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Similkameen Star 1908-10-07

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 "V
V'
Sheep, Deer, Goat, Wolves, Grizzly and Brown Bears
Little Minds are Quickly Tamed and Subdued by Misfortune
Princeton is in the heart of a great Goal and Ore Producing Zone—Coking Coal is Mined at North Fork of Granite Greek—The Conditions are most Favorabk for the Smelting Industry—Water Power Available for Electric Motive Purposes—Coal is $3.00 per Ton.
Vol. ix. No. 41.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY,  OCTOBER 7, 1908.
$2 a Year, in Advance
COPPER MOUNTAIN
Development   Work   on
Colorado Group now
in Progress.
the
Tunnel Scheme for Copper Mountain
Advocated—Owners Invited to
Unite Efforts.
Many will recall to memory, and it has
been said within the last two months,
that the group, known as the "Colorado
Group," was barren ground Andpromi
nent citizens have advised workmen to
carry ore from any old place and report
the same to the people of Portland, Ore.,
who are owners of said ground, hoping
thereby to get more unearned money.
However, it is a noteworthy fact that the
people mentioned are looking atter their
own interests through a reliable ageut,
and it is through his efforts and direc-
t ons that proper development work has
g ne on all summer and which has
o jened up a fine body of oie assaying in
gold $9 10 per ton and copper 18.97 per
cent. And, from indications shown in
the tunnel, one of the largest, if not the
largest, ore bodies on Copper Mountain
has been uncovered.
Arrangements are being made to run
a lother tunnel at the 200 foot level. All
intelligent and progressive mining men
of this section will watch with keen interest the results from this tunnel, since
it has become an established fact that all
Copper Mountain needs is development
work, which will uncover or penetrate
the ore at depth.
How much better results could be obtained from a tunnel run from the Similkameen riverside which would cut the
hill near the 2 000 foot level ? On all
sides one can hear the same story : "Yes,
that is the thing, but who is going to do
it?"
" Who is going to do it ?" That question puts oue in mind of the story told
by a contractor who was erecting a large
bridge in China by the use of native
labor. He said: "I came along wheie
the laborers were and I saw one Chinaman take hold of a large piece of timber,
then another did the same, and so on
until a dozen or more had tried their
strength. The Chinese foreman said he
could not get a man that was able to lift
the stick of timber. I then said 'make
them all lift together.' The timber immediately arose to its place with ease and
they _fl smiled."
That homely illustration exemplifies
what can be done where united effort is
required. If all get together and lift a
little in one way or another the tunnel
will be put through, i It is going to be
done.   Some one   is'^going to reap the
reward.     Why   not   the   owner of  the
prospect ?
Miners, prospectors and owners, get
together, select a leader, organize and
formulate plans—for in union there is
strength.
Many have waited from ten to fourteen
years for the copper to come to the surface and very little of it is closer now
than it was at the beginning, and it is
safe to sav another period of waiting will
elapse unless some energy and activity is
shown by those who have interests and
who wish to exercise their privileges.
Start the tunnel and the first thing to
result will be a developed mine—no mat
ter whose it is—ship the ore, and Copper
Mountain will do the rest.
Anyone interested in developing this
big mountain of ore and wishing to realize on his property should drop a line to
the Star, giving the name of the pre -
perty, also the name and address of the
OADfr and partners, if any. It may be,
however, that some will prefer to withhold any information, desiring to keep
their property as a legacy to their great-
grand children.
WHERE FRUIT CROWS
Similkameen   and   Okanagan
Valleys the Home of
the Apple
And the Peach, while Other Fruits
Grow to Perfection and with
Big Yield.
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
People Passing to and fro and Current Events Here and There.
A. Murchie, photographer, returned
from a trip to Penticton and the Okanagan last Saturday.
Anderson, Oleson and Alberson have
the contract for constructing all the culverts on the V..V. & E. between Hedley
and Princeton.
H. H. Avery, jr., left on Monday for
the Spokane fair and Nelson.
Dr. and Mrs." Whillans and Mr. Hincks
were a party of visitors to Princeton oh
Sunday.
County Court will be held in Princeton on Friday at 11 o'clock.
