   Jf} F"^ ¥"""^ ¥~^   The rich man's
beverage _£ J*7   \3 1"^. _T*y f^T   tonic   _?&   ^
Nourishing,    Satisfying,     Strengthening
The NELSON BREWING Co., ™-
Families supplied.      Hotel orders promptly delivered.
Patronize home make-
Subscription for Star $2 a Year
it was exposed to the surface at low
water, but the deeper bars and gravel
benches of'the old Tulameen channel
have not as yet been prospected, and
should become very rich near bedrock.
It was on this property that the
writer met his friends, Mr. Charles W.
Thompspn and his wife, who were
camped in one of the old placer cabins
on the north bank of the Tulameen
river below the old Grasshopper
mountain trail, and it was near this
spot that Mr. Thompson showed me
his pannings; in the bottom of his
"gold pan" I could see several small
nuggets of gold and platinum, probably worth about 25 cents eacl\. I could
also see several garnets without the
aid of a mineral glass. However, when
I adjusted.my glass to the bottom of
the pan I could detect several brilliant
rubies, and by moving the pan in different shades of light, I had no difficulty in detecting two diamonds,
which distinctly radiated their char-
actistic lights from their facets. I
have not heard where one can obtain
gold, platinum, iron, garnet, rubies
and diamonds from any alluvial deposit in the same pan in any other district.
Mr. Thompson also showed me several other diamonds which he had extracted from the dunite   (serpentine)
rocks found in the immediate neighbourhood, arid he kindly gave me the.
following statement regarding his researches  for  diamonds  in  the  Tulameen:  "Last year, when I came into
the Tulameen with a view to diamond
prospecting,   I   expected   to   find   the
conditions   of  the  occurrence   of  the
precious   stone   paralleling   those   of
South Africa, but I cannot now hold
that opinion.   Here the matrix of the
diamond is without any doubt the dun-
io, which in the Tulameen is in portion of the peridotitic intrusion which
is roughly in the shape of a triangle
with its vertex just south of the summit   cf  Mount   Olivine,   and  its   base
running in  a  northeasterly  direction
for   about   two   miles,   beginning   at
Eagle  Cseek,  some .two  miles  above
-t_ confluence with the Tulameen. The
area  of  this  peridotitie   stock  would
comprise, say, some 150 precious stone
leases of ten acres each.
I "In South. Africa the diamonds are
found in a brecciated shale-^'the blue
ground'     of     Kimberly—which     was
forced up by volcanic action through
vents made in the carboniferous shale,
Known as the 'Karoo' shales of the district.     It   is   true   that   considerable
quantities   of  Kimberlite—i.   e.,   ecjo-
gite—containing much red garnet, and
of the serpentine order, exists in the
Kimberly mine, but it is a most signi-
flcient fact that Gardner-Williams, as
an experiment, crushed 20 tons of the
Kimberlite   and- failed   to   discover   a
single diamond therein.    Whence the
'blue' obtained its load of diamonds is
a question;  whereas here, in the Tulameen, we have the stones in their
matrix,  a  terribly  hard  and  difficult
matrix to deal with it is, too.    Last
season I collected about 12 pounds of
samples containing a large percentage
of chromite from the northern slope
of Olivine  Mount..   By means  of re:
peated fusion with bicarbonate of soda,   I  obtained  fourteen   minute   diamonds of good lustre.    Two of them,
were  large  enough  to  exhibit facets)
under a pocket lens.   Doubtless in the
process   I   destroyed   and   carbonised
many crystals.-   Up to the present I
believe that no gem approaching even
1-8 carat' in weight has been produced
from the Tulameen peridotite; but in
view of, what they have done in Arkansas,   with   a   comparatively   small
. rea of diamondiferous dunite (where
I understand, upwards of a thousand
diamonds, large enough to be classed
as   'close   goods'  by  the  trade,  have
been mined), we are justified in hoping that  on  our  larger  intrusion  of
peridotite we shall, when more work
has been done, find payable ground.
"This season I am devoting to th _
■possibilities of placer diamonds which
may exist in the Tulameen river,
where it drains the perotite stock and
also further down, as far as Slate
Creek Bridge, to which the diamonds
would undoubtedly be carried down
under   the   existing   condition   of   a
Picture
Dignan Bros.
