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Similkameen Star 1911-10-04

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Untouched mineral wealth awaits the investor.
No one can be noble without being virtuous.
Illimitable power, white and black coal, for manufacturing purposes in Princeton district—B.C. Cement works soon to manufacture brick
and cement—Princeton Coal and Land Co. enlarging coal producing plant with latest machinery—Voigt camp sold for $2,000,000.
Vol. XII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4. 1911.
No. 40.
MINES AND MINING
Strike of  Coal Miners About
to End—Copper Mountain
Active Again.
Placers in this District Known to be
Rich—Coal Experts Examine
the Field.
Latest reports from the Crow's Nest
coal district are to the effect that the
mines will be re-opene I in the coarse of a
month. It is stated that a mrjority of the
miners are anxious to go to work.
Ed. Burr of Hedley was in town last
Wednesday on mj_rfng/busiuess. He is
interested in sp*_e^_iineral properties on
Copper moratafn.
J. E McCauley is making good on the
Reco and now has a strike which is in all
probability the lead that ouLcropped with
such excellent ore and which he has been
endeavoring to tap for two or three years
at depth. His indomitable courage and
pe: severance seem at last to have been
crowned with the success which they so
well merit. Mr. McCauley has spent a
big sum . f money in developing the Reco
and no one would deny him the reward
that is his.
Green Bros., of St. Paul, Minn., were
recently here making a general investigation of coal ground in the vicinity of
Ashnola. They were shown various properties by W. C. McLean.
J. Campbell, M.E., and chief of Ihe
Granby mines in the Boundary, arrived
last Thursday on a professional visit to
the United Empire on Onemile.
Geo. Aldous and Neils Larsen returned
last week from their high grade quartz
locations ou the Roche river, opposite
Powell & Bonniver's mine on the west
side of the river. Gold assays run high
in value and a well-defined ledge, 26 feet
wide, is exposed They will put a gang
of seven or eight men at work.
The Western Fuel Co. of Nanaimo has
concluded an/agreement with its coal
miners, whereby twp'^ears of industrial
peace dre/assujerd../The agreement is
based orr_he/<5_eJ_st terminated afterax
years of service. . j^a
The B.C. Copper Co.'s smelter treated
11,952 tons of ore last week.
Copper is quoted in New York at $12.25
to $12 35 ; silver, 53.
The Washington Steel & Iron Co. propose putting in a smelter to handle the
magnetic ores at Blewett; Washington.
The Princeton C_ial/& Land Co. produced 11,868 tona_3f^oal last year.
An extensive deposit of radium ore has
been discovered in South Australia. It
is associated  with carnotite,  an  ore of
uranium, and tobernite, a copper phosphate.
The total production of coal in Illinois
in 191 o amounts to 45,900,246 short tons,
valued at $52,495,897, as against 50,904,-
990 short tons in 1909, valued at $53,405,-
897. 	
THE LURE OF GOLD.
W. C Fry, who is conducting the pros
pecting for gold and platinum at the
forks of the rivers here, was in this coun.
try thirty years ago, but was caught in
the gold stampede into Cariboo and landed in Quesnelle with a plug of tobacco
and 25 cents in sniaU^Hange. He went
to work on the b*r_5_nd in a week or two
cleaned up $700. Afterwards he went to
Barkerville and cleaned up the snug
sum of $90,000 on Lj^ntning creek in
about three months/He knows all about
gold ill its coarse./nugget and scale con
ditions and ha^Aieen hunting it so long
'hat he may belaid to fairly smell it and
trace it to its haunts. He knows there is
gold and platinum here, it is largely a
question of how to save it.
EAST PRINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, Oct. 3—J. W. Kansky
is building a store for Mrs. R. Turner, of
Rossland, B.C.
The B C. Portland Cement Co has contracted with the United Empire Coal Co.
for all the coal which the}' will use. From
tests made the coal found on Onemile
creek is high in combustible volotite
matter, which makes it most suitable for
calcining cement rock.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Briggs, of Spokane,
Wash , spent a few days in town last week.
Grading between the main line and the
river will be c unpleted the latter part of
this week, and the switch will be laid to
the bridge at once for unloading bridge
material, for which the fi st car of iron,
from St. Paul, will arrive this week. The
timber for piling and false work is now
on the ground and J. McDonald, contractor, will have a force of men at work next
week. The pile-driver and carrier are
already in Princeton, and the bridge
should be completed about the middle of
November. The grading on the spur will
be ready for the rails before the end of
October.
C. R. Briggs, secretary-treasurer of the
B.C. Portland Cement Co., is in town for
a*few days.
W.J. Budd, manager of B.C. Portland
Cement Co., arrived in town today.
The Canadian Pacific railway has now
been in operation 25 years, during which
time its earnings have increased from
$10,000,000 to $104,000,000 and its mileage from 4,651 to 15,500. From two
steamers on the great lakes the com
pany's fleet has grown to 71 ships, of
which 16 sail the Atlantic, 4 Pacific, 5
Great Lakes, 22 in B.C. coast service and
22 on the B.C. lakes.
STRUCK COAL SEAM
Columbia  Coal  &  Coke  Co.
Into Big Vein Sooner
than Expected.
Coalmont Feeling the Impulse from
Present   Possibilities   and
Future Development.
Coalmont. Sept. 30 —The barbers have
made a rush to   Coalmont,  tq_p three
chair shops having been opened this week
while a two-chair shop is under construe-
tlon- A,c*?
The Coalmon? Hotel Co. are contemplating an addition of thirty rooms.
The Bank of Commerce has purchased
a double corner cjtj/Main Street.
Budd, Pringle and Shae's large livery
barn is almost complete, and covers four
lots on Front street.
F. Pr-Cbok, of Granite Creek, is erecting a warehouse on Main street.
' Mr. Ruddy, of Oro.ville, is erecting a
restaurant, J. T. RWti is building a store
and Mr. Burnhanr; of Tacoma, is building
a lodging house.
A. D. Worgen, of Hedley, is building a
real estate office.
A contract for the grading of side tracks
for the Columbia Coal & Coke Co. has
been let.
A very gratifying end to the big tunnel
driven by the Columbia Coal & Coke Co.
to tap their coal deposit came last Friday
when the night shift finished. The tunnel is in about 1,500 feet and it was expected another 300 feet might be required
before the coal would be struck. Manager
Fraset is delighted with the prospect now
afforded of producing coal for shipment
as soon ?s steel reaches Coalmont on the
V., V. & E. This coal possesses high
coking qualities and the company intend
to instal 200 coke ovens as soon as pos
sible. The good prospects of this company as a tonnage producer and large
employer of labor is beyond question.
There are fifteen feet of coal in the face of
the tunnel from which the development
of thymine will begin.
THE INTERPROVINCIAL ROAD.
F. W. Glover, C.E.. is making good
headway ou the interprovincial trunk
road and has obtained good grades and
easy curvatures from Hope to the Similkameen river canyoni. He expects to find
a route close to the river as far as Princeton, crossing Whipsaw, Ninemile and
Friday creeks at or near their mouths.
He has made a reconnaissance of the route
between Princeton and Ashnola, and expects to finish in November. Branch
roads will, no doubt, be required along
the route.    Mr. Glover Is an engineer
with experience in railway construction,
which eminently fits him for the work in
hand.
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
C. R. Briggs, secretary for the B.C.
Cement Co., arrived last Friday from
Vancouver. Progress all along the building line in connection with big works is
reported. He was accompanied by his
father and mother who are on a pleasure
trip and quite naturally are interested in
the scene of their son's heavy investments
and labors.
