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Similkameen Star 1911-11-01

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Princeton coal is clean and best for domestic use.
Suspicious mortals are precisely what they accuse others of.
Trade follows enterprise, and enterprise is the outcome of business tact and vigor—A general movement upward is the tendency of
the times and prospects are better than ever—Princeton Coal and Land Co. making large addition to plant, other industries likewise.
Vol. XII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESdAY, NOVEMBER J, \9\\.
No. 44.
MINES AND MINING
Gold and Platinum Dredging
Very Probable Industry
on Rivers.
Prospecting for Fay Placers will be
Carried on Coming Winter by
Lease Owners.
J. Roy Colwill, barrister, of Portage La
Prairie, Man., was in town Thursda., on
his way to Kennedy mountain, on behalf
of clients interested in mining property
there.
W. C. Fry returned from the coast and
California last Thursday. He was accom
panied by Mr. Keene, of Oroville, a placer
mining expert, who will probably be here
this winter testing ground for gold and
platinum.
C. F. Law, the well-known mining man,
was in town last Thursday. He has a
gang of men prospecting his placer leases
o 1 the upper Tulameen.
Messrs. Corwin, Hinton, Grant and
McDonald will drill and otherwise prospect the Similkameen river this winter
for gold and platinum These gentlemen
are Vancouver capitalists with the practical experience necessary for success,
and if the precious metals are there in
quantity they will recover them.
TOWN AND DISTRICT.
Prof. W. Bradf.ird Marks^late associate
of Strasburg's dancing academy, Detroit,
and recently of Nelson'and Grand Forks
schools of society ajncl theatrical dancing,
is about to open a/school in Princeton.
He is well recommended as an instructor.
Those desirious of taking lessons are ad
vised to enroll early.
C. L. Cummings has moved into his
largejiew premises and is better prepared
than ever to attend to orders in blacksmithing, sleigh and carriage building.
Board of trade meeting next Monday
night in court house at 8 o'clock. Among
other things the question of incorporation,
new public buildings, etc., will be considered.
Judge J. R. Brown has gone to the bedside of his father, seriouslyill at Sarnia,
Ont., which necessitates a second postponement of the County Court to.be held
at Princeton.
P. Swanson, proprietor of the Great
Northern hotel, went to Vancouver last
Wednesday, going via Merritt.
THE JEANNE KTJSSELL CO.
Judging by press reports throughout
the province, the above theatrical company is playing to capacity houses, and
citizens of Princeton and district have a
rare treat awai ing when they appear in
the I.O.O.F. hall tomorrow night, Thurs-
d iy, November 2,in 'The American Girl.'
Owing to previous engagement of the hall
by the Orange Lodge on Friday night, a
matinee, ' The Man from Home,' beginning at 2:30, will be presented Friday
afternoon. Saturday night, November 4,
'The Devil' will be played. Each of these
plays will prove most enjoyable and are
selected from a repertoire of two dozen
dramatic productions. Miss Russell has
a world wide reputation, and is assisted
by strong and talented actors. See them
and satisfy your love of genuine amusement and entertainment.
EAST PRINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, Oct. 30.—The large
engine room at the cement plant is now
in" tht hands of the carpenters, the masons
having finished the walls, which are built
of stone the entire height, as are all the
buildings at the works. A large gang is
now at work on the walls of the coaldry-
ing house.
R. W. Turner's grocery Jstock arrived
Saturday. This addition to his business
will be a boom/to residents of East
Princeton.
W. H. Galligher, of Vancouver, B.C.,
visited East Princeton and the cement
works last week and was much pleased
wi.h the prospects, both for the cement
plant and the town.
J. McPherson has charge of the construction of the bridge across the Similkameen, on the spur to the cement works.
Work will be started at once.
BUILDING NOTES.
H. T. Rainbow is moving the house formerly occupied by E. Waterman onto the
lot to which it properly belongs. He wi _
also make it ready for occupancy.
J. Knudson, contractor, is at work on
the A. E. Howse building foundations, and
will rush it to completion. He hopes to
have it roofed before very cold weather
sets in.
P. W. Gregory, C.E.iJs having a residence put on the firstoench above town.
It will be erectidr by Max Wilson, contractor.
AN APPRECIATIVE SUBSCRIBER
A subscriber at Coleman, Alta., writes
as follows : ' Dear Sir—Enclosed please
find cheque for #2, renewed subscription
to Star for another year. I do not think
I ever paid a subscription more cheerfully,
as your paper is doing a great work for
Princeton and district, which, I believe,
is destined to become an important point
in British Columbia, due to its many
natural advantages and resourceS^and
you are earning and deserving the support.of the community in your effort to"
make the same most widely known. I
hope to take advantage of them myself in
the near future. Wishing you every success, I am, yours very truly.'
THE NEW COAL TOWN
Coalmont Making Rapid Progress and will Soon
Have Railway.
Business Concerns Getting in Shape
for Trade—Survey of Road
is Finished.
Coalmont, October 24.—The Coalmont
Livery, Feed and Sale Stables have about
completed their large barn at Coalmont,
occuping a frontage of 75 feet, The company own altogether 100 feet . f ground
facing on Front street, and expect by
next spring to be utilizing their full space".
They have at present 30 head of horses in
theirstables.
The Coalmont Hotel Co., Ltd. express
themselves as being weir pleased with the
headway which is being made on their
large premises here. The second coat of
plaster is being laid on, plumbers are
busy installing the heating plant, and the
building should be ready to throw open
to the public by Ifewember 15th. When
completed and furrnshed this will be one
of the most commodious and comfortable
hotels in the interior, as tne proprietors
are sparing neither pains nor money in
preparing for the accommodation of their
guests.
Beautiful, sunny weather for the past
month has helped contractors on the
townsite not a little in forwarding their
building operations.
Messrs. Kennedy & Hale, of the Great
Northern engineering staff, w.re visitors
in town last week. While heie they made
arrangements with the Columbia Coal and
Coke Co. for the laving_of a wve for the
turning of the Great Northern engines.
The work will bejprosecuted immediately
upon the arrival of the railheacPai Coal-
mont. Work is now progressing favorably on the last crossing of the Tulameen
river, a few miles below town, and the
15th of next month should see tracklaying
completed. Eight or ten teams have been
kept busy for the last month or more
grading the site for the station buildings
and sidings.
The Coal Company are pushing along
the s.ork on their tram line from the
mouth of their tunnel" to the railway
grade, and are preparing-now to drift on
both sides of the 15ft. coal seam, which
was crosscut about thr*e/weeks ago.
The government engineers have completed the survey work on the new wajgoff
:road between Granite Creek and Tftta-
meen. The new road lies directly through
Main street, and follows a water grade for
the whole of the six: miles, crossing to the
southeastern bar__ of the Tulameen at
Coalmont, over the new bridge which has
recently been completed by the Coal Co.
Mrs. Boyce, .of Vancyijyer, returned
home a.few davs ago, after_spending a
month as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. T.
Johnston.
Arthur S. Williamson, of Williamson
and Tnrner, left for Vancouver, via Merritt, on Saturday, after putting in three
or four days sizing up local improvements.