Complete change of_program Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Good,
Clean Entertainment. Nothing to
offend.
If onr show pleases you,-tell others; If not, quietly tell us.
Cor. Bridge and Angela Street.
np|*/ Prices:
Children 15c. Adults 25c
NEW BARBER SHOP
MRS. GERSING
Located    Between   the   Court
House and Post Office
FJRST-CLASS   WORK   GUARANTEED
__>*_*t__.V_*«V_*__*__V**__*^
COALMONT HOTEL f
COAL-MONT, B.C. $
First-class accommodation %
for all guests '4
Hotel is new and well furnished.
Near station
Excellent cuisine and bar supplied
with the best
The Coalmont Hotel Co., Ltd. i
>><^>»i_j<^Vi^^;_><«;^;_><~j_j~><«.;^><M>j«^
NOTICE is given that Meh Joue has
purchased the laundry ovvned by Moy
and Hop Lee. He will continue the
business and do good first class washing,
as cheap, as the cheapest. Give me a
trial with your collars and fine linens.
Laundry, Tapton A v., near Bridge Streets
Yours truly,
MEH JONE.
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing1
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded, .
Careful attention given ro   al) -
Mail  Orders.
NOTICE.
Continued on page 5.
Argentine Fraction minenil claim:
situate in the Similkameen mining division of Yale district. Where located ,
Voigt mountain.
Take notice that I, George W. Aldous,
Free Miner's Certificate, No. 60892B. intend, sixty days from date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate of improvements for the purpose of
obtaining a crown grant of the above
claim. And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements,,
Dated, this 2ath_day_of March, 1913.
i^mM4MLm
_iy_-_fr.M'i1_Vf--ir_iT_
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAfe
May 9, 1913
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. H. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
subscription Rates.
British Empire. One Year,    -
$2.00
Foreign, One Year    -
I2.50
Payable in .Advance.
ADVERTISING RATES :
Land Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
8 cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 per in. per month
Special rates for long term ads.
Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Wednesday.
WATER POWER.
Favored with untold millions of
horsepower in the undeveloped
water resources of Princeton district the advantages for industrial
and manufacturing purposes are at
once apparent. For cheapness and
reliability ' white coal' has all other
power generators out-distanced in
comparison. Along the rivers and
innumerable creeks power sites are
available for hydro-electric purposes
from whence wire transmission
could be made to the various mining camps. Cheap and unfailing
power and light could thus be dispersed to the towns, placing them
in a position to offer inducements
to manufacturers to establish there.
From this inexhaustible power
source railroads could be operated
hundreds of miles, radiating east,
west, north and south from Princeton.
There are waterfalls in varying
heights to a hundred feet or taiore
on the rivers and streams. Then
the ordinary fall of the Similkameen and Tulameen rivers would
give a head of nearly 400 feet in
10 miles. At the headwaters of
these rivers and the tributary creeks
along their whole distance there are
hundreds of power sites, all waiting
for the electric harness that will
transform inanimate conditions into
vivifying force and reality.
Star submits a few facts and figures for comparative information
taken from the annual report of the
Hon. W. R. Ross, minister of the
department of lands in this province and who has jurisdiction over
its waters ; also acknowledgment is
made of information obtained from
a very useful publication ' Conservation,' published by the Dominion
government. The report of minister Ross is a comprehensive and
valuable publication and sets forth
the work which is being performed,
and which has already been accomplished in connection with the administration and use of the waters
of the Province. More particular
attention is given to the subject of
irrigation on account of the great
importance which attaches to the
use of water for agricultural purposes in British Columbia.    Specific
reference is made to some of the
more important water-power streams
in the Kootenays. For example—
a special investigation has been
made upon the itootenay river
which has a total tall of 300 feet in
a distance of 18 miles. As is known
the well constructed plants of the
West Kootenay Powett and Light
Company which supplies electric
energy to so many of the mining
plants in the 'Boundary country'
are siturted upon the Koothnay
river at Upper and Lower Bonning-
ton Falls.