Thanksgiving Day on Monday, Oct. 30.
Now the troubles of Turkey begin or have
begun in a war cloud.
Card of Thanks.—Mr. and Mrs. G.
Murphy sincerely thank the many friends
for kindnesses in word and deed following their recent bereavement.
The new Anglican church to be erected
on Billiter avenue, the contract for which
has been let J. W. Kansky, is expected to
be ready for worship about the middle of
November.
Mrs. Baird of Phoenix is visiting her
parents, Mr. & Mrs. Hagetman, Onemile.
For Exchange.—Five pieces of resident
property in Greenwood, B.C., that brings
owner approximately $1,000 per year, for
improved property or ranch in the
Similkameen district. Address A. L.
White, Greenwood, B.C.
John Gulliford is an expert potato
grower, judging by the fine spuds _e produces on his land, -^pWg^fSbtatoes are firm
as rocks, cleansktu_ed, full and pl_m£,
and gave an^euormous yield. .* ■
Two burglaries and two runaways are
among the events of a week's record for
Princeton. The yeggmen in one case
were evidently hungry and broke into
Semerad's restaurant; in the other they
took all the locks off but one in a vacant
house owned by Dr. Whillans. In the
runaways Jack McLaughlin received a
scalpwound and Miss Semerad suffered a
sprained arm.
Hugh Huuter, government agent and
mining recorder, was elected school
trustee to fill the vacancy caused by E. B.
Hall removing.
For Sale.—Garden Plot of 4 or 5 acres,
six miles from Princeton, on Similkameen
river. Price $300. Terms cash.—Apply
to Wong Sing.
FATAL ACCIDENT.
Last week little Glen Murphy, while
driving on a load of saw logs which his
father was hauling to the Similkameen
Lumber Co.'s sawmill, and which upset,
met very sudden/ death. Mr. Murphy'
escaped with xary severe contusions, but
the little boy was oaught by the cruel
logs and his innocent life entered into
eternal rest. The funeral service was
conducted by Rev. Mr. Osborne on Friday,' a large number attending in sympathy with bereaved ones.
 r
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
October 4, 1911.
A COMPLAINT.
Editor Star,—Sir: There is a man or
men in Princeton who has during the
past week offended against good behaviour, tolerance of perfectly legitimate
schemes and causes in a way which certainly seems mean, small-minded and
spiteful. A telephone post opposity your
office, at the turn of the street, affords'a
very useful and convenient medium for
the posting of notices relating to local
events. The aforesaid person or persons
has, however, in manner above described,
torn them down one after the other. A
second one was affixed about 12.30 noon,
but, at 1 p.m., in broad daylight, it had
been torn up. A third notice met a simi 1
lar fate, the fragments of paper lying y
arouud to bear witness to what I here'
write.
Such conduct surely must meet with
the most useful of all punishments—the
scorn and contempt of all right-minded
people.   Yours, etc.,
Princeton, Oct. 2. ' Fair Pi,_y.'
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Groceries Fresh Provisions
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF
Fruits aid vegetables
Removed to Irwin Mock Mm
Tr\T lie AND IF YOU ARE SATISFIED TELL OTHERS,
IIJ   US IF NOT, TELL US.
^^^_-_^*%^«V
O. H. CARLE,   The Grocer,   Princeton.
Great Northern
—Hotel —
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
*<*****%*<*>***
POTATO EXHIBITION.
Any potato growers in Princeton dis
trict who have potatoes worthy of exhib
tion  are invited  to
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communicate   with' 4**
Asahel  Smith,  Ladner,  B.C.,  who   has 1 4**,
been appointed by the provincial govern-1  Z
ment to arrange for tbe preparation and     X
collection of the exhibit.   The exhibition 1   **
is to be held in New York, November 12,1 *^b*
by  the  American   Land  and   Irrigation |
Exposition.     A prize  of $1,000  will  be
given by the Exposition for the best col
lection.    The   potatoes  must  be  chosen
with  reference  to  smoothness  of   skin,
uniformity of size and flushness of eye,
and free from all blemish, and must be
named.     Fine potatoes are grown here
and there is no reason  why  Uiat $1,000
prize should Jnol come  to some  of our
farmers
Icol .stream Estate Nurseries!
VERNON, B.C;:^fc:     **
Have a very fine assortment ot
FRUIT TREES
ORNAMENTAL AND SHADE TREES
AND SHRUBS i
1 Budded Stock a Specialty §
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All Trees offered for Sale are grown in Our Own
Nurseries on the Coldstream- Estate
General Agent, V. D. CURRY, Vernon, B.C.
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CHUECH ENTEKTAINMENT.
The entertainment given last night in
the 1.0 O.F. hall for the purpose of aid
ing  the   building   fund  of tlie Anglican
chu-ch was well attended and proved a
financial success, the total proceeds being
about $85   The program included a piano
solo by Miss Irwin, song by Mrs  Waterman, reading by  Mr. Stevens,  Highland
dance by Annie Cunningham to music on
the bagpipes by W. Forsyth, piano solo
by   Miss   Holmes,   comic    song   by   P.
Wright, songs by J. Wilson, song by Mits
E. Lyall and address by  the  chairman,
Rev. J. Williams.     The  plaudits of the
audience were generous and spontaneous 1
and all the numbers gave genuine enter- '
tainment and pleasure.    Tbe chairman's
address, largely reminiscent of his experiences  on  the   frontier,   was  punctuated
with frequent applause, in some instances
bordering   on   hilarious   demo striti n.
The rev. gentleman never lost his equipoise when greeted with vociferous cheers
and s'aruptng, in fact his composure was
in geometrical line diametric illy proportionate with the prolixity  of young parvenus who  wanted to drown the voice of
the   speaker.      To   be   appreciated   the
speech should be printed in  full.     Mr.
Soutter's gramaphone added zeal to the
occasion which was concluded with an impromptu d.anee and the national anthem
Congratulations from Walla Walla.
' I am pleased to note a better appear-
an :e and bet er matter in the Sar I was
with the Star when it was born, as one of
its readers. I hope it will soon be a great
daily. I'__ink Princeton will soon grow
into a great city. I kuoW2£f no other spot
that has the great possibilities surrounding it—sufficient to make it the Pittsburg
of the northwest. I feel a grtat interest
in Princeton and its good people, and bid
you God speed in your newspaper interest. ' ShU
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock  and   Jewelry repairing,
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given  or money
refunded.
Careful attention given  co   all
Mail   Orders.
WATER NOTICE.
W. C Fry, Limited, of Princeton, B.
C , gives notice that it intends on the
2nd day of October next, at eleven
o'clock in the forenoon, to apply to the
Water Commissioner at his office at
Fairview, B. C. for a'license to take and
use 275 cubic feet of water per second
from the Similkameen river.   ,
The water will be used on Lot 1822 for
power purposes.
W. C. FRY, Limited.
Dated this 18th day of August 1911.
Princeton, B. c.
Siniilkameen Hotel
J. IN. NELSON, Proprietor"
Large and New buildin.. , well Furnished and  Plastered; Comfortable ; Quietude. .
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
"MODEL"
LIVERY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs— Good   Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
COUNTY  COURT, YALE.
A sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House Princeton, Friday, 13th
day of October, 1911, at the hour of 11 o'clock iu
the forenoon. By Command
HUGH HUNTER.
Registrar County Court.
PERCY W. GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. C.B.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
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3,000
:.NEW.:
Views of Princeton
JUST RECEIVED
16 New Subjects
6P*       _3*       _3*
3 for 25c.
.fir*'    B^m**    e<5*
PRINCETON
I Drag and
f Bookstore
GEO. G. ______,, Manager.
