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Similkameen Star 1907-03-02

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 m
Published in the interest of Princeton and Similkameen district.
Vol. viii. No. 9.
PRINCETON, B?C, SATURDAY,   MARCH 2,  1907.
ECONOMIC DSESJOF
Lignite Coal='Article Written
for the Star by Llewellyn
C.  Wynne.
Before proceeding to go into detail on
this subject it is as well to have a clear
understanding as to exactly what a lignite coal is, and why the coal of the
Princeton coal fields is so classed.
The classification of different coals is
largely an arbitrary matter. Many classifications have been made, most of which
are based on the volatile combustible
matter contained in the coal. This volatile matter is that portion of the ccal
which is given off and burns as a gas,
when the coal is slowly lieated. before
the coal catches fire.
A general average of such classifications would be about as follows: Anthracite, o to 7 per cent.; semi anthracite, 7
to 12 per cent.-; semi bituminous, 12 to
25 per cent.; bituminous, 25 to 50 per
cent.; lignite, over 50.
The "Coal and   Metal   Miners  Pocket
Book" gives the following  classification
and description of the various  classes  of
coals:    Anthracite or  hard   coal—this  is
the densest and most lustrous  variety   of
all.    It burns with little   flame   and   no
smoke but gives a great   heat.    It   con.
tains very little volatile combustible matter.    Color,   deep   black,  shining;   fracture, conchoidal.    Semi anthracite is not
so hard nor so dense as the true  anthracite.    It's percentage  of volatile  matter
is somewhat greater and it  ignites  more
readily.      Bituminous,   or  soft   coal—Is
generally brittle;   has a bright  pitchy or
greasy lustre, and is rather more  fragile
than anthracite.    It burns with  avellow
smoky flame  and   gives   on   distilation
hydro-carbon oils, or tar.
Under the  head  of "bituminous"  are
included a number of  varieties   cf  coal
that differ materially under the action of
heat, giving rise to the general classiflca
tion—Coking or   caking coals   and   free
- burning   coals.      Semi-bitumfrious   coal
has the  same general  characteristic   as
the bituminous coal, although it is usually not so hard, and its fracture is more
cuboidal.     The   percentage   of  volatile
combustible matter is   less.    It   kindles
readilv and burns with   a   quick   steady
fire and is much valued as a steam   coal.
Cannal coal differs from ordinary bituminous coal  in   its   texture.      It is  com
yact, with little or no lustre and without
any appearance ofa banded structure.  It
breaks with a smooth  conchoidal   fracture, kindles readily and   with   a   dense
snooky flame.    It is rich in volatile com-
^ir^i £8^)ustible matter and makes an  excellei t
^Trascoal.    fYJo,- ^..111.1--
$ 2 a Year, in Advance
THAT SCHOOL REPORT.
Editor Star—Sir: In reply to your
remarks in the last issue of the Similkameen Star to Inspector Gordon's report
for September, 1906, on the Princeton
school, the school trustees beg to draw
your attention to the fact that, at the
lime Mr. Gordon made his inspection,
the teacher had onlv been teaching the
school for eleven days, that this was the
first school that she had taught in, and
at the time of'the inspector's visit had
not had the time or experience to arrange
her classes to the best advantage.
The trustees also beg to state the  definition of a "gentleman" given   in   your
paper of Ihe same issue, was not given by
the teacher of the Princeton school.
Yours truly,
C. E- THOMAS.
F. W. GROVES,
HUGH HUNTER,
School Trustees.
Princeton, 22nd Feb. 22, 1907.
AWFUL   SHIPWRECK [ GEOlOeiCAi REPORT
Causes Great Loss  of   Life-
Heavy Storm  Prevents
Assistance.
LET THERE BE PROGRESS.
Editor   Star—Sir:     At   the   public
meeting called by the Board of Trade for
next Thursda}- I would  reipectfully suggest that   a   committee   of   citizens   be
formed for the purpose of endeavoring to
induce the Great Northern   Railway Co.
to make   Princeton   a   divisional   point.
For   divisional   purposes   ground   room
would be required   and   the   c nnmittee
could as an intermediary seek   to   bring
b.iyer and  seller together.    Unless  citi
zens are wide awake to their   opportunities and act   it is probable   other  points
will be made  centers   of   industry whi'e
Princeton will receive the "go by."    Let
us be constructive  and   not  destructive,
shaping our own destinies and  guarding
our own interests without teliance  upon
blind luck or a dormant people.
Yours truly,
PROGRESS.