Reference is also made to the
Pend d'Oreille river. It is one of
the more important water-power
streams of the northwestern states,
the larger part of its drainage area
of over 25000 square miles is in the
United States. In Canada the Pend
d'Oreille has a fall of 423 feet in 16
miles.
When one bears in mind the grant
recently made by the United States
Government to the Montana Water
and Power Company,   which  company proposes to supply  the   power
for the electricial operation   of 450
miles of line   of the   Chicago,   St.
Paul and Puget Sound r.ilway   between Harrowtown,  Montana   and
Avery, Idaho, at an estimated  annual saving to the Road  of $250,
000 per year, one is impressed with
the latent hydro-electric possibilities
of important rivers like  the  Kootenay and the Pend d'Orielle.
This report of the department of
lands contains the report of the
Minister, reports by the heads of
various branches, including the
Forest Water Branch, and Survey
Branches. It contains acts aud
regulations appertaining to various
natural resources, and descriptions
of how applications may be made
to secure various grants and permits permitting their use.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
It cannot be urged too strongly
the necessity for industries in a
town where raw resources abound
in its vicinity. No matter how
humble the industry and its beginning . encourage its establishment.
Tall chimnies, smokestacks, the
blacksmith's forge, the full dinner
pail and the street filled with toilers, these are all much better to
look upon than the vacant lot. Fill
up the gaping, empty lots along the
main street, for these indicate lack
of energy and business ability.
W^h an estimated influx of a
half million people into Canada this
year it will not be long at this rate
of increase in population until the
Dominion will say to 'ma' : 'Daughter am I in my mother's house, but
mistress in my own.' Mis_ Canada is like all daughters, longing to
housekeep without any of mother's
apron strings about her. This independence is born of a desire not
to be a burden to the old folks.
B.C. Portland cement Co.
united Empire Coal Mining CO.
These Companies will Shortly
Operate on Extensive Scale and
Establish    Permanent   Payroll.
****Z********Z**^**4****^^
EAST    PRINCETON
The manufacture of cement will begin in a few
weeks. A permanent payroll and a growing town
with electric light system, waterworks and cement
paved streets, will result from the industries now in
formative stages. According to the history of progress in this province investments made now in East
Princeton real estate must double and treble in a
short space of time. This is the experience in other
towns, why not the same in East Princeton ? Two
railways will serve transjbprtation. ||^
<«<M^4$.H$M^^>*>4$>^^
Information as to prices of Lots and
Terms given by C. R. Briggs, Gen*
Agent, 615, Hastings St. W. Vancouver, or apply D. G. McCurdy,
East Princeton.
May 9, 1913
THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
CALL AND SEE OUR NEW
Ladles
Blouses
f>ti***B f*f*f
Prints and
Ginghams
WE HAVE A LINE
AT SPECIAL PRICES
THOMAS 1110$.
Plumbing ana Heating, Sheet Metal
work, Tinsmllhing
Shop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St., in 'Murdock's blacksmith shop'
■  I    T. DIGNANJf s ■'.!
PRACTICAL WORKMAN—PROPRIETOR
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
WATER NOTICE.
For a licence to take and use water.
Notice is hereby given that I, Thomas
Rabbitt of Tulameen Valley, will apply
for a licence to take and use 250 acre feet
per annum of water out of a small Creek,
which flows in a southerly direction
through Lots 391 and 151 and empties into
Tulameen River on Lot 151. The water
will be diverted at Lot 391 and will be
used for irrigation purposes on the land
described as Lots 151 and 101, Yale Division of Yale Distrrct.
This notice wbs posted on the ground
on the 21st day of April, 1913. The application will be filed in the oflice of the
Water Recorder at Ashcroft.
Objections may be filed with the said.
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller
of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B. C.
THOMAS RABBITT
Applicant.
WATER NOTICE.
PRINCBTON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
\Regular meetings. 8 p
 '       m., Thursdays,
.Sojourning brethren welcome.     Hall situate in
Howse Bldgs cor. Bridge St. and Vermilion Ave.
C. Willarson. d. G. McCurdy,
Noble Grand Secretary.
For a licence to take and use water.
