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Similkameen Star 1912-03-13

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 p
&■'
For a clean, high heating fuel use Princeton coal,
mmm******   ■
Mind is eternal, ever active, omnipresent, inspiring, deathless.
The Princeton Coal & Land Company have recently installed new machinery capable of  producing 500 tons of coal per day.
The   Princeton  coal   basin  is   estimated  to  contain  800,000,000 tons of coal—The coal that will make Pennsylvania jealous.
Vol. XIII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1912.
No. fi
PREMIER IS COMING
En   Route
in rough
M*
ough  Inteno
will Arrive here on
Monday 18th.
£*">
Princeton Conservative Association is
Active; Elects Officers and
Receives Report.
A general meeting of the Princeton
Conservative association was held last
Monday night in the court house. C E.
Thomas was chairman and W. C McDougall, secretary, both of whom were
elected for the present year in their respective capacities as president and secretary. Tlie' Hon Richard McBride,
premier, was chosen as honorary presi
dent of the associnti in; P. Russell, vice-
pies dent; George Wardl , second vice-
I^ggiiiciit.
J. O. Coulthard reported his mission as
del gate to the-nominating convention at-
SCe.emeos. at yphich A Megraw presided
Mr. Coulthard moved the nomination of
L W. Shatford, seronded by A. Letts of
Bri lesville, which was unanimously
carried. A resolution was passed heartily
expressing confidence in Premier McBride's administration and commending
Mr. Shatford's efforts to obtain further
railway facilities f.om the Kettle Valley
road, also approving, his good roads
policy in opening up new mining tern
lory and agricultural districts.
The association took steps to accord
the premier a public reception to be
given on his arrival here next' Monday
aiiernoon, l8th inst. Attorney-General
Bowser will speak at Hedley while the
premier will address the electors < f
Princeton: and district. A large attendance is expected. In the evem-ng boin
speakers will be at Keremeos, leaving
there tor Penticton and the Okanagan.
The premi r's party will arrive by special
train over the V. V. & E.
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA.
The importance of Princeton in the
estimation of the captains of finance mav
be guaged by the number and standing
of its banking institutions, witn three
of the leading banks of Canada in active
operation here it presages railway and
industrial enterprise beyond conception
of the general public, not as yet possessed"
of the inside information which prompted
the advent of these institutions. The
Royal Bank of Canada is the latest to
open its doors to the public, located for
th; present in the building opposite the
A E. Howse company's store. The head
office of this bank is in Montreal, and has
branches all over Canada, Newfoundland,
Bitish West Indies and Cuba. H. S.
H 'It, a director of the C. P. R.,«is president.    The capital of this bank  is  over   adjusted
$6,000,000,   its   total   assets   amount  to
$110,000,000,   and   its   reserve   and un
divided   profits  total  $8,275,000.    G. M.
K  Macleod, late of Port Moody and Port
erni, is manager here.
ANOTHER  INDUSTRY.
Robert Marr has brought in the
machiil.l'i' Tor a new sawmill which will
be erected about two miles from town
near China creeJat He intends to manufacture allkinds of lumber usually turned
out from local sawmills. The mill will
cut with a band saw 35 000 feet per day.
With an excellent quality of timber and
good machinery he expects tojtffve satisfaction to customers. Theyawmill wi.l
give employment to a laqfe number of
men, teaming, logging and sawing
HOSPITAL BENEFIT
The Ladies' Hospital Auxiliary announce one of their popular entertainments in aid of the Princeton gerferilj*
hospital to beheld Fridayevening, March
22 The occasion will be known by the
euphouious aud appetizing title, 'A Pie
S cial,' and will be interlarded with
games, dancing and real neighborly
sociality. Everybody is cordially invited
to come and have a piece of Princeton
pie and take part in the exercises of the
occasiou. The cause and the philan.
thiopic efforts of the ladies appeal to
everyone. Admission 25 cents. Come
early. 	
EAST PRINCETON NOTES.
East Princeton, Ma ch 11—The B C.
P/ortland Cement company will open
their lime kilTS/in a few dayjjj|^"-y
Work is to start on D. J. fnnis' livery
barn in a few days. Most of the building
■material being on the ground.
East Princeton is to have over five
miles of cement sidewalks.
E. P. Galliac and E. G. Marston arrived on Sa_K_ay's train frcm Spokane.
A. McGuire of Salmon Arm will build
a dwelling house on Eight avenue.
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
Rev. T. A. Osborne, wife and daughter,
are visiting at Hedley, the former exchanging pulpits with the local mission-
ary^JVIr Mawhinney.
x^F. Keefer, consulting engineer B. C.
Copper Co., arrived from Greenwoo'rt
Tuesday and went out to Voigt camp.
_.—T-tnr International Dry Farming Con*
gress is to be held in Canada' this year at
Lethbridge, Alberta, from October 21 to
26. It promises to be very interesting as
tr_fc£_lass of farming is coming into more
and more prominence. John T. Burns is
secretary at Lethbiidge.
The application of Ashcroft citizens for
government intervention and relief from
unfair conditions imposed by the water-
wsrks and electric light company will be
heard     by    the   attorney general     and
B.C. CEMENT C0.„fcD
Annual Report Gloyflng with
Favorable Prospects
and Progress.
Buildings in Forward State, Railway
Spur Graded, Cement Soon
on Market.
To the Shareholders of the B. C Portland
Cement Ci.mpanv, Limited:
I beg to present to you the second
annual report of this company.
The number of subscribers to our bonds
and stock has reached a total of 189.
The present officers and directors have
held their positions since the organization
of the company. At' the first meeting of
the directors after the annual shareholders' meeting held in February, thA
present officers were elected, and an
executive committee was appointed'frdm
among the directors to h£&£full powers
10 act for the full board of directors. The
committee appointed is as foi ows: L.
W. Shatford, M. L- A., chairman; J. A..
Harvey, K.C.; R. B. McLennan; B C.
Alexander, and C. R Briggs. The direc:
tors decided to make Vancouveftjje head
office of the company, aud C. R.ijriggs,
the secretary and treasurer, has had
entire charge of same during the past
year. • \t-"-5s!
