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Similkameen Star 1908-11-18

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 — —
mmmmmmmmm
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t7
Princeton will be a Coal Town when railway is built.
LKAMew
" Corruption wins not more than honesty."
Vol. ix. No. 47.
PRINCETON, B.C, WEDNESDAY,   NOVEMBER 18, 1908.        $2 a Year, in Advance
BURRELL VICTORIOUS-DEATH OF DEFERRED ELECTIONS
Appalling Majority Ends Political Despotism
in Yale-Cariboo—Federal Issues
Cut no Figure*
Personal Characteristics Stamp Burrell Superior Han
and Thousand Liberals Vote for Best Candidate—Government Can now Give Fair
Treatment to Everybody.
The deferred election for Yale Cariboo
on Thursday last proved a glorious victory for the Libeial-Conservatives. Any
person, be he Liberal or Conservative,
who took part in that victory cannot fail
to feel proud of the whole electorate and
of Princeton in particular for their splendid majorities. It was another illustration of that inevitable triumph of right
over wrong which ultimately awaits every
unjust cause or person. It was a well
deserved punishment of one who had
Viecome bloated with pride born of a
'little brief authority.' Mr. Ross should
never have been allowed to enter public
Hie. It was only by coarse jugglery that
he got nominated at the Kamloops convention in 1904. But the straight Liberals of that place did not forget his
trickery and hurled him out with a very
emphatic majority for Burrell.
In supporting Mr. Burrell the Star was
moved to do so in the interests of the-
Liberal party, the constituency and of
Princeton. Mr. Ross was so party blind
that he could not give even so small a
thing as a telephone to anyone here but
a Liberal and to some of them he denied
one out of petty spite. His promises
could not be relied upon and he treated
the town shamefully in the matter of
telephone accommodation. With the
flattering majority which Princeton gave
Burrell the Star was amplv vindicated in
the undeviating course it took frofn start
to finish of the campaign. Mr. Ross now
knows that the great majority of the people of Princeton resent his picayune
policy and bull-dozing methods. Had
he played the man he could have had a
majority as in 1904.
Ross's defeat in his own town shows
that even wheie he is best known he is
unpopular. Mr. Burrell had a large
majority in his city. Mr. Ross held out
bribes in the form of postoffices, government appropriations, telephones, etc.,
and employed corruption agents to bet,
cajole, promise, and unduly influence
electors on election day. Mr. Burrell's
election was gained without a cent of
corruption money or undue influence of
any kind—it was without spot or blemish
and he never hit below the belt.
The overtowering personality and record of Mr. Burrell stood in great contrast
to that of his opponent. Electors have
confidence in him, he is likable and that
is why M.P. is written after his name
today. Deferring the election was an
important factor as a cry in Mr. Burrell's
behalf, but of political issues, there were
not any. |$fcV
\ The following is an incomplete list of
returns received, but is near enough to
warrant the prediction that Burrell wil'
have about 1000 majority when the official count is published :
Burrell. Ross. Bunt
PRINCETON   51 31 10
Ashnola   1 3 —
Hedley   48 63 10
Keremeos   48 25 15
Tulameen   1 19 —
Penticton   108 49 3
Fairview   22 22 —
Okanagan Falls   15 15 2
Summerland   97 58 11
Peachland   66 23 3
Kelowna   152 83 il
Westbank   5   .     11 3
Vernon   301 223 40
Armstrong   173 95 3
Okanagan L'd'g  23 10 1
Aspen Grove   6 17 —
Granite Creek   4 2
Stump Lake   8 8 —
Merritt  ' 20 13 5
Middlesboro   14 9 1
Coutlee   762
.Lower Nicola   21 5 -   1
"Nicola   28 10 —
Lumby   41 47 2
Whalens   16 8 1
Benvoulin   28 n 1
Spences Bridge   25 4 7
Keefers   361
Shuswap   15 11 —
Three Valleys   3 4 —
Lytton   41 11 1
West Lake   27 —
Naramata   20 9 —
Notch Hill   18 25 6
Lillooet   47 15 —
Grand Forks   192 97 52
Greenwood   132 120 46
Kamloops   320 196 31
Eaderby   98 72 15
Sicamous   67 —
Midway   33 25 3
Ashcroft   32 39 —
Ducks   19 21 —
Eholt   33 9 6
Clinton   23 5 —
Barkerville   41 24 x
Stony Creek          4 8 —
115 Mile House   9 14 —
150 Mile House   11 22 —
Soda Creek            74 —
Wingoon                10 9 —
Salmon Arm         7° 79 5
Three Forks          6 I 11
Quesnel                 53 22 1
NOTES.