Notice is hereby given that I Thomas
Rabbitt of Tulameen Vallev will apply
for a licence to take and use 250 acre feet
per annum of water out of a small creek,
which flows in a southerly direction
through Lot 152 and empties into Tulameen River near Lot 152' The water
will be diverted at Lot 152 and will be
used for irrigation purposes on the landl
described as Lot 152, Yale Division ofjj
Yale District.
This notice was pasted on the ground"
on the 21st day of April, 1913. The application will be filed in the office of the
Water Recorder at Ashcroft.
Objections may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller
of Water Rights, Parliament Bnildings,
Victoria, B. C.
THOMAS RABBITT
Applicant.
VIENNA BOARDING HOUSE.
Rooms and firstclass board by the day,
week or month. Street in rear of court
house. Miss Schotzko.
PLATINUM IN B.C.
From   Page 3.
********************************j****j'*****?********************************
.**.**.**.********„****•.**************.********.*****************************
heavy river grade, rapid current, and
excessively hard bedrock. The bar,
half a mile above the bridge and at
the lower end of the gorge through
which the river flows, proved, in. former days, excessively rich in gold and
platinum, and as the diamond with its
specific gravity of 3.55, hangs behind
with the black sand if it gets the
chance, I consider that portion of the
Tulameen river worthy of being
thoroughly prospected. About forty or
fifty men in one season, prospecting
with- screens and gravitating sieves,
would demonstrate whether we have a
payable placer diamond field, or
whether the occurrence of the stones
is merely of geological interest.
"Last week I was prospecting at the
confluence of Eagle Creek and the Tulameen. In a crevice there I found
gravel which filled twelve pans, yielding three very small diamonds, 48
cents gold, 1-4 grain platinum, sundry
garnets, and a few red crystals, too
small to identify, but which were
probably rubies. The water in the
river was then too high for favourable
'fossicking' in the crevices.
"In prospecting for diamonds sufficiently large to be cut into gems one
should use a grayitating sieve. This
is 18 ins. in diameter, the side 3 ins.
high, the wire gauge No. 20 .003 ins.,
and the mesh No. 8. Two paifs of parallel steel wires (the pairs set at right
angles to each other) partially support the wirecloth, so that in the middle of the sieve there is a place 7 ins.
square, which, under the weight of the
load of washgravel, sags to a slight
extent. The sieve is nearly filled with
the diamondiferous gravel, screemed
to, say, 1-4 in., and is then immersed
in a tub of water and pulsated. This
sends all' the diamonds through the
lighter gravel to the bottom of the
sieve, and they at once work into the
middle of the 7 in. 'sag.' About a
dozen shakes or pulsations suffice.
The sieve is then thrown, inverted, on
to the sorting heap and lifted off. The
diamonds will then be found on the
top, and in the very centre of the
'throw.' The method is sure and expeditious. Any miner can learn to
operate the sieve and to 'gravitate' infallibly in an hour. However, this
method will not save minute diamonds
or diamond dust, so for prospecting on
the Tulameen I recommend a modification of the- gpldrocker, the perforations in the hopperiron being made
small, and the usual blanket covered
ladder replaced by finely corrugated
glass, or iron, plates covered with a
mixture of lard and tallow. When the
plates are set at the proper grade all
the diamonds will be caught on the
grease while most of the black sand,
quartz sand, &c, will be carried off by
the flow of water.
"In the trade diamonds are classified as follows: Bluewhite, first Cape,
second Cape, 1st bye, 2nd bye, off
colour, light yellow, yellow (the foregoing are called 'close goods'): then
come: Spotted, cleavage, light brown
cleavage, flats, maccles (trimmed),
rubbish, and boart. The international
carat is 205 milligrams—3.164 grains
—and the value of an average 1 carat
stone of 'close goods' is about $10.00.
'Dust' is worth about $92.00 per oz.
troy, say, 30c. per carat."
Both Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are
delightful people to meet, and I sincerely hope that.their hopes of finding
stones of a commercial value may be
fulfilled.