Geo. L. Fraser, general manager of the
Coal Co., spent lpsfwe'elc in Spokane on
company's busj_efes. He was accompanied
on the trip *y Mf_l Fraser.
Messrs. Williamson & Turner report a
continued activity in the sale of town
lots; over half the townsite isnow.disposed of;—
—TBetwo story building which is being
erected for E. L. Darrah. the baker, is
nearing completion, and should be ready
for occupancy in about a week's time.
BEAVER MAY NOW BE TRAPPED
Hunters and tiappers, including many
Indians, arc gathering in the vicinity of
the beaver haunts throughout the conntry
in readiness fo.' the opening ol the season
which has been closed for five years. Although the beaver were nearing extinction in th. Simi kameen district when the
five years' close season' commenced, the
animals are plentiful now, and some big
bags are anticipated. During the five*
year* the value of the pelts has increased
tremendously, and t he rush to obtain
skins is great.
TAX COMMISSIONER OBSERVES1.
Impressions of Editor Lugrin as Told
in the Colonist.
'This description has already grown to
such a length that I feel like deferring
any reference to the business prospects of
the country until another time, but each
day discloses so much of interest that perhaps it is well to dispose of the lessons of
each daily. We have come 71 miles today. We left coal mines on the Tulameen
and we have come to coal mines on the
Nicola. Near the former an extensive
cement plant is being installed ; near the
latter a gypsum plant is in operation.
Half of the distance between the two
rivers is timbered country ; the other half
grazing country. There is a good deal of
farm land at both ends of the road, especially on the Nicola end. Near the Tulameen end, but strictly over on the Similkameen side of the valley and about eleven
miles frOrn 'transportation, is the great
pre deposit on Copper Mountain, soon to
be opened on a large scale. These things
seem to furnish factors that will ensure
great prosperity in this section of British
,Columbia which we have traversed recently. There is not the least doubt that
Princeton and the region thereabouts are
feeling the impetus of a new life. A mile,
and a half from, the town the cement
works will soon be in operation, and when
Continued on page 4.
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November i, 191 *•
* WHAT KIND OF A BAND WILL
OUR BAND BE?'
Editor Star—Sir : Replying to your
two questions in last week's Star : 'What
about the band ? ' and ' Where is Billy
Knight, ex-leader ? ' I beg to inform you
that I am not responsible for the band's
silence. Quite the reverse. I venture to
say ' Had I not been voted out of the
leadership, the band would now be playing third-grade music instead of none at
all.' There has not even been a practise
since playing at Hedley on Labor Day.
The public who so cheerfully subsciibed
toward purchasing some of the instruments should request the band to give an
account of itself. If some of the employers of labor in the district could be
induced to give steady employment to a
few energetic band men the present dor-
ment members might be aroused to action
again. Thanking yoj/forthe space given,
I remain, musically/yours,
V      Bhi,y Knight.
Princeton, B C, Oct. 28,1911.
WHAT IT MEANS.
Editor Star—Sir : Tuesday,. October 31,
is known as Hallow'een, and every one
knows that Hallow's means Saints and
'een is 'eve,' so the name signifies the
eve of All Saints Day, or the evening before that day which is November i. This
day commemorates in all old churches, as
the Anglican, the Roman and the Greek,
the eminent and famous, the great and
good of every age who made the world
better.. They lived and died for great
principles, and they are remembered with
joy and thanksgiving. Of recent years
are the innocent customs and joyous
gatherings in the home the night before,
babbing for apples, pretending to find
out the initials or the features of our
sweethearts, and various suchli.e harm
less and innocent jollity. Nowadays less
innocent customs obtain, introduced we
shouldn't wonder from the South Pacific;
boys aud men take free range over the
.towns and villages and they do things
which are relics of a lawless and uncivil
]sed time : damage property, overturn
buildings, tangle people up in various devices, and altogether run riot without restraint. The officers of law aud order who
are paid for that night, as for every other
night, are not in evidence. Why ? No
body can say. Good customs are worth
keeping, bad customs are not. Are we
entirely civilized or only partly so ? Is it
not reasonable to expect the time has
come when ordinary good neighborly be
havior may be looked tor on every evening of the year of 365 days, instead of being let go on the night of all others when
famous, holy and kindly characters are,
or should be, held in remembrance ?
Yours truly, Junius.
Princeton, Oct. 30, 1911.
AN INTERESTING BOOK.
Through the lists in The Bookman and
elsewhere it is comparatively easy to keep
track of the popularity of current fiction,
as well as of some of the non-fiction and
juvenile books. The St. Louis Public
Library publishes this year, as it did last
year, a list showing the preferences of its
readers in non-fiction as represented by
the loan of books at the central building.
It will be noticed, as in the list of last
year, that Mrs: Eddy's book leads all the
rest with triumphant ease, the number of
copies of Science and Health in the library
being fifty-eight, number of times issued,
2>I35- ' Innocents Abroad,' by Mark
Twain, with thirteen copies, was issued
1,576 times.—Boston Transcript.
Nelson's population is 7,000, including
suburbs of a mile around.
ODftrELLOWS
COMMENCING
THURSDAY
November 2
MISS JEANNE
gMI88tt|
ANVAN. AND THE /*/**/%+***
Jeanne Russell Co.
16  PEOPLE  16
THURSDAY, NOV. 2:
'The American GirP
FRIDAY, NOV. 3:
MATINEE at 2:30 p.m.
'The Han from Home'
SATURDAY, NOV. 4:
'The Devil'
High=class Vaudeville [
Between Acts
Every Production Complete !!
Plan and Sale of Tickets at
C. Willarson & Co.'s
Prices: 50c, 75c, $1.00
Matinee Prices:
25c and 50c
I KNUDSON
Contractor   and   Builder
Estimates Furnished—Cement, Wood
I Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
Neat & Artistic Printing at Star Office
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Groceries Fresh Provisions
WE CARRY A FUL . LINE OF
Fruits and vegetables
Remove. to Irwin Mock    i
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Try Us
AND IF YOU- ARE SATISFIED TELL OTHERS,
IF NOT, TELL US.
.•SA/N/WW
O. H. CARLE,   The Grocer,   Princeton,  f
$_j_j_x_:_;_:_:____x«.^^
H*>:~.K'«>*<K«» ♦♦♦
Icoldstrcam Estate Nurseries"
VERNON, B.C     I
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Have a very fine assortment ot
FRUIT TREES
ORNAMENTAL AND SHADE TREES
AND SHRUBS
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% Budded Stock a Specialty!
All Trees offered for Sale are grown in Our Own
Nurseries on the Coldstream Estate
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♦>    General Agent, V. D. CURRY, Vernon, B.C.
I T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
.. Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing,
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded,
Careful attention given to  all
Mail  Orders.
COUNTY  COURT, YALE.
A sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Friday, 13th
day of October, 1911, at the hour of 11 o'clock iu
the forenoon. By Command
HUGH HUNTER,
Registrar County Court.
C__— NOTICE, the above court is postponed
to Friday, Nov. 3rd, jg    ^^ HUNTER
^g£ NOTICE—The above court is postponed
until Friday, December 3rd, 1911.