In 1904 Ross had a majority of two in
Princeton and 17 in Hedley.
Princeton did herself proud, 92 votes
cast, more than half for Burrell and ten
more than the Rossites and Socialists
combined. Socialists are now a political
factor in Princeton. Room enough iof
all.
But for the herculean work done by
the Rossites and surreptitious "influence-'
together with all the advantage of his
party beine. returned to power on the
'26th ult., the prestige of his being a
government supporter for one term in the
House, it is doubtful if Ross could have
saved his deposit. The Burrellites did
very little work and spent no money, so
that Ross had it all his own way and got
what was coming to him.
The Socialist candidate lost his deposit
money.
Outside of the office holders, the beneficiaries and those who were promised
or expected something, there is a pleasant feeling of relief now that Ross is
where he can do no harm. No true Liberal but rejoices at the weeding out of
such men.
It is announced by placard from Hedley that Joe Wigmore is lo supersede
Stevens as manager of the telephone
line. Many people would welcome the
change. Then we could have a little fun
with It; now it is of little use and certainly is not amusing or even ornamental.    Superintendent Wigmore.   Ahem !
Now that the battle is over let us all
work together for the upbuilding of
Princeton. As one brushes a fly off his
nose so brush aside the knockers, growlers and grumblers. They are merely
flies on the wheels of time.   Ross was a
fly-
The returns produced quite a crop of
incidents. A man in an exuberance of
impetuosity hoisted his flag inverted aud
so it floated to the amusement of observers ; one person developed a mild form
of hysteria on hearing that Ross had
crossed the great political divide, but regained sense when told that nobody
would be disturbed in the public service
as the late member still held the patron-
agt ; at Tulameen 9 different persons are
claiming to be the one who voted for
Burrell now that he is in the saddle ; "I
ran in seven voters for Burrell" said a
man who was charged with Ross ammunition ; "the V.V., & E. will not be
built in ten years if you do not elect
Ross," said a newly arrived coriuption
agent; "I will never take another meal
in this town, if I should, I hope it will
choke me," said the same man'when the
poll was closed and Burrell announced
"twenty ahead."
General Manager Gruber of the Great
Northern says that the rails will be in
Princeton ist of May ; Ross's man with
the bag, "King Kill-it," says it won't be
built in 20 years if the people didn't elect
him.   Which is right ?   Savee !•
Good-eve, Mr. Curtis; good-bye Mr.
Ross.
HILL SPEAKS AT SPOKANE,
Urges Duty Free Coal—Princeton is
Natnral Sourre of Supply.
The Star has been kindly handed by
Mr. Waterman a speech delivered by
James J. Hill, railway magnate, at Spokane recently. Anything Mr. Hill says
regarding tonnage, transportation and
development is backed by nearly a half
century's experience. He is the acknowledged "railway king" of the continent,
owning and controlling a colossal system
of railroads, besides being interested in
mines, smelters, coke productiou and
myriad other enterprises. He is a large
owner of mineral property in the Similkameen aud, as everyone knows, he is
the moving spirit in the V.V., & E. Said
spirit is not now lightning-like in its
construction movements but it may not
be all Mr. Hill's fault. Having reference
to the Princeton coal mines, Mr. Hill
said :
"One of Spokane's greatest needs is
cheap coal. There are no extensive coal
'fields nearer than British Columbia.