In a letter to the Similkameen Star
last year Mr. Camsell is quoted as saying that 'the sample of chromite from
which the diamonds were obtained also yielded platinum and gold. This is
the first time I have seen platinum in
the solid rock. . . . Practically all the diamonds obtained are clear
and white, apparently excellent gem
stones, if we can only find them big
enough, and there is no reason why
we should not." This further note
by Mr. Camsell suggests an added
value for platinum-bearing peridotites
of the section: "In the course of the
mapping and examination of the body
of peridotite, which extends from
Olivine mountain across the Tulameen
valley to Grasshopper mountain,
masses of chromite were observed in
several places in the peridotite. Hand
specimens of this chromite imbedded
North West Home _t
Sloan company
CAPITAL       -      -      $100,000.00
Head Off lee, Winnipeg, Man.
LOANS FROM $500 to $10,000 TO
BUY OR BUILD A HOME
Do you own a  home?    If no , consider our plan and STOP RENT
Money   Loaned   at    5  p.c.   yearly
Interest.     Write or consult
J. F. WADDELL, Agent, Princeton, B.C.
The Place to Meet
The Man You Know
AT
Continued on page 6.
LEN HUSTON'S
agar & News Stand
TOBACCOS, CIGARS   PIPES
Agent for Nelson Club and Kusko-
nook Cigars, made by
NELSON CLUB CIGAR CO.
Ice Cream, Sodas, Confectionery
IRWIN BLOCK
J. L. HUSTON,   -    =    Prop.  ,.
D. Q. McCURDY
REAL ESTATE
Fire   and   Life   Insurance
———  Specialty	
EAST PRINCETON LOTS
EAST  PRINCETON
B.C.
Similkameen Hotel
SUMMERS fi WARDLE
PROPRIETORS
Large and New building, well Furnished aud Plastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample  Rooms, spacious, in hotel.
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Painceton, B.C.
DOMINION HOTEL
D. McRAE, Proprietor
TULAMEEN,  B.C.
LIVERY IN CONNECTION
Miners',   Prospectors'   and Travelers' Home
RATES : $i to $2.50 per Day
THE GATEWAY TO THE
Tulameen Gold and Platinum Mines.
WOOD FOR SALE.
Dry or green wood  in  cord or carload
lots.   Orders left at Len Huston's.
PERKINS & ALLISON.
 May g, 1913
*1
Why You SI
A Gurney - Oxford Range     $!__>
Because the Gurney Economizer saves 1 ton
of coal  in every 6 burned in other ranges.
Because the Economizer gives you absolute
control of your stove and the fuel consumption.
Because the range is air tight and consequently does not.waste the heat.
Because its new Special Grate is another
fuel saver, and the stove is shaken with one
operation.
Because its Divided Flue makes every hole
a cooking hole.
Because of its sanitary artistic design.
Because of its Broiler equipment.
Because of its polished top which requires
no stove polish.
Because of its roomy over-size oven which
results in perfect baking of any article of food.
The Gurney-Oxford range will do everything
that a stove is intended tq do — and infinitely
more in that it has four scientific fuel-and-labor-
saving devices that are exclusive — the Economizer, the Divided Flue, the Special Grate, and     _„
-Z      .. «___*)
the  Broiler. ^ff
A   Gurney-Oxford   will  prove of inestimable     ^^
worth in your kitchen.    It will save your time,      .Hi
it will   never  aggravate    your   temper,   it   will
end your trials.
FOR SALE BY
The A. E. HOWSE CO., L'D,
PRINCETON, B. C.
$S£^
SO   YEARS*
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
Invention is probably patentable. Co_.m__.ica-
Mons strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patent"
sent free. Oldest agency for securing? patents.
Patent, taken through Munn & Co. receive
Special noiice. without charge, in the
s
A handsomely illustrated weekly. I.argest cir.
dilation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 t
year; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers.
IM&Co.3616™^ New York
Branch Office. 626 if St., Washington. D. C
Certificate of Improvements.
Copper King Mineral claim, situate
in the Similkameen mining division of
Yale distiicf Where located: On Kennedy mountain.
Take notice that Charles Bonnevier
for himself and agent for Gustaf Pouwels
F.M.C. No. 53823B, Free Miner's Certificate No 53824B, intend sixty davs from
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Re
corder for a Certificate of Improvements,
for the purpose of obtaining a Crown
Grant ofthe above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of snch Certificate of
Improve-ments.