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The Princeton II
Livery "Feed
stables f
IN. HUSTON, Prop'.
BOARD OF TRADE, PRINCETON, B. C.    Meets first Monday in
each month.
General Livery business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in-all its branches. Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
Real Estate, Finance, Mines
Real Estate is dull but prospects are bright.
Good time to buy.
FOR SALE
Three mineral claims showing gold and platinum, $25,000.
Ranch l_s miles west of Princeton, 192 acres,
$3,000.
Lot 27, Block 19, with 2"roomed house, price,
$400.   Wood aud coal shed, root cellar and well.
Lots 7 and 8, 'block 43, 50x190 feet  and 50x165
feet.    Choice  residential,   second  bench  above
town.   Price $400 each.
' Lot 11, block 8, 50x100 feet.   Price $350.
Two lots in.Hedley, inside and corner. Price
$200 and $250—Also in east addition op. Mr. Smiths
house.   Price $350.  •
Lot 6, block 24, house cents for $6 per mo„ $500,
Agricultural land, near Coalmont, 80 acres, $1600.
Claim in diamond belt, $500 ; locations made.
Mineral properties.
Water power.
Suburban acreage to lease.
Business lots in east  Princeton from $450 to
100.
Address:    J. M. WRIGHT,
Princeton, B.C., Canada.
J. D. Lumsden,
President.
K
C. Brown,
Secretary.
Advertise in the Similkameen Star.
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October 4, 1911.
HE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Anglican church services for next Sunday, Oct. 8th: Granite, .preek, n a.m,
Holy Communion ; Princeton School
House, 7-30 p.m., Evensong and Sermon.
Subject, ' What evidence have we that
God exists? "
Methodist, church service, Sunday,
Oct 8th. In Oddfellows' hall, at 7:30
p.m. Service at the cement works at 3
p.m.
Presbyterian church services —Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
service, 11 a.m.
Christian Science iesson-sermon subject October 8th : ' Are Sin, Disease and
Death Real ? ' Ye shall know that I am
the Lord, when I have opened 3'our
graves, and shall put my spirit in you,
and ye shall live.—Ezekiel 37 : 13, 14.
MINING FOR 100 YEARS.
H. W. Dubois, of Philadelphia, engineer
and general manager ot the big plant of
the Quesnel river, Cariboo district, says
that there is enough gold gravel to keep
the plant busy for 100 years. The plant,
which is one of the largest in the world,
reprerenting an investment of over
f 1 o..o,ooo, commenced operations for the
first time on August l8th,and is handling
15,000 tons daily which will soon be in
creased to 25,000 tons daily. Three years
were devoted to the surveys and.examina
tions before a start was made at building
the plant. They expect to make the first
cleanup about November 1. There is a
vast water supply from Swift river, 26
ui_d_j distant.
standing the fact that aluminum is the
most abundant of all the metals in the
earth's crust, of which aluminum oxide
forms about 15 per cent. The great process made in the industry is noted in the
fact that a report on bauxite and aluminum for 1910, by W. C. Phalen, just published by the United States^ Geological
Survey, shows a consumption in the
United States in that year of 47,734,000
pounds, valued at nearly $12,000,000. The
price has just dropped from $1 an 'ounce
to about 53 cents a pound. Mr. Ph_len
states that although aluminum has iu recent years become a most important eco
nomic metal, it is at present produced
only from bauxite, a comparatively scajce;
mineral,and that even the great discovery
which made this possible is only the first
stage of wrestling the metal from its various rock and earth combinations. Aluminum is an essential constituent of all
important rocks except sandstone and
limestone and is found in all clays The
snpply is therefore practically limitless,
awaiting only the perfection of a process
for cheap extraction^.*
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE^
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL^- $10,000,000 REST,-   $8,000,000
THE SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
of The Canadian Bank of Commerce will receive deposits of $i and
upwards, on which interest is allowed at current rates. There is- no
delay in withdrawing' the whole or any portion of the deposit. Small
deposits are welcomed.  • A234
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, to be
operated by any one of the number or by the survivor. A joint account
of this kind saves expense in establishing- the ownership of the money
after death, and is especially useful when a man desires to provide for
his wife, or for others depending upon him, in the event of his death.
J. D. ANDRAS,   Manager, PRINCETON  BRANCH
**BB*BB*BB*B**BB*BB*BB**AAb
_»*•«?_)_•_.♦*_♦*_**_**_**_"_**
K. C. BROWji
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON  BLOCK
ALU *INU__ IN CLAY.
N >t over a generation ago aluminum
was little more thai a curiosity. It was
worth $15 or more a pound and its total
production*!!! the United States was''less
than a bundled pounds a year, notwitl^
WATER NOTICE
The M_n^U&inieetfPo$. er Company, Limited,of
fvarucbuver. BC. ftivono.k e that we intend,on
the 10th day *.f November nt.xt._at eU-ven o'clock
in the fort.m.o 1. to apply-to i he. Wafer Commis
s'oner at his office at N10.-la, for a license to take
and use 21 ouM" feet of water per second ftom.
Red Creek, a uibntaiy of Fivemile Creek, near
Princeton.
The water .viil be u .ed at Fivemile Creek, about
^ of a mile b.'o v Red Creek for power purposes.
We intend to apply at the same time forJfae_'-
missiou to store 4 ono aoit.-fe.-t, more or-lessjof
the said water in a reservoir at hcud of falls on
Red Creek.
SIMILKAMEEN  POWER COMPANY, Ltd.
Dattd this 27th day of :September, 1911.
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Pioneer Meat Market
^M/SA^^^^V
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR
I Beef, Pork, Mutton, Fish, j
V l__tSO IN STOCK '"^
:| Fresh Butter, Eggs,   Sausage,  Pickled
Pig's Feet, Salmon Bellies, Herring, Prime Lard, Etc.
I P. BURNS & CO., LTD.
A ___._.._?__.*_A_ ■>_*_«%A_*.-#-A*yAA
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S^^^^^^^^^^P#f^M%t^t^^^^ ♦%
All HUNTERS TAKE NOTICE
THAT IT IS LAWFUL TO SHQ.OT but not otherwise Bill Blue and Willow Grouse from ist September to
31st December ; Ducks, Geese and Snipe from ist September to 28th February ; Deer from ist September to r5th
December; Prairie Chicken during month of October only.
Ducks, Geese and Snipe may be sold during the:months of
October a'nd November ^nly; Our Stock of Guns and
Ammunition may be sold any day.
V*4**
A. L. WHITE'S FURNITURE STORE  .
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The i L BOWSC CO., LSI
Nicola       Merritt       Middlesboro        Princeton
KING & GIBSON
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
____U__*_t_/_.____U_______t*_A .       •
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
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^^^^^m^*f*W^^M^^^^.^^^^^^^^^
FOR SALE.
HOI/MES FLAT,  212   acres more or
less.'! With water record  of 300 inches
from Fivemi.e Creek. /
Just four miles east/of Princeton.
Part cash, balancer on easy terms.
Apply to V
-KEREMEOS LAND CO.,
Keremeos, B.C
Similkameen Land & Mines
H. B. BROWN, Broker
443 Pender St. W. Vancouver, B.C.
Will Buy or Sell.
Nicoia to Okanagan.        ' Bulldog'
♦T>"^rv**y
 '." —
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
October 4, 19".
c^x
October 4, 1911.
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advance,
If not prepaid all names will be dropped off the
list of subscribers.
ADVERTISING RATES :
Land Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.'
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
8 cents per line each subsequent insertion1.*"
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 per in, per month.
Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Monday.