F. W. Groves, P.L SM arrived on Monday from Okanagan Centre and will remain about a month. '
Fred. A. Kribs of Portland, Ore., was
in Princeton last week in connection with
his timber interests. He left on Sunday
for home, with J. Garrison, his cruiser.
Charlie Lambert has closed down work
on his placer claims on Granite Creek.
He has everything ready to begin work
next season washing gold from the can
yon.
A. L. Davis left last Saturday for Butte,
Mont., from  whence he goes to Salem,
Ore.,   where   he  will have charge  of a
chemical plant for the Goldquick Min
ing Co.
D. O. Day returned last week looking
like his former self after hospital treatment in Portland, Oregon.
Harry Bishop, Nelson's crack hockey
"goal tender, was in town on Oct. rst representing Thorpe & Co., aerated waters
of Nelson.
Gordon Murdoch returned from a trip
extending as far as Summerland on Okanagan Lake last week and expresses both
pleasure and surprise with the almost
phenomenal development of the countty
beginning at Keremeos and extending
northwards along White Lake, Green
Mountain, Okanagan Falls, Dog Lake,
Penticton Naramata and Summerland.
The whole country is undergoing rapid
transformation, due largely to the hunger
for fruit land manifested by Manitobans.
No better class of settler could be found
in all the world than these people. They
are the cream .of the wheat belt where
they made money growing "No. 1 hard'
and raising large families.
In his travels Mr. Murdoch noticed
that everyone talked fruit as well as ate
it. He was most courteously shown over
different properties by land agents who
kept a carriage and pair for the use of
visitors. Where a few years ago the wolf,
coyote and bob-tailed deer roamed at will,
now laden fruit trees and beautiful residences adorned the laud. Small capital
was required to begin a fruit ranch but its
reward was so generous when once the
trees bore that revenue led expenditure
by a long pace.
Mr. Murdoch considers Summerland
an ideal residential place. No liquor is
sold there, hence there is no constable
and no arrests. It wi 1 be a day's drive
from Princeton when the government
completes the road from Five-Mile to
Trout Creek. Messrs. Lawrence and Md-
Alpine, formerly of Princeton, are located
here and are doing well, the latter having
married a most excellent wife and has
issue a fine boy. Mr. Carry, the C.P.R.
engineer running a line from Nicola to
Penticton, is at Summerland with his
f party.
At Penticton a pe?ch and tomato cannery is in operation. Here the Messrs.
Shatford are doing much to improve the
town and country.
At Keremeos everything indicates pro
gress and expansion.   The big irrigation
ditch will  be  finished  in time for next
year's crop and great results are anticipated from the reclamation of uplands.
Apples and peaches were an abundant
crop, the demand for them exceeding the
supply in Winnipeg and the Northwest.
A ton shipment of grapes' from a small
vineyard gives one an idea of the productive value of a patch of ground well
V
supplied with water.   The average price
of fruit from growers was 3j«jC. per lb.
Trips abroad only serve to emphasise
the fact that Princeton district is ahead
of all in variety of natural resources. Its
mineral, timber and agriculture alone
being assets that must forever prove a
vast source of revenue and wealth to tbe
country. The railroad is the last link to
be forged in the chain of development—
after that steady and permanent improvement must ensue.
TOO MUCH BOOZE.
An Indian freighter on the Nicola road
had a 'close call' resulting from booze
and bad dfiving. His wagon left the
grade throwing him off his seat. All unconscious of the danger he laid until a
tiniely passei-by got him into a place
where he could safely snooze until sober.
The horses were detached from the wagon and made as cpmfortable as could be
under the circumstances. There is a law
against supplying liquor to Indians but
its enforcement is largely a matter of
chance.
SOME PLAIN FACTS.
Newspaper at Vernon Misleads—The
Telephone Mismanagement.
On the 2nd page will be found an excerpt from the Okanagan in which reference in false terms is made to the owner
of the Star. He never dealt with "government telephones as though they were
his personal property " nor has he "been
breathing vengeance against the Liberal
party and Mr. Ross." In the first statement allusion is probably made to connecting the wire with the Howse Co's
store. Permission had been asked to
have telephone connection made as formerly when the public phone was removed
to the government office. Pending a favorable reply connection with the main
line was made without the authority of
either Mr. Ross or Mr. Stevens. It was
in no malicious or high handed spirit
that it was done. It was reasonably presumed that the store would be given a
wire as formerly since it always had been
a customer of the line since building.