Dated this 7th day of March, 1913.
PLATINUM IN B.C.
From   Page 5<
in serpentinised peridotite were
brought in and handed to Mr. A. A.
Johnston, mineralogist to the survey,
to determine the nature of the chromite. In the course of his analysis
Mr. Johnston obtained a residual product from fusion, which proved, on
exanmination, to be diamonds, yielding positive reactions in all the tests
for that mineral. Further tests were
made in New York by Dr. G. F. Kunz.
who confirmed the discovery. So far
as our knowledge of the occurrence
yet goes, the diamonds are. associated
with the chromite, and are not found
in other parts of the rock mass, so
that their distribution depends on
that of the chromite. The chromite
itself does not occur here in large
bodies, and its distribution is very
erratic." The diamonds obtained
from the sample analysed are small,
though their quality is excellent.
They have proved very difficult to extract from the rock without being
broken, and even after extraction they
often break up in the course of a few
hours or days into smaller fragments.
The matrix for the diamond is a peridotite of the variety dunite. It occurs as an intrusive igneous stock
about three miles long and a mile
wide, bordered on all sides by pyroxenite, into which the peridotie passes
by gradual change in composition.
The two rocks are of the same age,
and have been thrust through rocks
of apparently Triassic age, consisting
of volcanic minerals and a few thin
beds of a'rgillite and limestones.
Whilst the present development and
prospecting on the Tulameen river
and its tributaries, by placer miners,
Chinamen, and companies, is nothing
to speak about, the former operators
made wages by the goldpan, rocker,
and sluiceboxes. I doubt if the latter
have so far made expenses, but if
these companies interested were to
extend their operations in a businesslike manner and handle the gravels
and benches on the Tulameen on a
fairly big scale with modern appliances, they J would undoubtedly get
very good returns for their expenditure. Small portions of the Tulameen gravel beds could be profitably
worked by suitable dredgers, but the
majority of the auriferous benches
and terraces would have to be worked
by steam shovels and hydraulicing,
as there is ample water power going
to waste from the larger creeks that
flow into the Tulameen\ river in this
platinum belt.
The present best paying methods
used by individuals is 'fossicking' at
low water, and in the fall of the year
successful 'fossicking' can be done on
a commercial scale.
A number of Vancouver people are
now interested in these alluvial deposits of the Tulameen^ and the following companies have been organised: The British Columbia Platinum
Company. This is the pioneer company in this field, and was organised
by Mr. C. F. Law, with ,a capitalisation of $200,000 in $1.00 shares, with
the following directors: William
Henderson (president), Gilbert Blair,
R. P. McLennan, Charles F. Law, and
D. von Cramer, all of Vancouver. They
have several good bench leases. More
recent companies are: The Platinum
Goldfields, Limited, and the Tulameen
Gold & Platinum, Limited, both of
Vancouver, B. C. The Roany Hydraulic Syndicate own several good
leases below Granite creek, and the
Coalmont Syndicate own several good
leases on Granite creek, and many
individuals own halfmile leases on the
Tulameen and its tributaries. Messrs.
Johnson, Matthey & Co., of Hatton
Garden, had their expert, Mr. A. B.
Coussmaker, from Siberia, for several
months last summer makin? a survey
of the extensive gravel benches of the
Tulameen and examining their probable platinum and gold contents.
[concluded ]
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
STANDS OUT
prominently on every house painted
with
Maple Leaf Paint    |
COVERS most surface and does
it well.
SPREADS easily and evenly
WEARS the longest time.
PROTECTS  against every kind
of weather.
PRESERVES best from decay.
Looks Best all the Time
Ask your dealer for Maple Leaf
Paints and Varnishes, the brand
that gives best service. Write and
have our Decorative Aid' Dept. at
Toronto, send you color schemes for
painting. 13
__l^^^_5irS!_Sfi!t_^3__fufi_^
For Sale by Max Wilsoi
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations.
COAL mining rights ofthe Dominion, in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Yukon
Territory, the North-west Territories and in a
portion ofthe Province of British Columbia, may
be leased for a term of twenty-one years at an'
annual rental of $i. an acre. 'Not more than
2,56o acres will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by the
applitcant in person to the Agent or Sub-Agent
ofthe district in which the rights applied for
are sltuated.
