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Similkameen Star 1911-10-11

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Semi-Bituminous Coal in Princeton basin.
The selfish life is empty, also unhappy: Give and get.
Important Mining Deal Indicates future Of District Rests on Solid foundation.
17   I\*a»K)        	
Vol. XII.
PRINCETON, B.C., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER Jl, 1911.
-tfw-
No. 41.
RECORD MINING DEAL
Voigt Gamp Sold to the B. C.
Copper Co. for Sum in
Seven Figures.
Big Development Work in Hand and
Constuction Mark New Era
in Mining.
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With the ren_nt conclusion of the deal
which finally*disposes of Voigt/Camp,
owned and developed by EmiKH. Voigt,
M.E , and associates, the largest/transaction in an ore proposition that has ever
taken place in British Columbia has pass
ed into history The magnitude of the
deal may be inferred, including, as it does,
some 63 or 64 mineral claims, besides
2-ono acres of land. timbered and grazing,
and also available in portions for smelter
sites, etc.
B.C. Copper Co. Bays Camp.
The purchasing party to the Voigt camp
deal is one of the largest and best known
mining and smelting companies in the
west—the B. C. Copper Co. The head
office of this company is in New Yurk,
Newman Erb, president; RjOZIEggles
ton, secT-treas. ; E G. Warren, manager
atid superintendent of works. The company is capitalized at $3,000,000, and last
year had a favorable profit and loss bal
ance of #256.561. and cash $107,095 The
smelter is sittrSTed at Greenwood, about
135 miles from Princeton by rail, aud the
company ownsandoperaites about a dozen
miu_sjnJB___«_____l____uaa^
ton^jrhief of which is the Mother Lode
group in the Boundary, containing 180
acred with fine ore bodies.
Price Biggest Yet.
Although the price paid has not been
officially announced, the amount io well
understood to be»j2,ooo,ooo_>, this, owing
to terms and conditions to be supple
mented with expenditures, bringing the
"t >tal cost upwards of $3,000,000. A smelter, tram line and all the equipment neces-
I sary for a large copper-producing plant,
are included in the plans and outlay. A
gang of men will be immediately employed in development of this vast property, the company's engineer, Fred Kef-
fer, being now on the ground making
preliminary examination for that purpose.
Mr. Voigt Stayed and Won.
It is thirteenvears ago since Mr. Voigt
prospected what is now the famed Voigt
Camp. Hisjpng experiencgj___mining in
Baker City, Idaho, at R<_s1____-B C ,and
o'.her camps proved an unerring guide to
him in his determination to found a camp
equal to any He systematically prospected his claims, making assays and procuring such other data as would enable
him to present a proposition en bloc that
must command capital.
Adversities and difficulties await every
successful man's career, and these, like
phantoms of superstition, serve only to
prove one's courage and perseverance
Mr. Voigt proved equal to ev^ry discouragement offered by ruggedl obstinate
naturei_caring less, proBaTSwrJ for unwar-
ranted critic/sms_-WiKK_he usual ' cold
water ' showeitdy upon intelligent enterprise than ail The other supg___ous obstacles. His success meau<Tadvancement
for the whole countrv__nd his reward will
be a mighty incentive to the mining men
interested in this section.       1
Luck in Odd Numbers.
If there is luck in odd numbers, the
thirteen y<£_|rs during yh')^ Mr. Voigt
has anxiopsly \vai.ea\irtrcon_u__mation
here chrojfl^_?fl^H»gs to him and Princ< -
ton district U_:)"certain/good luck in all
honest, pio_si_g tpH. The congratulations of th_ people are due the man who
has conferred such far reaching benefits
on the country at large, and it is a matter
of satisfaction to know that he intends to
still follow his profession in this district.
Smelter is Fart of Deal.
Voigt's Camp is to be the scene of great
future mining operations, all the conditions necessary being present to warrant
the statement. Continuous true fissure
veins have been traced^wo and three
thousand feet carryij»j£good copper and
gold values. Little bornite is found, but
the even distribution of values through-
oat the camp makes the abundant ore,
easy of treatment, especially inviting to
smeltermen. Copper in many of its varying conditions may be found here.
With a smelter constructed and located
to command large custom tonnage from
the Similkameen and Tulameen valleys,
and with short haul coke from Coalmont,
the smelting possibilities are extremely
favorable.
perity for the' whole country. He is
patiently waiting for the completion of
the V. V. & E. to the coast. Keremeos
will then take another big stride in fruit
growing and allied industries.
R. H. Carmichael went to Grand Forks
yesterday on a business trip and will return week end.
E. Barr Hall, of Princeton, B.C., is in
town this week. Mr. Hall has leased a
house in Chilliwack, and will, with his
family, reside here.—Chilliwack New Era.
D. M. Fiench made a flying Dusiness
trip to Oroville last week. The word
' flying' is used cautiously when applied
to Jim Hill's 'cannon ball express.'
Mrs. Allison, the elder, returned from
a visit to California and B.C. coast points
last Friday. She enjoyed the trip thoroughly, but more than ever she loves her
Princeton, having resided here forty
years or more. I'aio^
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MINES AND MINING
Placer   Mining   will Receive
Increased Attention in
the Future.
Granby Mining Expert Examines Properties—Summit Camp Ore
to Spokane.
J. J. Armstrong,  of Keremeos,  was a
visitor to Princeton last Friday.    He is,
of course, pleased with the outcome of, .
the  elections and  sees continued  prj_s£•'develop the well-known silver-gold ores
C. M. Snowden has been placer pros
pecting, and met with very encouraging
results. He found gold and platinum in
the proportions of the latter of 4 to 10,
and shows coarse samples of both which
indicate rich ground. Platinum is worth
$45 per ounce and this gold $18 per ounce.
Col. Stevenson, the veteran mining man
and poineer, left FridayTor Kelly creek
to do some furtherpfospecting and assessment work on his claims.
E. E. Campbell, M.E , made an extended investigation of theAJnited Empire, Coalmont and J_4tipsaw mining
camps while here lastweek. He will report to his company/the Granby Mining
and Consolidated Co.
The fine gold receipts at the Vancouver
assay office for 9 months of this year total
$1,000,000. Large cleanups yet remain
to be made before the end of the year.
P. Y. Smith is on a visit to Princeton,
after prospecting during th^summer on
Bear 'creek and performing assessment
work at Summit. **
C. F. Law has a gang of ten men at
work on Slate creek in charge of Mr.
Davis, an old Colorado and Nevada expert placerman. prospecting for gold and
platinum.^
Fred Stamper, prospector, arrived from
Vancouver last Wednesday.
.'Edwards is packing into Summit
^__p 2,000 lbs. of supplies, with which to
and $18 in gold.    A tunnel, now diiven
100 feet, will cut the vein at depth.
Most of Mr McCauley's time and effects
have been directed to the development of
what is known as Camp No. 2 Here he
has spent about #$0,000 in payment for\
prtcpeitiua and laboT! Several open cuts
show high grade copper gold ore. Ou the
Reco claim a tunnel has been driven .70
feet in length and a drift 80 feet. These
are to tap the ore body at a depth of 262
feet. This is the first time that ore has
been struck at such a depth on Copper
Mountain, and demonstrates that the ore
is strong as followed downwards The
tunnel has already developed 16 feet of
ore.
There are many properties on Copper
Mountain with fin.1 surface showings, but
the owners^as vet, have not had tbe capital to p.?v. the _^__rtT_T_ref-profitable ore
at de______t—Consequently much interest is
of this camp. Wit& ^characteristic enterprise he hrs shippeu 1,000 lbs. of ore to
the Spokane Expo. He reports the trail
to the Summit in bad condition in spots
and in need of immediate repair.
COPPER MOUNTAIN.
Good Ore Struck at Depth—Property
in Mining Turnover.