HUGH HUNTER.
BOARD OF TRADE, PRINCETON, B. C.   Meets first Monday in
each month.
J. D. Lumsden,
President.
K. C. Brown,
Secretary.
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52.
Regular meetings. 8 p
m., Thursdays,
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situate  in
Thomas Block.   •' Oddfellows Hall."i V
J. F. Wadpeli,, Jas. Gellatly.
Noble Grand. Secretary
1 3,000 \
I ■■■ ■■■■ :new-: :: :: I
I Views «f Princeton I
1 JUST RECEIVED f
i 16 New Subjects
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/J 9fi^         *Wfr*           _C^* ^\
\ 3 for 25c. 5
\ e£*    «£*    _5* /
h PRINCETON £
\ Drug and l
I Bookstore \
y GEO. G. ___XL, Manager. ^
4i~>-c^_^c^c^^_
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
Similkameen Land & Mines
H. B. BROWN, Broker
443 Pender St. W. Vancouver, B.C.
Will Buy or Sell.
Nicoia to Okanagan.        ' Bulldog
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NOVEMBER  I,   1911.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
SPECIALS.
Guaranteed Strictly Fresh Eggs, Hazel-
wood Butter, Snow Cap Butter an 1 Oroville Butter on sale all the time at
Semerad's.
See Semerad for Good Eatables—The
Home of the Oyster. Orders taken for
real good Home Made Sauerkraut.
Wanted.—By young man, position,
two years' experience in store, good
teamster.—Apply Star office."
Grain and timothy hay for sale by F. F
George.   Inquire at the harness shop of
Thompson" & Prosser.
Owners of lots on Bridge street and
Vermilion avenue, desiring to sell, will
please communicate with J. M. Wright,
Princeton, B.C.   State lowest price.
COAL MINERS STRIKE ENDS.
The great strike of coal miners has, at
last, come to an end, and the hardships
resulting from it, both to miners and coal
consumers, will cease. Within a week,
it is expected, the mines will be in full
running order, and the 5,640 union men
who quit work at midnight on the 31st
».d_y of March last, at;_ the 1,500 non-
Vunion men whos_(DCC_TOtion ceased with
the commen(___ient^__. the strike, will
again find employment.
Basis of Settlement.
The basis of settlement, according to
the Lethbridge dispatch, is the Gordon
award as to wages, the recognition of the
check-off system, some slight change in
the wage schedule, chiefly regarding contract work, and an agreement fora period
of two years.
The settlement of the strike, which has
lasted nearly seven months, brings to an
end one of the sternest fought conflicts
between labor unionists and employers
which British Columbia has ever seen.
The strike was one which affected directly
or indirectly many hundreds of thousands
of persons in the prairies and in British
Columbia.
In the immediate strike zone a serious
business depression followed the closing
of the mines and this depression was felt
in greater or less degree over a very widely
extended area.
Granby Will Operate Again.
In West Kootenay the mining and
smelting industry was one of the heaviest
losers through the closing of the mines
and the increase in the price of fuel which
resulted from coke having to be brought
from Pennsylvania, and many men were
thrown out of employment as a conse
quence. The cost of coke laid down
there from the east was $12 per ton, compared with less than $6 per ton paid for
fuel from the affected district. The
Granby smelter and mines in the Boundary were compelled to close down, owing
ti this enormous increase in the cost of
operation, and although the Trail smelter
and the British Columbia Copper Co.'s
smelter continued in operation throughout the seven months, it was only by a
curtailment of production from the mines
with which they were connected, and at
an enormous cost to the two companies
that the furnaces were kept in opera'ion
Tremendous Cost to Consumer.
In Nelson and throughout the country
relying for its coal upon district No4_t$.
which produced about 12,000 tons per day,
the cost of fuel to the consumer was very
heavily increased and in some cases actual
coal famines have been reported.
Placing the increased average cost to
the consumer at the low estimate of $2.50
per ton, the people of the districts affected
have paid $6,000,000 more for their fuel
than under normal conditions. And the
greater portion of this $6,000,000 has gone
to the railroad companies as the higher
cost of coal imported from Montana,
Pennsylvania, Vancouver island and other
collieries has been in nearly every case
attributable to the transportation charges
It Really Costs Very Little
To Keep Warm and Comfortable
Even In The Coldest Weather !
Permit Us to Suggest "How"
JUST FULFIL TWO CONDITIONS :
FIRST:—Buy Only All-Wool Underwear, for it is only ALL WOOL
UNDERWEAR that keeps your skin and body in that dry, healthy, cold-
resisting condition, which is so necessary to the perfect enjoyment of crisp,
bracing, winter weather.
SECOND:—Buy AH Your Underwear from Us, for in that way on_y
you can be absolutely sure that you are getting ALL WOOL    We guarantee
it. _ Besides, by buying your Underwear from us, you obtain it at the Right /
Price, yes—at such a low price that it costs you really very little to keep /
warm and comfortable during the coldest weather.   ' \
We have several excellent lines of Men's Under=
wear in stock, ranging in price from $i to $2.50
per garment, but would call your special atten=
tion at this time to our i4=Karat Hen's All=Wool
Underwear, in all sizesSgMm 34 to 44, with
Drawers to match, made from Pure i4=Karat
Wool, extra heavy, unshrinkable, double=breasted
Shirts at $1.50 per garment. Try a suit or two !
This number is a winner !
THEN :—'GET THE HABIT OF TRADING AT HOWS^S—
IT WILL SAVE YOU MONEY."
The A. E. Howse Co., Ltd.
PRINCETON,  B. C.
THE CANADIAN  BANK
Of: ^COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000        REST, | $8,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerces is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
Africa Crete
Arabia 1   Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark.
Australia
A u stria-Hungary
Belgium *'-■'■■
Brazil
Bulgaria
Ceylon
China
Egypt
Faroe Islands
Finland
Formosa
France
Fr'ch Cochin China
Germany
Great Britain
.I.
Ja
ina M
Greece
Holland
Iceland
India
Ireland
Italy
"apan
ava
alta
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Philippine Islands
Portugal
Roumania |
Russia
Servia
Siam
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlements
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United States
Uruguay
West Indies, etc
' Manchuria
Mexico
The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable; that is they are drawn in sterling1, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. A233
■■■#;"-Mb .        J. D. ANDRAS,  Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH	
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vvvvvvvVvVVVvvvvVVvvv^ J
Pioneer Meat Market!*
^/V^VN/WN*
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR f
Beef, Pork, JVbtton, Fish, 1
ALSO IN STOCK. 1
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Fresh Butter, Eggs,  Sausage, Pickled J
Pig's Feet, Salmon Bellies, Herring, Prime Lard, Etc.
P. BURNS & CO., LTD. |
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All HUNTERS; TAKE NOTICE
THAT IT IS LAWFUL TO SHOOT but not otherwise Kill Blue and Willow Grouse from ist September to
31st December ; Ducks, Geese and Snipe from ist September to 28th February ; Deer from ist September to .5th
December ; Prairie Chicken during month of October only.
Ducks, Geese and Snipe may be sold during the months of
October and November only. Our Stock of Guns and
Ammunition may be sold any day.