To the astonishment of the Howse Co.
not only was the connecting wire taken
away but stubborn refusal made from that
time, nearly a year ago, to the present to
grant telephone connection. A phone
was. installed in a private residence since
the Howse Co. were denied one. A big
mercantile company with a store at Nicola as well as Princeton cannot obtain a
phone, though an old customer and its
members Liberal, voting for Mr. Ross at
his first election. Mr. Ross favored a
Conservative rather than his own friends.
Of course politics should not enter into
the management of a public utility—first
come, first served should be the guiding'
principle.   But mention is made of it to-
(Continued on 3rd page.)
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
October 7, 1908
^ THE STAR, ^
One Year,
J. M.WRIGHT.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
Payable in Advance.
$2.00
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reportftie any change in address or
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices io and 5 cents per tine.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month
advert ising.
No transient advertisement inserted unless
accompanied with the cash.
HYPOCRISY EXPOSED.
Of   all  low  class,    contemptible
journals  the  one which under the
guise of saintliness and purity proceeds to "knife" a' man or another
newspaper  is  the lowest in human
depravity.    Editors  of that stripe
are   the  "Black Hand"   of  journalism,  ready  to take  by  stealth
what is  more valuable than gold,
aye,   than  life,    character.     After
a lecture on campaign morality and
" fair play " the Vernon Okanagan
assails the Star and those connected
with it for  daring  to  criticize  the
member for Yale-Cariboo, Mr. Ross.
Its hypocrisy,   its "veiled" suggestions and its   false statements show
that the   man  behind  the  quill is
an adept in the treacherous role he
fills on the Okanagan.    Let us look
at   him   in   his   mud-thrown  ele
ment :
" The gentleman who owns the Star
•was bred and born a Tory. He may have
, given the Liberal party some support
when it suited his purpose. It was not a
question of political principle at all, but
of personal advantage, and when he was
not allowed to deal with government telephones as though they were his personal
property, then he turned and has ever
since been breathing vengeance against
the Liberal party and Mr. Ross. If the
Conservative press want to know what is
at the bottom of the 'S'ar's animosity,
they can get full, particulars from the
gentleman referred to who is now in England, &c."
The first assertion would lead one
to think that if a   ri.ian were born a
Tory be should   remain  one all his
life.    Because a man's parents were
of that   political  creed   is   it   to be
inferred  that  he shall follow suit ?
s    If a parent.isja  Nihilist should the
son be one also ?    What figure does
.   bir^h  cut  in   any intelligent man's
political affiliations ?    None !   Only
;in  the   mind   of   the party blind,
stupid adherent  like the Okanagan
editor  do hereditary  politics have
any influence.    If it were  not   for
the  free,    independent,   intelligent
/<    elector there would be no change in
:i     corrupt  administrations   or  unfair
representatives.     It  is the history
of all  governments  that   mischief
and  corruption  thrive  best with a
long retained party in power.    Yet
the     narrow    minded    Okanagan
endeavors  to   heap  odium upon a
man because he leaves the political
party of his  forefathers  because of
its corruption.    There would be no
Liberal' government  in Canada today  but  for those intelligent and
fair-minded Tories who threw out
the "nest of traitors" in 1906 and
put Sir Wilfrid in. It was a political triumph that any loyal son of
the country might well feel proud
in contributing to. All honor to
the man who has the courage to
forsake his party, his father, or any
other tie that he may. vote according to guiding conscience and ennobling convictions.
"It was not a question of political
principle,"    says    the   Okanagan.
That  is .the  stab   of the   dastard.
The Okanagan man would not give
a person credit for sincere and genuine  motives.    He  might  say the
same   thing   of the   fifty   thousand
other  voters  who revolted.     Can
this  hypocritical  scribe  know the
thoughts and intents of men?    No.
Then  why  does  he ascribe mean,
despicable motives ?    There is only
one answer.    Because he  is' mean
and despicable himself.    The owner
of this   paper  has   no axe to grind
and asks no favors-frora the'Liberal
or.any other party.    All  he asks is
to be treated fairly and.not discriminated   against  by   the, member  or
any of his   underlings  in  the matter of a telephone.