.Address all communications and make cheques
payable to
 '-gJSa, J.-M. WRIGHT.
NOTE AND COMMENT.
It is encouraging to see two large
smelting companies reaching out for
the copper-gold ores so abundantly
distributed over this district. Here
they find coking coal and ore in
juxtaposition thus eliminating long
hauls and heavy freight charges.
The conditions are ideal for establishment of smelters in Princeton
district.
The absurdity of war will soon be
in strong evidence when the Turk
and Italian armies get within range
of each other. Europe is armed
cap-a-pie, great unrest prevails, and
the fight between these two nations
is said to be the prelude of a great
general war involving the leading
nations. This inharmony of the
nations begins in the individual,
and, while men inculcate and encourage the brutalizing principle of
war by keeping huge armies of nonproductive men ready for the slightest emergency, there will be wars
withr all their entailed miseries. If
the money spent in armaments were
used in education and the peaceful arts, poverty and distress would
have lost their greatest ally. Let us
work along peaceful lines—free
trade among all nations and universal peace. Something for statesmen
to ponder over and the noblest aim
mortals could strive for.
A correspondent writes Star setting forth the importance of organizing a Boosters' Club for the Similkameen district, the purpose of which
would be to do effective advertising,
thus interesting outside capital in
the opportunities afforded for sound
investment. That there is need of
more capital in the Similkameen no
one disputes ; that there is need of
ten booster clubs to awaken the people of the Similkameen from their
slumberous condition, no one doubts;
that in unity theie is strength, all
have*proven. Therefore, Agitate !
Agitate !!
Martin Burrell, M P., by the
splendid majority he received in the
recent elections, by his proven ability as a legislator and by his personal record of probity and integrity, is undoubtedly entitled to be
classed as of cabinet timber. He is
a specialist in horticuiture, and his
versatilit}' and experience along
general lines of the country's requirements mark him as a man of
destiny in parliament. And while
it may seem presumptuous on part
of Star to suggest, no prime minister
in the formation of his cabinet can
afford to dispense with the services
of a member who by general acclaim
is endowed with those qualities
which make for strength and stability of government. While he is
resident in B.C., he is not insular
or provincial in thought or speech ;
he is a citizen of Canada and as such
would give impartial service to all
the provinces. Martin Burrell,
M.P., minister of mines or agriculture, either, would be appropriate.
The report running iu Star covering the coal area owned by the
Princeton Collieries Co., Ltd., gives
much information that is representative of all the various properties
in Princeton district. The quality
of the coal is shown in thermal
units as possessing greater steam-
raising capacity than either the well
known Pennsylvania or Cardiff
coals. With the immense deposits
of such good coal for domestic and
steaming purposes, it may readily
be seen that a great future is certain
for Princeton and vicinity.
One thing that will result from a
change of government is the cleaning up of ingrained grievances and
abuses, the result of a party too long
in power at Ottawa. Officialism
and bossism had grown to such
mighty proportions that the public
service was run on lines to suit the
convenience of some government
hireling who cared no more for the
accommodation of the people than
the despot upon his throne. Rules
and regulations governing or supposed to govern the operation of the
departments were set aside just as
the stupidity of any incompetent
government employee would dictate
for his own ease and convenience.
So notoriously corrupt and inefficient had some of the branches of the
public service become that it was
utterly impossible to obtain redress
for any mismanagement, and, in reply to well-founded complaints made
to the heads ot departments, the
stereotyped reply and nothing more
would result. The public generally
are familiar with these complaints
as made in the Star and other newspapers since as far back as 1905.
The member for Yale-Cariboo is
aware of these grievances as made
from time to time by boards of trade,
the press, and published and private
correspondence. Now that he sits
to the right of Mr. Speaker, his
efforts toward reform must bear
fruit and any remedies or improvements in the public service he may
suggest will have the hearty endor-
sation and support of the public. It
was time for a change oi government.
*? *x~Z*<**Z**Z"ZK**Z**t**Z*^^^
Rich Resources
SURROUNDING
EAST!
PKINCET
The New Cily With The Payroll
Give you the opportunity for one of the
SOUNDEST INVESTMENTS
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In British Columbia.
t>*t*B^*B*B**BAA***BB**AJ>M^^+AA&B
CITY LOTS  ARE  BEING OFFERED
SALE FOR THE FIRST TlflE.
FOR
IT IS INEVITABLE THAT THE VALUE OF
THESE LANDS WI LL GREATLY INCREASE
Here are some of the Reasons :
East Princeton is surrounded by huge de=
posits of Coal, Cement, Copper, Gold, and
other important ilinerals.
The British Columbia Portland Cement
Co. is erecting a half a million dollar plant,
which will employ between 300 and 400 men.
work to at least 1,000 men.
For transportation, East
Princeton will
have, in the near future, the Great Northern
and the Kettle Valley lines, both of which,
will pass through the towwnsite.
East Princeton is beautifully situated on
the Similkameen River, with an abundance
£   of water power available.   The new city has
every facter for growth into a big industrial
centre.
It presents a rare opportunity for investment.    Get full particulars immediately.
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D. Q. McCURDY
RESIDENT AGENT.
Or write RAYMOND E. WARD, Pacific blk, Vancouver.
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The United Empire Co. is shipping a lignite coal of the besl quality and is developing   ♦♦♦
in_m_>n__t ennnpr Hp>t_rt_i_ _   r_»_iiii_,iri_r l_n*f._» _>_>_i       __►
immense copper deposits, requiring large re
duction works and several hundred employees. The Princeton Coal & Land Co. is
increasing its daily shipments to 300 tons of
coal, providing employment to about 150
men. Other coal companies are spending
♦♦*   over $2,000,000 in development, and will give   *?
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POWER OJ? COMPOUND INTEREST
A man may secure an absolutely sure
income of $600 a year for his little five
year-old daughter, or granddaughter,
from the time she is 55 to the end of her
days, if he will pay to the Canadian government .he sum of $964.75. If she should
die at any time before reaching the annuity age the money paid, together with
3 per cent, compound interest, will be refunded to the purchaser, or as he may
direct. There are but few parents who,
when they understand the matter", will
not be anxious to make the investment,
if they can spare the money, in-order to
have the assurance that their daughter,
no matter what reverses overtake her after
she is 55, would have a comfoitable income in her old age—an income that she
cannot be deprived of by any process of
law. Full particulars of this excellent
scheme may be had on application to the
Superintendent of Canadian Government
Annuities, Ottawa, to whom letters go
free of postage.
INVESTIGATE TAXATION.
A Royal Commission composed of Hon.
Price Ellison, Minister of Finance, chairman; Hon. A. E McPhillips, President
of the Executive Council ; W. H. Malkin
of Vancouver, a well-known wholesale
merchant and progressive student of practical economics ; and C. H. Lugrin, editor
of the Victoria Colonist, is to carefully
investigate the operations of the Assessment Act of 1910 and assessment and
taxation matters generally, reporting the
evidence taken with conclusions and re-
recommendations to the government. A
secretary and stenographer will accom-!
pany the commissioners on their lnterest-
iug'tour, for which the itinerary has been
arranged to cover the whole province, the
following places, among others, being
visited:-    MtUti^  f
Grand Forks, Friday, 13th October.
Priuceton, Saturday, 14th October.
Merritt, Monday, 16th October.
Kamloops, Tuesday, 17th October.
Summerland, Thursday, 19th October
Penticton, Friday, 20th October.
Kelowna, Saturday, 21st October.
Vernon, Monday, 23rd October.
Any person may give evidence and wilt
be accorded every facility for voicing
grievances and opinions on the question;
of taxes.""