Princeton, March 1, 1907.
The   Rotterdam   mail    steam   Berlin,
from England, with  141   passengers   and
crew, was wrecked off the Hook  of Holland at the entrance  to   the   river   Mass
leading to  Rotteidam   shortly before   6
o'clock   on   Thursday last, and with the
exception of  one person   all   on   board
perished     A   terrific   gale was   blowing
right inshore and drove the steamer on a
sandbank.    Heavy seas quickly pounded
the vessel to pieces.    She broke in   two,
her  forepart sinking   immediately, while
the doomed passengers   and   crew could
be seen for a brief space clustered on the
afterpart.    Tugs and lifeboats put out   to
the assistance of the Berlin, but the   violence of the storm made it  impossible  to
approach   the   wreck, and   the   helpless
spectators   saw   the   steamer   break   up
without being able to render the  slight
est assistance.
On Similkameen by Mr. Cam=
sell Continued from  Last
Week's Star.
BOARD OF TRADE  MEETING.
Thi meeting of  the  Board   of   Trade
called for   Thursday evening   next   promises to be the most interesting since its
inauguration.    Besides   the   election    of
officers for  the year   a   number of new
names will be proposed   for  membership
showing the citizens are  becoming  alive
to the  necessity of  keeping   the   Board
afloat.    Important matters  pertaining to
the future welfare cf Princeton will likely
come up for discussion and it is  important that the  members  turn  out in force
"WESTERN   CANADA."
gas coal
black.
W§m~
Color, dull black and grayish
(Continued on page 3.)
Mr. Hall, traveller in this part of the
Province for the well known firm of R.
P. Rithet & Co., has been removed to
other territory and in future Mr. B K.
Taylor will cover this ground. Mr. Hall;'
was extremely popular with the mer-
| chants here, who wish him success in his
new field.
For the convenience of the public a
postoffice will be opened at Tulameen on
the 1st of next month, with John Henry-
Jackson, formerly of Princeton, in fu 1
charge of His Majesty's mails.
E. P. Wheeler, of Conconully, Wash.,
is expected in Princeton shortly to commence operations on the Columbia Cop
per Co 's property at Friday Creek.
R. A. Lambert, of Vancouver, who was
in Princet >n last fall looking after his
mining interests, will arrive from the
coast shortly to commence operations on
Granite Creek where he holds leases, and
with proper machinery Mr. Lambert is
confident of making a big clean up.
"Western Can.'.da" is   the   title   of  a
booklet just usued by the  Canadian   Pa
1 cific Railway Company, setting  forth   in
a most interesting manner the  vast  agricultural resources and splendid possibilities of the Provinces  of   Manitoba    Saskatchewan, Alberta   and   new   Ontarii .
The testimony of those who have planttd
their stakes in   these western   Provinces
is given and all tell   the   same   story o*
prosperity and contentment.    The booklet is appropriately illustrated   and   is   a
credit  to   the   company that   issued   it.
Copies can be obtained free of charge by
addressing Advertising  Dept ,   C. P. R.,!
Montreal, Que.-
A man by name of E. McBain was ar-1
rested last week on the charge of having
murdered jeweller Zimmerman at Pen
ticton a few weeks ago. The arrest was
made in Vancouver by F. O. Conklin.
assistant of Mr. Walsh of the Canadian
Detective Bureau. When a: rested Mc-
Baifl fainted.
Taking as a central point the town   of
Princeton,   whose    elevation   above  sea
level has been variously estimated at form
1,885 feet to 2,120,  and   which   lies  in a
shallow depression occupied by  Tertiary
sedimentary rocks, there is a marked rise
in the slope of the lines radiating to   the
west, south and east, while the  gradient
to the north is almost imperceptible.    In
this curve the hills have  all   been  worn
down below the limit  of intense   alpine
erosion and appear as rounded ridges and
dome-shaped  summits  of gradually  increasing elevation towards the circumference.     Only  towards  the   periphery  of
this curve do the summits attain an   elevation greater than the tree  line,   which
!in this district isappioximately 7,000 feet
above sea leval, but except in the   immediate vicinity of Princeton these are usually well wooded with spruce,  pine,   balsam and tamarack.      This rounded outline and regularity of form, while in   the
^rnain due to erosion,  is also   in   part the
result of the filling in   of old  irregularities of the surface  by . the  Tertiary   lave
;flows which still cover such  a large  proportion of tbe surface.     Glacial actitn—
;b)!h   the action  of  erosion  as  well  as
deposition—has also  been   inst iu mental
in reducing the vertical relief.