Another very promising camp on Copper Mountain is the Trachyte, known as
J. E. McCauley's Np. 1. The ledge has
been uncovered .this past summer that has
been the faed(_r in by-gone ages.'to the
rich placers an the Similkameen river below Friday creek. Mr. McCauley intends
to have the stamps dropping on this ore
before another summer has passed.
Open cuts on the Trachyte group show
a 22-foot ledge with a 3-foot pay chute on
the foot wall assaying, #15.60 in copper
aken  by all  in the development of the
Reco ^_.
Mr. McCauley never lost faith in his
property and has proven to the-world, including critics, that ore is to be found at
depth on Copper Mountain, a very important detail for any new mining camp.
For this he is deserving the gratitude and
good will of all claim owners in this section, aud also of the people at large. His
labors mean revenue for the government
and prosperity for the commercial community
Mr. McCauley has refused the offers of
three parties with cash who wanted to invest with him recently. He believed it
was for the best interests of himself and
all concerned to do so. He prefers to
work, if slowly, yet surely. By so doing
he has gained the confidence and cash of
financially capable men who will continue the work he has been doing alone.
It is understood the deal will be closed
within thirty days.
RAILWAY POINTS.
The third crossing of the Tulameen has
been made during the past week. Two
other crossings remain before Coalmont
is reached with the steel. Ballasting up
to the end of the track is in progress, and
it is expected the road will be ready for
traffic as soon as the last rail is laid, about
the first of November.
A large crew has been constructing
telegraph line between Princeton and
Coalmont, but, as they could not work
ahead of bridge construction, they were
removed to Everett.
Conductor Styce on the work train,
confined to the hospital for a few days, is
convalescing.
The rumor is revived that a through
passenger train will be operated from
Spokane as soon as tracklaying is finished.
May it be so.
V. Kistler, district freight and passenger agent for the Great Northern at Grand
Forks, has been promoted to a better
position at Portland, Oregon.
____;
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
October ii, 191 r,
BUILDING NOTES.
T. C. King is erecting a cottage on Vermilion avenue, in which he will reside
when finished.
Neil McFadden is putting a large verandah on his new house.
Thos. Lavalley is building a neat cottage for Mr. Wilcox near Similkametn
hotel.
A new fence of handsome design will
soon be placed around the courthouse
grounds by Neil McFadden.
Mrs. Allison has recently added a fine
verandah to her house across the Tulameen.
i Groceries Fresh Provisions
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF
Bert Irwin has the foundation laid for  %
his new house on Kenley avenue. ■ V
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Great Northern
—Hotel
Frais oid vegetables
Removed to Irwin Mock \:,
TW lie AND IF YOU ARE SATISFIED TELL OTHERS,
11J   US IF NOT, TELL US.
-_^_*S/V^^***
O. H. CARLE,   The Grocer,   Princeton.
J. A. Johnson has recently finished his
cottage on Endchffe avenue.
J. J. Priest will shortly move into his
house en Kenley avenue, its complecion
being well ndv^ncfji.      aJ^M.-
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C>*__y,
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J. W. Kj*__3', contractor for the new
Anglican church, has the concrete foundations laid.
Max Wilson is putting on the finishing
touches to his pretty bungalow, Billiter
avenue.
C. O. French has beautified the ' Cliff'!
house   with   paint   and   architecture   ofi   X
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ornate yet pleasing design.
Bert Thomas has recently put an addition to his house on Angela avenue.
"Coldstream Btole Nirscriesl
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VERNON, B,
Have a very fine assortment ot
FRUIT TREES
ORNAMENTAL AND SHADE TREES
AND SHRUBS
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cement in East Princeton.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Presbyterian church services—Sunday
schobl, 11 a.m.' Evening service in the
court house, 7:30. Coalmont—Morning
service, 11 a.m.
■ Christian Science lesson -sermon subject, October 15th : ' Doctrine of Atone
ment ' And it came to pass on the morrow, that Moses said unto the people, Ye
have sinned a great sin : and now I will
go up unto the Lord ; peradventure I
shall make atonement for your sin.—Ex.
32:30.
'Anglican church services for next Sunday, Oct. 15th: Princeton School House,
ri am, Matins, Holy Communion and
Sermon on 'Spirit Luke the Beloved
Physician ' ; 7-30 p.m., Evening Prayer
and Sermon.
Methodist church service, Sunday,
Oct 15th In Oddfellows' hall, at 7:30
l._n, ; cement works at 3 p.m.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910.
/ "R^OTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
y* .    December next, application will be made to
jX   the Superintendent of Provincial Police f^JP*-renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor bvjetail in
the hotel known as the Coalmont Hot_J__uate at
■  Coalmont, in the Province of British Qsfumbia.
Dated this 12th day of October. 191_T
COALMONT HOTEfcTCO., LTD.
Louis Marcottf, JKEanager.
Two business blocks on Bridge street I f Blldded   StOClW 3* SpeCialtV ^
will be erected in  the early spring, the I   .$,♦ 4&>
parties waiting on the manufacture of  <J» All Trees offered for Sale are grown in Our Own              £
A, Nurseries on the Coldstream Estate                            t
4%     General Agent, V. D. CURRY, Vernon, B.C.     X
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L. T. JOUDRY
, KXPERT
Watchmaker
Watch, Clock and   Jewelry repairing-
promptly and neatly executed.
All Work Guaranteed.
Satisfaction given or money
refunded.
Careful attention given  co   all
Mail   Orders.
/"_«   __»>   I
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
-Estimates Given
Workmanship Guaranteed
Jobbing Work Promptly Attended to
PRINCETON   LODGE
I.O.O.F. No. 52'.
IRegular meetings. 8 p
m., Thursd ays,
Sojourning brethren welcome'.'-^Hall situate  in
Thomas Block.   ■' Oddfellows Hall."
J. F. W-dlel!., Jas. Gellatly.
Noble Grand. Secretary
MODERN WOODMEN
OF AMERICA
Meetings, third Mondays,  in the Oddfellows' Hall.
Visitors welcome.
J  F. WADDELL, Consul.
P. RUSSELL. Clerk.
COUNTY  COURT, YALE.
A sitting of the County Court of Yale will be
held at the Court House, Princeton, Friday, 13th
day of Oc tober, iqii, at the hour of 11 o'clock in
the forenoon. By Command
HUGH HUNTER
Registrar County Court.
?££__-—NOTICE, the above court is postponed
to Friday, Nov. 3rd, igu.
HUGH HUNTER.
PERCY W. GREGORY
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. CE.
CIVIL ENGINEER
AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND SURVEYOR
Star Building, PRINCETON, B.C.
"DOARD OF TRADE, PRINCE-
Igg   TON, B. C.    Meets  first Monday in
each month.
J. D. Lumsden,
President.
K. C. Brown,
Secretary.
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NEW
Views «f Princeton
JUST RECEIVED
16 New Subjects
4^*    He*    <^*
3 for 25c.
PRINCETON
Drug an.
Bookstore
GEO. G. LYALL, Manager.
D. M. FRENCH
Undertaker and
Funeral Director
Coffins Supplied on Short Notice
Shop Bridge St.,. Princeton
Similkameen Land & Mines
H. B. BROWN, Broker
443 Pender St. W. Vancouver, B.C.
Will Buy or Sell.
Nicoia to Okanagan.        ' Bulldog
P. SWANSON, Prop.
First Class room and board .
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
Pri_ce?o_, B.
Slntikanieen Hotel
J. N. (SELSOI., Proprietor
Large and New building, well Furnished and  Plastered ; Comfortable ; Quietude.
Sample Room, central, Britton Bl'k
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Hotel is situated near Great Northern Railway station.
Vermilion Avenue,
Princeton, B.C.
"MODEL""
LIVERY STABLE
PRINCETON, B. C.