Very little was done towards actual
const! uclion until after April ist of this
year, most of our energy being directed
towards the disposal of our bond£E_d
stock. Active construction Wja§^.g^gi|3
abont the middle of April under tne
direction of W. J. Budd of Calgary, who
was employed by the directors .to build
the entire plant and place it on a producing basis. The factory buildings are.
nearly all completed and ready for the
installation of the macKinery. They are
built of limestone taken from our~owtf
Quarry, and are largJSly fi reproof.^^The
main factory building is 60 feet by 434
feet; the boiler and engine house is 60
feet by no feet; the coal drying and pul-
yerisfllig house is 35 feet by 65 feet., and
the stock house is 60 feet by 200 feet.
All the above . are finished-except the
stock house, which will be completed
when there is no longer danger from
frosts. The office and laboratory building will also be built this spring. Other
improvements consist of stable and blacksmith buildings, clearingvOf the grounds,
opening up of the limestone quarry and
the construction .of the railway spur frort
the main line of the Great Northmf
railway to our works and the coal.- nijSte
of the United Empire company.
The building of the railwav spur has
entailed a very heavy expense, costing
the company more than #45,000. The
United Empire company,   who own  the
adjoining coal mine, have agreed to bear
one-half the cost. The railway company,
by an agreement about to be concluded
with them.HHll furnish and lay all the
steel, surface aud maintain tracks and
assume the operation of the spur The
railway company's outlay for laying- ihe
steel, etc., will be about $15,000.
The Great Northern railway company
are prepared to let contracts for the com-1
pletion of their line across the Cascade
mountains to Hope, B.C., from -which
point they have traffic arrangements
with tht* Canadian Norther.11 railway 'o
Vancouver. They are also buUdijg a
line south from Oroville, W^sfiihgton, to
Wenatchee, WashingtQi*; through the
famous irrigated dJJmets of the lower
Okanagan valley- and Columbia river
regions.      c^"
The^^ganadian Pacific railway is now.
aclfffely constructing the Kettle Valley
pailr.oad^which is to be a link of their
/southern main line running from Winni,.
nipeg to Vancouver. Contractors are
riow at work on parts of the line as t-ur-
Viyed from Penticton through Princetcn.
to Merritt. Thirty miles of the rails are
laid south of the latter point. The surveyed line crosses our spur at East
Princeton townsite. When complete-,
the Kettle Valley railway will give an
outlet for our cement to the Okanagtfifi
lake region, the BbtttfSWfy countrv to th-
e^st, the Fraser yalle^,j__> _he Northwest
and an additional road' to Vancouver.
No better maik^etjin the world for cement
;Cin be found than the territory that these
two lines of railway serve. Prices are?3
Continued on page 3.
;• ^   ELECTION TITBITS
. 3§_r§?h   Smith   will   probably    run ■ in
Nanaimo. ^jCu/S^U^^^f.
L.   W. Shatford   \yill   accompany   the
premier Tn his tour of thi" Similkameen.
'^J. P. McConnell  is  standing*ibr  Yale
■agiSKitist Alex  Lucas.    He   will  searcetssjg
stand   when   the   result of the  pollssrajj,!
known on the 28th.'
;
The premier and  attorney-general  area
meeting with enthusiastic  receptions fp
the interiorjaf British Columbia.,-.
.   The premier has given his word that tl«
Kettle Valley railway will be built in and
through   Princeton.     That ought   to  be
satisfactory and encouraging to all.
The railway policy is what the people
want—it means progress and prosperity.
L. W. Shatford has made very good for
the Similkameen. Let him finish his
work of development ana return him by
EfCclamatjdn ""
tr —
"PvtfG. Stewart  has  been  appointed to^
e Presbyterian mission at Princeton in
succession to J R. Craig, who is leaving
at the end of the present month. An
■oKlT-ined married minister will be
stationed at Coalmont.
E. Waterman went to Vancouver on
Monday last.   .
 s^—^f
1
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
March 13. 1912.
THE fEEKLY GRIST
Mrs. Westwood and Miss Westwood
will be at home Tuesday, -Wednesday
and Thursday, 'the 19th, 20th and 21st
insts.
A. Hickling left for the old country on
Monday, going via Vancouver. He is delighted with the winter which he spent
in Princet»m_n_Tiis health is much bene-
■fitte4-fiunnue change of climate.
Mr. and Mrs E. B. Hall and family
arrived from Chilliwack last Friday.
They are pleased to get back to the sun
blessed Similkameen after living at the
weeping coast. Mr. Hall will erect a fine
residence on Knob hill from which he
will be able to 'watch Princeton grow.'
W. IS Parrish, secretary treasurer of
the Columbia Coal & Coke company,
with his daughter, is at Coalmont, and
bought the first railway ticket sold
through t<- that point over the V. V. & E.
B. L. Smith, for several years accountant at the Bank of Montreal here, has
been promoted to the managership of the
new branch at Princeton, and left on
Tuesday taking with him the good wishes
of a large circle of warm friends which
he has established during his residence
here.—Vernon News.,
4*. W. C. Mawhinney of Keremeos, Metho-
■ |Vw *l '
dist missionary, preached in the ^.O.O.F.
hall Sunday.
The EastetA Townships bank is now
merged into the Bank of Commerce, the
staff and books hav'iWr been transferred
to the latter's premise^-^As ' to the disposition of the staff no information has
been received as yet. "*\-^
George Thurber, recent agent at Grand
Forks, spent the week end visiting Mris
Frazier, the G. N. agent here.
Last Sunday James Malone received the
sad intelligence of the death of his mother
in Toronto at the age of 85.
S R. Tilson & Co. have opened a gents'
furnishing store at.Coalmont.
The Orange ball given on the 29th ult.
was one of the most sociable and pleasurable functions ever held in Princeton and
was well attended, guests coming from
(he farther limits of the valley.
• H. E. Forsythe, real estate agent at
Merritt, was in town this week.
• Following are the names of those killed
in the Merritt mine disaster last Thursday: John Hogg, H. Grimes, John
Pattie, John Templeton, — Kelly; missing: Wm. Baxter, Wm. Hurd; injured:
H^rry Hogg, H. Cohshi.
John Isbister of Coalmont was the guest
of J. R. Craig over Sunday.
A A. Evelyn of the old Eastern Townships bank left for'Vancouver Monday.