Many evidences of recent development
in  the  topography  occur.     The   South
Similkameen from the  Pasiyton   to  the
Whipsuv cteek occupies a  deep  narrow,
V-shared valley indicative ofa  comparatively recent uplift, which imparts to this'
portion of the stream increased vigor and
power of erosion.     The    valley of the
Tulameen also, above Otter creek, as well
as many of its tributaries, is very narrow
and steep, showing that the drainage jfras
not been very long in operation since the
change in elevation.
Numbers  of terraces  and  deposits  of
gravel also occur at various elevations  to
a height of 1,100 feet  above-the pre ent
level of the lowest ones.     As a  rule   the
higher of these only now occur as small.
remnants  of more    extensive    terraces,
formed in the period itnn rdiatelj- follow^
ing on thedisa] ] earano c fthe Cordiller-
an glacier, and   which   have  since   been
reduced in size  by   (•••    ordinary atmos-
pheiic  agencies  <■>' er .-ii>n,    or  by  the
action of streams w huh  a-e  now far below them.    There are t! <  most  apparent
evidences      of      comparatively     recent
changes of level.
Accompanying the changes of level and
either a direct result of them, or   of  the
blocking of ancient  channels   by recent
Continued on page 3.
 m
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
March 2,  1907.
The Similkameen Star
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON,  B.C
— BV—
The Princeton Publishing Co.
B   STONK  KHN.NKDY, Editor.
SUBSC.tll* HON   RATE:
One Year,
PavnMt
$2.00
A QUETTION OF   LEGALITY.
Subscribers will confei a tavor un this office by
promptly reporting any change in address oi
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising ratfes furnished on application.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents pel line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one mouth
advertisina.
SATURDAY,   MARCH 2,  1907.
THE SCHOOL QUESION.
On another page will be found a
communication signed by the school
trustees ton "hing an article that appeared in last week's Star in connection with the public school report and Inspector Gordon's reference to the Piinceton school. The
trustees would seem to hold the
Star responsible for Mr Gordon's
report, which is of course ridiculous. Mr. Gordon enjoys the reputation of being one of the best
schcol inspectors in tbe Province
and it is not at all likely that he
would make an unfavorable report
without good reasons. The Star
merely stated that tbe report showed
an unsatisfactory state of affairs in
the school that required immediate
attention. The trustees also state
that at the time Inspector Gordon
made his inspection and report the
teacher had only been in charge
eleven days and "had net had the
time or experience to arrange her
classes to the best advantage."
Mr. Gordon made no reference to
the re-arrangement of the classes,
but said distinctly that the teacher
lacked training and experience, that
the work was poorly done, and the
absence of system produced idleness,
confusion and careless work. It;
short, more immediate study wis
necessary if the teacher was-
to succeed. Inspector Gordon also
visited the Princeton school in
the fall of 1906 and what'did he
say regarding the school then?
Practically what he said a year be
fore, in spite of the fact that the
teacher had had a whole year in
w'-ioh to gain "experience and ar-
jj . ce her classes to the best ad-
\ .li'.^ge." His first impression was
1 • ..L-i.tly a correct one.
'iYe trustees "also beg to state
v' * definition ofa 'gentleman' given
i yntir paper of the same issue was
1 I given by the teacher of the
{' t-ceton." The Editor of the
; ir begs to state he is no way re-
f -ipsible for the statement that ap-
i -v.-..red in this paper last week con
'. ned in a letter signed "Parent."
V.' y the trustees should seemingly
j ■ "Ut of their way to apologize for
t..c shortcomings of any teacher we
are unable to understand.
During the recent Provincial elections a great deal was heard  about
the "unlimited cheek" ofthe Ottawa
Government in disposing of certain
lands on the northern  coast known
as the Metlakatia Indian  reserve to
the Grand Trunk  Pacific   Railway
Company.     It   was   claimed   that
once the Indians  relinquished their
rights to the reserve  the   land   reverted to the Province.    This  now
appears to   be   an   open   question.
The World deals with   this   matter
as follows:    "That the Government
had doubts as to its powers is shown
by its taking from the railway com
pany an    understanding   that   the
company shall assume all risks and
eosts that may be incurred iu maintaining their title to the land.    The
question of the right ot the Dominion Government  to   deal   with   the
land ofthe reserves which they had
tiken over in trust for the  Indians
t| a moot one, and it would be well
in the interests of present   and   future generations   if it were decided
quickly.       There   are   many  -who
maintain      that      so     long    as   a
a single  Indian   of   the   Tsimpean
tribe remains alive, he would  have
avalidcliim  on   the   reserve   and
might block its disposal;   and   that
question   yet   remains   undecided
Generations yet unborn might contend for the possession of the land.