HERMIT MERCHANTS.
Keeping to oneself isn't a good plan fori
a merchant to follow. The retailer who
leads the existence of a hermit meedn't
expect to keep pace with the times. Indeed, he is practically certain to get left,
in the competition  for trade.
Methods of fifteen or twenty years ago
won't do today. Modern methods are
absolutely necessary to success. Old-
fashioned stores, though they made money
years ago, today are making nothing.
Conditions are constantly changing—men
must change with theru.
You have GOT to keep up to date. This
most old merchants have learned,-but
there are some who are dropping out of
it, being left behind, because they live
too much like hermits.
Merchants who keep even pace with
changing conditions are those who regularly read their trade journal, are active
members of Associations, and advertise
regularly in their local newspaper.—
Retail Grocery Review.
♦♦♦♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ *♦♦♦♦♦ H _l_ll^_l___lt_l_$li^_^_^4^4_^iil!J_M^ w
Lo&s Colquhoun, the bandit who
. ffi«.d in the public eye in 1905 in holding up the westbound express on/the
C.P.R. near Ducks, B.C., died September
24th in New Westminster penitentiary
hospital. Colquhonn was a pal of Bill
Miner and Shorty Dunn in this holdup.
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Coalmont
A legitimate
Investment
Today
MOST PEOPLE want^'tb invest their money where
they are reasonably sure of a good return. If the
investiretit is to be made in real estate there are several
things to be considered : The situation of the town, climatic
conditions, transportation facilities, and primarily the
amount of the monthly payroll. When these questions are
asked regarding Coalmont they may all be answered to the
credit of the town. The situation and climatic conditions
are ideal ; the main line of the V.,V. & E. railway runs'-'
through the town on its way to Vancouver.
The Columbia Coal & Coke Co. operating here have practically an inexhaustible supply of a pure bituminous coal;
They   are   installing   immediately   a  plant   which  will handle
2000 tons  of-coal in 8 hours—this  means employment for between.
800 and 900 men all told.
Figure out this payroll and see how many coal mining towns
in B.C. can beat it.
In a very short time Coalmont will necessarily have a population of from 2000 to 2500 people. Will this cause real estate to rise?
We .11 know the answer. Then take the opportunity that presents
itself now—buy first hand and reap the benefit of this increase.
The prices and terms are such that anyone can afford to lnves
to the extent of one or two lots. They range from $175 to $550, on
terms of )4 cash, balance over 18 month.,.
Address all communications and remittances to
WILLIAMSON & TURNER,
Soi,e Agents,
COALMONT, B.C.
PRINCETON BAKERY
and CONFECTIONERY
FRESH BREAD DAILY—ALL KINDS
OF PASTRY, PIES, &C. ■'£&
RESTAURANT
C. V. Semerad & Co.
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A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Jobbing Work Promptly Attended to
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays,  in the Oddfellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J   F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL, Clerk.
J. KNUDSON
Contractor    and   Builder
Estimates Furnished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
>:••:♦♦:•♦>♦>♦
'._**,__»._*__*_**__»___» **__*«*__*_**_i*«V*'__*«
1   ...Hotel...   I
foiKrifMl
I    TULAMEEN, B.C.     |
X       Good Fishing, Boating       ,t,
*\* Mining Centre |
I mps. L J. Henderson 1
y PRORIETOR *J*
liiis___^^^>__^^__?^?___^^_^ll
  f	
C. L. CUMMINGS
Horseshoeing
a Specialty
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
Carriage Building
Painting, Repairing
All Work Neatly  and  Promptly
Phone 28]     Done
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
Regular meetings. 8 p
m.. Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate  in
Thomas Block.   ■' Oddfellows Hall."
J. F. Waddell, Jas. Gellatly.
Noble Grand. Secretary
FOR SALE.
OWL SKATING RINK
For Sale or Lease.
J, OSWALD COULTHARD,
Manager.
. For Sale.—Improved resident property
in Greenwood, B.C., or will exchange for
improved property in Princeton, B.C.—
Address A. L. White, Greenwood, B.C.
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAk
October 4, 1911,
BIG COAL MEASURES
(Continued from last issue)
1.—The most favorable location both
for transportation and to open up and develop this coalfield  would be at No. 8
/Tunnel, 80ft. into No. 3 Coal seam, out-
}<prop 8ft. thick, on the south bank of the
(   Tulameen river on Lot  244, where the
coal could be followed from the*grassroots.'   On the same lot on the west side
of the river the G. N. railway passes with
an 0.8 per cent, grade in favor of the
loaded cars towards Princeton and there
is sufficient area for railway sidings and
plant for an output of 500 tons daily,
loading the coal directly into the railway
cars or bunkers.
2.—Another favorable location would
be at No. 9 Tunnell on Ninemile creek.
3.—Several, if necessary, located south
of Princeton along the Similkameen
river.
Quantity, Quality and Royai/ty.
From the geological evidences, coal
outcrops as. exposed by the erosion of the
Similkameen and Tulameen river., and
their tributaries and by denudation ; and
the drilling work done by the Vermilion
Forks Mining and Development Co., the
Similkameen Valley (now the Osoyoos)
Coal Co., (Blakemore) Alexander Shaip;
besides the development work executed
ill the colliery of the Vermilion Forks
Mining ahd Development Co at Princeton, and the coal measures cut through
in the Great Northern railway company's
tunnel, and from other available and,
_flftheniic information gained by tue reporter during his personal examination
of a considerable aieaof the pioperty and
in his collecting and observing sufficient
data whereby a very conservative aud ap
proximate estimate cah be made of the
four coal seams from such data or facts
indicating their general permanency and
continuity, more or less,however variable
they may be in detail.
Taking  these  four   coal-teams   (there
may be more) horizontally in area, neg
JT^cting their various dips; and to their
j   being subject to the geological effects of
j   tilting, folding, faulting, and general loss
in working, as numbered I, 2, 3 and 4 in
ascending order, which are 20, 9 4 and 8
feet respectively, aggregating a thickness
of 41 feet.
■ Taking the average thickness at a half
or say__o feet  over an  average area of
8,000 acres, this should easily make pos
sible' the producsion of 160 million tons
of coal which at an output of i,000 tons
daily, or 250,000 tons annually, allowing
for contingencies, should last for about
640 years, the 'life of the o ine.'
Analyses.
Moisture   10.40
Vol. Combustible Matter .   31.00
Fixed Carbon  47-30
Ash      3 50
From several samples taken by R. H.
Morris, M.E., Spokane, Wash., from the
colliery operations of the Vermilion
Forks Mining and Development Co.'s
analysis by J. Sullivan   Vancouver, _t:G.'
Selected samples from the 18ft. 5}4in.
seam of Vermilion Forks Mining and Development Co. at Princeton Analysis by
fast coking by Mr. Hoffman of the Geo
logical Survey Department of Canada A
lignite'.-Joif: the better class, character of
coke, pulverulent; color of ash, brownish
yellow.
A Princeton analysis bf the Vermilion
Forks Mining and Development Co. gives
12, 176 B.T.U., which, if not better^w
equal to mo%t of tue'best bituminous coals
in Pennsylvania I lb. of Prin?etbn coal
evaporates 126 lbs. of water, whereas
those of Vancouver Island evaporate 7.8
to 9 lbs and that of Cardiff, Wales, Eng.,
10.69 lbs.
These results are characteristic of excellent lignite coals bordering on the
quality of bituminous, and are valuable
for gas makings steam raising, and do-
_afsti£_»sev^nd can compare favorably
wifh the lignite and semi-butuminous
coals of Alberta and British Columbia.