Quite a stampede has been caused by a
placer miner, M. Harrigan, making a big
strike a* Granite creek He cleaned up
over $100 from a wheelbarrow of din
taken from opposite the old town
F. J. Sauve of Keiemeos was in Piinceton distiict last week posting election
proclamations. He intends tj establish
in business h'ertfT-
B. R. Barlow of Princeton wjUseafaMish
a fruit canruhj/in the immediate future
at Keremeos. [T__is will pjgSjjej. boon to
the Similkattieen district.
J. O. Coulthard and family will remove'
shortly to Roanie catnpfor the summer.
His house wil. be occupied by Mr. and
Mrs. Swanson during that time.
J. B. Desrosiers, ex-alderman of Green
wood, is in town and expects to establish
here as a builder and contractor
SPECIALS.
A fine opportunity to secure a good
musical nstrument—a drawing for an
organ in good repair will be held on
Easter Monday. Tickets for sale by Rev.
J. Williams.
For Sale—A dandy 'batching' outfit.
Also L. C. Smith typewriter. Ask th,t
operator at Great Northern station.
FOR SALE at a Bargain—Household
Furniture almost new, also Carpenter
Tools.   Apply at Star Office.
TO RENT
A well equipped-?' and stocked farm,
situated eight miles from the town of
Princeton, B C^Good house and farm
buildings. 'Awarded man with family
preferred, i $6r further particulars in
quire of    -*f S. R. GIBSON,
Princeton, B. C.
We are still
doing business
at the
old stand
owing to the vigorous
and efficient efforts of
citizens on the morning
of the ist, and are practically giving away goods
stained by water on that
occasion. A glance at our
window will save you
money.
PRINCETON
an.
Bookstore
Drug
GEO. G. LYALI» Manager.
I
lopi laiK ol canii
CAPITAL j
RESERVE UNDIVIDED PROFITS,
5,990,000
8,275,000
A General Banking Businsss Transacted
Interest allowed on savings accounts at higest current
rates.    Dratts and money orders sold on all  points.
PRINCETON BRANCH       G. M. K. MACLEOD, Manager
^M^AA^^A^A^MAAA^NA^^^^Wt ^x/X_*U\AAAi>JVVU^i*trMVVVS*-*yfc*^^^^^^^^* ■ _»___» __ __^
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, -   $8,000,000
THE SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
of The Canadian Bank of Commerce will receive deposits of $1 and
upwards, on which interest is allowed at current rates. There is no
dlelay in withdrawing- the whole orjiny_portion of the deposit. Small
deposits are welcomed.__^.— A234
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, to be
operated by any one of the number or by the survivor. A joint account
of this kind saves expense in establishing the ownership of the money
after death, and is especially useful when a man desires to provide for
his wife, or for others depending upon him, in the event of his death.
J. D. ANDRAS,  Manager, PRINCETON BRANCH.
BANK OF MONTREAL
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♦
♦
ESTABLISHED 1817—HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL
R B ANGUS, Esq., President I
Si* EDWARD CLOUSTON, Bart . Vice-President
H. V. MEREDITH, Esq., General Manager
Capital - - -       $14,887,570.00
Reserve and Undivided Profits   -  $16,855,185.36
SAVINGS   BANK DEPARTHENT
Deposits received from $i upwards.   Ranching and Mining Business
given every attention
BANKING    BY    MAIL
Deposits may be made and withdrawn by mail.    Out of town accounts
receive every attention.   A General Banking Business Transacted
PRINCETON BRANCH
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B. L SMITH, Manager
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P. BURNS & Co.
MEAT CONTRACTORS
Wholesale and  Retail  Butchers
and Provisioners
Ostermoor Felt Mattresses      j
Have yop ever tried one of these celebrated mattresses ?
If you have, we need say no more, as the goods will have
convinced you of their superiority; but if you have not,
we would like an opportunity to show you a sample and
explain its merits. The Ostermoor has proven itself by
actual test to be the best felt mattress on tbe market. |
A.   L. WHITE'S   FURNITURE    STORE
A. E. IRWIN
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Best  Cedar  Shingles  $3.50 per M
KffODERN WOODMEN
iV1 OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays, in the Odd
fellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL. Clerk.
V
.
March 13, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
B.C. CEMENT CO., L'D.
From ist Page.
>-«*>-
higher and development of the country
is unsurpassed anywhere. Being situated in the interior, we have a decided
advantage in the matter of easy and short
hauls and rates over plants situated on
the coast, and can successfully compete
with them in such' impo tant markets as
Vancouver, Victoria and Prince/Rupert.
We can market our product equally well
in the Spokane territory.-^diie to our
strategic position. la central British
Columbia and central Washington we
have a decided advantage over any other
factory. Our output for several months
will undoubtedly be consumed at interior
points without shipping to the coast or
Spokane. We are continually receiving
enquiries from all over this territory for
our cement. Our entire output could
easily be disposed of if we were operating
at the present time.
The directors have wisely made provision for the doubling or even trebling
of the capacity of the plant on short
notice and at a relatively small cost. The
output can be increased in about 60 or 90
days at an additional outlay of about
$50,000 for tnachinery. Thus an unexpected demand can easily be met.
Our general superintendent informs us
that he can have the plant completed
and producing cement in the next four or
five months if nothing unforseen happens Contracts for about $87,000 worth
of machinery have been made, and most
of this is now ready at the factory for
shipment, and some is on the way. Our
total freight and machinery expenditure
will be about $125,000
1 would especially direct your attention
to the treasurer's report and the statement
of the company's finances. It shows a
steady and healthy growth. With conservative and able management this
company will be a first-class income producers for its shareholders.
Respectfully submitted,
C. R. Rogers,    J. A. Harvey, K C,
Secretary. President.
Treasurer's Report.
LIABILITIES. •
Capital $244 431 00
Debenture bonds  181.931  00
Sundry  creditors     47.535 26
Liability on contracts for plant
and machinery under order 87,188 50
Accrued liabilities       5,040 78
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
Water Rights in   the Railway Belt
YALE WATER DISTRICT
126 54
ASSETS.
Property and equipment $302,372 45
Plant   and   machinery under
Order as per contra     87,188 50
Sundry debtors      9,543 75
Cash        1.429 12
Accounts prepaid    .      119 75
Bonddiscount andcotnmission 148780 00
Organization expenses     16,692 97
Vancouver, B   C , Dec. 31, 191]
126 54
T. CLARK KING
Architect
Graduate of the Art and Science Department
Kensington, London, Eng.
Member of the Alberta Architectural Association.