General Freight Delivery—Contracts
Taken—Coal hauled promptly.
Variety   of   Rigs—Good   Roadsters—
Big Stables—Courteous Attention
to all Customers.
.BiWOMflBD & GARRISON
Tlie PPincetoii
statues
'?
General I/ivery business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notice.
Praying in all its branches. Prices right
Satisfaction guaranteed.
Real Estate, Finance, Mines
Real Estate is dull but prospects are bright.
Good time to buy.
FOR SALE
Three mineral claims, showing gold and platinum, $25,000.
Ranch 1% miles west of Princeton. 192 acres.
$3,000. ij
Lot 27, Block 19, with 2"roomed house, price,
$400.   Wood aud coal shed, root cellar and well.
Lots 7 and 8, block 43, 50x190 feet and 50x165
feet. Choipe residential, second bench above
town.   Price $400 each.
■ Lot 11, block 8, 50x100 feet-   Price $350.
Two lots  in Hedley, inside and corner.   Price
$200 and $250—Also in east addition op. Mr. Smiths
house.   Price $350.
I Lot 6, block 24, house rents for $6 per mo., $500,
Agricultural land, near Coalmont, 80 acres, $1600.
Claim in diamond belt, $500; locations made.
Mineral properties.
Water power.
Suburban acreage to lease.
Business lots in east * Princeton from $450 to
Address:
J. M. WRIGHT,
Princeton, B.C., Canada.
Advertise in the Similkameen Star.
)
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October ii, 191 i.
THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
Charlie Pouwell (Beige) is in the hospital with a badly-cut foot resulting from
an accident at Ground Hog Flatywhile
working on the survey o_Tthe interprovincial road. He is making good progress toward recovery. \J
C. O. French went down to Spokane
last week and will, incidentally, take a
look at his townsite in the suburbs.
O. H. Carle received two nice goose
eggs from the Dog Falls Poultry Ranch
on Friday and will be pleased to show
them to curiosity hunters.
Kenneth Hankinson met with a painful
accident last week, having smashed his
thumb so that he is obliged to lay aside
his railroad work until healing is effected.
Colin Campbell, chiei license inspector
for the province, was, on/____ay last, appointed superintendent of provincial
police vice F. S. Husjcy, deceased.
A. Hjekling, director of the Bfinceton
CofkK&_jand Co.. of Ivond&pyEng., is in
_t_rwn on his regular visit.
C. R. Briggs left on Thursday last for
the coast.
Mrs^Eyirl has sold her Tulameen livery
bu$_t___> to J. H. Jackson.
Billy Summers returned last week from
the cyclone and rattlesnake country in
the western states, and is glad to be back
in Princeton where peace and plenty
reign.
Joseph P. Wigmore, or just plain 'Joe'
when he is slinging silk on a four-wheeled
flyer, says he needs a rest and will take a
trip to old California. He is liable not to
return alone, and, in any case, intends to
settle down in Princeton. That's right,
Joe. There's no place like home, sweet
home.
_Avery, jr., wife and child, arrived
fn Vancouver last week./
Charles Carlson, suffering from nerve
trouble, was in the hospital for a few days
and discharged in good health. He speaks
well of the institution and the kind treatment received.
The directors of the B. C. Cement Co.
are expected to visit the works in East
Princeton the latter end of this month.
W. A_J___aSi foreman of a g_hg ef-road
constr_ctors_J_ making ar road through
the Sun3H___^-^fee_--^_i_iy__toconnect
wi thihe—Onetml _n\t>_-k-__ad.
Martin Burrell, M.P., now has 1,880
majority over Dr. McDonald.
Jack Way is in charge of the Princeton
Drug and Book Store during Manager
Lyall's absence on pleasure and a_sine§j3
vacation. Everybody knows Jack and
his sunny smile, and welcomes are coming his way now, as always.
Plum pudding hats may be seen in
fashion this fall. It will be difficult to
tell, in some cases, where the head leaves
off and the hat begins.
SPECIALS.
Just try those big, healthy oyster?, :n
can or bulk (each individual oyster is a
mouthful), at Semerad & Co 's. Oysters,
lest we forget, are food for all deep
thinkers-and hard workers.
Grain and timothy hay for sale by F. F.
George. Inquire at the harness shop of
Thompson & Prosser. /
After  next  Sunday! tire  restaurant :n
connection with Semerad & Co 's bakery
will be dispensed with, owing to increas
ed business in  the bread, fruit and con
fectionery department.
LIQUOR ACT, 1910.
I Notice is hereby given that, on the first day of
December next, application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police for the transfer of the' license for the sale of liquor by retail in
and upon the premises known.as the Tulameen
Hotel, situate at Princeton, B.C., from Kirkpat
rick & Barnes to Kirkpatrick & Malone, of British
Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, l?l_t
KIRKPATRICK & BARNES,
Holders of License.
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE,
Applicants for'Transfer.
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Trie A. L nowse CO., Lid.
Nicola       Merritt       Middlesboro        Princeton
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
REST, -   $8,000,000
THE SAYINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
of The Canadian Bank of Commerce will receive deposits of $1 and
upwards, on which interest is allowed at current rates. There is no
tlelay in withdrawing the whole or any portion of the deposit. Small
deposits are welcomed. A234
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, to be
operated by any one of the number or by the survivor. A joint account
of this kind saves expense in establishing' the ownership of the money
after death, and is especially useful when a man desires to provide for
his Wife, or for others depending upon him, in the event of his death.
 J. D. ANDRAS,   Manager, PRINCETON  BRANCH	
Pioneer Meat Market
wwww
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR
Beef, Pork, Mutton, Fish,
ALSO IN STOCK.
Fresh Butter, Eggs,  Sausage, Pickled
Pig's Feet, Salmon Bellies, Herring, Prime Lard, Etc.
P. BURNS & CO., LTD.
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All HUNTERS TAKE NOTICE
THAT IT IS LAWFUL TO SHOOT but not otherwise Kill Blue and Willow Grouse from ist September to
31st December ; Ducks, Geese and Snipe from ist September to 28th February ; Deer from ist September to r5th
December; Prairie Chicken during month of October only.
Ducks, Geese aud Snipe may be sold during the months of
October and November only. Our Stock of Guns and
Ammunition may Le sold any day.
A. L. WHITE'S RiiiTM STORE
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I       KING & GIBSON    I
DEALERS IN
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Lumber, Shingles, Lath, Builders'
Hardware, Paints & Oils
B************B******A********4A***A******
Plans and Estimates Furnished to Builders
OFFICE: Vermilion Ave., near Station
PRINCETON, B.C.
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NELSON BREWING CO.
PRINCETON, B.C.
Ph^icians Recommend Our Beer
for Emaciated Patients
As a beverage, healthful ;  for the table, appetizing ;   for social
and proper use, better than wine.    Families Supplied.
	
 HP" '       ■
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
October m, 191 i,
October ii, 1911.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
(J. n. WRIGHT)
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
At PRINCETON, B.C., by
Princeton  Printing and Publishing Co.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES :
British Empire, One Year -   - $2.00
Foreign, One Year ----- $2.25
Payable in Advauce,
If not prepaid all names will be dropped off the
list of subscribers.
ADVERTISING RATES St I
Land Notices, 60 days, $7.50 each.
Coal Notices, 30 days, $5 each
Reading Notices, 20 cents per line each insertion.
Legal Advertising, 12 cents per line, 1st insertion,
S cents per line each subsequent insertion.
Liquor Licenses, $5 each.
Advertisements by contract, $1 per in. jier month.
Copy for publication as reading matter exclusively or for advertising should be delivered not
later than Monday.
Important   local   matter   unavoidably
left over to next issue of Star.
A BRIGHT OUTLOOK
The big mining transaction that
is chronicled in this edition may be
said to presage an epoch of unparalleled activity in the Similkameen.