If this contention were   to   be   admitted   the   confusion   into which
trust titles  would   be   thrown   by
never ending claimants will be   appreciated.    There are others who as
stoutly maintain that the consent of
a majority of the tribe having been
secured, the power of sale rests with
the   Dominion   Government which
has only carried out the wish of the
tribe in selling the land outright to
the  railway  company.    Admitting
the last contention to  be  the  case,
there remains what   is   called   the
' reversionary interest" of the Provincial Government   to   be   considered.    Now,   have  the   Provincial
Government a reversionary interest
in the Indian  reserves?    Did  they
not, when making over the land to
the Indians, part with their own interest iu the  land?    And   did   they
not by passing the land.over to the
Dominion   Government   relinquish
all claim to it and  left  it with  the
Dominion   to  dispose   of   as   they
might deem best in  the interest  of
the Indians?    The  tract  of nearly
two million  acres of land  on Vancouver  island was   placed   in   the
hands of   the Dominion   in   trust,
and   by   that   Government   it was
passed over to   Mr. Dunsmuir, who
accepted it in good faith.    Suppose,
we say suppose, for we   attach   no
importance to the  illustration, that
a   resident    of   Vancouver   Island
should come forward  and   claim   a
"reversionary     interest"    in     that
great tract and sue  for   his  share?
What commotion would  be created
in the legal and  railway worlds  of
the county?     The  title   of   every
acre of land acquired   by the  company might be successfully attacked
and all instruments that had   dealt
with land held in   trust would   not
be worth   the   paper   upon   which
they were written.    Has the  Province not been asked to run its head
against a stone wall iu  fighting the
railway company for a reversionary
interest?    So long as the  sum    obtained for the land is its fair market
value (and there are dozens of citizens who are   prepared   to   testify
that it was six   and   a   half   times
above that value when it was sold),
and tbe   money derived   from   the
sale is to be applied to   the   use   of
the natives, can it  be held that the
land has not been dealt  with in the
interest of the natives and  that the
Dominion  Government   in   dealing
with it have not acted within   their
rights?    The question is a complex
one and being strictly legal   in   its
character can only  be  decided   by
the courts before whom, let us hope,
it will soon be brought.
NOTICE.
Klondyke mineral claim, situate in the Similka
meen mining division of Yale district.   Where
located:   On Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves, acting as agt.
fcr B. Baker, free miners certificate No. 3908B,
A. K. Howse, free miners certifu ate No. 93444B
and T, J. McAlpine free miners certificate No.
3842B, intend, sixty days from the date hereof, to
apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate of
improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown grant of the abeve claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 21st day of February, 1907.
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to Peter Merck-
ley that if he does not pay for the keep of
his horse Joe, and take hini away, I will sell him
by public auction one month from date of this
notice. C B. HARRIS.
Princeton, Feb. 16  1907. 7-11
THE
COPPER
A WISE   MEASURE.
Realizing the evil effects of bringing juvenile offenders before the
ordinary courts of justice, a bill,
known as the Juvenile Delinquents
Act, is now before the Dominion
Parliament and will in all prooality
become law. The measure is
modeled after recent legislation in
the United States where it has been
found to work most satisfactorily.
Under existing conditions the child
is subject to exactly the same treatment as the mature prisoner and
unless the magistrate is a man of
unusual thoughtfulness and discrimination the result of arrests and
punishments of juvenile wrongdoers
is to make the unfortunates hardened criminals before the law is
through with them. It is to correct
this and to redeem the youth who
is on the downward path—by special treatment to restore self-respect,
reclaim and educate the stunted
mentality, that the bill has been
introduced.
One of the most redeeming features of bill is that trials will be
conducted privately and no mention
of tbe name of the child or guardian
concerned in the case is allowed to
appear in reports without special
permission of the magistrate.
HANDBOOK
(New edition issued Nov. 15th, 3906.)
Is a dozen books in one, covering the
history, geography, geology, chemistry,
mineralogy, metallurgy, terminology,
uses, statistics and finances of copper. It
is a practical book, useful to all and
necessary to most men engaged in any
branch ofthe copper industry
It lists and describes 4626 copper mines
and companies in all parts of the world,
descriptions running from two lines to
sixteen pages, according to importance
of the property.