Plans and   Specifications  of Buildings   furnished  at reasonable rates.
Office : KING & GIBSON
Vermilion Av. Princeton, B.C.,  Phone 18
NOTICE.
^Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice th it I. Samuel A. Cawley,
of Chilliwack, B. C, intends to apply
for a licence to prospect for coal and. petroleum under the following described
land_$ situated near Princeton: Commencing at the northeast corner of Lot
361, thence south to southeast corner of
Lot 361, thence west to southwest corner
of Lot 361, thence following Tulameen
River to point of commencement.
SAMUEL A. CAWLEY,
Feb. 14, 1912.        W. S. Wilson, agent.
NOTIC2 is ht-reby given that any person
par tne 1 ship, company, or municij ality
having any claim to water rights in th r Ratl>vay
Belt may file with the Chief Water Cuuimissibnrr
at the r'arliament Buildings, Victoria, a state
ment of claim to water privileges on a pnnie!
foim (No 50), which can be obtained from tlie
Wat r Commissioners at New Westminster, Yale
Ashcroft, Kamloops, Reve'stoke and Gulden, or
firm the Chief Water O mmissioner
Evidence will be heard at local points as sooi:
as the claims have been examined and tabulated
and notices will be published in  ihe  British Col
um^'-i Gazette and lo:al papers of the  place and
date when each stream will be dealt with     Oh.
jections may be filed with the Chief Water Com
missiouer.   The following strea:. s ate supposed
to be wholly or partiallv w'thin the Railway Belt
in the Yale Water District:
Am ricau creek
Atv1<-i sou river
._nderson creek.
Boston Bar creek.
Black Canon.
Beaver, lake.
Ru't. r creek
Poothroyds flat.
Coquihalla river.
Carry creek
Chilliwack river.
Chilliwack lake.
China Bar creek.
Cisco creek.
Dewdney creek.
Emory Bar creek.
' Eagle creek
Hmory creek
Four-mil.* creek.
Five-mile creek. .
Fraser river
Fort Dallas creek.
Gordon creek.
Garnet creek
G< ose lake.
■   Harrison like.
Hunter creek.
Hanan creek.
Tsobelle creek.
Jones lake.
July creek
Jackass Mountain creek.
Kelly creek.
Kawkwa lake.
Kanaka Bar creek.
Lytton creek.
Lauder ere- k.
Mineral lake.
Murray lake.
Muddy^lake.
Spffbrderers riar creek.
Nahie creek.
Nohomeen creek.
Nahatlatoh lake.
Nshatlatch river.
Niger creek.
Nicolum river.
Nesaquack ceek.
Nikaia creek.
Pierre cieek.
Quoteek creek.
Ruby creek.
Rodick Creek.
Railroad creek.
River creek
Rocky gulch.
Stryen creek.
Salmon river.
Spuzzum creek.
Sawmill creek
Stiver creek,       jQA;
Skuppa creek.
^, Si wash creek.
Siwash creek  north fork.
Siwash creek, south fork.
Sleese creek.
; ,Samallow river.
Skagit river.
Schkam creek.
Seven-mile creek.
Spring creek
Sucker creek.
Sorrell Springs
Siska creek
Skussy river
Tamihy creek.
Tulameen river.
Tulameen river, west fork.
Tulameen river, south fork.
Texas creek
Trafalgar Bar creek.
Uz-vi-hoos river
Unknown creek.
Waleach creek.
.Yale creek.
Stream rising two miles west of Keefers.
I Small stream at Spuzzum
Stream through station yard, North Bend.
Stream at Camp 16, N.W. #, Sec. 34, Tp. q
Stream through S E #. Sec 30-, Tp. 12 R. 26.
Stream half a mile west of C.P.R station at
Yale.
Stream west of C. P. R. coal bunkers at North
Bend.
Springs in Tp. 14, R. 27, on east side of Cariboo
Road.
Statements of claims may also be filed to water
in any unnamed spiing, stream, creek, pond,
gulch, lake, or other source of water supply, in
the vicinity of any of the said creeks, etc.
Dated February 14th, ic-12. -
W. R   ROSS,
Minister ofLands.
BlASOORS
The Bias prim iple of construction is quite different
to the average, being boned
on the bias instead of straight
up and down like other
corsets. It is this difference
in the way they are made,
which makes them so strikingly easy and comfortable,
and those who have never
worn a Bias Filled have yet
to know what the right
corset will do for them. Its
bouings and clasps will not
rust, and the fabric will not
tear with the hardest and
rr'ost constant use. Every
yard of material is accurately tested for strength, and
everything about them is
guaranteed by the  makers.
PRICES
$1.25, $1.75, $2, $2.50
The A. L. HOWSE CO., Limited
PRINCETON, B.C.
^^^^i^*^^^^*^^^^^^^^*^^^^,^^^^^^^^^^^^^ts
KING & GIBSON I
DEALERS IN"
Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
vrrrw«*"«"*"»Tv
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
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^The Town 0! opportunity   f
The rails have been   laid   into  the town and Coalmont is now tfietiew
terminus,   the  base   of operations for   the  next   forty miles of railway
building.
Before six months have passed there should be a payroll in Coalmont of
between   350   and  400  men: This   means population, which naturally
means good business.
]JF YOU ARE WISE YOU will  invest in a little Coalmont real estate
now while the choice is still good.
Don't let this opportnnily slip   along  with   the  others   which have got
past you.    Write for our circular and   price list ; a post card will bring
it to you.    There are still some 50-foot lots left
Two blocks from the centre of town at only
$225, $55 cash, bal. in 18 months to suit.
Williamson  & T|arner§
AGENTS, COALflONT,  B.C.
 -   ——
	
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
March 13, 1912,
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
March 13, 19*2-
t
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. H. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Prtncetgn  Printing and Publishing Co.
THE NEXT REPRESENTATIVE
At the Conservative convention
held at Keremeos last Friday L,.
W. Shatford was again the unanimous"-choice of his party for representative of Similkameen electoral
district in the provincial legislative
assembly. Since his first election
in 1903 Mr. Shatford has becone
more and more popular with his
constituents until now no other
name is thought of or presented at
any of the party conventions.