It is a deal in ore mining of the
greatest magnitude in this province
and therefore carries with it an importance that is certain to put the
mining industry on a permanent
basis in Princeton district. One
large company, capable and enterprising, such as the B. C. Copper
(§>., ^established in this 4j. tr'ct>
creates confidence, and is an immense incentive to other companies.
Indeed, another large company is
al&"e.ad-y negotiating for mineral properties with; a view I to making a
start.
It has been often remarked that
Princeton district affords every facility and almost every variety of
mineral for the successful operation
of mines and the reduction of their
products. So prevalent are the
minerals, from diamonds, platinum,
gold, silver and copper to the the
baser ones, iron, zinc, lead, coa',
etc., that.It. quite confounds the
theories of experts. However, all
these are here, and in such abundance and quality as to warrant the
construction of coking and smelting
works.   <^-?'
It all means that population will
follow in the wake of enterprise and
capital, and that large centres will
spring into existence. Expansion
in every line of existing business
will certainly take place, and the
creation of new industries is a sequence of demaud and.supply. Thanks
to an ever provident provincial government, the building of roads and
trails to mining camps have mightily
encouraged the prospector, as well
as the capitalist. The interprovincial road, now in course of survey,
traverses a wonderful field of mineral deposits east and west of the
Hope mountains.. On this, tbe
threshold of future prosperity and
•greatness, every individual citizen
should bear the responsibilities entailed by rapid progress aud development and unite in one grand,
persevering boost.
CALLED DOWN, CALLED DP.
Our friend and contemporary, tbe
editor,   Hedley    Gazette,    devotes
much space to the Star for its daring venture of an opinion on the
political situation.   It is certain that
Premier Borden will either reverse
the tariff policy of the Liberals or
follow in their footsteps.   The Conservatives are exponents and advocates of protection, retaliatory if you
please.    That was the tone of the
campaign  from  the  leader down.
The Gazette need not hedge on that
point.   In regard to all other points
disputed  by  the  Gazette,  no  one'
newspaper has a monopoly, although
its editor may be monopolistic, by
birth and education, of all the intelligence  and   prescience   floating
around  about   election   time,  and
Star objects to the cat-egorical cat-
echization of our esteemed contem.
The editor of this illumiuant has
always  believed  in free trade, and
will personally advocate it, but the
changed conditions of a paper may
not   permit   public   expression   of
opinion ; in fact no good editor will
thrust   his  ego  into  any   political
question, but rather look upon his
readers as more capable of sizing up
the  situation  than   he  himself is.
Come, Major, beafxyour sword into
, ig for the
good oKh)uman/ty, tbe_i our voyage
across the b!jj. out into the unfathomable deep, will be one sweet call
homewards and to rest.
GOOD ADVERTISING.
The provincial government has undertaken a great advertising scheme in sending a large exhibit of potatoes from all
parts of the province to the New York
exposition, at which a trophy, valued at
$.1,000, is offered in competition for the
various districts of North America.
C H. Stuart Wade, F.R.H.S., arrived
in Princeton yesterday to select tubers
for-show at the Maddison Square Gardens
3rd to 14th November, from this dts__Sij.
arid, although the official notice sent
ahead three weeks since seems to have
miscarried, he believes that there are
sufficient available jJdTatoes to put up a
fair exhibit. In conjunction with Ashael
Smith, a Delta expert, the whole of British Columbia has been traversed, Mr.
Wade taking the eastern and Mr. Smith
the western porcipn.-,
The eastern commissioner has traversed
the country from Kamloops east to Golden and part of the Columbia Valley,
Thence down the Arrot/Lakes, stopping
off at many places aud obtaining excellent results. With Nelson as a centre,
Kaslo, the west arm of the Kootenay and
selected points were visited, as also from
Cranbrook. In the Boundary district,
Rossland, Trail, Grand Forks and Keremeos have added a considerable number
of varieties to a list which is now showing
nearly 150 varieties, and it is to be hoped
Princeton will be writ large in the list of
contributors to the government's scheme
of advertising the province.
A special train, conveying J. M.
Grueber, general manager ; J. H. Emerson, assistant manager; E. L. Brown,
general superintendent, arid R. C. Morgan, division superintendent, pulled into
Princeton early last Wednesday morning.
It was an inspection trip, and nothing
new developed.
In British Columbia.
AA**BB*BB*BB*B**BB*BB*BB*BB*BB*BB*BB*B**B
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CITY LOTS  ARE BEING  OFFERED
SALE FOR THE FIRST TIHE.
FOR
IT IS INEVITABLE THAT THE VALUE OF
THESE LANDS WILL GREATLY INCREASE
Here are some of the Reasons :
East Princeton is surrounded by huge de=
posits of Coal, Cement, Copper, Gold, and
other important ninerals.
The British Columbia Portland Cement
Co. is erecting a half a million dollar plant,
which will employ between 300 and 400 men.
The*£jnited Empire Co. is shipping a lig=
nite coal of the besl quality and is developing
immense copper deposits, requiring large reduction works and several hundred em=
ployees. The Princeton Coal & Land Co. is
increasing its daily shipments to 300 tons of
coal, providing employment to about 150
men. Other coal companies are spending
over $2,000,000 in development, and will give
work to at least 1,000 men.
every facter for growth into a big industrial
centre.
It presents a rare opportunity for investment.    Get full particulars immediately.
D. G. McCURDYI
RESIDENT AGENT.
Or write RAYMOND E. WARD, Pacific blk, Vancouver.
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Rich Resources
SURROUNDING
EAST
PRINCETON
The New City With The Payroll
Give you the opportunity for one of the
SOUNDEST INVESTMENTS
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For transportation, East  Princeton will
have, in the near future, the Great Northern
and the Kettle Valley lines, both of which,    W*T
will pass through the towwnsite. ^
East Princeton is beautifully situated on ***
the Similkameen River, with an abundance 1
of water power available.   The new city has   4t4
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at her
TEN YEAES AGO.
[From Similkameen Star of 1901.]
Supt. Kiileen has advised the Commissioner of Lands and Works that the wagon
road from Princetonto_Ke£___«os be constructed at 6nce, JobnBromley to/be
foreman. x/
The coutract for tbe courthouse was let
to Wm. Irving1Jas<Lft_ii rnh ison, <n p. rvi;
Miss Louise Allison gave a dance al
mother's home on Tuesday, January 22,
which included games and a bountiful
supper, the happy party breaking up at
the usual hour in the morning.
A scheme is on foot to supply Princeton
with electric light. E. Allison has applied for 1,000 inches of water on Cold-
water creek to generate 350 horse Slower.
A grand sheet and pillow-case dance
will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Waterman on Monday, February nth.
Chas. Richtee'r killed seven coyotes and
one cougar within a mile and a half of
town.
Miss Spphie Dunlop has. arrived and
will ofi^nthe first school in Princeton in'
_*€townsite building on Monda^/
Judge Murphy is in town talking
railroad.
THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE.
An empty stomach is most susceptible
of poisou ; the head, in like condition, is
a safe harbor for evil.
Boost, and the world is with you ;
knock and no one is with you ; even the
Knockers dislike'a Knock artist.
Good, effective preaching is always
backed by strict practising of the model
we set for others. Words are good, but
deeds are better.
Conscience should not be allowed to
stand in the way of a get-rich-quick man.
Suspicious, sensitive persons are generally guilty of the thing they accuse others
of being.
The greatest coward is the man who
blames his wife for his own frailties.
;j.Clean up your own backyard before
grouching about your neighbors, in other
words, take the mote out of your eye so
you may see clearly.
V4^^^^^^^^»JH_>4^^^m5><$M^4^4$>4^^^^^
LIQUOR ACT, J9.0.
■MOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
*~ December next, applicatioh will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel known as the Tulameen Hotel, situate
at Princeton, in tbe Province of British Columbia, i
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911. V
kirkpatrick & malone.
TWOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
SJS December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for re-!
newal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail:
in the hotel known as the Great Northern Hotel,
situate at Princeton, in the Province of British!
Columbia,
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
P. SWANSON.   ,
MOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of,
**~ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial olice for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail
in the hotel knowu as the Otter Flat Hotel, situate
at Tulameen, in the Province of British' Columbia.!
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
MRS. E. J. HENDERSON.
■MOTICE is hereby given that; on the first day of
x ^ December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Granite Creek Ho__,"W_i-'
ate at Granite Creek in the Province of British
Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
H. GOODISSON.
MOTICE is hereby given"that, o_ the first day of
December next, application will be made to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel license to selljiquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Allison Hotel, situate at
Allison, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
G. GOLDSBOROUGH.
MOTICE is hereby given that, on the first day of
x 3 December next, application will be made to
the'Superintendent of Provincial Police for the
grant of a license for the sale of liquor by wholesale in and upon the premises known as The Nelson Brewing Co., situate at Princeton, B.C., upon
the lar.ds described as Lots 1,2.3, and the property
is on 23, 24. Vermilion Avenue.
Dated this 12th day of October, 1911.
THE NELSON BREWING CO.,
per Aug. Thomas.
k     Coalmont
A legitimate
Investment
Today t
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MOST PEOPLE want to invest their money where
they are reasonably sure of a good return. If the
investment is to be made in real estate there are several
things to be considered : The situation of the town, climatic
conditions, transportation facilities, and primarily the
amount of the monthly payroll. When these questions are
asked regarding Coalmont they may all be answered to tbe
credit of the town. The situation and climatic conditions
are ideal ; the main line of the V.,V. & E. railway runs
through the town on its way to Vancouver.
The Columbia Coal & Coke Co. operating here have practically an inexhaustible supply of a pure bituminous coal.
They are installing immediately a plant which will handle
2000 tons of coal in 8 hours—this means employment for between
800 and goo men all told.
Figure out this payroll and see how many coal mining towns
in B C. can beat it.
In a . very short time Coalmont will necessarily have a population of from 2000 to 2500 people. Will this cause real estate to rise ?
We all know the answer. Then take the opportunity that presents
itself now—buy first hand and reap the benefit of this increase.
The prices and terms are such that anyone can afford to inves
to the extent of one or two lots. They range from $175 to $550, on
terms of % cash, balance over 18 months.
Address all communications and remittances to
WILLIAMSON & TURNER,
Sole Agents,
COALMONT, B.C.
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HOTEL TULAMEEN
KIRKPATRICK & MALONE
PROPRIETORS
Modern in Equipment and
In All Its Appointments!!
BATH ROOnS, ETC.
Commercial .* Sample *** Rooms
GOOD ATTENTIVE SERVICE
Headquarters for Mining Men
Princeton Bakery
And Restaurant
Fresh Oysters, New York Counts*
Can or Bulk.
Fresh Cranberries,
Fruit, Vegetables,
and Confectionery.
Meals at any hour of the day
C. V. Semerad & Co.
'»W_A_y_/^^__^////AWWVi
Princeton Carriage
And Iron Works
C.   F.  CUMMINGS,  Proprietor
OOOOOO
Horseshoeing, Etc.
General Blacksmithing.
Sleighs Built to Order.
All Work Neatly & Promptly
Phone 28 Executed.
FOR SALE.
HOLMES FLAT, 212 acres more or
less. With water record of 300 inches
from Fivemi.e Creek.
Just four miles east of Princeton.
Part cash, balance on easy terms.
• Apply to
KEREMEOS LAND CO.,
Keremeos, B.C
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K. C. BROWN
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public, Etc.
PRINCETON,   -    B.C.
BRITTON BLOCK
Priest
Photographer
Princeton
60   YEARS'
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights ___,
Anyone seeding a sketch and description may
—r opinion free whe"--
/patentable.   Conn	
tlonsstriotly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patent!
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
Invention is probably patentable. _Commnnica-
sent free. Oldest agency for securing: patents.
Patents taken through Mnnn & Co. receive
•_>«__ notice, without charge, to the
Scientific American.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest circulation of any scientific journal. Terms tot
Canada, t „75 a year, postage prepaid. Sold by
all newsdealers.
MUNN & Co 8MB~»*^- New York
Branch 0_S?s, 625 F St. Washington, IX C.
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"I      lll_l.ll. JUJijimi.
-
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
October n, 191
BIC COAL MEASURES
(Continued from last issue)
Outputs, Markets & Transportation
. The output of coal and coke in B.C. is
not increasing as rapidly as the demand,
and the market is very important. The
supply has been and still is very inadequate to the demand, which is increasing
yparly in eyppp^ins th. nwpply, thereby
maintaining a. regular price with occasional advances, so that if the output goes
on   even   rapidly  increasing   for   many
years to come, it will still find an open
market.
The rapidly increasing manufacturing
industries on the Pacific coast and in the
States, the installation of many steamship
lines for the Orient, and the rapid increase
in the commerce of the Pacifio are causes
which have combined to establish the de-
£.—-> tnand for coast coals for all time, or, at
<. feast, until the fields are exhausted ; and
to this may be added tbe fact that new
coalfields are not being opened up commensurate with the increased demand,
and also that the remaining large undeveloped coalfields contiguous to the coast
are few in number; therefore the value of
available coal properties such as this one
become apparent.
Diminution and consumption of market
or other production resulting in chronic
conditions,'generally causes reduction in
prices when diminution in industrial
*3rctivity occurs, but this has not'yet been
felt in the coal trade, nor likely to be for
a cor_Sia'erable period.
- Oil fuel for steamships has made con-
_/    aideiable progress recently, and as these
coals never find such markets, coal is stiff
king and is therefore absolutely indispensable foi^hiany years to come. <«*_;
The limiting factors in the production
Hitherto have been in transportation faci
. • •"- _fe"*t_. ___
a tie's rather than the coBrenes; but with
" __evJf§_t,'Northern railway now completed to Princeton and through >our
property, and operating between Prince-
tOTjTBjSijMid Spokane, Wash.,307 miles,
making connections en route with branch
railways to Grand Forks, Nelson, Ross
land, the Boundary country generally,
and all points on the Canadian Pacific
railway.
The Canadian Pacific railway have been
running trains to Nicola for-several-years
and are presently constructing aud extending their system from Merritt up
Coldwater rivei towards Princeton ; and
also to Vancouver, B.C.jjya Hope under
the Kettle Valley railway
The Kettle Vall«s^. railway pisses south
and parallel and in close proximity to the
uorth eastern boundary of your property
The Canadian Pacific railway have also
made surveys from Penticton north of
Princeton up Onemile creek to join either
their extension from Merritt or Nicola.
'Surveys have also been made by the
Great Northern railway from Oroville,
Wash., the present gateway of the Similkameen Valley, to Penticton, B.C., and
also-south securing from Princeton, on
both sides of thei?ftiiilkam£. n river, a
grade of I per r. nt. np to Wtppg-mr r». plr j
making it feasible for the transportation
of coal from the centre and eastern part
of your property.
The Great Northern railway are presently constructing and extending from
Princeton via Granite creek (12 miles
completed) to Vancouver (120 miles more)
with a tunnel about 1,000 ft. long through
a bluff between the Similkameen and
Tulameen rivers, south and above Prince
ton. The tunnel is about completed.
Bridging the Tulameen river from the
west end of the tunnel, the railway will
follow the|west bank of the river, and the
steel will be laid on, very shortly, as far
as opposite the coal outcrop and tunnel in
coal seam No. 4—8ft. thick, on Lot 244.
