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Similkameen Star 1906-05-12

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Smelting with raw Princeton Coal is quite probable*
LKAMkn
Kindness makes sunshine wherever it goes: Try it.
Similkameen Valley has not a peer on all the broad continent for diversity of resource—Mining is the backbone of the district—Immense forest
areas in the foothills of mountain ranges—Grazing land is plentiful and gives forth the famed nutritious bunch grass—Gome and see the valley.
Vol. vii.   No. 7.
PRINCETON, B.C., SATURDAY, MAY 12, J906.
$2 a Year, in Advance
V.
t
■ ■
1
RED PAINT DEPOSITS.
'™ red paint deposits about two miles
up the Tulameen river from Princeton
are proving of real value-to citizens who
have occasion to use that color in painting their buildings or any article they
may wish to renew or preserve. The
•"paint bluffs", as they are called, have
an excellent location along the proposed
railway 'line which will enhance their
value from a shipping standpoint as the
paint-(red oxide of iron) could be shovelled into the cars. J. Swansborough has
recently used it for floor painting and
speaks highly of its qualities for this par-
ticu4ar purpose while as a roofing material it withstands the weather satisfactorily. Indians long ago used it for ornamentation of their burial ground figures and statuary, the unfading qualities
of the paint being very noticeable. All
that is required now is machinery to
properly grind and mix the ingredients,
the raw mineral is here in abundance for
the manufacture of red paint. Princeton
is indeed highly favored with the great
variety of natural resources in this section which must give rise to important
industries in the days of easy transportation now drawing nigh. |
BEAR CREEK ROAD.
C. F. Law camein from Vancouver last
Saturday and has lost no time in beginning wont on the unfinished portion of
the road to the Bear creek mines. The
government has made quite liberal appropriations for the construction of this
load which will be of great service in
the development of that rich mineral
section. A gang of 22 men are at work
on the road and it will be hurried to a
finish in time to get in supplies and ma
chinery for the Similkameen Mining and
Smelting Co. before the season closes.
Mr. Law is pleased with the railway out
look and expresses a cheery optimism in
the future of the whole Similkameen.
COMPLAINTS ABOUT FREIGHT.
Complaints of a very serious nature
, are made with respect to the losses of
7 freight coming over the C.P.R. into the
Similkameen. Hardly a consignment
arrives which has not been broken into
and some of the contents extracted. It
would take a detective to locate the guilty
ones in their pilfering practices but it is
only a matter of time until they are
caught, as with all of that class. A band
of freight thieves was recently caught
at Winnipeg whose operations were successful for some time when they were
finally 'run down' and are now doing
penal service. As a rule railway, express and steamboat companies, freighters, mail and all common carriers are
anxious to deliver everything intact, but
it so happens that a bad employee will
sometimes cast a shadow of suspicion on
the innocent. The police authorities are
the best source of remedy.
HOLDUP ON THE C.P.R.
Robbers Plunder Mail Car at
Ducks and Get Away
with Swag.
Long Dry Spell Broken by Musical
Patter of Rain which Makes
Ranchers Rejoice.
Rev. E. H. Bartlett, Episcopalian, will
conduct divine service in the court house
tomorrow, at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. He
preached last Sunday at Hedley where
he has taken residence.
County court will be held next Thursday in the court house at 11 ajn. before
Judge Clement.   The docket is light.
Jas. Rennie, brother-in-law of Mrs A.
Bell, arrived in Princeton this week on
a visit. He was formerly a merchant in
Fernie and latterly manager for W. R.
Megaw at Vernon. Mr. Rennie is very
pleased with the location and prospects
of Princeton and these, no doubt, will
have much influence in determining his
permanent residence here.
W. C. McDougall left on last Sunday's
stage for Vancouver on legal business
and will be absent about two weeks.
Chas. DeBarro has bought the Granite
creek hotel from Mrs. Alice James and
will immediately enter into possession.
Jim Snowden and Bob Cramer ran a
pack train of supplies up to Friday creek
this week for the owners of the Gladstone mine.
Yesterday forenoon about two hours'
rainfall laid the dust and freshened the
parched vegetation. Ranchers had become anxious about crops before the rain.
HOLDUP OF V., V. & E.