The Copper Handbook is conceded to
be the
World's Standard   Refer-*
ence Book on Copper
The mining man needs the book for
the facts it gives him about mines, mining and the metal.
The investor needs the book for the
facts it gives him about mining, mining
investments and copper statistics. Hundreds of swindling companies are exposed in plain English.
Price is $5 in Buckram with gilt top;
$7 50 in full library morocco. Will be
sent, fully prepaid, on approval, to any
address ordered, and may be returned
within a week of receipt if not found
fully satisfactory.
HORACE J. STEVENS
Editor and Publisher,
550  Postoffice Block,  Houghton,
Michigan.
NOTICE.
Chicago mineral claim, situate in the Similka-
meen Mining Division of Yale District. Where
located :   On Bear Creek.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves, acting as
agent for William Henry Armstrong Free Miner's Certificate No. B2805, intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a cert ficate of improvements, for the purpose
of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above  claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 29th day of Decern!: er, 1906.      2-10
Spring Suits
In the Latest Makes and Nobbiest
Shades in all sizes. Hats, Caps,
aud Neckties in abundance.
ALEX.   BELL
GENERAL  MERCHANT,  Princeton
WaWMkmm^^^m
volcanit flows, have been  some striking
changes of drainage;   The most marked
instance of   this is the deep wide  valley
of Wolf creek, now occupied by a stream'
inconsistent with the size  of the valley.
It seems probable  that   this valley, with
its  continuation   through Swelter  lake,
once carried a great part of the drainage
of the   Similkameen  river  which   now
flows through  the  Tertiary basin   about
Princeton.    All the smaller streams   en
IiH_if^LKAHEEN    STAR
Continued from page 1^^^^^^——,
Lignite—Brown coal; often has a la-
maellar or woody structure, is sometimes
pitch black, but more often has a dull or
brownish black color. It kindles readily
and burns with a yellow flame, and comparatively little smoke, but it gives only
a moderate heat. It is generally non
coking. The percentage of moisture is
invariably high—10 to 30 per cent.
The V. S. Geological  Suruey have  recently made a new sub-division, namely,
.■..tauis en- centlymadea new sub-division, namely,
tering the south side of this valley oc- sub-bituminous coal, to include coals of
cupy hanging valleys, so that they de- the class that occurs in the Princeton
bauch in watenalls, or have been forced area. These coals have a volatile com-
to cut deep canons down to the level of bustible matter from 35 to 45 per cent,
trunk valley. ' Ar* s^"u '" '"'
l^P^esChoice
by 1 ason of its
Purity and flavor
;    #is ■ ■
WmmtgKSm
"c results, however
afj&o   bVj  45   per cent.
Are black with a pitchy lustre  and  have |
a conchoidal  fracture.    They are  far superior in all ways  to   the   brown woody
lignites and it is not fair to class them to-1
^mmmrTSm&   ig>W    me results, however,   gether.    It is only within the last decade J
show that the glacier was losing its great   or so that these coaIs have been marketed
power of erosion and was  rather deposit-   to any extent on the continent  of North
ing iis load.    This is  evidenced   by   the   America,  but  they have   been   used   in
•     srusll number of  grooved   and   striated   Europe for  many years.    The profirable
rock exposures, and by the thick deposit   uses of lignite can be viewed  from   three
of rock detritus on the   summits   of  the   standpoints   (a)   used  raw;   (b)   used in
hills as well as iu the valleys.    Prospect-   the fonn of briquets; (c) used in gas pro-
ingfor mineral deposits on this account   ducers.    It is the intention of this article
becomes more difficult than  in   a   region   to louch briefly on all three.
.  where the strength of glacial erosion had       A-    In the State of Wyoming there is a
been greater.    At present no glaciers oc-   large fiel(l of lignite  coal which is being
cur in  the  belt between  the   boundary   extensively mined at  the  present  time.
lines and Princeton.     Many ofthe high    The Chicago, Burlington  &  Quincy Ry.
est summits, however,  at  the  boundary   use these ' Sheridan" almost  exclusively
lines, hare beautiful glacial cirques c;rv\d   °:l   their   locomotives.    This   lignite   is
out of the solid rock on the  sides  facing   very similar in composition to  the Prin-
the north.     These nsusally   have small   ceton  coal.    It   contains, however, more
lakes  in   the  bottom  filled   with   water   moisture.    The average moisture  in   the
drawn from the snow, which lies  on   the   SheridaiH?f*i"'»   '
sides and rims of the cirques  until   well
on into the middle ofthe summer.