A. L WHITE'S FIIRINITIIRE STORE
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KING & GIBSON
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near .Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
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,**.***********.********^**^.**^^*****i*****^***********+*****s******^
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NELSON BREWING CO.
Ily .".% PRINCETON, B.C.
aRhysicians Recommend Our Beer
for Emaciated Patients
As a beverage, healthful ;   for the table, appetizing ;   for social
and proper use, better than wine.    Families Supplied.
 r
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November i, 191 i,
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. n. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVBR.Y WEDNESDAY.
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advauce,
ADVERTISING RATES :
Laud Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each.
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
S cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 perin. per month.
suggestive in a brace of Colts which
h_-fcWrJed in his inside pockets." It
is saicTTEat he is too old to mend,
but is there not another trite saying
' while there is life there is hope.'
Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Monday.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
The importance of placer mining
in this section is indicated by the,
leases held on much, if not all,' cf
the available ground on the rivers
and creeks. Since the early days of
placer mining by the old time rocker
and grizzly on Granite creek and
the Tulameen and Similkameen
rivers, with tributaries, a well
grounded conviction has been present in the minds of raining men
that profitable operations by dredge
or other machinery would, some
day, be an accomplished fact. That
day seems to be nigh. About a
dozen companies and individuals
are now preparing to begin actual
minifig on their .proper ties, and the
erection of the first dredge will
shortly be undertaken. So far as
information is available the existence of values in gold and platinum
abundantly warrants expenditure
for proposed operations. Dredging
for gold in California and New Zealand has been very remunerative.
Prospecting and testing in Princeton district gives much better returns in gold and platinum than in
other countries and there is no doubt
that a great industry will be established here.
Is the Princeton board of trade
dead or is it in that condition known
as coma ? If ever citizens had an
opportunity to show their interest
in an institution that makes for the
general good it is now. The board
has about $50 in the treasury which
6ught to be put to some public use,
say lighting the corner of Vermilion
avenue and Bridge street. It has
been impossible to get a quorum
lately, evincing a low state of public
spiritedness and downright carelessness. Wake up citizens, or, like
Rip Van Winkle, you will find
things so changed when you do that
you will be hopelessly left in tbe
race.
November i, 191 i.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
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TAX COMMISSIONERS OBSERVE.
From First Page.
I say that all the buildings in course of
erection are of stone, and one of them is
400 feet long, it will be apparent that the
industry will be an important one. Right
at Princeton itse f is an operating coal
mine It is shipping some 200 tons of
coal daily, and its output is to be enlarged.
The coal is semi bituminous. Coalnx nt
is about 12 miles up the Tulameen. As I
do not wish anything-that may appear in
these letters to seem like an advertisement, I shall only say of Coalmont that
the owners of the mine and of the town
site, who are Canadians, are not only lading their plans on broad lines, but are
C .rrying them out thoroughly. The com
pany has a coal area that is oval in s_ape,
being about five miles long by 2>% miles
wide. There are six seams of coal and
their average width is about 50 feet. The
estimated contents of the field is about
300,000,000 tons.'
Our old friend, Bill  Miner  (the
C  jvord ' friend ' is used carefully and
\i
^without implicating anyone in his
depredations) is again a free man.
While Star has no sympathy with
his lawless conduct, we do wish the
old jailbird would reform or go to
Venezeula and make^cotumon cause
with that other robber. Castro,
' Castor Oil.' In either way he
would allay any uneasiness in North
America, while he is running loose
and wild. During t_f» twn y. _„« he
lived at Princeton, he frequently
called on~The ' devil' and discussed
social and political matters, and, as
a memento of his visits, there still
hangs his picture among such
notables as Sir xhbs. Shaughnessy,
Tommy Burns, Sir Wilfrid Laurier
and the Hon. R. Iy. Borden. There
was nothing suggestive in the name
he assumed while here, 'Mr. Edwards,' for by this name he was introduced into select circles and
danced with the creme de la creme
of society, but there was something
A POPULAR ACTRESS.
The Jeanne Russell Co. drew large
hoiis;s at Pent'cton, the seats iu ihe hal
being all bought up long before the cur
tain rose. The Herald says of Miss Russell : ' She needs no criticism in Penticton. Her winning stage mannetisms are
well known and appreciated and her impersonation of characters was on a very
high plane. The Devil is a very popular play and the vaudeville acts are a new
feature.' Don't fail to see this company.
Reseived seats at Willarson & Co.'s.
Thursday nie;ht, Friday matinee, and
Saturday night.
There was a large attendance Sunday
night at the Presbyterian service to hear
the question of Socialism exponded by
Mr. Craig, a resume of which will be
given next week. Next Sunday evening
the subject will be ' Homesteading.'
Dr. Bennett and the Misses Laura and
Irene Irwin metored from Kamloops en
Thanksgiying Day, on a visit to Bert
Irwin and sister.
Any one in need of experienced writer,
call at Star oflice for information.*
Rev, Mr. Cleland, of Penticton, is visiting Rev. J. Williams.
Dressmaking & Millinery
Mms. TURNER & BYSOUTH
French Block, Bridge Street
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Rich Resources
SURROUNDING
EAST
PRINCETON
The New city With The Payroll
Give you the opportunity for one of the
SOUNDEST INVESTMENTS
In British Columbia.
CITY LOTS ARE BEING  OFFERED  FOR
SALE FOR THE FIRST TlflE.
IT IS INEVITABLE THAT THE VALUE OF
THESE LANDS WILL GREATLY INCREASE
Here are some of the Reasons :
East Princeton is surrounded by huge de=
posits of Coal, Cement, Copper, Gold, and
other important ITinerals.
The British Columbia Portland Cement
Co. is erecting a half a million dollar plant,
which will employ between 300 and 400 men.
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The United Empire Co. is shipping a lig
nite coal of the best quality and is developing ♦♦♦
immense copper deposits, requiring large reduction works and several hundred em=
ployees. The Princeton Coal & Land Co. is
increasing its daily shipments to 300 tons of
coal, providing employment to about 150
men. Other coal companies are spending
over $2,000,000 in development, and will give
work to at least 1,000 men.
For transportation, East   Princeton will
have, in the near future, the Great Northern
and the Kettle Valley lines, both of which,
X   will pass through the townsite.
Y      East Princeton is beautifully situated on
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the Similkameen River, with an abundance
of water power available. The new city has
every facter for growth into a big industrial
centre.
It presents a rare opportunity for investment.    Get full particulars immediately.
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D. Q. McCURDY
RESIDENT AGENT.
Or write RAYMOND E. WARD, Pacific blk, Vancouver.
I? £__
Orders Promptly Attended To [ <£n*4*** .J.**.^^
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PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES.
The Daily News is iy receipt of the
annual report of the provincial archivist,
E. O. S. ScholefielcK dealing with the
wdtfk which "has" been accomplished in
the way of ccJle«ing and collating all
available recortl/ relating to the early as
well as more recent history of British
Columbia. While to some this work may
appear to be of little value, to the student
and to the man who desires to secure
authoritative information on any period
of British Columbia's history it will prove
priceless. Many of the documents now
in charge of the archivist have been in
possession of the government for many
years, while others have been more recently acquired, but up to last year no
effort had been made to arrange or classify
them. The result of the first year's efforts
in this direction is indeed most gratifying,
and bears indisputable evidence of Mr.