There is also a railway under construction from the Okanagan Valley to the
Columbia river, to connect with the main
transcontinental line to Wenatchee,
Washington.
From Princeton the railway follows the
Similkameen river on an easy grade to
Oroville, Wash. From Oroville to" Mol
son en route to Spokane, there is a heavy
grade, but this will be overcome when
the line, now under construction, is built
from Oroville to Wanatchee, through the
Okanagan Valley, to connect with the
main line of the Great Northern at the
latter place.
This branch, when completed, will give
an excellent outlet for the Princeton coals
into central Washington on very favor
able grades.
The present transportation facilities are
excellent for the distribution of Princeton
coals to the Boundary count: y and Spo
kane (307 miles distant) and with the
completion of the described competitive
railways and will undoubtedly be increased very materially within a few
years.
The present freight rates on coal from
Pqgceton to Sp___k_ane (307 miles) is $2.50
per ton, and will probably be reduced to
$2 after the Okanagan Valley railway is
completed, which will give easier grades.
The Nicola Valley Coal & Coke Co.,
Ltd., werecharged a freigfaf>rat_rfi_p___
miles of $2 per ton, which was reduced to
$1.80 without competitive railways.
Capitalization and Profits from
Operating Collieries in B C.
These coal seams referred to are well
deposit.d, with good sandstone roofs, and
floors for economical mining.
. The tendency in Western coal-mining
is to secure economical production by the
adoption of the most improved methods
of mining, handling and preparing the
coal for the market.
In this case would advise that the coalmining of this field be executed by ma
chinery of the latest type, ' The Siskel'
machine for coal;cutting and with the
ultimate haulage: both being driven by
compressed air.
The prime factor in the administration
and working of collieries should be the
recognition of the axiom that the more
faulty the coal-seams are, and other unavoidable continguencies, the greater the
necessity for building lip a large reserve
fund to be devoted to development work
for further bonanzas, and also that the exploratory work should be carried on at'a
steadi pace : which generally results in
securing the minimum cost; and content
poraneously with the working of the bonanza, which bears out the trite saying
that preuention ;s better than cure.
Very probably,  with further develop
ment, other coal-seams, etc., may'be dis'
covered.
The coal-seams, over 4ft. in thickness,
in these properties, ought to be operated,
based upon the practical experience, in
actual operation, under the administration of the reporter on Vancouver Island
and in the Nicola Valley, and from operations in Alberta and Western Canada, at
the following costs :—
Daily output in tons      500
Wellington Colliery Co., Ltd., Vancouver
Island, under the reporter's administration in 1901, was $ 1.35 per ton of 2,240 lbs.
The limit of profitable production may
be said to be reached whenjcoal seams of
not less than 3 ft. in thickness have to be
worked in this district, excepting anth
racite. _S«S_v_s?'
(To be contfiaula in next issue.)   /
NOTICE.
Take notice that I, C. O. French, of Princeton,
B.C , intend to apply for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum in Kamloops division of
Yale district as follows:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W corner oflot 1520 and marked
C. O French, S.W. corner, thence 60 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 60 chains west,
thence 80 chains south, to point of commencement.
C. O. FRENCH
Dated September 18th, 1911. Locator..
NOTICE.
Yale laud division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, C. O. French, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner)
of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following described lands.
to wit:—Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. corner of Lot 380 and marked C. O. French's
-__Sre6rner, thence 80 chains south, thence 80
chains west, thence 80 chains north, then.e 80
chains east, to point of commencement.
Located 14th September, 1911.
C. O. FRENCH, Locator.
By J. B. Wood   Agent.
WATER NOTICE.
-^Notice is hereby given that an application will
be made under part V of the 'Water Act.-1909'
to obtain a license in the Ashcroft water division
of Yale District.
A The name, address ahd occupation ot the
applicant: Walton Hugh Holmes, Granite Creek
B.C., in the District of Yale, preemptor.
B The name of the lake, stream or source is
Ward Creek.
C   The__Snt of diversion is on Lot 520.
D The quantity,of water applied for (in cubic
feet per second), four.
E The character of the proposed works-
ditches, flume or pipes.
F The premises on which the water is to be
used iapre-emption Lot 520, RecordNo. 329.
G The purposes for which the water is to be
used is irrigation and household,
H If;forirri^„o__j_5_Hbe the land intended
to be njigated. giving, acreage. Bench on north
bank of Granite Creek, 160 acres.
J Area of Crown land intended to be occupied
by;the proposed works, not any.
K __i__i___5_ was posted on the 16th September
1911, and application .will be made to the commissioner on the 2_r_"_ay'„_ October, 1911.
. L Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands
are likely to be affected by the proposed works
either above or below the outlet. None, -
WALTON HUGH HOLMES.
Granite X_ieek.
NOTICE.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that I, J. B. Wood, of Princeton,
B.C., intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum under the following "described lands,
to wit:—Commencing at a post planted at the
N.W. corner of Lot 388 and marked J.B. Wood's
N.E. corner, thence 80 chains south-Jhence 80
chains west, thence 80 chains nort„r_bence 80
chains east, to point of commencement.
Located 14th September, 1911
J. B. WOOD, Locator.:
WATER NOTICE
{The Similkameen Power Company, Limited, of
Vancouver, B C, give notice that wcjntend, on
the 10th day of November next, at eleven o'ctbeki
in the forenoon, to apply to the Water Commis
sioner at his office at Nicola, for a license to take
and use 20 cubic feet of water per second from
Red Creek, a tributary of Fivemile Creek, near
Princeton.
The water will be used at Fivemile Creek, about
_. of a mile below Red Creek, for power purposes.
:.We intend to apply at the same time for permission to store 4,000 acre-feet, more or less, of
the said water in a reservoir at head of falls on
Red Creek.
SIMILKAMEEN POWER COMPANY, Ltd.
Dated this 27th day of September, 1911.
• IO
.10
•05
Wages   $1.10
Royalty    10
Materials and stores	
Administration 	
Amortization 	
Total cost per ton  of  2,240   lbs.   	
f.o.b. (mine run)   .1-45
Market   price   at   shipping   point
(mine run)     2.50
Clear profit per ton of 2 000 lbs.   	
(mine run)  J1.05
If daily output was 1,000 tons the clear
profit per ton of 2,000 lbs. would be $1.20
of mine run.
The cheapest coal ever produced by the
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that the annual
ge__ral meeting of the shareholders of the
Penticton Rai way Company will be held
at the office of the company, 901 Metro
politan Buildsng, Vancouver, BC, on
Wednesday.ti;t,he 18th day of October,
A.D. 1911, at the hour of 11 o'clock in the
forenoon, for the purpose of electing
directors and transacting all such other
business as may properly come before the
meeting.
Dated the 8th day of September, A.D.
1911.
A. H. MacNEILL, Secretary.
" PUBLIC INQUIRIES ACT."
HI&HONOR (he Lieutenant-Governor in Council has been pleased to appoint the Honorable Albert Edwara McPhillips, K.C. President
of the Executive Council ; the Honorable Price
EHJgcn, Minister of Finance ; Charles iHeni.y
Xiigrffr,' of the City of Victoria. Esquire ; and
William Harold Malkin, of the City of Vancouver,
Esquire, to be Commissioners under the " Public
IhquiricS Act " for the purpose of entering into
and reporting upon the operation bf the "Assessment Act, 1903," with respect to its practical
bearing on the financial requirements of the
Province. -
The said Commissioners will hold their meetings on the dates and at the places mentioned
hereunder, namely:—
Victoria at the Executive   Council   Chamber
Parliament Buildings, Monday and Tuesday,
25th and 26th September at 10 a.m.    At the
Court-house or the Government Office at the
following places :—
Nanaimo, Wednesday and Thursday, 27th and
28th September.       -
Vancouver, Friday and. Saturday, 29th and 30th
.^September.