Many Liberals who opposed him in
his first candidacy have since been
converted to his support and are
found today among his stalwart
friends arid workers. The reasons
for Mr. Shatford's popularity are
his absolute honesty of purpose and
unsullied political career. No
stronger argument or proof of his
sincere desire to serve the public
faithfully and well can be found
than in the large appropriations ob-
t lined each session for public works
throughout the Similkameen.
Wherever legitimate improvements
were required willing assistance
has been given until from an almost
roadless constituency as he found it
there is an ever increasing  mileage
of highways, trails and bridges.
The construction of the Kettle
Valley railway through tbe Similkameen has been a matter of keen
solicitude for Mr. Shatford and it is
through his influence that the route
has been made to conform to the
requirements of the public, giving
East Princeton, Princeton, Coalmont and Tulameen that competitive transportation so valuable to
all centers. With a record for
honest, faithful representation and
a well known personal character,
honorable alike to himself aud his
constituents, there is no valid reason why Mr. Shatford should not
be again allowed to continue the
good work which he takes so much
worthy pride in. As a matter of
public appreciation and due recog
nilion of valuable services rendered
to all political parties Mr. Shatford
should be returned by acclamation
next Thursday, thus encouraging
and honoring one who ha^s rendered
such signal service to his constituency and the province generally.
not fail to be moved with pity. A
'cup of cold water' is the least one
could offer. Out of our abundance
a few dollars will save many lives
this spring and sumraer in benighted
China. Star will gladly forward
contributions to the central committee at Vancouver.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Four millions of Chinese starving
and perishing is an appalling con
dition and must appeal with tragic
force to all civilized Christendom.
Here in the Similkameen no one
licks tbe necessary food to sustain
life; contrast that with the famishing millions in China and   one can-
RE  WATERWORKS
Editor Star—Sir: As several inaccuracies crept into the various accounts of
the dearth of water on the occasion of the
late fire at the Great Northern hotel, it is
as well that you should insert in vour
paper a full statement of the facts.
On the morning of the 29th of February
the*pump engineer sent word of his being
too unwell to attend to his duties. As
soon as possible a substitute was found
for him, and pumpingTommenced at
11:30 a.m. He pumped until 6 o'clock
aud then reported tathe pump engineer
that he had scvei. feet ijf water in the
tanks, there reaft/ being but five and
one half feet, an accident, unreported to
the company,   having Kappener. Tfo* the
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feuaga^ This he was tola was sufficient
and he went home. Had the guage been
correct he would probably have been
told to continue puuipine for some time
longer.
Even with a small supply in the tanks
it denotes an abnormal use of wa er on
the nigh: of the 2gtn of February for
five and one hall feet of water would last
for over len and one-haif hours, and in-
addition the large supply in the mains
was available. To show the vagaries ol
water usage; on the afternoon of the 4th
inst., the day the pump house wa.S.Jb.urnt,
five and one Ban reelwas registered by
the guage at 2:30 p.m., and yet thissupply
served the town until 6 p.m. the following
evening.
The tanks have never been blocked by
ice, and there is no reason to believe they
were on this occasion. The average
usage of water from the tanks is about
five and one-half inches'per hour. Asa
rule the water left in the tanks at night
is between 11 and 12 feet. Pumping
commences at 7:45 a.m. and .finishes
about 3.30 p.m. Since the pump house
v. as burnt down on the 4th inst. the
company are making every endeavor to
provide a small supply of water for town
use temporarily, pending repairs to the
plant. In the interval customers are
particularly requested to be as conserva
vative with the water as possible.
Yours faithfully,
Princeton Water Works Co., Ltd.
Stephen Freeman, Sec.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES^
Presbyterian church services-—Sunday
school, 11 a.m. Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
set vice, 11 a.m.
Subject next Sunday:    'The jealousy of
a woman.'
■1
Methodist    church    service,   Sunday,
March 17.     In Oddfellows'  hall, at 7:30
p.m. ; cement works at 11 a.m.
Anglican church services for fourthSun-
day in Lent, March 17: Princeton, 11
a.m , matins, holy communion and sermon.    7:30 p.m., evensong  and  sermon.
Thursdays in Lent special services
at 8 p.m.
Christian Science lesson-sermon subject for Sunday next: 'Sub tnice.'
Faith is the substance of things hoptd
for, the evidence of things not seen —
Hebrews n.1.
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THE MAN WHO CAN FORESEE
I THE TOMORROW OF
WILL MAKE MONEY BY INVESTING THERE
S_t   .Sffil; _rNOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
A nODEL CITY
Water system.
Electric light.
Cement walks.
Natutal parks.
Nicely wooded.
Fine garden soil.
Athletic grounds.
Excellent drainage.
No danger from overflow.
Can have fine sewer system.
Wide streets and lanes.
Local and long distance phone system.
A PAYROLL CITY NOW
Furnished by the B C. Portland Cement
Co. : Cement, Lime, Bricks.
United Empire'Co  : Coal and Copper.
Princeton Coal & Land Co. : Coal.
Princeton Lumber Mills Co. ; Sawmill.
B.C Copper Co. : Copper.
The Platinum-Gold Fields Co.: Placer
Mining.
One thousand men will be employed
inside of year.
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Natural centre, ranching country, fruit growing. Huge deposits ot copper, gold, silver, platinum and other minerals. Has
big water power development. Lots in such towns as Grand Forks, Kamloops, Blairmore, Alta., Baker, Wash., are worth 5 times
what is   being   asked at East Princeton and the payroll is not as large.
FREE CEMENT walks with each lot sold—cleared streets.    Water main to be laid in streets this summer.
BUSINESS LOTS $450 up : Terms 10 p.c. cash, 5 p.c. per mo. Residence lots, $200 up : Terms, 10 p.c. cash, $10 per mo.
7 p.c. on annual balances.    (% of all lots are to be reserved) for future sale.     Get full particulars at once.
C. R. BRIGGS, Gen. Agent, 6I5 Hastings W., Vancouver. D. G. McCURDY, Resident Agent, East Princeton, B.C.
A RAILROAD CENTER
The Kettle Valley railroad, which will
soon be the main line of the C.P.R. system, brings Vancouver 300 miles nearer
Winnipeg, passes through the townsite.
Final survey is now being made.
The<_reat Northern has tracks on  two
sides of the townsite and will soon be v^
finished to Vancouver.    These two roads ♦.>
give transportation in all directions from 4, .>
East Princeton. JJL
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K
PRELIMINARY REVIEW AND
ESTIMATE OF MINING
FOR YEAR 1911.