In surveyed territory the land must be described by sections, or legal sub-division of
sections,and in unsurveyed territory the tiact
applied for shall be staked out by the applicant
himself.
Kach application must be accompanied by .?
fee of $5. which wtll be refuuded if the rights
applied for are not available, but not otherwise.
A royalty shall be paid on the merchantabfe
output of the mine at the rate of five per cent per
ton.
The person operating the mint shall furnish
the Agent with sworn rerurns accounting for
the full quanity of merchantabl e coal mined
and piy the royalty thereon. If the coal
mining rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least once a
year.
The lease will include the coal mining rights
onlv, but the lease may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may
be considered necessary for the working of the
mine at the rate of $10.00 an acre.
For full information application should be
made to.the Secrstary of the Department of
tne Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-
Agent of Dominion Lands,
W. W. CORY
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication of this ad-
vertisment will not be paid fo*-
NOTICE is hereby given that meetings of the
Provincial Labor Commission willbe held at the
following places:—
Penticton—Tuesday, May 6th, lo a.m.
Hedley—Wednesday, May 7th, 2 p.m.
Princeton— Thursday, May 8th, 8 p.m.
Greenwood—Saturday, May 10th, 2 p,m.
Phoenix—Tuesday, May 13th, 2 p.m.
Grand Froks—Thursday, May 15th, 8 p»m.
Other meetings will be announced later.
The Commission will haar evidence on all matters affecting labor conditions in the   Province.
All persons interested are invited to be present.
H. G. PARSON,
Chairman.,
F. R. McNamara,
Secretary. mh20 \
May 9, 1913
THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
Cheap
Footwear
TJ is rather an expensive economy, for as a rule, you not only suffer in
comfort, bnt in appearance as well.
% Wearing qualities also are inferior to the better shoe and you seldom
feel that you have had just returns for the original cost.
IT IP1VICTUS shoes are not cheap shoes. They are made from selected leathers, by skilled workmen, on foot-lorm lasts. Their style is
distinctive and their comfort so perfect that your feet are forgotten.
^f They give the utmost of wear and are worth many times their cost
in the satisfaction you receive.
§ A better shoe man never wore.
§ The best good shoe, Invictus*.
The A. E. HOWSE Co. Limited,
-*    4**B**4>4P***4**4**4***Sb4*4>Sb4*^bA4?BB*B4*b4?B4?bA
__
KING   &   GIBSON
DEALERS IN
*
m
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
? ESTIMATES   FURNISHED  TO   BUILDERS
*\* OFFICE: Bridge Street, Near Bank Commerce
I PRINCETON, B.C.
F. P. COOK
General Merchan!
Miners' Ouiiiller
Princeton, Granite Creek,
Coalmont
OLDEST ESTABLISHED
NOTICE.
Yale land district, district of Yale.
Take notice that Thomas Henry Brown
of Rossland, B.C., occupation, banker,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 281, thence south 40
chains, east 40 chains, north 40 chains,
west 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres.
THOMAS HENRY BROWN,
H. C. A. Cornish, agent.
February 12, 1913.
*ww-
Gasoline
Benzine or
Carnations
Which do you prefer ?
Nice to have people sniffing
gasoline or benzine when you
come near them.
Gasoline and benzine will
clean soiled clothing, gloves,
etc., but it will also explode
and is most inflammable.
NYAI/S KLE-NEM will do
all that Gasoline or Benzine
will do in the way of cleaning
but it will neither burn nor
explode.
It also leaves a dainty odor
of carnations.
Anyone who ever used Kle-Nem
will never go back to the old fashioned way.
Kle Neon is only a quarter a
bottle.
Princeton Drug and Book Store
GEO. Q. LYALL, Manager
B.C. HORSE.
Regimental order No. 3, by Lieut-
Colonel C. L. Flick, commanding 31st
regiment B. C. Horse. Headquarters,
Merritt, B. C, April 25, 1913:
. Appointments, promotions and retirements: To be adjutant: Lieut. R.
E. Paget, vice Forester transferred to
corps reserve.