The?    -   'ft
Princeton
Livery   I
and |5S§
Feed   ■ J|
Stables. j§|
HUSTON   BROS.,  Props.
Nine Fine Ranches
160 to 640 Acres Each
Good Soil and Well Watered, all from
two to ten miles from Princeton. In ihe
lamous fruit belt of B.C. Prices range
from $5 to $15 per acre. ki^
Two elegant business corners, also inside business lots.
A nice 5-room residence, on two, lots.
12  most   desirable   Residential   Lots,
Cheap1.'   '"' '
For Rent—A    5-Room---house. ..  One...
small house.    Nice location,
J List your property with us.
AVERY  &,  AVERY
Real Estate, Insurance, Notary Public
W
General Livery business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
pr coal' delivered on shortest notice,
Draying in all its branches. Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
FOR SALE.
TULAMEEN
W^§L ...LIVERY
SAM CASSIDY, Prop.
Driving   Rigs,   Pacfc? and
Saddle Horses for Hire
w
need to eat meat if you want to
enjoy life.    We have the best.
Horses Pastured and Delivered
SUMMERS & WARDLE
BUTCHERS
PRINCETON
Lot 4, Block Four ; Lots, 8, 9 and 10
Block One.   Price, $500 Cash.
Adddress : M. M. POWERS,
Vancouver, B.C.
TICKET J'S
Myrtle 1
fNaviLip
Largest Sale in Canada
For further  particulars . apply to
SAM   CASS IDY,; |s*j
Tulameen, B. C.
Brags;;;:.!
pDPugs I
jj H Brags
A GOOD ilf
SPRING TONIC
is what you require.
Campbell is the man to
see about it.    Don't delay.
CIGARS AND  it
TOBACCO    I
 AT	
The Citg Drug store
J. R. CAMPBELL.
PRINCETON -       B. C.
Gpca! Normern
—— HOtCl—
MANLEY & SWANSON, Props.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
prinecion, B. c.
F. W. GROVES
Civil and flining Engineer
B. C. Land  Surveyor
Examinations and   reports   made   on
mines and prospects.y*}.",;.'.
Has   a   thorough   l^nowledge   of   the
Similkameen and Boundary Districts.   ,
Plans of .all Surveyed Lands and Mineral Claims
n the District. PRINCETON. B.C
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
Regular meetings, 8 p
\gkg_jgg' -<^b/        in., Thursdays.
Sojourning brethren.welcome.    Hall situated in
Star building.
N. Huston, J. O. Coulthasd.
6 Noble Grand. Secretary.
fc>
__^_____      WHISKEY      	
CLEAR ROCK
MINERAL WATER
make a
Perfect Blend
Sold bv all Dealers.
It Pays to Advertise.
A_
October 7, 1908
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
-SOME PLAIN FACTS.
show the utter faithlessness of Mr. Robs
in making such a glarii g exhibition of
favoritism and partiality.
Princeton seems to have been discrinr-
nated against in regard to a public telephone, for, as everyone knows, there has
been, until recently, many montts of
inferior service or none at all. . The people nf Princeton contribute thfeir quota
to the ie*euue of the Io ninion andare
entitled to fair and equitable treatment.
Public and private denunciation of the
telephone management, for which'Mr.
Ross cannot escape responsibility since
he muse have known all about it, has
often been made. It remains for the people to resent such unfairness and make
good their strong protestations or will
they turn and lick the hand that smites.
A. MURCHIE "Eg"
PHOTOGRAPHER wnniB-se
Photos of Families taken at their
Homes—Views of Princeton
and Surrounding Camps.
AMATEUR WORK FINISHED
Address    -     PRINCETON. KC.
__r
LOCAL AND GENERAL
After long and  serious meditation it
1 a 1 been decidjd to petition the govern-
m :nt for money to build a road to the
North Fork coking coal mines
Word   was received   Monday  that the
2 year old son of Donald Macphail had
died at Nicola. Many expressions of
sympathy art heard for Mr. and Mis.
Macphail in their bereavement. 5*5tj$"Ji
Pulfprd, the Hedley forger, has been
se itenced to 8 months in lafllfesHfe:..
Robert Stevenson   returned  from Hed
ley last   week     He   is  mending slowly
from his serious accident of a month ago.