New Westminster, Monday, and October
Revelstoke, Wednesday. 4th October.
Golden, Thursday, 5th October.
Ctanbrook, Saturday, 7th October.
Fernie, Monday, 9th October.
Nelson, Wednesday, nth October.
Rossland, Thursday, 12th October.'ill
Grand Forks, Friday 13th October.
Princeton, Saturday  14th October.
Merritt. Monday, 16th October.
Kamloops, Tuesday, 17th October.
Summerland, Thursday, 19th October.
Penticton, FHday, 20th October.
Kelowna Saturday, 21st October,
Vernon^Mondav Mrd Prober,"'
It is requested that all persons who are interested in the matter atoresaid, and who desire to
be heard, will not fail to be present at the meei-
ings.of the Commissioners
PRICE ELLISON,
Chairman.
Treasury Department,
13th September, 1911.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS.
1***B********4^4**4**b*?bb*bb*bAb*bA***bA^bA*A^
It
Y
 Hotel   ;
liter Has
TULAMEEN, B.C.
Good Fishing, Boating
Mining Centre
mps. E. J. Henderson
PRORIETOR
FOR SALE.
OWL SKATING RINK
For Sale or Lease.
J, OSWALD COULTHARD,
Manager.
Province of British Columbia.
Notice is hereby given that all public
highways in unorganized districts and all
main trunk roads in organized districts
are sixty-six feet wide, and have a width
of thirty-three feet on each side of the
main centre line of the travelled road.
THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, July 7, 1911.
NOTICE.
Similkameen division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ernest Waterman, of
Princeton, B.C.occupation mine manager,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1822 thence
south seven chains to the southwest cor-
of Lot 1822, thence west along the north
bonndary of Lot 2049 to the high water
mark on the right bank of the Similkameen river, thence northeast along the
said high water mark to the point of
commencement and containing five acres
more or less. ERNEST WATERMAN,
Aue.25, 1911.    Percy W. Gregory, agent.
w
eg
:_.
K
msm
_
October ii, 191 i.
THE     SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
A WAENING.
It has become such a general practice
among vegetable and fruit growers to put
the best samples on the top of the box or
bag of whatever it may contain for the
purpose of deception that the law is now
being enforced regarding same. At the
New Westminster police court recently,
before Police Magistrate Edmonds, Ban-
ford Bros., fruit growers, of Chilliwack,
pleaded guilty and were fined $10 and
costs for having offered for sale in the
New Wastminster city market six boxes
of apples, the shown surfaces of which
■were not a fair representation of the contents of the boxes, and also pleaded
guilty to charges of insufficient marking
and over-grading of fruit.
GENERAL NEWS.
The commission appointed by the B.C.
government to investigate assessment and
taxation conditions, with a view to devising reforms, held its initial sitting last
Monday in Victoria, with Hon. Price Ellison and C. H. Lugrin as commissioners
No increase of wild land tax has been
suggested, but poll tax may be increased
from $2, to $4. Exemption from taxation
is advocated for impr.vements as an encouragement to building.
Owing to strikes and disputes in the
month of August, Canadian workers lost
203,000 working days in that month
According to the latest census returns
for the administrative county of London,
the total population for greater London is
7,252,963 The area of this city is 693
square miles. In 1910 the five boroughs
of New York contained 4,776,883 persons,
although the population is now estimated
at more than five million.
The members-elect of the new parlia
ment include no less than 76 lawyers.
Other callings will be represented as follows : Farmers, 36 ; merchants, 17 ; lumbermen, 10; journalists, 8 ; notaries, 7 ;
law student, 1 ; laborj man, I ; live stock
exporter, 1 ; stock broket, I If Carrick
is elected in Thunder Bay and Rainy
River there will be one real estate agent
in the House. There are a couple of members whose occupation it is difficult to
define.
NOTICE.
SPECIALS.
For Sale—Improved resident property
in Greenwood, B.C., or will exchange for
improved property in Princeton, B.C.—
Address A. L. White, Greenwood, B.C.
For Sale.—Garden Plot of 4 or 5 acres,
six miles from Princeton, on Similkameen
.river. Price $30". Terms cash.—Apply
to Wone Sing.
For Exchange.—Five pieces of resident
property in Green wo > 1, B.C., that brings
owner approximately $1,000 per year, for
improved property or ranch in the
Similkameen district. Address A. L.
White, Greenwood, B.C.
Old Papers for Sale.—Bundles of 100 for
25 cents.    Apply at Star office.
J. KNUDSON
Contractor    and    Builder
Estimates Furnished—Cement, Wood
Fibre Plaster and Lumber.
Advertise in the Similkameen Star.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Lydia L. French, of
Evanston, Ills., occupation wife of C. O.
French intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about one
mile west of the south west corner of
Charles Bonniviers' pre emption on
Roche river and marked Lydia L-
French's S E corner, thence 80 chains
west. 40 chains north, 80 chains east, 40
chains south to the point of commence
ment, and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LYDIA L  FRENCH,
July 29, 1911.       Chas. O. French, agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Chas. O.  French, of
Princeton, B. C, occupation tinsmith in
tends to apply for permission to purchase
the   following   described   lands:    Commencing at a post planted at the south
west corner of Chas  Bonni vier's pre-emp
tion   on    Roche   river    marked   C.    0
French's n  w   corner thence 80 chains
east, 40 chains south, 80 chains  west, 40
chains north to the  poiut of commencement and containing -.20 acres more or
less. CHARLES O. FRENCH,
July 29,- 1911.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take   notice that   Nicholas Codd,   of
Colfax, Wash.,occupation farmer intends
to apply for permission to  purchase the
following   described   lands.    Commenc
ing at  a post  planted at  the   southeast
corner of Gus. Powell's pre emption  and
marked Nicholas Coad's s w corner thence
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west,   80   chains   south to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or iess.       NICHOLAS CODD,
July 26, 1911.   Chailes O. French, agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Susan Nokes, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation wife of
Aaron Nokes intends to apply for permission to purchase the folio, ing described lands: Commencing at a post
planted on the northwest bank of Roche
river about two miles from the mouth of
Cambie creek and marked Susan Noke's
n e corner, thence 80 chains west, 80
chains south, 80 chains east, 80 cbains
north to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
SUSAN  NOKES,
Ang. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that John Gifford, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation cattleman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands'
Commencing at a post planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked John Gifford's
n e corner thence 80 chains west, 80
chains south, 80 chains east, 80 chains
north to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
JOHN GIFFORD,
Aug 2, 1911.      Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Nettie Laird, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation musician,
intends to apply for permission to pur
chase the following described lands:
Commencing at a p--st planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked Nettie Laird's
s w corner thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less,
NETTIE LAIRD,
Aug. 2, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Bridget McGovern, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation housekeeper
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about 8
miles west of the. mouth of Copper creek
marked Bridget McGovern's n ■ w corner
thence 80 chains south, 80 chains east, 80
chains north, 80 chains west to the point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
BRIDGET McGOVERN,
Aug. 1, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
. Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Edward A. Nokes, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation coachman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about two
miles northwest of the mouth of Cambie
creek about 40 chains northeast of said
creek and marked E A  Nokes' n  e  corner  thence  80 chains south,   80  chains!
-west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and contain
ing 640 acres more or less.