Coal carries a duty of 60 cents a ton into
the United States. Get that removed
and good domestic coal can be laid down
in Spokane in carload lots for less than
$5 per ton. It should be retailed at a
dollar profit which wou-d make coal here
at #6. Cheaper coal is absolutely necessary *br Spokane manufacturers. The
city is getting too big to burn pine
slabs,"
GREAT NORTHERN ANNEX.
The opening of the Great Northern
anuex to the public last Thursday night
gives unmistakable evidence of the enterprise and confidence in the future of
Princeton which the owners, Messrs.
Manly & Swanson, seem to possess to an
unusnal extent. They are, however,
active and successful businese men and
their investment of several thousand dollars in enlargement and improvement
may be taken as a pointer toward the
near development of the country generally. To meet present and future requirements the annex was necessary. It
is fitted throughout in first class style and
affords the modern accommodations.
The bar was made by the Brunswick-
Balke Co. and is the finest between Vancouver and Winnipeg.
m
 ——
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
November 18, 1908
November 18, 1908
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
TJHjiJE>T\AR
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
One Year,   -    - ...
Payable In Advance.
$2.00
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reporting any change in address or
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices io and 5 cents per line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month
advertising.
No transient advertisement inserted unless
accompanied with the cash.
TWO GREAT VICTORIES.
Something fell last Thursday !
Was it a landslide; did a planet
drop from the ethereal blue, or did
the earth just open and close her
jaws and with one big crunch swallow two utterly rejected political
candidates, the one in Yale-Cariboo
-and the other in Kootenay ? Yes,
-it' did that, but it was also the
■downfall of pride, arrogance, self-
conceit, corruption and blind par-
tizanship. The result of the elections completely obliterates both
Ross and Curtis from further consideration by any intelligent electorate. They wilfully, foolishly
and stubbornly resisted friendly
advice to fight a fair fight on tbe
26th of October. If they had lost
■on that day they would have went
■down" in honorable defeat and .'still
retained the .respect of electors.
But they chose the unfair method
and many Liberals joined with the
Conservatives in condemning such
tactics by overwhelming majorities
in both constituencies. Ross and
Curtis have rendered themselves
political impossibilities for all time,
the one to return to his ink pots or
a country postmastership and the
other' to attend his mining business.
The determining factors in the
■election were personal rather than
political. Ross had the choice of
day, an important leverage, if unfair, and around this and personal
qualifications hu.ng the smoke and
fire of debate on and off the platform. 'Better terms' is always a
good campaign cry for the Conservatives in B.C. In a sense, this
question is still sub judice, and
while the Judge (Sir Wilfrid) is on
the bench no one doubts his desire
and willingness to do justice to
British Columbia. And it will be
done irrespective of the party complexion-pf its representatives. Regarding a " white B.C." it is patent
to all- that -with a $500 poll, tax on
Chinese, restricted Japanese immigration and the Hindus deported
this cry is merely a political catch
phrase. Any government in its
supposed possession of a sane mind;
will not encourage, immigration of
non-assimilative heathens. Voters
are intelligent enough to know that
governments want electors, citizens,
nation builders, not poor, ignorant
Orientals. But candidates and
campaign orators must have something to debate, beyond personal
.qualifications.
All of the elections  in B.C. were
decided; practically, on the personal
worthiness, record and character of
the candidates. No federal or provincial question intruded sufficiently to make a real issue. In
Yale-Cariboo Mr. Ross needlessly,
wantonly alienated more than one
thousand Liberals by his personal
offensiveness and deferred election
policy. His conduct of the telephone system and rank distribution
of patronage caused the largest vote
ever polled in Princeton and gave
Mr. Burrell the largest majority
ever recorded at this polling station.
His denunciation of absent and defenceless private citizens from the
platform here revealed the man in
his true character. No wonder
he lost caste with the people. He
imperilled the cause of Liberalism in this section by his arbitrary,
bull-dozing practices and the party
is well rid of him from the House
where he caused unseemly debate
and wasted valuable time.