Hedley Protests Against Obstructive Tactics of the
Ottawa Lobby.
Railway Construction Well Advanced
in Earthwork, Rock Tunnels
May Delay.
(l/ROBBERS HOLD DP TRAIN.
Train robbers have again made their
unwelcome appearance in B. C. having
held up the Imperial Limited on the
C.P.R. at Ducks, a station about twenty-
five .miles east of Kamloops. While the
engine was taking water a robber sprang
into the cab with pointed revolver and
ordered the driver to pull ahead, the
mail coach having been severed from
the train and rifled by two other robbers.
It is not yet known what the value of
the mails amounted to or if any express
was stolen. It seems the passengers were
not molested. A reward of #11,500 has
been offered for the capture of the desperadoes who are believed to have struck-
across country for Uncle Sam's land, in
doing so they would probably hug the
Hope mountains and find a hiding place
in the fastnesses of Washington. The
robbery was on Tuesday shortly after
midnight.
Later—Two suspects have been caught
at Revelstoke and another is heading
toward the Similkameen.
A public meeting was held at Hedley
recently protesting against any unnecessary delay being allowed by the government in the dispute of right by the
C.P.R. for the V., V. & E. to enter Hedley. A message was sent D. Ross, M.P.,
respectfully notifying him of the sentiment of the meeting. There are many
kinds of hold ups on railways these days
and the C.P.R. evidently knows how to
give and take them.
Between Midway and Molson 2000 men
are at work on the railway grade. Six
miles west of Midway at Myers creek a
200 foot tunnel will be finished early in
June and a 900-foot trestle near Midway
will be ready for steel about the same
time. Two miles beyond Myers creek
a 350-foot tunnel is nearly done. The
tunnel at Rich bar near Oroville is making slow headway owing to water and the
difficulty in getting men to work in'it.
From Oroville to Keremeos the grading
will be done in six weeks. Tunnels will
be the only source of delay to tracklaying and may be overcome by temporary
tracks around them.
Trappers O'Lynn and Johnson are said
to have found a new and low pass through
Hope mountains which may yet be of
use for railway construction,
PLACER MINING PROSPECTS.
Several placer leases have been taken
on Granite creek recently by parties who
expect that gold mining will be very profitable this year owing to anticipated low
water resulting .from little snow in the
higher altitudes. There are believed to
be rich pockets of gold in the famous old
creek which can only be reached at unusually low water. If the present dry
weather continues during the summer
bar mining in all the auriferous streams
and rivers will be practicable with the
primitive rocker. It would not be surprising if the old gold-mining days were
again repeated by stampedes to the various placer grounds hereabouts.
D. O. Day and D. M. French are at
work on the Jennie Silkman, Copper
mountain.
Constable Hewat is confined to his bed
with symptoms of what may prove a
serious illness. Dr. Schon is in attendance and the hope is entertained that
prolonged sickness will be averted.
PLAY BALL AT HEDLEY.
The baseball season opens in the Sim
ilkameen tomorrow with a game between
Princeton and Hedley clubs which will
be 'pulled off' on the grounds of the
latter. Princeton team are all husky
fellows and keen for ball but they have
had little practice and enter on the diamond tomorrow with a heavy handicap
in this respect. The team will be picked
from the following players : Lnndy, Mac-
donell, Campbell, Scott, Broadfoot, Summers, Lyall, Hughes, MeDermott, Ryder
and Young. This is the first team to
represent Princeton in an outside match
of any kind and the result will be eagerly
anticipated. When the railroad comes
the club will then be able to reach out
and tackle Spokane, Portland, Vancouver
and possibly some of the intervening
smaller towns. The club goes to Hedley with wishes for good luck and victory
from citizens generally and the sporting
editor ot this valuable paper.
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
Willarson & Johnson have been at Copper mountain doing assessment work on
their mineral claims.
The continued dry spell makes it very
dangerous to set fires out. A heavy penalty is inflicted for neglect of fire regulations which the provincial police are
instructed to carry out.
E. F. Voigt and wife have gone to
Portland, Ore. on a visit and expect to
be away about a month. Work in Voigt's
camp is temporarily shut down.
Rev. D. F. Smith, B. A., Presbyterian,
is expected to arrive soon and take charge
of this mission field.