Scholefield's efforts and his interest in
the work which has been entrusted to
him in addition to his duties as provincial
librarian.
The collection now in possession of the
government, it is true, is not as large as
might be desired, or as it will be in the
course of a few years, but it is, nevertheless, an important one, for it contains
much useful information regarding this
part of Canada which can be found nowhere else on the continent. Some of
the documents relate to the days of early
discovery and others to more recent
events, but the bulk deal with the period
between the formation of the crown colony
of Vancouver island in 1849 and the union
in 1871 of the crown colony witb the Do
minion of Canada. This was an important
period in British Columbia's development
and one concerning which it is highly desirable all possible information should be.
secured not only for present use but also
for the benefit of the generations to come.
During the time that Mr. Scholefield
has been archivist, he has accomplished
much, but his labors cannot have their
proper fruition without the assistance of
all in possession of information or documents which would assist him in making
the records as complete as possible. It is
sincerely to be hoped that Mr. Scholefield
will have the co-operation so necessary to
t_e success of his important work.—Nelson Daily News.
CELEBRATION STATEMENT.
Following is a statement of receipts
and expenditure in connection with Labor
Day^ports at Tulameen :     ——__——
Total subscribed...: $186.25
Prizes $137.00
Money on hand   16.25
Money to be collected  19.50
Decorations ,    9.00 -
Printing    4.50
Total $186.25
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Presbyterian church services.:—Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
service, 11 a.m.
Anglican church services for next Sunday, Nov. 5th: Granite Creek, 11 a.m.,
Holy Communion and Sermon. Princeton
School House, 7-30 p.m., Evening Prayer
and Sermon.
Methodist church service, Sunday,
Nov 5th. In Oddfellows' hall,*_t 7:30
p.m. ; cement works at n a.m.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject, 'Adam and Fallen Man.' The first
man is of the earth, earthly:, the second
man is the Lord from heaven.—I Corinthians 15: 47.
The coal famine is averted by the strike
being settled.
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Coalmont
A legitimate
Investment
Today
M(
they are reasonably sure of a good  return.    If the
TOST   PEOPLE   want   to   invest  their money where
I of a good return. If the
investment is to be made in real estate there are several
things to be considered : The situation of the town, climatic
conditions, transportation facilities, and primarily the
amount of the monthly payroll. When these questions are
asked regarding Coalmont they may all be answered to the
credit of the town. The situation and climatic conditions
are ideal ; the main line of the V.,V. & E. railway runs
through the town on its way to Vancouver.
The Columbia Coal & Coke Co. operating here have practically an inexhaustible supply of a pure bituminous coal.
They are installing immediately a plant which will handle
2000 tons of coal in 8 hours—this means employment for between
800 and 900 men all told.
Figure out this payroll and see how many coal mining towns
in B.C. can beat it.
Address all communications and remittances to
WILLIAMSON & TURNER,
Soi<e Agents,
COALMONT, B.C.
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In a very short time Coalmont will necessarily have a population of from 2000 to 2500 people. Will this cause real estate to rise?
We all know the answer. Then take the opportunity thai presents
itself now—buy first hand and reap the benefit of this increase.
"""" The prices and terms are such that anyone can afford to inves I |jg£
to the extent of one or two lots. They range from $175 to $550, on \ .,
terms of X cash, balance over 18 months. _W
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Princeton Bakery
Fresh Oysters, New York Counts,
_ Can or Bulk.
Fresh Cranberries,
Fruit, Vegetables,
and Confectionery.
C. V. Semerad & Co.
a
MODEL "
LIVERY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
•   General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety  of  Rigs—Good  Roadsters-
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
BROOMFiaD S GARRISON
STAR
JOB PRINTERY
DO YOU WANT:
Letterheads
Billheads
Meal Tickets
Milk Tickets
Printed Envelopes
Visiting Cards
Ladies', Gent's, Misses'
Business Cards
Posters
Dodgers, Dates
Statements
Invitations
Wedding and Ball
Ball Programs
Bills of Fare
Butter Wrappers
Letter Circulars
Memos.
Cotton Signs
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY!
STAR QUICK PRINT
60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights &c.
Anyone seeding a sketch and description maj
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communications strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
Bent free. Oldest acency for securing patents.'
- Patents taken through Munu & Co. receive
special-notice, without charge, in the
Sciettlific But-least ♦
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Iiargest elr»
eolation of any scientific Journal. Terms for
Canada, $_T5 a year, postage prepaid. Sold by
all newsdealers.
MUNS. & Co.36'Broadwa"' New York
Branch Office, 625 F St.. Washington. D. C   .
 Pffjp.'.jl
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November i, 191 i,
SCIENCE AND INVENTION.
Attitude of Patent Office Toward
Perpetual Motion.—The U.S. Patent
' Office regards perpetual motion as meaning a mechanical motion which creates
energy, that is to say, a machine which
works and operates without the aid of any
power other than that generated by the
machine itself and which machine, w.hen
once started, will operate for an indefinite
time.   The Patent Office also holds that
these views are in accord with those of
the scientists who have investigated the
subject and are to the effect that mechanical perpetual motion is a physical impossibility.   These views can be successfully
rebutted  only   by the   exhibition   of a
working model, and, while many persons
have filed applications for patents on perpetual  motion,  such   applications   have
been rejected as being inoperative and as
opposed to the well known physical laws
and in no instance has the requirement
of the Patent Office for a working model
been complied with.   The Patent Office
will  not now permit an  application  for
patent on perpetual  motion to be filed
without a  model,  this practise   having
been adopted by the Patent Office to save
applicants for patent the loss of fees paid
with  their applications in  cases  where
perpetual motion has been claimed. After
an application for patent has been con
sidered by the Patent Office Examiner,
the first government fee of $15 cannot be
returned.
Metal Railroad Ties.—Three pat
ents, No. 1,003, 637 to No. 1,003,639, have
been granted to William Henry Morgan,
of Alliance, Ohio, for metal railroad lies,
all three of the ties being characterized
by cross or transverse portions and end
portions which extend lengthwise the
rails for supporting the latter.
The Telephone and the Phono
Graph.—A reproach which has often
been raised agttfist the telephone is that
it leaves no trace whatever of the conversation transmitted. Thus, a telephone
conversation can never figure in a law
suit. It is not surprising, therefore, that
for some time past efforts have been made
to devise an apparatus by means of which
a permanent record can be kept of tbe
words spoken over the telephone, and the
phonograph has often been thought of in
this connection. According to a note reproduced in La Na' ure from L'E'ettrici. t • t
Prof. P. Perolti has just scored a success
in this direction. The telephone receiver
is composed of two loud speaking telephones ; one of these is furnished with
the usual mouthpiece ; the other is con
nected with the vibrating membrane of a
Pathe phonograph. The current required
for this telephone is a little greater than,
for ordinary installations. The phonograph record can be made to reproduce
the speech in the usual manner.