J. R. Campbell and W. Summers returned from Hedley on Monday.
Claude  Snowden  and  his nephew let
f    ■ Olga, Wash., last Saturday, going out
v-.a Slate Creek. v*^wj'
Subscribers in arrears who "refuse" tl e
Star at the P.O., will please cail and set-
lie account.
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60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communications strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
sent free. Oldest opency for securing patents.
Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive
. tpeciol notice, without charge, in the
Scientific Biitufu
A handsomely Illustrated weekly, largest circulation of any scientific journal. Terms for
Canada, $3.75 a year, postage prepaid. Sold by
nil newsdealers.
iWUNN.iCo.8618'-^ New York
Branch Office. GB F Bt, Washington, D. a
It Pays to Advertise.
...Hotel...
oner Flat
TULAMEEN, B.C.
x
$■■ ■
5
X
*
wm. J. Henderson
PRORIETOR
¥
^^^^^^^^^^^^^4^^*^^^4r^47^47^4m^^friT V.VJ*r
"notice.
Certificate of Improvements
Frieda, Cabin, Colorado Fr., Edward 7th, Fr„
No's 6, Fr.; 7Fr.; 26, Fr. and 27 Fr., mineral
claims, situate in the Similkameen mining division of Yale. Where located: On Copper
Mountain.
- Take notice that I, G. Evert Baker, Free Miner'8
.Certificate No. B20055, acting for self and as agent
forT. T. Burkhart, F.M.C. No. B2C053 and Frieda
E. Baker, F.M.C. No. B20054, intend, 60 days frttri
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements for the purpose of
obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, uhdeT. Jwc-j
tion 37, must be commenced before the issuance of
such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 19th of September, A.D. 1908.     89-48
WOOD, VALIANCE
& LE<iQTT, L'M.
-:o:-
Complete Slock ol Shell aid Heavy Hardware
Sporting Goods and contractors' supplies
VANCOUVER, B. C.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HEAD   OFFICE, TORONTO
B. £. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
ESTABLISHED 1807 '
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Reserve Fund, -    5,000,000
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
PflllNTRY RIIQIWPQQ Every facility afforded to farmers and
bUUN I n I DUOIIlLOO others for the transaction of their
banking1 business.    Sales notes will be cashed or taken for collection.
RANKINP RY MAN Accounts maybe opened by mail, and
DMIllXlllU   DI    III MIL     - monies  deposited  or  withdrawn  in
this way with equal facility. 115
A. J. MARLOW, Acting Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH. '[
Similkameen ¥VancyS<i<l-iery Co.
^^HARN-ESS and-SADDLES -
i|y_Tips, Bits and Spurs
BOOTS and SHOES MADE TO OftDER
Harness Repairs and Boot Repairs Attended to.
First Class work;
Similkameen Lumber Co., Ud. I
J, F, Waddell, Mgr,
ROUGH AND DRESSED LUMBER
Ail kinds  of mouldings made.      Orders promptly
attended   to.      For   further   particulars   apply   to
J.  F. WADD i, Princeton,
x
t
I
X
X
X
X
X
5
X
y
1*
X
Interest Charged on Accounts 30 Days Overdue.
M^*<*4>**4***<,**,0<>**<^^^******************************
HI The fS
"if
Tf
A. E. Howse Co.
Limited
Nicola Princeton
"THE BIG STORES"
IVV^^^^^^AA^^^^^^^^^^^^A^
«f Don^ buy your Fall and Winter goods    -a*
i
yf
before calling on us*    We carry
complete lines=Prices to suit*
f___i
^ Just arrived from the east: a large
Consignment of Bedsteads,
Mattresses, Etc*
%t^0^^^^^tm^m^r^^^^^^m^m^m)tm^^
Salt Fish of all kinds.
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October 7, 1908
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At fconfluence of the Similkamefil and Tulameen Rivers
Send for Maps
SIMILK A.MEE% ■JMTMSCf g
«^£ «j£ «i£
and Price Ltst t<§
(pipit-'
ERNES
^WATERMAN,
111        &*_Vi - v*>^ ii#|^llS1'||ifte^ 114
Resident    MtlfiaWei ^
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VERMILION    FORKS   MINING   AND     DEVELOPMENT    CO'Y
tas^
3^~£?;
^5_^_^5S5__SS_^^/^
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