An accident, resulting in the death of
two miners and probably fatal injuries to
a third, occurred at the Nickel Plate
mine, Hedley, on Tuesday last. The unfortunate men unknowingly drilled into
a charged hole which exploded with the
result noted. So far as could be learned
the names of the men are Scotty Doran,
married; "FrenchJoe," and—Anderson.
'Bert Thomas is at Copper mountain
doing assessment work on his mineral
properties.
J. Spath, of Spokane, arrived in town
this week oh his way to Friday creek,
where he is interested in the Gladstone.
Miners will be employed this summer in
the development of the property.
J. Biitton has been developing the
Speculator, adjoining the United Empire,
and has exposed some very fine ore.
It is understood a dumping ground has
been selected about a mile up the Nicola
road. A scavenger will have to be engaged with proper outfit and other requirements of the Health Act gradually
introduced until good sanitation prevails.
The London Standard has an article on
B.C. which the Star will print extracts
from in a future issue.
 M
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THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
May 12, 1906
The Similkameen Star
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON,  B.C.
—by—
The Princeton Publishing Co.
A. E. Howse, Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
One Year,
Payable in Advance.
$2.00
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
^promptly reporting any chauge in address or
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month
advertisinn.
All cheques to be made payable to
A. E. HOWSE.
CIRCULAR FROM EDUCATION
DEPARTMENT.
A circular has been issued by the
Hon. F. J. Fulton, minister of education, which should be carefully
read and preserved for future reference by parents and others interested in schools. The change from
the old school law to the new -was
and is the subject of considerable
adverse criticism. As with all
changes of law and government
wherein the cost and responsibility
is localized or shifted from the state
to the individual there is bound to
be disputation and the present effort
to improve our educational system
is no exception. Much of the criticism is nothing more nor less than
the result of prejudice and opposition to change.
For economic and successful government the individual man must
be made to feel his proportionate
share of the burden of education
or any other national undertaking.
So long as the citizen shirks his
duty and makes the government
answerable for his own neglect then
there will be indifferent results.
Under the old system of education
in B.C. nepotism and "pull" prevailed in the appointments or in
the appropriations—teachers were
selected because of their coming
from a certain province and not on
their merit, while the lion's share
of school monies went to the sections having friends at ' court.'
The new act is designed to remedy
all this and to make for greater
efficiency and economy.
The Star would urge that a fair
trial be given the Act which by
modifying as experience is gained,
a. really good and workable school
law may be evolved from the present
somewhat crude Act. First of all
a careful study of the Act should
be made by every taxpayer, then
intelligent consideration is possible.
Educational reform is too momentous to be made the plaything of
a political party. It is therefore incumbent on every citizen of what:
ever political creed he may be to
assist the government of the day in
working out amendments.
Some provision should be made
in the reformation entered upon for
teaching,   at least, the elementary
principles of mineralogy. The
bountiful distribution of minerals
ali over this province makes it a
most inviting field for the student
and investor. If the youth of the
country were taught their use,
value and methods of discovery a
knowledge helpful in attaining practical results would be gained. The
ground work for scientific training
in a mining school would thus be
laid and the youthful mind awakened to the possibilities of their
rich mineral heritage.
The circular issued from the education office explains the changes
in the School Act made at the recent session of the legislature. The
principal features of the amending
act, it is pointed out, are in the
making up of the assessment roll,
changing date of annual meeting,
eliminating income from assessable
properties, making payment of supplementary grant to teachers
monthly instead of half-yearly, and
in placing schools in rural municipalities under the control of one
municipal board of trustees. New
provisions are also introduced to
allow residents of localities supporting assisted schools to raise
funds either by voluntary contribution or by assessment, to be decided
upon by the people at the annual
meeting, and for the advancing to
rural districts of such portion of
the amount to be raised as may be
deemed to be immediately necessary.
It has been decided to place rural
municipalities on practically the
same footing as the cities with regard to the management of their
schools. The assessment, levy and
collection of school rates in rural
municipalities is done by the municipal authorities and teachers'
salaries and incidental expenses of
those schools are paid direct by the
municipal council. The control of
the schools is in the hands of a local
municipal school board consisting
of five members.
The annual nomination and election of school trustees will be at
the same time as the nomination
and, election of reeve and councillors.