The following prelininary review and
estimate of mineral production for the
year iqii has been received from the
Department of Mines, Victoria, from
■which extracts are made as under :
'As this bulletin has been prepared before the receipt of the official reports for
tlie year 1911 of the gold commissioners
and mining recorders of the province,
and the customary returns of mineral
production made annually by managers
of mines and reduction works, it must
necessarily be regarded as being simply a
preliminary review of the progress ot the
year last past, together with an approximate estimate of the quantities and value
of the several mineral products of the
province.
' The estimated mineral production during 1911 has a total value of $23,211,816
If the revised statement of production,
to be made up after receipt of returns
from the operating mines and reduction
works of the province, shall show this
estimate to be approximately correct, as
it is believed they will do it will then be
seen that the total value of production in
1911 will be about $3,165,250 less than
that of 1910, and less by a different
amount than that of each other year
since 1905 _• .__3
' The comparatively large decrease in
value here shown is not, however, an
evidence of retrogression, for the mining
industry of the province most assuredly
continues to make substantial progress,
iiotwiinstanding the diminution'in' production noted here. The curtailment of
output is clearly attributable, for the
most part if not entirely, to the effects ol
the strike of coal, mine employees in the
CrcwS-Nest district. Southeast Kootenay.
The suspension of work at the mines and
coke ovens lasted for practically two
thirds o the year, and prevented pro:
d iction of coal and coke during that
period to an extent that • involved a decrease in value from East Kootenay alone
of nearly $3,000 000. If 10 this lie added
ihe decrease in value of production
of metals ot one copper-producing company alone—as compared with 1910, of
$1,600,000—which was he direct result
of cutting off the ou pply of coke for its
blast furnaces, there will be obtained a
total decrease of more than $4,500,000,
which' was an immediate consequence of
labor difficulties at the Crows Nest
collieries,
' The net production of coal, estimated
at 2,455,000 long tons, is 365,000 tons.leFjSi
than that of 1910. Coke also shows 3
decrease—of about 140,000 tons; the output in 1911 - as only about 78,000 tons as
compared with 218,000 tons in 1910. The
coal was produced in the several districts
in the following approximate proportions:
Vancouver Island, 1,785,000 tons; _5jjfigja
and  Southeast  Kootenay,  425,000  ton..
Practically all the coke was from the last
■^t mentioned   district.    The  effects  of the
strike of the coal mine and coke oven
employees on the production of coal and
C' ke in the Crows Nest district, Southeast
Kootenay, has already been mentioned;
iu quantities of products it brought about
this position: there was a decrease (net)
of 605,0 )o tons of coal and 140,000 tons
of coke. As the net decrease for the
whole province was 365,000 tons, it will
be seen that iu other districts the decrease
from the Crows Nest collieries was in
part offset by increases in other parts—
in the output of Vancouver Island,
Nicola valley, and Similkameen coal
mines.
' In both the Nicola valley and Similkameen districts progress was also notice-
Cortinued on page 6.
Right Prices in the Right Place
THOMAS BROS.
KEEP A FRESH STOCK GROCERIES
I Spring Goods Arriving I
■       BOOTS, SHOES, CLOTHING       I
!____! _|
H       We aim to serve our customers with  i
fi  the best and give satisfaction |
TIOMILS
Ye   Olde   Firm
IRO-S. f
of   Princeton
NELSON BREWING GO.
PRINCETON, B.C.
Physicians Recommend Our Beer
for Emaciated Patients
As a beverage,  healthful ;   for the table, appetizing ;   for social
and proper use,  better than wine.    Families Supplied.
.•_.♦_.♦_.•_.♦_.♦_.♦_.♦_.♦_,_.♦_.♦„.___..____ ___^
y.*****.**.**.**.**.**************^***y**^*******^**************i^***•~.?**.*****************************************v**7**^-*r*4**i*m
BUY YOUR SUPPLY
Of Potatoes, Apples and
Vegetables, Etc., From
OH. CARLE
THE GROCERYMAN
PRINCETON, B.C.
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Advertising is the Life of business=-=Try it
Westwood & Brooke
POULTRY FARM
PRINCETON, - British Colombia
m£M
"SPOKESMAN"
This White Leghorn male, bird won 2nd prize
Spokane Pouttrv bhow, lyi'i. .ilso headed 2nd
prize pen at same s-how. i_e Is sired by ist prize
dinner at Spokane Poifltr\ Show, 1911, which
also won shape and color specials at .same show.
Also was ist prize winner at Seattle in 1910
We are now booking: orders for Kgg Settings,
and forward same when required- by customer's.
Pen No. 1—Our selected prize winning stock,
$5 p.r setting of 15 eggs.
Pen No. 2—A choice pen that will produce
winners and layers, $3 per setting of 15 eggs.
Pen No. 3 —a. sp end id utiliu pen for'egg production. $1 50 per st tting, of l5 egS" .
Book your orders early. Terms cash with order.
Address:    PRINCETON   B  C.
J. KNUDSON
Contractor    and    Builder
Estimates Furnished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   L.   CUMMINGS,   Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc* |
General Blacksmithing.
Carriage Building and  Repairs
.   Ali, Work Neatly & Promptly
«  Phone 28. Executed
The Princeton
livery Ifc
stables
N. HUSTON, Prcp'r
General Livery business   carried on
Horses for hire, single or double.    Wood
or  coal   delivered   on   shortest   notice.
Draying in all its branches.  Prices right.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
March 13, 1912,
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§8$
WATCH PRINCETON GROW
PROCLAMATION
Electoral District of
SIMILKAMEEN
To wit: Public notice is hereby
given to the electors of Similkameen
Electoral District that in obedience
to His Majesty's Writ to me directed, and bearing date the 27th
day of February in the year of our
Lord, one thousand nine hundred
'and twelve, I require the presence
of the said electors at the
GOVERNMENT OFFICE, FAIRVIEW
ON   THE
14th DAY OF MARCH, 1912
at 12 o'clock noon, fere, the purpose
of electing a person to represent
them in the Legislature of this
Province.