Though glacial material is widespread,
boulder clay is rarely observed Terrace?
of gravel and sand and some beds of clay
are frequently found adhering to the
sides of the main valleys,
-This coal  is   shipped   from   Sheridan
Hanging valleys have already been  re-   County. Wy , west to Butte, Helena  and
ferred to as occurring on Wolf creek, and   Spokane (a distanr
also on thf Tni«
.. ~ .uuisuire  in   the
Sheridan coal being  i3 per   cent., while,
that in ovr coaTdoes  not exceed   12  per
cent.    The ash   contents  on   the   other
.hand in the Sheridan coal seem  to   be   a
little lower than in Princeton coal.    A-h
in Sheridan co.il,  3  to   5   per cent;    in
Princeton, 5 to ro per cent.       <^^amawi
-This coal  is   shipped   from   Sheridan
SOW
Celebrated Scotch
WHISHtV
SOLD BY ALL DEALERS
ASK FOR IT
Hudson's Bay Company
SOLE AGENTS
m{
Spokane (a distance of 750 miles.)
east a« for "- r
_. .viucva instance of 750 mile
also on the Tulameen river  above  Otter   east as far as Omaha (800 miles).    It has
creek, been found to bequite the equal of bitum-
The  thick    deposit   of glacial    drift,   inous coal> whe" the question of  cost  is
though a hindrance to the speedy develop-   ttken into account, both  for   household
ment of the mineral resources of the dis-   and for steam purposes.    The shipments
trict, must be reckoned as a  part  of iis   from Sheridan are   made   in   box   cais,
economic resources in that it has produc-   which preserve the coal from slacking as
ed  a  consider ible   extent  of  excellent   it otherwise would do if exposed to   th
farm and grazing land,   which   could   l.e   elements on a long haul.
made to support a  much  larger  popula-       For burning these coals under  boilers
tion than it now holds a light draught and a 1 large grate   area
Soiid Geology.—Geological work on   are required,
the Similkameen becomes  very difficult Continued in next issue.
on account of the great variety and complexity of the rock formations, as also on       The Canadian Bank of Commerce have
account of the thickness and   widespread   opened a branch of  their  institution  at
covering 01 drift     Plutonic, volcanic and   Prince Rupert.
sedimentary rocks are all present  cove-i-       Messrs. C DeBarro and W. Holmes bf
ing a period from Palaeozoic to later Ter-   Granite   Creek,   visited    Princeton     on
aTar      [Continued in next issue.] Wednesday.
THOMAS  BROTHER?
General  Merchants .
*   Do   YOU 9 Then come and   • i
I   Wear |1WHHI|
J *vICS» prices  right    >
Princeton, B. c.
NOTICE
*Vv\^
<£fe>-
'&>
-i»KS.l-of 143 P JJ       nCet°n m M road.
__      s* Spencer, a&-t
And 80 chains f»n«=t. o«   t.  .
S. Spenctr, Agt
NOTICE.
The Bargains that we are offering are causing
more excitement than the recent elections did
and justly so. If you don't believe it come and
investigate
!•"'    Stores at Princeton and Granite        *
Creek f
And 80 chains west; 80 chains north; 80 chains
east; and 80 chains south, back to post;640acies.
x,. c. k;t<k,
S. Speilcer, Agt.
And from N.K. cor  of K} le's location 80 chain
W; 80 chains north; 80 chains east; and 80 chau
iouth, back to post; 640 acres.
J. S. LOUGHNAN,
S. Spencer, Agt
Located this 20th day of fan . ioo~
"jmesUaci Kractioi al ltr
TaTe'^r^rh      from hX> °"
George B  i^„!,   i '• Amslev Mesra„
tend  sfatv £VFrce Miner's CerMfT   a£enI <"or
The
Princeton
Feed   Stables
NEIL  HUSTON,  Prop
General Liveiy Business carried on.
Horses for hire, single or double. Wood
or coal delivered on shortest notict
Prices   right.     Satisfaction   guaranteed.
Grant of tlie "boveola'in.
And further lake notice that action, under section 37 must be corrmenced before the issuance
ot such Certificate 1 f imp-cements.
£ated this ist da\ c/ March. A  D. 1007.   (-17
WANTED TO RENT.
A   SMALL   R.iKCH    wi:li   encu>>h .cultivated
*»■   land to grow fVed ft r ,-ibcut 12 head of stock
Apply "A," care of Star.