WATER NOTICE
The Similkameen Power Company, limited, of
Vancouver, B.C., give notice that we intend, on
the 10th day of November next, at eleven o'clock
in the forenoon, to apply to the Water Commis
sioner at his office at Nicola, for a license to take
and use 20 cubic feet of water per second from
Red Creek, a tributary of Fivemile Creek, near
_?Hnceton.
The water will be used at Fivemile Creek, about
% of a mile below Red Creek, for power purposes.
We intend to apply at the same time for permission to store 4,000 acre-feet, more or less, of
the said water in a reservoir at head of falls on
Red Creek.
SIMII^KAM__.!_.N POWER COMPANY, Ltd.
Dated this 27th day of September, 1911.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, C. O. French, of Princeton'
B.C., intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described lands,
to wit:—Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 380 and marked C. O. French's
N.E. corner, thence 80 chains south, thence 80
chains west, thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains east, to point of commencement.
Located 14th September, 1911.
C. O. FRENCH, Locator.
By J. B. Wood   Agent.
Great Northern
—Hotel—
P. SWANSON, Prop.
Advertise in the Similkameen Star.
PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS ACT.
TAKE NOTICE that I have received objections in writing to the retention of
the following names on the Register of Voters for the Similkameen Electorial District on the grounds stated below.
And take notice that at a Court of Revision to be held on the 6th day of November, 1911, at the Court House, Fairview, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, I shall hear
and determine the said objections, and, unless such named persons or some other
Provincial voter on theii behalf satisfies me that such objections are not well
founded, I shall strike such names off the said Register.
Dated this 7th day of October, 1911.
JAS. R. BROWN, Registrar of Voters.
The following persons are reported absent from the district:
First Class room and board
Wines, Iyiquors, Cigars
PRINCETON,
B.C.
No.
3
13
3°
38
53
55
65
83
91
101 ■
127
128
PERCY W. GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship. Guaranteed
Jobbing Work Promptly Attended to
137
165
193
200
204
206
217
230
231
251
254
277
308
310
3i8
341
368
37i
382
296
440
44i
482
463
470
475
491
5io
525
629
539
562
580
604
611
612
656
659
661
681
687
699
73o
739
741
743
744
753
756
764
772
814
828
845
858
884
886
188
219
343
419
468
608
631
683
Name
Alexander Matthew
Anderson, John F...
Baker, Fred   	
Barton, Richard    ...
Bille, Frank   	
Black, Harold A	
Boon, Sidney	
Brown, Thomas P...
Bryan, Albert T. ...
Burch, Charles 	
Casselman, Judson...
Cassidy, Samuel	
Chepmell, Harry  ...
Campbell, Donald J.
Dalrymple, William
Deardorff, Isaac	
Devane, David J. ...
Dick, William	
Donokue, James   ...
Elmhirst, James	
Elmhirst, Richard...
Frank, Joseph A	
Freeborn, Thomas H.
Gillespie, William  J. H.
•Hackney, David   G.
Halcrow, Robert  ...
Harding, Howard W.
Harkness, Jefferson G.   .
Hughes, Frederick..
Humphrey, Archibald
Jackson, Axel	
Jermyn, Geo. S	
Lucey, James	
Laing, James 	
Lyon, Lucius M. ...
Leggett, David 	
Livie, William  	
Love, John 	
Mahoney, Joseph ...
Matheson, Angus ...
Middleton, Sidney A.
Monroe, Angus	
Murray, Thomas W.
McDonald, Angus...
McKenzie, John	
McLeod, John	
McRae, Donald	
McRae, Donald	
Phelan, Thomas ...
Pollock, Henry Clay
Pople, Edward	
Read, Wm. Gadd ...
Revely, Wm. F ,
Ritchey  James, jr	
Schneider, Franz	
^cherbauer, Louis	
Seymour, Charles	
Shaw, James Randolph .,
Shaver, Henry A....
Sinclair, William James..
Sketchley, David	
Smith, John R	
Snow, Stephen Morris   ..
Thompson, John   ...
Vance, W. C	
Webb, Herbert	
Wilkinson, Alfred	
Woods, Silas T	
Woodward, Wm. E.
Wright, Harry	
Place.
. Olalla
. Rock Creek
. Princeton
. Rock Creek
.  Hedley
. Keremeos
. Hedley
Hedley
. Princeton
. Princeton
. Hedley
. Tulameen
. Princeton
. Keremeos
. Fairview
. Hedley
. Hedley
. Rock   Creek
. Keremeos
. Keremeos
Keremeos
Main Kettle River
Sidley
Okanagan Falls
Hedley
Beaverdell
Princeton
Keremeos
Hedley
Hedley
Hedley
Bridesville
Hedley
Hedley
Olalla
Fairview
Hedley
Hedley
Keremeos
Olalla
Keremeos Station
Rock Creek
Beaverdell
Sidley
Westbridge
Hedley
Olalla
Keremeos
Rock Creek
Sterling Creek
Sidley
Hedley
Hedley
Bridesville
Keremeos Station
Hedley
Nickle Plate Mine
Keremeos
Rock Creek
Fairview
Princeton
Sterling Creek '
Fairview
Keremeos
Camp McKinney
Princeton
Hedley
Rock Creek  Mtn.
Hedley
Keremeos
The following persons are reported deceased :
Darragh, Felix 	
Downing, John	
Hawkins, Thomas...
Kennedy,. Frank   ...
Lightley, James	
McMahon, Peter  ...
O'Neil, George 	
Reith, James     	
Kilpoola Lake .
Princeton
Rock Creek  -  ■
Sidley
Sidley
Sidley
Sidley Mountain
Keremeos
Sliilihoeieen Hotel
SUMMERS S WARDIE
PROPRIETORS
Large and New building, well Furnished and Plastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIETOhS
Modern in Equipment and
In AH Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOriS, ETC.
Commercials Sampled Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
...Hotel...
user fii
TULAMEEN, B.C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Centre
Mrs. L J. Henderson
PRORIETOR
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Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   F.  CUMMINGS,  Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc.
General Blacksmithing.
Sleighs Built to Order.
All Work Neatly & Promptly
Phone 28. Executed.
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays, in the Odd •
fellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J. F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL, Clerk.
Subscribe for the Similkameen Star.
•$0>.
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November i, 1911.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
THE OCTOBER ROD AND GUN.
On the eve of the opening of the big
game hunting season, Rod and Gun in
Canada, published by W. J. Taylor, Ltd.,
publisher, Woodstock, Ont., is to the fore
with a plentiful supply of good game
hunting stories, covering Canada from'
the Atlantic to the Pacific. The open'ng
story by Mr. Bonnycastle Dale is particularly good, consisting of a fine description of the gallant effects of a little fawn
to escape, its rescue by the sportsman
whose best instincts were aroused by its
hopeless struggle, and its capture and re
vival by the petting showered upon it.