The mode of nomination of candidate shall be as follows:
The candidate shall be nominated
in writing; the writing shall be
subscribed by two registered voters
of the district as proposer and
seconder, and by three other registered voters of the said Electoral
district as assenting to the nomination, and shall be delivered to the
returning officer at any time between
the date of proclamation and one
p.m. of the day of nomination, and
in the event of a poll being necessary, such poll shall be open on the
28th DAY OF MARCH §
AT
1 Beaverdell, Post Office.
2 Westbridge, Broomfield's Store.
3 Rock Creek, Crawford's Store.
4 Bridesville, Charltou's Store.
5 Sidley Mountain, Post Office.
6 Camp McKinney, Post Office.
7 Fairview, Government Office.
8 Vaseaux Lake, Mclntyre Residence
9 Okanagan Palls, Post Office,
io Kaleden, Hatfield's.
ii South Penticton, Lay ton's Residence.
12 Green Mountain, Post Office.
13 Keremeos Center, Drug Store.
14. „ Keremeos, Post Office.
15 Hedley, Union Hall.
16 Princeton, Court House.
17 Ashnola, Townsite Office.
18 Granite Creek, Post Office.
19 Coalmont, Coalmont Hotgk,
20 Ttnameen, ' Otter Flat, Schubert's
Store^
Of which every person is hereby required to take notice and -govern himself
accordingly.
Given under my hand at Keremeos this
2nd day of March, 1912.
J. A. BROWN,
Returning Officer.
V
PRINCETON/
lie sub Wed Simii-
koniccH District
)k
Land of Beautiful Scenery and
Healthful Climate
Land of Vast, Varied Mineral
and other Resources
Land  o£ Big  Game,
Fish, NatSaHfteserves
Fowl,
Land of the Prospector and
Homeseeker, the Capitalist and
Investor
Land of Promise, Hope and
Prosperous Days—Come and See
If you want to keep in touch
with Princeton and District. .
Subscribe for the Star
"I $2 PER ANNUM
PRELIMINARY REVIEW &c.
From 3rd page.
able, additions having been made to the
coal mining plants, and the output of
coaj^in 1911 was larger. The Nicola
.Valley Coal & Coke company increased
.ts output from 141,000 K_ng tons in 1910
to about 190,000 tons in 1911, and enlarged its coal-handling plant to a
capacity of 1000 tons a day. Thtee other
coal properties in the Nicola valley also
had development work done on them in
preparation for mining coal on a com
mercial scale, though as yet their production remains comparatively small.
-Coal was reached by a long crosscut tunnel on the property of ttie Columbia
Coal & Coke cbtnpany, situated between
Granite creek and Collins gulch, in the
Tulameen valley, and the work of equipping this mine with plant and machinery
is in progress, while railway transportation has already been provided. At
Princeton, the Princeton Coal & Land
company has made arrangements with a
coal mining machinery firm to supply a
tipple and other equipment, the handling
capacity to be 500 tons of coal a day and
the plant to be ready for use early in
1912.
' The British Columbia Copper company was active lasi year in its endeavors
to secure more mines The McKinley
and Riverside groups in Franklin camp,
Grand Forks division; the Voigt group
near Princeton, Similkameen; and the
L H. group in the neighborhood of
^Silverton, besides some -claims*near
Greenwood in the vicinity of the Mother
Lode mine, were bonded under option of
purchase, should the results of development work warrant their acquirement.
A group of fifteen claims in Washington,
a few miles from Grand Forks, was also
bonded.
'The British Columbia Copper company
last autumn took under bond and option
of prirckase .sjsfty three mineral claims
situated on Copper mountain, a few
■mires from Princeton. Some of these are
Ueing explored, and it was the company's
intention to continue prospecting and
development for several months, which
work was commenced at four different
places. There are numerous other
mineral claims in this division.
' Buildings for a cement manufacturing
industry have been erected at East
Princeton; railway connection is being
made to these works, and plant and
machinery obtained.
' Princeton Coal & Land company's
coal mine at Princeton has been opened
by a slope and counter, with three levels
east and one west, together representing
about 4000 feet of development. Numerous crosscuts bring the total up to considerably more than a mile of underground workings. In the summer of 1909
a tipple structure with straight bar
screens was erected, and a ^o-hor<.e-pqwer
boile*-a«d4uyst put in. This plant had
a capacity of only about 100 tons a day,
so in 1911 it was decided to install a
modern coal-handling and screening
plan), to be in running order by the end
of January, 1912/ The new plant and
other equipment include the following:
Rotary dump; Shaker screens for lump,
egg and nutf coal; two picking belts;
Victor box ,car loader; compressor with
[Continued on 7th page.
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March 6, 1912
THE     SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
PRELIMINARY REVIEW? &C
From 6th Page.     *.
■ capacity of 744 cubic feet of free air per
minute; Hardy coal cutting machines;
two 75-horse-power boilets; machine shop
with full equipment of power and hand
tools; 80-ton railway track scales, etc.
New buildings were bath house for
'- j miners, blacksmith shop, store house and
stables. Cost of new equipment will be
V- __, approximately $1.00^100. The output of
cd51 in 1911 was about 23.000 tons, as
compared with nearly 12,000 tons in 1910.
' The United Empire company further
*.•.,% developed its coal property. The Osoyoos
company opened a seam of coal at least
60 feet in width. The Princetoa«jQol-
lieries, limited, put down a slope nearly
1000 feet. The Columbia^Coal & Coke
certfipany drove a long crosscut tunnel on
its coal lands situated between Granite
creek and Collins gulch, and prepared
for putting in equ pment for mining and
handhpg coal, but no particulars were
received The V. V. & E. railwav was
extended from Princeton up the Tulameen
river, so as to provide transportation
facilities for the Columbia company's
Coalmont colliery.
' Drilling to determine the depth of the
gravel bjds along the Tulameen river
was continued. Following the discovery
early in the year by the geological sur
vey of minute diamonds in chromite rock
from Olivine mountain, Tulameen, the
river gravel in the vicinity was prospected:
for diamonds in the wash. Work was
with endeavors
and   platinnm.'
,**.<**z*+z*+z*+z**\**.**z**.*w
ORCHARDISTS
Fraser valley Nurseries, Ltd.
ALDERGROVE,       -       B. C.
Have the Finest Home Grown Nursery stock
Including Apples, Pears, Plums, Cherries
Small Fruits and Ornamental Shrubbery
LIVE DISTRICT AGENT WANTED
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Similkameen Hotel
SUMMERS & WIBBIE
PROPRIETORS
Large and New&uildin-', well Furnished and \Mastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
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t£* •* <r$**z
For full particulars write
RICHARD McCOriB, General Manager
ALDERGROVE, B C.
Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
Great Northern
—notel—
P. SWANSON, Prop.
-^^^^^^^^^^*z^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
also done in  connection
to find more placer gold
F. P. CO#_
General Merchant
Miners' outfitter
Princeton,   Granite Creek
OLDEST ESTABLISHED p~~*f"
O. R. BOUCHER
ARCHITECT
Coalmont, B.C.
PERCY W, GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
Plumbing and Healing. Sheet Metal
f    work, T_ns_n.i_.fng
Shop corner Angela Av. and Bridge St , in ' Ivlurdock's blacksmith shop' 1
DIGNAN & ATKIN
PRACTICAL WORKMEN—PROPRIETORS '
Work Guaranteed Consult us about your work
First Class room and board
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
PRINCETON,
B. C.
b*bb*b**b**b**b**bA
K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
L. T. JOUDRY
EXPERT
Watchmaker
W$5HWR<S_____J_8^P!9.
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...Hotel...
oner Hit
1
TULAMEEN, B.C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Centre
__p$.t J. Headers, ra
PRORIETOR
"MODEL"
IVK'Y STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
' General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs—Good   Roadsters-
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all  Customers.
fl*RMW_ELDSGARRS$4N.
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing1
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attentian. given to  all
Mail  Orders.
Priest m
Photographer
Princeton
PRINCETON    LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52
Regular meet.ngs. 8 p
m., Thursdays^
Sojourning, brethren welcome.     Hall situate   in
Thomas Block.    ' Oddfellows Hall."
Jas. Gellatly. p. Russell,
Noble Grand Secretary
NOTICE.
Similkameen division, Yale district.
Notice is hereby given that I intend to
to
HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PKOPRIKTO-S
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOriS, ETC.
Commercials Sample S Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
Real Estate, Finance, Mines
The  Door of   Opportunity  is
Wide Open.
The ' West' affords many examples of f ortun es
made from ground floor investments. Winnipeg,
Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver had a similar
beginning to that of Princeton. Fortunes have
been made in real estate from a very small invest^
ment.   Princeton, which includes East Princeton,
am.lv for a license "to nro.ner-t icr nn<*\ i has undoubtedly the best prospects of any town
-.pprv lord license 10 prospect tor coal) on the map. ]nvest while the town is yet in its
-L-IQ pejsrplt-um on the following described \ infancy and see prices steadily rise,
land, situated near Princton: Com
mencing at the northeast corner of lot
2049; theflpe east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to the point of commencement, containing 640 acies more
or less. C   M. SNOWDEN-
February 14th, 1912.
FOR SALE
TO  CANADIAN   ARCHITECTS
Competition for New   University Buildings to
Be Erected at Point Grey, Near Vancouver, British Columbia
The GOTernment of l?fitish Columbia invite
Competitive Plans for the general scheme and
design for the proposed new University together
with more detailed Plans for the buildings to be
erected first at an estimated cost of $1 500,000.
Prizes of $10000 will be given for the, most
successful Designs submitted.
Particulars of the competition and plan of site
may be obtained on request from the undersigned.
The designs to be sent in by July 31st, 1912,
addressed to
^ITHE MINISTER  OF EDUCATION,
Parliament Buildings;*"""
Victoria, British Columbia.
Notice fo Delinquent co=Owner.
ToT, c. REVELY—Take notice that unless
y<™ do pay, within gi days from the date hereof,
Wum °f $23i-95> being your proportion of the
expenditure required for the years4g63-4-5-6-7-_ o
10-11 by Section 24 of the Mineral Act, upon the
Transvaal Fraction Mineral claim situated on
Copper Mountain in the Similkameen Mining
Divislon.together with interest and all costs of
this notice, to the undersigned your co-pat tner
in the said claim, your interest in the said claim
shall, become vested in the undesigned whn ha*
made the required expenditure.
-. _   _      . A- E. HOWSE.
Dated this 29th day of January, igi2
Lot on Bridge Street; withm 100 yds. south of
Vermilion av.
Townsite Welldo. Two railways—gold-platinum
placers, ore and coal mining.
Ranch 1% miles west of Princeton. 192 acres,
$3,000.
Two lots in' Hedley, inside and corner. Price
$200 and $250—Also in east addition op. Mr. Smiths
house.   Price $350.
Lot 6, block 24, house rents for $6 per mo., $600,
Agricultural land, near'Cdalmont, 80 acres, $1600
Claim in diamond belt, $500; locations made.
Mineral properties.
Water power.
Suburban acreage to lease.
Address :    J. M. WRB3HT,
Princeton, B.C., Canada.
\
Scavengers!
JOHNSON & REHN
Work promptly attended to. Town
health regulations complied with ; lawful
sanitary conditions in force. Orders may
be left at C. Willarson & Co's.
 ■ __
I
4
Y
1
f
4*4
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
March 13, 1912,
PRINC
TON
According to the laws of industrial progress and the experience of founders of western towns,
there must be a tangible, genuine basis on which to establish the future city. No amount of
coaxing can bring blood out of a stone, nor can the greatest scientist extract sunbeams from a
cucumber. Every man makes his own destiny==his own fortune==nothing comes by so-called
good luck.   The door is wide ajar for all who have pluck and a little capital.   Investigate Now!
Princeton
I
With its Unequalled Mineral Resources
Its  Healthful Climate and Pretty Site
*
Is destined to be the Largest City in the Interior of British Columbia.
Five hours' run to Vancouver when the V., V. & E. is finished.
H
li
i
Your Opportunity Is NOW!
CHOICE LOTS FOR SALE
And to Suit All Requirements
Enquire of j        ERNEST! WATERMAN        1 Manager for
16   Prii
rinceton, Court Houser   ™
17 Ashnola, Townsite Office.
18 Granite Creek, PostOffice.
19 Coalmont, Coalmont HotfiL.
20 TtTTahieen, Otter Flat, Schut
Store^
Of which every person is hereb;
quired to take notice and govern hie
accordingly.
Given under my hand at Keremeos
2nd day of March, 1912.
J. A. BROWN
Returning Offic
cm con & mi co
♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦tH^t* *♦*■ *Z* *Z**Z**Z* *Z**Z**4*
€
Jte>
—

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