NOT CE.
^^^mWii ?rc-> ^vS SI
of Lands and Worker& ne, m '' £ ft "nnissiorli
-«° acres ,.f pasture land ^t, ^?1C"^to Purchase
dmsion of Yaledistric and ni U.lhe Ka»nloor!s
laldiv^^at a stake at theTp^ ,S fo«
land 20 chains W. from Hi w .. B* Cor- cf th«>
township 9I, thence North Socw COr- of P® -,
40 chains; thence Somhfo-.£?''s th«>ceWest
40cha,ns to point cf ecnfn eVcerrenC'h" • * *•*
Located Jan.31,1507. E. A_HO\VSE..
 llUU,J.p»ii,lll
THE     SIM.ILKAMEEN     STAR
1
^fAfAfw^C^^
m
1
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Driard Hotel
** * I ^ NICOLA  LAKE ********
THE Hotel has been thorougly
renovated and refitted..J* «£*
Everything: first-class. No pains
spared to please the public. Table
supplied with best the market *
affords. Fine "Wines, Liquors and
Cigars.    Telephone and Bath •* >*
Headquarters   for Princeton, Spence's   Bridge
and Kamloaps Stage Lines
m
m
i
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1
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lf^W^^*^WIIWIf^^^>f^^>f^^^^^^1'1^1
"Not one man in ten reads books.    The
newspaper is parent, school, college, pulpit,   theatre,   example,    counsellor    all   in   (
one."—Wendell  Phillips. ♦
-♦-♦-»-»- *************
What papers do you read % Let
us suggest the satisfying combination of a first class metropolitan
daily and a well edited, up-to-date
local weekly such as
THE WINNIPEG
DAILY  FREE PRESS
— AND —
Princeton Starf;
We will send you the above two
excellent papers on a three months'
trial order for 75c, and prepay the
postage on both. A nominal price,
just to get you started; you will
not, we are satisfied, having once
read them, be content to do without
them. To take advantage of this
offer you must, however, be a resident of Alberta or B. C.
The following form filled out and
forwarded to the Star will receive
grateful acknowledgment and
prompt attention.
Star, Princeton :
Mail to undersigned address the Winnipeg Daily Free Press and the Princeton
Star, postage prepaid for three months,
for which I enclose 75c.
Name   ...
Address
Wood,
Vallance &
LeggatJ
L mited
March 2, 1907.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Sherwin -Williams'
Paints
JIIURALO'S 1st quality
Cold Water) Sanitary Calcimo
1
VANCOUVER, B. C.
J. A. SCHUBERT
Has now in stock and is constantly receiving large shipments of
General Merchandise
and is prepared to supply all
kinds ot goods at lowest prices
Mail Orders Promptly Filled
STORES  AT
PENTICTON and HEDLEY
SAVAYIV "HI/A
DNIZDIlftD IV
%•
QnjvH aooDtV.,
60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
bwokly ascertain our opinion free, whether an
Intention Is projmbly patentable. TpnUnnnicn- .
tioiisstrldt/WconnilentlHl. HANDBOOK on Patents,
tent free. 0M9st agency for sefflarliiKpateuts.
Patents taken through Minui & Co. receive
special notice, without charge, in the
Scientific American.
A handsomely illustrated weekly, largest olr-
culatlon of any scientific Journal. Terms, »3 a
year; four months, $L Sold by all newsdealers.
1V1UNN & Co.36,Broadway- New York
Branch Office. 826 F St., Washington, D. C.
Great Northern
—i Hotel—
y^m
MAN LEY & SWANSON, Props.
First Class koom and
Board
Wines,   Liquors   and
Cigars
Princeton, B. c.
March 2, 1907
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
Synopsis of Canadian Homestead
Regulations.
Any available Dominion Lands within
the Railway Belt in British Columbia,
may be homesteaded by any person who
is the sole head of a family, or any male
over i8 years of age, to the extent of one-
quarter section of 160 acres, more or less.
Entry must be made personally at the
local land office for the district in which
the land is situate.
The homesteader is required to perform
the conditions connected therewith under
one of the following plans:
1. At least six months' residence upon
and cultivation of the land in each year
for three years.
2. If the father (or mother, if the tath
er is deceased), of the homesteader resides upon a farm in the vicinity of the
land entered for, the requirements as to
residence may be satisfied by such per
son residing with the father or mother.