A.perceptible and progressive increase
in quality in the analytical composition
of coals occurs with in increasing cover
or descent. For every 300 feet in descent
the volatile matter decreases 1 per cent,
and the temperature 526 F.
About five miles west of the northwestern boundary of-y^nr-p^operty is the
proptrty of the /British Columbia Coal
and Coke Co., y^il_$ihi7ch the reporter
examined in August, 1909. Between
these^_tw__poi__s a volcanic intrusion in-
tervenus, the qualities of the coals at the
latter-porn, being a bituminous coking
ccal similar to those of Nicola Valley Coal
and Coke Co., Ld., therefore this volcanic
intrusion may change the analytical com
position of your coals in that vicinity to
wards Granite creek and Nicola.
The good dome_tic coals of Puget Sound
including those of Renton are in a very
much higher horizon in the Tertiary
Period than those of Princeton, and are,
in consequence, inferior in quality to
those of Piinceton.
Roya]£yiis___ia_____ts per ton (taxation)
under the 'new law ' to British Columbia
government. Lands located under the
'old law'5 cents per ton of 2,240 lbs ,and
lands crown granted previous to 1877 are
txempted from royalty.
IAlex Sharp. M.E . formerly in. charge of
tlie   T_in«..mir  . r_il   rtiinp_|~^flf.  ^T B.C.'s
Kcognizeffexperts, says : ' These deposits
(are ten times as extensive as those ot the
aanious Wellington section. The upper
Beams are semi-bituminous, the middle,
bituminous, aud the lower seams semi-
anthracite coal. Theseajpis vary in thickness from 5ft. to 9ft , and are of about the
right thickness for convenient and econo-'
mical working. I regard the measu:e as
being v^ry v.lu ible.' ^jjaj
He classes these coals as lignitic or an
intermediate between lignite and bitum
inous.
Timber and Labor.
The property is well covered with red
and black pine limber, with patches here
and there of the usual cotton wood in the
very moist areas. The pine produce ii
distributed frequently in ideal parkf, the
red pine being of very suitable sizes and
adequate for all mining purposes, in fact,
they are the closest approximation the
reporter has seen in the province to that
of the Norway pit propwood used in Britain for colliery purposes--none better.
Among the timbers best fitted to with
stand the rapid deterioration in mines are
the conifers especially the Douglas fir of
t le Pacific siope, the spruce, hemlock and
mountain tamarac, which are light, easily--
worked material1, and last as well as any
need.
Adequate and excellent supplies of fresh
water can be had from the several creeks
for all domestic, industrial and electrical
purposes.
With such pleasant climate and natuial
resources there should be no difficulty in
securing the requisite labor, and, as there
are several ideal areas for excellent town
sites on the property, for the development
of which it is generally desirable that the
employees own their homes.
Discipline should be as strict as the circumstances will allow and the workmen
employed should be as intellegent and
skilled as the conditions and the labor
supply will allow.
(To be continued in next issue.)
For Sale —Garden Plot of 4 or 5 acres,
six milesfrom Princeton, on Similkameen
river. Price $3<M: Terms cash.—Apply
to Wong Sing.
"AT IT HERE SIHCE l^OO.
\_____!§i|ERJ_S^
you WORK,
MM YOUR MONEY
WORK TOO.
si pEFosrrin. voDRwvm&s
WI-HUSTHE. w»_.___ri
42. INTEREST WHICH
UrtC__J.TI.OIY.rlL> :
/fripnone. isreturpi-
/1BLE on PEIWIP
AS avICKLV _ S THEM/ML')
Gfll. CARRY IT.
PEOPLE JUST /ISC/IREFUL
/fr1P CtWTlOt)5 .5
youc.f.BE,
flREVX/EL^PLErlSEP,
..ND THOROUGHLY
5/1TISFIE0.
WITH THE V_.yiMV_.l_1
OUR Bl_5li._SS IS
TRANSACTED-/? BUSINESS
MflPW&EP BY PEOPLE OF
AP05T/IL. GIVING
yOUR WMB_r/.PPRESS
WI&raOI.PT_y BRING __U
PULMI.FORM|jnoi..
WRITE TOM
SHOULP .01/HAVE .N.
WSflNGMis BUSINESS II.
.V^MGOUVER-VICfniTy,
REMTSTOCOIi-EGT,
.GflEEMEIiTSFORS/ILE"-
M0RTG_GE5T0I_0KMER
rlNP-Oti-EGT,
FIRE IM5UR_r.CE TOPICS
let us/rn™ TO IT.
we riRE pl__.5s.ig
OTHERS WE Wl_.BE SURE
TO PLEASE YOU.
DowJr^er* Co. Ltd.
321 Cambie St mt,
^Afarxcoxrver B.C.^
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that the annual
general meeting of the shareholders of the
Penticton Rai way Company will be held
at the office of the company, 901 Metropolitan Buildsng, Vancouver, B C , on
Wednesday, the 18th day of October,
A.D. 1911, at the hour of 11 o'clock in the
forenoon, for the purpose of electing
directors and transacting all such other
business as may properly come before the
meeting.
Dated the 8th day of September, A.D.
1911.
A. H. MacNEILL, Secretary.
PHest I
Ph otographer
Princeton
WATERNOIICE.
Notice is hereby grlven that an application will
be made under part V   of the  'Water Act. 1909/
B v ww J!??6 in the Astferoft water divisicn
of Yale District.
A The,name, address and occupation ot the
applicant: Walton Httgh Holmes, Granite Creek,
ti.O., in the District of Yale, preemptor.
Ward Creek"16        ^ ^  Str6am 0r S0Uree is
R   .R_e point of diversion is on Lot 520.
#Ji  The<auaE&W of water applied for (in cubie
feet per second), four.
__-Fi_ThSi charact(:r    of   the   proposed    works:
ditches, flume or pipes./ 9
F, ?he Prer*»ses on which the water is to be
Un   JJ Pre-emption Lot 520, Record No. 329
**j .Ve purposes for which the -water is to be
used is lrnsration and hous.hold,
H Jf for irrigation describe the land intended
£.____. 1TPMatQ ^vin* acreage. Bench on north
bank of Granite Creek, 160 acres.
__   .uAr*a of cj-°wn ^d intended to be occupied
by the proposed works, not any
iqii   ThJs n°tice.was posted on the 16th September,
1911. and application will be made to the commissioner on the 23rd day of October, 1911
L Give the names and addresses of->any ripar-
latf^roprietors or licensees who or whose lands
are hkeiy to be affected by the proposed works,
either above or below the outlet,   None-
WALTON HUGH HOLMES.
Granite ^Creek.
'PUBLIC INQUIRIES ACT" ..
HIS HONOR the Lieutenant Governor in Coum-
* * cil has been phased to appoint the Honorable Albert Edwara McPhriltps, K C. President
of the Ex cutive Council; the Houoiable Price
Ellison, Minuter cf Finance ; Chalks Heniy
Lutrrin, of the City of Victoria Esquire ; ai,d
William Harold Malkin, of the C.ty cf Vancouver,
Esquire, to be Commissioners under the ' Public
inquiries Act " for the purpose of entering into
and reporting upon the operation of the 'Assessment Act, 1903" with tespect to its practical
^raring on the financial requirements cf the
Province
The said Commissioners will hold.their meeting** on the dates and at the places mentic^U'd
hereunder, namely :—
Victoria at the Executive Council Chamber-
Parliament Buildings, Monday and Tuesdav„
25th and 26th September at 10 a m. At the
Court-house or the-jGuvernment Office at the
following places :—
Nauairao, Wednesday and Thursday, 27th atid
28th September.