The whole narrative makes an irresistible
appeal to the highest ideals of sportsman
ship, and proves a capital opening fot aj
number which includes hunting of many
varieties and under widely different conditions. Mr. Starratt's paper on Woodcock Shooting in Nova Scotia is another
article which stands out prominently as
one which cannot fail tO]_tit t__£ feelings and the memories of all bird hunters]
and make them live many of their ex-,
periences over agai _. Big game hunting,
■however, is given the pride of place in
this number, and it is a foregone conclusion that in many a camp throughou:
this broad Dominion, Rod and Gun will
pove not only an acceptable but an in
dispensable companion. Many an imports int article of the outfit would be less
missed than this number. Those who
have the arrangements for the hunting
parties and camps so general next month
throughout the Canadiau woods will
please take notice. A wet day in camp
can be passed most pleasantly with a copy
of the big game hunting number of Rod
and Gun in Canada.
that from and after 60 he would receive
$25.18 every three months so long as he
lived. If he died before he was 60, all
that he had paid in with three per cent,
compound interest would be refunded to
his heirs, and if he died just before his
first instalment of annuity fell due, his
heirs would inherit $771.70. A postcard
sent to the Superintendent of Canadian
Government Annuities, Ottawa, giving
your age last birthday, will secure you
information as to what an annuity will
cost.
: IMPORTANCE OF GOOD ROADS.
; An important step towards the improve-
' ltient of existing roads in western Canada
will be taken on Nevember 3 and 4, when
meetings of all interested in this movement will be held in New Westminster
B.C. The meetings are called by Mayor
John A. Lee, and will be attended by a
large number of the members of the West
minster Automobile Club, the Vancouver
Auto Club, the Victoria Auto Club, the
Seattle Automobile Club, and other automobile associations.
I The Pacific Highway Association will
be represented at the meetings by a strong
delegation, including prominent San
Francisco, Portland, Tacoma, Seattle,
Bellingham and Spokane men. These
men will come prepared to urge the-extension of the Pacific highway, which
now stretches from Vancouver, B.C., to
Tia Juana, Mexico, a distance of 2,009
miles. The scheme favored by the highway enthusiasts is the building of the
Pacific highway through-Biitish Colum
bia, via Hazelton, and on to the Yukon.
! The extension of the Canadian highway with the object of eventually making
it a good road from the Atlantic to the
Pacific will also command much of the
attention of the meetings. Resolutions
asking the Federal government to assist
in this scheme ypill be introduced during
the convention.
Other matters to be discussed include
the placing of signs and guide posts along
all travelled roads, the standardizing of
legislation regarding the speed of automobiles and the ' rule of the road,' and
the planning of a campaign in favor of
better roads.
THE VALUE OF SMALL SAVINGS
If a young man, 15 years of age, were
determined to saye three car fares a week,
and to pay the 15 cents thus saved every
week until he was 60 to the Canadian
government for the purchase of an annuity, the result of his thrift would be
The Princeton
Livery I Feed
stables
N. HUSTON, Prop'r
• General Livery business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
NOTICE.
Similkameen division, Yale district.
Ta^e notice that Ernest Waterman, of
Princeton, B.C.occupation mine manager,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1822 thence
south seven chains to the southwest cor-
of Lot 1822, thence west along the north
boundary of Lot 2049 to the high water
mark on the right bank of the Similkameen river, thence northeast along the
said high water mark to the point of
commeucement and containing five acres
more or less. ERNEST WATERMAN,
Aue.25, 1911.    Percy W. Gregory, agent.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick Logan, of Vancouver, B.C , occupation an agentTintends-to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
16 miles west of Princeton, B.C., and about
ten miles south or the Tulameen river, ajtribuiary
of Granite creek Jmarked Frederick Logan's sw.
coiner, thence 80 chains e'astfSo chain __brt_l, 80
chains west, 80 chains south to poiut of beginning,
containing 640 acres, more or lets.
^RgDERICK LOGAN.
Sept. 23, ion. Charles O  French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take nctice that Thomas Wilson. of Vancouver,
__.._occupation a clerk intends toapply for permission to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted about 16
miles west of Princetou. B C., and about lo miles
south of the Tulameen river a tiibutary. of
Granite creek, and marked Thomas WJl|_a's'njHH
corner, thence 80 chains west, 80 chains south 80
chains east, 80 chains north, to point of beginning, containing 64a acres more or less.
THOM.1S WILSON.
Sept. 23,1911: Charles O. French, Agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Nathan P. Daugon, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation 1 builder, intends to apply
for|permission to purchase the tollowing described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
VoT_I_Hrwe_rT>f Princeton, B.C., and about ten
miles south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
<iT__itecree_r__d marked Nathan P. Daugon's
n.w. corner, thence 80 chains south, 80 chains
east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, to point of
beginning, containing 640 acres more or less.
NATHAN P. DAUGON.
Sept. 23,1911. Charles O. French, Agent
Yale laud division, Yale district.
Take notice that George Scharff, occupation a
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about 16 miles west of
Princeton, B.C., and about ten miles south of the
Tulameen river, a tributary of Granite creek, and
marked George Scharff's s.e. corner, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains south, 80
chains east to point cf beginning, containing 640
acres more or less.
GBORGEC SCHARFF.
Sect. 23, ign. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James M. Watson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation a contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following
de__rH____»nds : Commencing at a post planted-
about 16 miles west of Princeton, B.C., and about
eight miles south of the Tulameen river, a tribu-
tiJiylof Gran__~creek, and marked James M.
Watson's n.w. corner, thence 80 chains south, 80
cnains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, to
point of beginning, containing 640 acres, more or
less. JAMES M. WATSON.
Sept. 22,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Enoch Wilson, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation fatm hand, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following desciibed
lands: Commencing at a post plauted about 16
miles west of Princeton B.C., and about 8 miles
south of the Tulameen river, a tributary of
Granite creek, thence 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east, 80 chains north, to place of
beginning, containing 640 acres, more or less.
ENOCH WILSON.
Sept. 22 1911. Charles O French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Gorgon Cambell, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation teamster, i_.__ic_Pto apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
16 miles west of Princeton, B C., and about eight
miles south of the Tulameen ijtyer, a tributar^pf
Granite creek, and marked Gorgon Canibell's
s.w. corner, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east-, 80 chains south, 80 chains west, to point of
beginning, containing 640 acres, more or less.
GORGON CAMBELI .
Sept. 22, 1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James F. Wilson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation a carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
16 mU?s west of Princeton, B.C., and about eight
miles south of the Tulameen riVer, a tributary of
Granite creek, and marked J. F. Wilson's s.w.
corner, thence 80 chains north 80 chains west, 80
cnains south, 80 chains east, 10 pla .e of beginning, containing 640 acres more or less
JAMES F. WILSON.
Sept. 22, iqn. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James Burlon, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation a teamsttr, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following describ
ed lands: Commencing at a post plan tea about'
'three miles southwest of timber limit No. 39,107,
on the east side of Roche liver, and marked
James Burlon's n w. corner, thence 80 chains
south, 80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
I west, to point of beginning, containing 640 acres
more or less. JAMES BURLON.
Oct. 2,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Alma Anderson, of Vancouver,
B.C., occupation a widow, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described
lands : Commencing at a post planted one mile
southwest of timber limit No 39107 on the east
side of Roche river, and marked Alma Anderson's
S-W- corner, thefece 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west, to point of
beginning, containing 640*acres, more or less
„LMA ANDERSON.