3. If the settler has his permanent residence upon farming land owned by him
in the vicinity of his homestead, the requirements as to residence mav be satisfied by residence upon the said land.
Six months' notice in writing should
be given to the Commissioner of Dominion Lands at Ottawa of intention to apply
for patent.
Coal lands may be purchased at Jiop^r
acre for soft coal and $20 for anthracite.
Not more than 320 acres can be acquired
by one individual or company. Royalty
at the rate of ten cents per ton of 2.000
pounds shall be collected on the gross
output. W. W. CORY,
Deputy of the Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for
CM. BRYANTS
PROVINCIAL
ASSAYERS
THE VANCOUVER  ASSAY   OFFICE,
ESTABLISHED 1890.
Analysis of Coal and Fireclay a Specialty.
Complete Coking Quality Tests.
Reliable PLATINUM Assays.
VANCOUVER, B. C  '
CALEDONIAN
WHISKEY
and
CLEAR ROCK
MINERAL WATER
make a
Perfect Blend
Sold bv all Dealers.
TUCMTTS
Myriief
Navy I
Tobacco
Largest Sale in Canada
FIVE ROSES FLOUR
The only Reliable Standard Brand made from the
highest grade of Manitoba
hard wheat,
LAKE OF THE WOODS
MILLING CO.
guarantee that no bleaching
either bv CHEMICALS or
ELECTRICITY is used in its
manufacture.
Accept no Substitute.
F. W. GROVES
A. R. COLL., SC.   D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
Map of Surveyed Claims on Copper
and Kennedy Ms. and Surveyed
Lands around Prince on: Price, $2.
PRINCETON,     - B. C.
CLAUDET *\ WYNNE
IASSAYERS
MINING ENGINEERS and
METALLURGISTS
Don't Forgot  that
20 th Century
Brand
Men's Fine Tailored Garments—the very make
of clothes that all the best dressed men of Mont=
real, Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver and all the
leading cities, wear—can be obtained right here
in Princeton. Hundreds of new patterns to
choose from.
FIT GUARANTEED
THE
Am   Em   HOWSE
COMPANY
Nicola
LIMITED
Princeton
C TELEPHONE COIUMU. ICATIOh TO ALL POINTS.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HEAD  OFFICE, TORONTO
ESTABLISHED  1867
B. E. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent of
Branches
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Rest, - - - 5.000,000
Total Assets, -  113,000,000
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
CDMME   C1AL AND FARMERS' PAPER DISCOUNTED
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT
D.p>sits of $1 j.nd upwards received, and interest allowed at
current rates. The depositor is subj ct to no delay whatever in
the withdrawal of the whole or any portion of the dep sit.
PRINCETON   BRANCH—A. E. JACKSON, Acting Manager.
A. MURCHIE *$gj«
PHOTOGRAPHER **nm%, sc
Photos of Families taken at their
Homes—Views of Princeton
and Surrounding Camps.
Address   -    PRINCETON, B.C.
H, H.CLAUDET
Assoc. Inst. M  M.,Mem.
Am Inst. M.E.
ROSSLAND, B.C.
L. C. WYNNE
Assoc. Inst. M.M.
Late Assayer LeRoi.
PRINCETON, B.C.
Mines and Mills Examined, Sampled
and Reported on.
Samples   by   Mail   Receive  Promp
Attention—Correspondence
Solicited.
PRINCETON  and ROSSLAND, B.C.
moncH wanted!
W
In Xchange for all
kinds    of   Meats.
Keep warm by eating lots
of good Juicy  Beef.
SUMMERS & WARDLE
BUTCHERS
Advertise in
the Star
A FEW LEFT
Lowney's Chocolates
Manicure Sets
Toilet Sets
Fancy Perfumes and
Children's Toys
Atomizers
Ihe Cily Drug store
J. R. CAMPBELL.
PRINCETON
B.C
' "   ' '""'-	
 THE     SIMJL'KAMEEN     STAR
March 2, 1907.
§
■$,
1
!;H
li
♦    ♦     ♦
he Town of \ ♦
W$£$mi
^iiia
tktsh IColurriSia
Sfj^   _ _
sn3
At ^confluence of the Similkameen and  Tulameen Rivers
SIMILKAMEEN  DISTRICT
Send for Maps
taJ«
&
and Price List to
I ERNEST ... WATERMAN,
Resident    Manager
VERMILION    FORKS   MINING   AND     DEVELOPMENT    CO'Y
gresaggasa'
^!j^'JW?^sB^^ga^s^s^g^,r/
1
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