Vancouver, Friday aud Saturday, 2Qth and 30th
September.
" New Westminster   Monday 2nd October.
Revelstoke, Wednesday, 4th October.
Golden, Thursday, 5th October.
C-anbicok, Saturday, 7th October.
Fernie, Monday, 9i& October.
Nelson, Wednesday, nth October.
Rossland Thursday, 12.h October.
Grand Forks, Friday  13th October.
Princeton, Saturday   14th October.
Merritt. Monday, 16th October.
Kamloops, Tuesday, 17th October.
Summerland. Thursday, iqth October.
Penticton, Friday, 20th October.
Kelowna Siturday, 21st October.
Vernon, Monday 23rd O. tober.^
It is requested that all persons who are interested iu the matter aforesaid, and who desire to
be heard, will not fail to be present at the meei-
iugs of the Commissioners
PRICE ELLISON,
Chairman.
Treasury Department, r*^*___ft
13th September, iqii.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS.
Province of British Columbia.
Notice is hereby given that all public
highways in unorganized districts and all
main trunk roads- in organized districts
are sixty-six feet wide, and have a width
of thirty-three feet on each side of the
main centre line of the travelled road.
THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, July 7, 1911.
NOTICE.
Similkameen division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ernest Waterman, of
Princeton, B.C.occupation mine manager,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1822 thence
south seven chains to the southwest cor-
of Lot 1822, thence west along the north
bonndary of Lot 2049 to the high water
mark on the right bank of the Similka- ■
meen river, thence northeast along the
said high water mark to the point of
commencement and containing five acres
more or less. ERNEST WATERMAN,
Aue.2Siji9H.    Percy W. Gregory, agent.
1
:(*'
M
£_F
3IL
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October 4, 1911.
THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
THE GEAIN CE0P FOE 1911.
NOTICE.
Canada Will Become The Granary of
The World.
Ottawa, Sept. 14.—A bulletin on the
field crops of Canada, issued to day, gives
their average condition by provinces at
the end of August, together with estimates
of the production of spring wheat, oats
and barley at that time. The per cent,
condition of wheat Is giyen as 86 80, of
oats 84.44, and of barley 84.73, which is
about five to seven per cent, higher than
last year and nearly the same as two years
ago. The other crops range in condition
from 80 to 86 per cent., and ate generally
somewhat lower than in 1909 and 1910.
The rains of August hindered the lipen-
ing of the grain, and some injury was
caused by hail storms, low temperature
and rust. Towards the end of the month
frost prevailed in many sections of the
northwest provinces, the full extent of
which could not be determined at the
date of the reports, bnt in the case ot
wheat, oats and barley, production was
lowered by probably 12 per cent, which
has been followed in the table. In the
older provinces the grains ripened earlier
and little damage was sustained, excepting from drought in some localities, and
tne reported condition was 75 or over.
The average yield of spring wheat is estimated at 19 14 bushels per acre for the
Dominion, which is seven bushels more
than last year, and the total yield at 186,-
928,000 bushels. The fall wheat was reported last month at 17,706,000 bushels,
being grown almost wholly in Ontario
and Alberta. The total wheat yield of
the country is therefore estimated to be
204,634,000 bushels, or 81,849,000 bushels
more than last year at the same date. The
average per acre is 19.50 bushels, or 6 30
bushels per acre more than last year.
For the Dominion «the yield of oats is
given as 368,153,000 bushels, which is
94.906,000 bushels more than last year's
estimate at the same date, and the aver
age at 35,81 bushels per acre, being more
than last year by 7 10 bushels. The average for barley is also higher than last year
by 7 31 bushels, and the iot^l yield is estimated at 61,559,000 bushels as against
39,388,000 bushels for last year.
The estimated yield of spring wheat for
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta this
year is 181,535,000 bushels, of fall wheat
3 193,000 bushels, of oats 204.758,000
bushels, and of barley 30,205,000 bushels,
as compared with 98,808,000 bushels of
spring wheat, 1,082,000 bushels fall
wheat, 92,201,000 bushels oats, and 14,-
853^000 bushels bailey in the previous
year.
In Prince Edward Island, Nov. . cotia
and New B uiswick the estimated yield
of spring wheat i-; 1,453.000 bushels, of
oats 16.699,000 bushels and of barley
437,000 bushels; in Quebec 1,777,000
bushels spring wheat, 44,619,000 bushels
oats, and 2 389,000 bushels barley ; and
in Ontario 2,163,000 bushels spring wheat.
14,513,000 bushels fall wheat, 102,077,000
bushels oats and 18,5.8,000 bushels barley.
The final estimates of last year printed
in the December Monthly give the production for the whole country as 16,610,-
000 bushels fall wheat, i33.379.6°° bush
els soring wheat, 323,449,000 bushels oats
and 45,147,600 bushels barley.
The October number of the Census
Monthly will give the statistics of the
areas of field crops of the Dominion this
year as taken by the census of the first of
June.  -
For Exchange.—Five pieces of resident
property in Greenwood, B.C., that brings
owner approximately $1,000 per year, for
improved property or ranch in the
Similkameen district. Address A. L.
While, Greenwood, B.C.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Lydia L   French, of
Evanston, Ills , occupation wife of C. O.
French intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about one
mile  west of  the south west corner of
Charles     Bonniviers'   pre emption     on
Roche   river    and   marked     Lydia   L
French's S E   corner, thence 80 chains
west. 40 chains north, 80 chains east, 40
chains south to the point of commence
ment, and containing 320 acres,  more or
less. LYDIA L  FRENCH,
July 29, 1911.       Chas. O. French, agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Chas. O.  French, of
Princeton, B. C, occupation tinsmith in
tends to apply for permission to purchase
the   following   described   lands:    Commencing at a post planted at the south
west corner of Chas  Bonnivier's pre-emp
tion   on    Roche   river    marked   C.    O
French's n  w  corner thence 80 chains
east, 40 chain; south, 80 chains west, 46
chains north to the point of commencement aud containing 320 acres more or
less. CHARLES O. FRENCH,
July 29, 1911.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take   notice that   Nicholas Codd,   of
Colfax. Wash., occupation farmer intend-
to apply for permission to purchase the
following   described   lands.   Commenc
ing at  a post  planted at the   southeast
corner of Gus. Powell's pre emption  and
marked Nicholas Codd's s w corner thence
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west,  80   chains   south to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or iess.       NICHOLAS CODD,
July 26, 1911.   ChailesO. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Susan Nokes, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation wife of
Aaron Nokes intends to apply for permission to purchase the follo> ing described lands: Commencing at a post
planted on the northwest bank of Roche
river abcui two miles from the mouth of
Cambie creek and marked Susan Noke's
n e corner, thence 80 chains west, 80
chains south. 80 chains east, 80 chains
north to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
SUSAN  NOKES,
Ang. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that John Gifford, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation cattleman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands*
Commencing at a post planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked John Gi_brd*s
n e corner thence 80 chains west, 80
chains south, 80 chains east, 80 chains
north to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acrcs more or less.
JOHN GIFFORD,
Aug 2, 1911.      Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Nettie Laird, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation musician,
intends to apply for permission to pur
chase the following described lands:
Commencing at a p' st planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank theieof and marked Nettie Laird's
s w corner thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less,
NETTIE LAIRD,
Aug. 2, 1911.   Charles O French, agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Bridget McGovern, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation housekeeper
intends to apply for permission to pur
chase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about 8
miles west of the mouth of Copper creek
marked Bridget McGovern's n w corner
thence 80 chains south, 80 cbains east, 80
chains north, 80 chains west to the point
Of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
BRIDGET McGOVERN,
Aug. 1, 1911.   Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Edward A. Nokes, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation coachman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about two
miles northwest of the mouth of Cambie
creek about 40 chains northeast of said
creek and marked E A Nokes' n  e cor
ner thence 80 chains south,  80 chains >
west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to!
the point of commencement and contain
ing 640 acres more or less.