Oct. 2, icii. - Charles u. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that George A.Howell, of Vancou-
couver, _ C , occupation a builder, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands : Commencing at a post planted
one mile southwest of timber limit No. 39107, on
the east side of Roche river, and marked George
A. Howell's n.w. corner, thence 80 chains south,
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, to
point of begiSning,contaimng 640 acres,'more or
less. GEORGE A. HOWELL
Yale land division, Yale district.
Oct 2,i9ii. Charles O. French, Agent.
Take notice that Francis T.Reid, of Vancouver,
B.C , occupation a book-keeper, intends to apply
for permteston to purchase the following described lands : Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles southwest o^Umber limit No. 39.107; .__
the east side of Roche river, and "marked Francis
T. Reid's s w. corner, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west, to
point of beginning, containing 640 acres, more or
less. fcftjPRANCIS T. REID
O-'t. 2, iqit. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Cory Keamster, of Vancouver,
BC, occupation a clerk, intends to apply for permission to puichase the following described
lauds : Commencing at a post planted one mile
west of the northwest corner of timberflflimlt
No. 36,827, and marked Cory Keamster's n,e_jcor4
ner, thence 80 chains west, 80 chains south, 80
chains east, 80 chains north, to point of beginning,
containing 640 acres, more or less
CORY KEAMSTER.
Oct. 4, 1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Harry M. Bayford, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation an electrician, intends to.
apply for permission to purchase the following'
described lands: Commencing at a post planted
about one mile we-"t-of the n__:nwest corner of
timber limit No. 36,827, and marked Harry M.
Bayford's n.w. corner,1-thence 80 chai__*e_st7"8_'
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north, to
point ot beginning, containing 640 acres more or
less. HARRY M. BAYFORD.
Oct. 4,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that James H. Graham, of Vancouver, B.c, occupation a clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described
lands: [commencing at a post planted about 15
miles south of Princeton, b c, and one mile west
of the Similkameen river, and marked James H.
Graham'. _Tw,cornS7 .hence 80 chains east, 80
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north, to
point of beginning, containing 640 acres more or
less. JAMES H: G,RAH_M.
C Qj£t". 4,1911. Char__fT>. French, /&e_ff*¥
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick H Corby, of Vancouver, B c., occupation a teamster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands: commencing at a post planted
about 15 miies south of Princeton, B.C., and one
___le*west of the SimUkameen __W£i7__d'_iarked
Frederick H.Corby'ss.w. corner, thence80chains
east, 80 chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, to point of beginning, containing640 acres,
more or less. FREDERICK H. CORBY.
Oct. 4,1911. Charles O. French, Agent.
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
NOTICE.
Take notice that I, C. O. French, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply for a license to prospect for
coal aud petroleum in Kamloops division of
Yale district as follows:—Commencing at a post
plantecral ___ S?W. co'rner of lot 1520 and marked
C. O French, S.W. corner, thence 60 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 60 chains west,
thence 80 cnains south, to point of commence-
_)___]'_
C. O. FRENCH
Dated September 18th, 1911. Locator.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, J. B. Wood, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described lands,
to wit:—Commencing at a post planted at thfc
N.W. corner 01 Lot 388 and marked J. B. Wood's
N.K* corner, thence 80 chains south, thence 80
chains west, thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains east, to point of commencement.
fTBScated 14th September, 1911.
J. B. WOOD, Locator.
LIQUOR ACT, .9.0.
TW'OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
*^t   December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Similkameen Hotel, situate
at Princeton, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th Day of October. 1911.
GEO. E. WARDLE
CHRISTOPHER SUMMERS
JAMES? WA___ACE.
T^OTICE is _i ___>y gi_firthat, on the first day of
*• ' December next, applicatioh will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Tulameen Hotel, situate
at Princeton, in tbe Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE.
■^OTICE is hereby given that,_on the first day of
^■^ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Great Northern Hotel,
situate at Princeton, in the Province of British
Columbia,
Dated this 12th day of October. 1911.
P. SWANSON.
TWOTICE is hereby given that, on the fi_st day of
* . December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial ' olice for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Otter Flat Hotel, situate
;at Tolameen, in the Province of- British1 Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
' MRS. E. J. HENDERSON.
I^OTICE is hereby given that; on the first day of
A ' December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for re-
__wal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Granite Creek Hotel, situate at Granite^Greek __v_i__P:__^__w_,_»f British
Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
H. GOODISSON.
MOTICE^sTieBeby given thiat, on the first day of
■*■ ' Df__mbej^Tiext. application wiH tfe made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of t_e hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
tlyjhotel_«____ as the Allison Hotel, situate at
Allison"; in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 19_T.__
G. GOLDSBOROUGH.
I^OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
. £| December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for the
grant of a license for the sale of liquor by wholesale in and upon the premises known as The Nelson Brewing Co., situate at Princeton, B.C., upon
-the lands described as Lots 1,2.3, and the property
is on 23, 24, Vermilion Avenue.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
THE NELSON BREWING CO.,
per Aug. Thomas.
1WOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
A ' December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hoteMroense to _Hl liquor by retail ihf"
the hotel known as the Coalmont Hotel, situate at
Coalmont, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October. 1911.
COALMONT HOTEL CO., LTD.   _
L. N. Marcotte, Manager.
LIQJJQR ACT, 1910.
Notice is hereby given that,  on the first day of.'
December next, application wilt Be made to the'
Superintendent of Pro_fo__r_x_<__ft-__e transfer of the license for the sale of liquor by retail inj
and upon the premises known as the Tulameen!
Hotel, situate at Princeton, B.C., from Kirkpatrick & Barnes to Kirkpatrick & Malone, of British!
Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
KIRKPATRICK & BARNES,
Holders of License.
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE,
Applicants 'for Transfer.
 -S_S_«H-5S5i5S
8
TH^E4  SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November i, 191 i,
Tempera Mutantur
THE TIMES ARE CHANGED
«*    p   And We Are Rapidl^ Changing With Them !   **   *&
Princeton coal & lim Co
:0   The Pioneer Mining and Development
'■■:-'pL^r"    <&<£ Company of the Similkameen dM*
(Owners of Princeton Townsite)
PRINCETON, the Converging Point of Rivers,
Roads and Trails        :,'        • 3#
-—*■—-=
The Commercial Centre
Government Offices
Public Schools,  Hospital
Fraternal Societies
Board of Trade
Religious Denominations
Pure Water
Waterworl
and Good
__s System
A Pretty, Cleanly and
Healthy Town, situated
at the forks of Tulameen
and Similkameen Rivers
The Princeton Coal & Land Co. at present employs about 100 men operating coal
mine, and are now increasing facilities for mining on a large scale
A  Splendid Domestic Coal
CHOICE LOTS FOR \ SALE
Jf^*<**:f,::
-____> ___<
Information cheerfully given.   Apply to
ERNEST WATERMAN, Manager, Princeton, B.C
«__£«T __>
$m&%
•#©S__
-'- •
—;	

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