Although Mr. Burrell is not a
Liberal the Star hopes to lend him
some, feeble though it may be, service in carrying.out, certain reforms
and investigating certain discrepancies' and ■ generally repairing the
injurious effects of the late member's foolish policy in this section.
Regarding theLiberals who opposed
Mr. Ross, thev are none the less
Liberal in spirit or ambition for
having done so. They still retain
their confidence in all the ministers
and especially in the Premier, beloved of all Canadians who do not
allow the asperities of party to sour
their thoughts and words.
[acksmithin
HUGH MAQUIRE
NOTICE.
TVTOTICE is hereby given that thirty days after
"■■^ date we intend to apply to the Supt. Provincial Police, Victoria, for a renewal of retail liquor
license for the Great Northern  Hotel, Princeton,
MANLY & SWANSON.
Princeton, B.C., October. 15th, 1908.- ■
•   ~~^oTic_r
fSjOTICE is hereby given- that tljifty days after
■*-^ date I intend to apply to the Supt. Provin"
cial Police, Victoria, for a renewal of retail
liquor Iicensefor Hotel Otter Flat, Tulameen, B.C.
W. J. HENDERSON.
Tulameen. B. C, October loth, 1908.
ICI
Certificate of Improvements
Frieda, Cabin, Colorado Fr.,- Edward 7th, Fr.,
No's.6, Fr.; Y-Fr.; 26, Fr. and. 27 Fr., mineral
claims, situate in the Similkameen mining division of Yale. Wh^re located: On Copper
Mountain.'
Take notice that I, G. Evert Baker, Free Miner's
Certificate No. B20O55, acting for self and as agent
forT. T. Burkhart, F.M.C. No. B20053 and Frieda
E. Baker, F.M.C. No. B20054, intend, 60 days from
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements for- the purpose o
obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37. must be commenced before the issuance of
such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 19th of September, A.D. 1908.      39-48
X
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...
OO*
©iter- Fin
TULAMEEN, B.C.
•  «!•
s
PRORIETOR
I have recently leased the shop run by
G. Murdoch. By strict attention to busi
ness and good workmanship hope to receive your patronage.
Horse Shoeing a Specialty
Repairing Promptly Done
Prices Right'—Terms Cash
iitai NorthcrB
—Hotel—
The
HUSTON   BROS.,  Props.
General Livery business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Draying in all its branches. Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
A GOOD
SPRING TONIC
is what you require.
Campbell is- the man to
see about it.    Don't delay.
CIGARS AND
TOBACCO   ;^f
 AT	
MANLEY & SWANSON, Props.
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
Xts
tarn, §. c.
need to eat meat if you want to
enjoy life.    We have the best.
BUTCHERS
ffjjfp   landscapes
vimi*      Groups
6RAPHER Porfpalts, &c
Photos of Families taken at their
Homes—Views of Princeton
and Surrounding Camps.
AMATEUR WORK FINISHED
Address    -     PRINCETON. BC.
J. R. CAMPBELL.
PRINCETON - -      ' -
B.C.
R, W. GROVE
Civil and JTining Engines
B. C. Land  Surveyor ""
Examinations and   reports   made   on
mjnes and prospects. ; w'
Has   a   thorough   knowledge   of   the
Sirnukameen and Boundary .Districts.
Plans of all Surveyed Lands and Mineral Claim?
in the District. PRINCETON. B.C.
WHISKEY
i
Syij33(J!3i   -> MINERAL WATER
*M inake a
yjis-a"
'■Sdl'd' bv _U Dealers!;
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 5-.
Regular meetings, 8 p
m., Thursdays.
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situated in
Star building.
N. Hoston, J. o. Coulthard.
6 Noble Grand. Secretary.
LOCAL AND_GENERAL
Executive Agent Marpole and Engineers Catubie and Carry are coming to
the Similkameen on an inspection of the
recently surveyed C.P.R. route.
J. D. Lumsden, manager for the Howse
Co., was in town last Wednesday looking
well after his long siege of typhoid. He
went on to the coast where he will undergo massage treatment. Many friends
were glad to see him around again.