EDWARD A. NOKES,
Ang. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Henry Magee, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation clerk, in
tends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: Com
mencing at a post planted about 8 miles
west of tbe mouth of Copper creek
marked Henry Magee's n e corner thence
80 chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains
north, 80 chains east to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. HENRY MAGEE,
Aug. 1, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Margaret Durgan, of
Spokane,    Wash.,   occupation   wife     of
Michael Durgan, intends to apply for per
mission to  purchase   the following   described lands:   Commencing at  a post
planted about 8 miles west of the mouth
of Copper creek, marked Margaret Dur
gan's s w corner, thence  80 chains  east,
80 chains north, 80 chains west. 80chains
soutb   to   the  point   of commencement
and containing 640 acres more or less.
MARGARET DURGAN,
Ang. 1, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take   notice that  Tessie Warren,   of
at a post planted about six miles up the
Roche river from its mouth and about 40
chaius northwest of said river and marked Mary Laird's n e corner thence 80
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains
north, 80 chains east to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. MABY LAIRD,
Aug, 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ella Warren, of
Evanston, 111., occupation clerk, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing
at a post planted about six miles up the
Roche river from its mouth and about 40
chains northwest of said river and marked
Ella Warren's SW corner thence 80
chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains south to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acrcs
more or less. ELLA WARREN,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O  French   agent.
Yale land diyision, Yale district.
Take notice that Andrew 1 aidlaw. of Spokane
Wash , occupation mining broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Similkameen riverabcut
60 chains north of the mouth of Roche river
marked Andrew Laidlaw's NIC corner thence 40
chains west. So chains south, 40 chains east. 80
north to the point of commencement _rd containing 320 acres more or less
ANDREW LaTDL.iW,
July 28. 19", Gharles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Jeffrey R. Short, of Spokane,
Wash., occupation clerk intends to apply for per-
E.,. 1 mission to purchase the following described lands:
vanston,  111., occupation   stenographer   commencmg at a post planted at the souUnwM:
intends to apply   for permission   to pur-' corner of timber limit No. 36826 and ma_E«tj
chase   the   following   described    lands: j R. Short's NE^corner thence
t ™ . ■   _»_iat_i_    ____>__r     5L_ _naitt_rnn. II
Commencing at a post plauted ou the
northwest bank of Roche river abont
two miles from tbe mouth of Cambie
creek and marked Tessie WaTren's s w
corner thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west to
tbe point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
TESSIE WARREN,
Aug. 4. 1911.     Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that ■ Mary Kelly, of
Spok.ue, Wash., occupation married
woman intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the northwest bank of Roche river
about two miles from the mouth of Cambie creek and marked Mary Kelly's s e
corner, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains' south, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
MARY KELLY,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Horace Gifford, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation cattleman
intends to apply for permission to pur
chase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked Horace GifT-
ord's n w corner, thence 80 chains south,
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more cr less.
HORACE GIFFORD,
Aug. 2, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that William H. Bell, of
Chicago. Ills , occupation electrtcian intends to apply for permission to pur
chase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
seven miles up the Roche river from its
mouth and about ten chains north of
said river and marked W. H. Bell's n w
corner thence 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. BELL,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Laird, of
Spokane. Wash., occupation wife of F.
C. Laird, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about j,%.
miles up the Roche river from its mouth
and about ten chains northwest of said
river and marked Mary Laird's n e corner thence 80 chains south, 80 chains
west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
MARY LAIRD,
Ang. 1, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Laird, of Spokane, Wash., occupation widow intends to
apply   for   permission   to purchase the
following described lands:   Commencing
chains south, 80
chains west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.      JEFFREY R. SHORT.
July 27, i9u. Charles O   French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Lee Be_ , of Spokane, Wash.,
occupation stenographer intends to apply for
permiseion to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a pest planted about one
mile up the Roche r ver from its mouth and on
the north bank thereof and marked I.ee Bell's
SW corner thence 40 chains north, ^ochains east
40 chains south 40 chains west to the point of
commencement and containing 160 acres more
or less. LFE B_L_.
July 28, 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Elizabeth C Laird, tf Spokane, wash., occupation widow intends to apply
for permission to pu:chase the following de
scribed lands: Commencing at a post vlanted
about 2% miles up the Rcche river- frbm its
mouth on the northwest bank thereof and
marked E C Laird's SE corder thence 80 chains
north, 80 chains west,80 chains south, 80 chains
east to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
ELIZABETH C. LAIRD,
Julv 29, iqii. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick C. Laird, of Spokane, Wash., occupation broker, intends to apply
foi permission to purchase the following describe lands: Commencing at a post planted
about 2_. miles up the Roche river from its
mouth and on the northwest bank thereof and
marked F. C. Laird's NE corner thence 80 cbains
west, 80 chains south, 80 chains east, 80 chains
uorth to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
FREDERICK C. LAIRD.
July 29 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale districl.
Take notice that Clara G. Laidlaw, of Spokane,
Wash , occupation wife of Andrew Laidlaw, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lauds: Commencing at a
post planted about 2% miles up the Roche river
from the mouth of said r*ver on the northwest
bank thereof and marked C. G. Laidlaw's NW
corner thence 80 chains east,.80 chains south, 80
chains west, 80 chains north to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less
CLARA G. LAIDLAW.
July 29,191I. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Jennie O'Laughlin. of Spokane, Wash., occupation teacher intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted
about three miles south of the mouth of Pasayton river and about ten chains west of said river
marked J. O'Laughlin _ SW corner thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains south, 80
chains west to the point of con.mencement and
Containing 640 acres more or less.
JENNIE O'LAUGHLIN.
July 29, iqii. Charles O. French, agent-
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that William A. Nicholas, oi
Spokane, Wash., occupation broker, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands. Commencing at a post planted
about two miles north of the mouth of Roche
river and one mile west of the Similkameen
river and marked W. A. Nicholas' SW corner
thence 80 chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM A. NICHOLAS,.,
Aug. 8. iqii. Charles O. French, agent.
Similkameen Land & Mines
H. B. BROWN, Broker
443 Pender St. W. Vancouver, B.C.
Will Buy or Sell.
Nicoia to Okanagan.        ' Bulldog'
v
 8
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAK
October 4, 1911,
Temp&ra t iWat^nimr
THE TIMES ARE CHANGED
_%*-' <£    And We Are Rapidly Changing With Them !    _#    &
Wi
The Pioneer Mining and Development
e^e_# Company of the Similkameen «_£«_£
(Owners of Princeton Townsite)
PRINCETON, the Converging Point of
Roads and Trails
e C&mtim^rci^S Centre
Government Offices
Public Schools,  Hospital
Fraternal Societies
Board of Trade
Religious Denominations
I A Pretty, Cleanly and
Plire    Water   and    Good        Healthy Town, situated
Waterworks System
althe forks of Tulameen
and Similkameen Rivers
The Princeton Coal & Land Co. at present employs about .00 men operating coal
mine, and are now increasing facilities for mining on a large scale
A  Splendid Domestic Coal
Jt_F<
E LOTS  FOR SALE
Information cheerfylly given.   Apply to
ERNEST WATERMAN, Manager, Princeton, B.C
"-"•
£9?
M
.
te
rn
J I

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