Corps Reserve: Capt. H. G. Forster
is hereby transferred to corps reserve,
March 10, 1913.   Capt. R. Campbell is
hereby transferred to corps reserve.
CHARLES FLICK, Lieut. Colonel.
Rev. T. A. Osborne will shortly be
gazetted to a commission. A copy of
the list of necessaries for camp is
posted in the government office
Princeton.
LAY BEADING.
Editor Star—Sir : It is not generally
understood that in the Church of England there is always a welcome to suitable lay people to assist in services and
preaching. This does^*vffay with the
prejudice tnat, "thp^arson has everything his own wsefl" It also opens up
avenues of usefulness for many persons
who are capable. I append a copy of
the Rigiinp'g ijppngp, i_t. iy conferred up
on n"rJ)flr Tif^'hy ^'litli.P- tr> beln in
this parish.
Yours truly,
W. HERBERT MAYERS.
LAY READER'S LICENSE
Adam, by divine permission, Bishop of
New Westminster to our well beloved
( Name of Reader) greeting: We do, by
these presents grant unto you, of. whose
faithfulness and competent knowledge
we are well assured, our license to execute the office and perform the duties of
a lay reader, under the guidance and
direction of the incumbent of Princeton
iu our diocese and jurisdicton. And we
do hereby notify and declare that this
our enmm'ssion shall remain valid, and
have full force and authority until it be
revoked by us, or our successors. Aud
so we commend you to Almighty God,
whose blessing and favor we humbly pray
may rest npon you and your work.
A. W., New Westminster.
BELIGIOUS SEBVICES.
Christian  Science lesson-sermon subject  next   Sunday:    'Adam   and   fallen
man.,   When men are cast down,  then
thou shalt say, There is  lifting  up.   Job (
22 : 29.
Anglican services will be held on Sunday at ir a m. and 7:30 p m.
***************************************************************************.
■VVVVVVVWrVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV** I
I   ...Hotel..
otter F___f
I
r
I
!
$
4*^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^*^**^**^**^**^**
TULAMEEN, B.C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Center
MPS.E. J. Henderson
PRORIETOR
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIKTOkS
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOriS, ETC.
Commercials Sample _* Rocm
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining-Men
Hotel Princeton
P. SWANSON, Prop.
Now completed  on site of the old
Great  Northern.    Only  brick
hotel in Similkameen.    A
first class house.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
PRINCETON,
B.C.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that an Application will be made on behalf of the
Kettle Valley Railway Company and the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company to
the Board of Railway Commissioners for
Canada on the ninth day of June nineteen
hundred and thirteen, or so soon thereafter as the Application can be heard for
a recommendation to the Governor iu
Council for the sanction of a lease from
the former Company to the latter Company of the lines of railway of the former Company.
This Notice is given pursuant to the
provisions of Sections 361 ofthe Railway
Act.
Dated at Montreal this 30th. day of
April, 1913.
E. W. BEATTY
Solicitor for said Companies.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   •    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COI/UMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
Boost for industries.
The Prineeton
Livery g Fe
stables
IN. HUSTON, Prop'r
General Livery business carried on
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
"MODEL"
LIVERY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs—Good   Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
All kinds of Coffins and Caskets on hand
Vermilion Av. op. Similkmeen Hotel
—■— —^
 8
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
May 9» 19J3
Princeton C
land €0.
Five Reasons, For You To Invest In Princeton
Because Princeton is the
Center of a Coal7 Ore and
Placer Mining District.
«_£_£
Because There are Splendid
Opportunities for Manufact=
uring Industries.
Because the Surrounding Country is Adapted For Cattle, Horse,
and Sheep Raising. Farm, Garden and Poultry Products Find a
Ready Market at High Prices, at Princeton. Climate and Water are
Excellent. • School and Church Facilities are the Best in the Similka=
meen Valley.
Unlimited Water Power,
Rivers and Creeks Afford
Millions ot Horse Power,
Now Running Waste.
Two Railroads Building to
Coast. Great Transprovincial
Trunk road-Rivers and Roads
converge here.
M
f
Write or Consult, £__ Waterman, Resident Mgr.
INCETON  COAL & LAND ! £0.
>». — ___.
I
I
^7
■
__^

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