J. J. O'Leary, of Wallace, Idaho, is in
town and will go to Ashnola to look up
his mining interests.
Remember the lecture Monday evening by Rev. Mr. Conn.
Public worship in the court house Sunday at 7:30.
F. J. Gillespie, provincial manager of
the Excelsior Life Insurance Qo., was in
town yesterday.
Peter Marquet, of Nicola, is a visitor
in Princeton.
C. P. Charleton goes to Nicola tomorrow returning in a week.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty days after
date the undersigned intend to apply to the
Supt. Provincial Police, Victoria, for a renewal of
retail liquor license for Hotel Tulameen, Prince"
McCOSKERY & KIRKPATRICK.
Princeton, B. C, October 15th, 1908.
Fire, Life and
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
DEAD   OFFICE, TORONTO
B: E. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
ESTABLISHED  1867
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Reserve Fund, -    5,000,000
Insurance a
INSURE NOW : You Don't
Know what to-morrow
may bring forth.
forTsale
FARM LANDS
FRUIT LANDS
STOCK RANCHES
CHICKEN RANCHES
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
COUNTRY. BUSINESS ^^^^^^^
banking business.    Sales notes will be cashed or taken for collection.
Accounts may be opened by mail, and
monies  deposited  or  withdrawn  in
this way with equal facility.
A. J. MARLOW, Acting Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
BANKING BY 1AI
Business & Mesldeaatlal lots
IN PRINCETON
Gold, Silver & Copper, $1.   A v e R Y & A V E R Y
G. G. WEST, Provincial Assayer, 530 Real Estate, Insurance, Notary Public
Richards St., Vancouver, B.C.
60   YEARS*
EXPERIENCE
imllkameen Valley $a<Mlery Co-
harness and SADDLES
and Spurs -      ;jp
MADE TO ORDER
BOOTS and SHOES
Harness Repairs and Boot Repairs Attended to.
First Class work
' Trade Mark3
Designs
Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
aulclily ascertain our opinion free wnotuer an
invention is probably patentable. Communion-
tloMstrtotlyconfldentfeiHANDBOOK on Patent.
sent free. Oldest agency for securinepatents.
Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive
tpecial notice, without charge, in the
A handsomely illustrated weekly, largest circulation of any scientific Journal. Terms for
Canada, $3.75 a year, postage prepaid. Sold by
oil newsdealers.
9
ilffl &Co£e«ro,dwa,.fa York
Branch Office. 625 F Bt, Washington. D. C
I > Largest Sale in Canada
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 5-.
k Regular meetings, 8 p
m., Thursdays.
Sojourning brethren welcome.    Hall situated in
Star building.
N. Huston, J. O. Coulthaod.
6 Noble Grand. Secretary.
Similkameen Lumber Co., Ltd.
J, F, Waddell, Mgr,
•«_•>
It Pays to Advertise.
i
X
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X
X
X
ROUGH AND DRESSED LUMBER
All kinds  of mouldings made.       Orders promptly
attended   to.       For   further   particulars   apply   to
J. F, WADDELL, Princeton,
Interest Charged on Accounts 30 Days Overdue.
V
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complete
sporting * €oods and contractors' supplies
1 B.C.
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A. E. Howse Co.
Nicola
Limited
i THE BIG STORES "
Princeton
* WE HAVE THEM
DOOR HATS—To keep the mud out.
STOVES—A full line of heating.
STOVE BOARDS'-To keep floors clean.
YOU NEED THEM
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR November is, i 08
 . __   -  -    -     _ 9
ss__i_g-a-_r.E5a_gE^^
. I . The Town o£ . . .
British   Columbia
At the conflunce of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers
Send for Maps
SMLKAMEEN DISTRICT
t2r _5p _Sp
and Price List to
_tt^_
fc   ERNEST   WATER]VLAJSf/| ;;.gg
Resident    Manager ii|
VERMILION f FORKS   MINING   ANDf DEVELOPMENT    CO'Y
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