EDWARD A. NOKES,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French,  agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take   notice    that   Henry   Magee, of
Spokane, Wash.,  occupation   clerk,   in
tends to apply for permission to purchase
the   following   described   lands:     Com
mencing at a post  planted about 8  miles
west   of    the   mouth   of  Copper   creek
marked Henry Magee's n e corner thence
80 chains south, oO chains west, 80 chains
north, 80  chains   east   to   the   point   of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. HENRY MAGEE,
Aug. 1, 1911.    Charles <3L French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Margaret Durgan, of
Spokane,    Wash.,   occupation   wife     of
Michael Durgan, intends to apply for per
mission to  purchase   the  following   described  lands:    Commencing at   a post
planted about 8  miles west of the mouth
of Copper creek  marked Margaret Dur
gan's s w corner, thence 80 chains east,
80 chains north, 80 chains west. 80 chains
south   to   the  point   of commencement
and containing 640 acres more or less.
MARGARET DURGAN,
Aug. 1, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take   notice  that   Tessie  Warren,   of
Evanston,  111., occupation  stenographer
intends to apply  for permission  to purchase   the   following   described    lands: j
Commencing   at a post  plauted ou  the j
northwest   bank of   Roche   river about
two miles from   the  mouth of  Cambie
creek and marked  Tessie Warren's s w
corner thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains  west to
the  point of  commencement   and containing 640 acres more or less.
TESSIE WARREN,
Aug. 4. 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Kelly, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation married
woman intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the northwest bank of Roche river
about two miles from the mouth of Cambie creek and marked Mary Kelly's s e
corner, thence 80 cbains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains south, 80 cbains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
MARY KELLY,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, _ge'nt.
Yale land division, Yale district.
- Take notice that Horace Gifford, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation cattleman
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
mouth of Cambie creek on the northwest
bank thereof and marked Horace Gifford's n w corner, thence 80 chains south,
80 chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
HORACE GIFFORD,
Aug. 2, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that  William H.   Bell, of
Chicago, Ills., occupation  electrtcian in
tends   to apply for   permission  to   pur
chase   the   following   described   lands:
Commencing at   a  post   planted. about
seven miles up the Roche river  from   its
mouth  and   about ten   chains  north of
said river and marked W.  H. Bell's n w
corner thence 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west, 80 cbains north to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more -or less.
WILLIAM H. BELL,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Laird, of
Spokane. Wash., occupation wife of F.
C. Laird, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about 3%-
miles up the Roche liver from its mouth
and about ten chains northwest of said
river and marked Mary Laird's u e corner the. ce 80 chains south, 80 chains
west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
MARY LAIRD,
Aug. i, 1911.    Charles O, French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Mary Laird, of Spokane, Wash., occupation widow intends to
j apply   for   permission   to  purchase the
following described lands:   Commencing
at a post planted about six miles up the
Roche river from its mouth and about 40
chains ncrthwest of said river aud marked Mary Laird's n e corner thence 80
chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains
north, 80 chains east to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
•more or less. MABY LAIRD,
Aug, 4, 1911.     Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Ella Warren, of
Evanston, 111., occupation clerk, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing
at a post planted atiout six miles up the
Roche river from its mouth and about 40
chains northwest of said river and marked
Ella Warren's SW corner thence 80
chains east, 80 chains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains south to the point of
commencement and containing 640 acres
more or less. ELLA WARREN,
Aug. 4, 1911.    Charles O  French  agent.
Yale land diyision, Yale district.
Take notice that Andrew I aidlaw. of Spokane
Wash , occupation mining broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands: Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Similkameen riverabcut
60 chains north of the mouth of Roche river
.marked Andrew Laidlaw's NE corner thence 40
chains west, 80 chains south, 40 chains east, 80
^north to the point of commencement ard containing 320 acres more or less
ANDREW LaTDL.-W,
July 28. 1911, Gharles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Jeffrey R. Short, of Spokane,
Wash., occupation clerk intends to apply for pei£
mifsion to purchase the following described lands.
Commencingat a post planted at the southwest  .
corner of timber limit No. 36826 and marked J
R, Short's NE corner thence 80 chains south, 80
chains west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east to
the point of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.       JEFFREY R. SHORT,
July 27,1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Lee Bel', of Spokane, Wash.,
occupation stenographer intends to apply for
permiseion to purchase Ihe following described
lands: Commencing at a pest planted about one
mile up the Roche river from its mouth and on
the north bank thereof and marked Lee Bell's
SW corner thence 40 chains north, 40chains east
40 chains south 40 chains west to the point of
commencement and containing 160 acres more
or less. LFE BELL.
July 28, 1911. CharlesO. French, agent^-^
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Elizabeth C   Laird, cf SpoH.
ane, wash., occupation widow intends to  apply
for permission  to purchase  the   following de
scribed lands:   Commencing  at a post   planted
about  2%  mites  up the Roche   river from   its
mouth   on  the  northwest   bank   thereof   and
marked E. C. Laird's SE corder thence 80 chains -
north, 80 chains west, 80 chains south, 80 chains .
east to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
ELIZABETH C. LAIRD,
Julv 29, 1911. Charles O. French, agent. "
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Frederick C. Laird, of Spokane, Wash., occupation broker, intends to apply
foi permission to purchase the following describe lands; Commencing at a post planted
about 2% miles up the Roche river from its
mouth and on the northwest bank thereof and
marked F. C. Laird's NE corner thence 80 cbains
west, 80 chains south. 80 chains east, 80 chains
uorth to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
FREDERICK C. LAIRD,
July 29 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take'notice that Clara G. Laidlaw, of Spokane,
Wash., occupation wife of Andrew Laidlaw, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands: Commencing at a
post planted about 3% miles up the Roche river
from the mouth of said river on the northwest
bank thereof and marked C. G. Laidlaw's NW
corner thence 80 chains east, 80 chains south, 80
chains west, 80 chains north to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less
CLARA G. LAIDLAW,
July 29, 1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that Jennie O'Laughlin. of Spokane, Wash., occupation teacher intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted
about three miles south of the mouth of Pasayton river and about ten chains west of said river
marked J. O'Laughlin's SW corner thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains south, 80
chains west to the point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
JENNIE O'LAUGHLIN,
July 29,1911. Charles O. French, agent.
Yale land division, Yale district.
Take notice that. William A. Nicholas, of
Spokane, Wash., occupation broker, intends to
apply lor permission to purchase the following
described lands. Commencing at a post planted
about two miles north of the mouth of Roche
river and one mile west of the Similkameen
river and marked W. A. Nicholas' SW corner
thence 80 chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM A. NICHOLAS,
Aug. 8. iqii. Charles O. French, agent.
Similkameen Land & Mines
H. B. BROWN, Broker
443 Pender St. W. Vancouver, B.C.
Will Buy or Sell.
Nicoia to Okanagan.        ' Bulldog'
■___.
 =P5H
8
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
October h, 191 r.
^
'■•■"■ X-
Temporal Mutantur
THE TIMES ARE CHANGED
&    *&    And We Are Rapidly Changing With Them !    <&    s>
PPlICClil £011 & UM €0
^|f®i The Pioneer Mining and Development
.^pj^H^r^*«* Company of the Similkameen ^^
<|j| (Owners of Princeton Townsite)
§§ PRINCETON, the Converging; Rdint of Riversp
§111 -;;^,;       Ife    .Roads and Trails,;-;..:^SS|@^' '=:2
■*____* *______?■"'"*'*■ **••' *#fe$ "  "'•'"■:"■-»" *C..;___"0!>   .' ^W \     •   "J
The Commercial Centre
Government Offices
Public Schools,  Hospital
Fraternal Societies
Board of Trade
Religious Denominations
Pure Water and Good g
Waterworks System £8
A Pretty, Cleanly and
Healthy Town, situated
at the; forks j>f Tulameen
and Similkameen Rivers
The Princeton Coal & Land Co. at present employs about J00 men operating coal
mine, and are now increasing facilities for mining on a large scale
A  Splendid Domestic Coal      i
CHOICE LOTS FOR SALE
Information cheerfully given.   Apply to
ERNEST WATERMAN, Manager, Princeton, B.C.
dk
t___t_".i
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