For rural school districts it is now
the duty of the assessor to make
up the school assessment roll in the
first place without receiving a list
of the assessable persons from the
trustees, and to submit it to the
annual meeting, after which the
trustees are to return it with corrections and revisions and any
necessary additions. The whole of
the work of assessing and collecting school rates is done by the provincial'assessors, and the collections
are paid over quarterly to the trustees by the minister of finance. The
government supplementary grant
to teachers' salaries will be payable
monthly. Annual meeting will be
early in July. The circular will be
sent with assessment slips shortly.
WARNING - GLANDERS.
In districts where the existence of
Glanders is suspected and especially in
neighborhoods where actual outbreaks
have occurred the adoption of the fol
lowing precautions by owners of horses
and others interested will do much to
prevent the spread of the disease and the
establishment of fresh centres of infection.
1. Horses or mules having a nasal discharge or other suspicions symptoms
should not be admitted to livery or feed
stables or yards, blacksmith shops,
church or school sheds, railway stock
yards, private stables or other places
where they are likely to come into direct
or indirect contact with animals of the
equine species.
" 2. Ail stables, yards or sheds used for
the accommodation of horses or mules
should be regularly and frequently
cleansed and disinfected in the manner
prescribed below.
3. After cleansing the premises thoroughly, and burning all debris, the in
terior should be well gone over with hot
steam, or boiling water, adding to the
latter at least one quart of crude carbolic
acid to each five gallons after which the
entire surface should be thickly coated
with a hot solution of fresh lime wash,
to which crude carbolic acid has been
added in the above mentioned proportion.
Outbuildings, fences, and tying posts
with which infected animals have been in
contact, should also, when possible, be
thoroughly treated in a similar manner.
All ordinary harness and stable utensils
which have been in contact with infected
animals or infected premises, should be
thoroughly soaked in a hot solution of
crude carbclic acid of a strength of one
part to twenty.
Materials which might be injured by
the above treatment, such as valuable
harness, robes cushions, etc., which have
been in contact with infection, should be
placed in an air tight room and fumigated with Formaldehyde after which
they should be thoroughly cleaned.
4. In stables where outbreaks have occurred or where diseased animals have,-
inadvertantly or otherwise, been stabled,
even temporarily, the cleansing and disinfection should be especially thorough
and in such cases it is safest to remove
and burn feed boxes and mangers when
of wood : iron^ articles can be rendered
harmless by passing them' through fire
or by immersing them for some time in
boiling water. All litter from suspected
animals should be burned or carefully
fenced until used.
5. Farmers and others should, whenever possible, avoid admitting strange
horses and mules to the premises occupied by their own animals especially of
the same species. It is a good plan to
reserve an isolated building for outside
horses or mules, but where this is impossible they mav be accommodated in
cow stables, cattle not being subject to
glanders infection. Such horses and
mules should be watered from special
pails, which, together with all other stable
utensils used on or about them, should
be carefully cleansed and disinfected before being used for other animals. Stalls
occupied by strange horses or mules
should be well cleansed and disinfected
and, if at all possible, left unoccupied for
some time.
6. Where new horses or mules are purchased in or from districts where glanders exists, they should, unless carefully
tested with Mallein prior to purchase, be
stabled apart and closely watched for
some time before being brought in con
tact with other animals of the equine
species.
7. It must be borne in mind that while
nasal discharge, or ulceration, enlarged
glands, the presence of farcy buds, unaccountable swelling of the limbs and
general unthriftiness, often characterize
cases of Glanders, the disease exists in
many animals without, for the time being
any external manifestation whatever, the
only means of detection in such cases
being the Mallein test, and that these"
occult or latent cases are in some respects
the most dangerous because unsuspected.
Our experience shows that it is possible
for animals of this class to convey infection to others without themselves devel
.oping acute symptoms. It is therefore
plain that great caution should be exer
cired in the purchase or handling of
strange horses or mules especially in
those districts where the disease has become established.
8. The carcases of animals dying from
or slaughtered as being affected with
Glanders    should,   when   possible,   be
burned or, failing this, buried at least six
feet beneath the surface.
9. Owners of premises Where outbreaks
have been dealt with should bear in mind
that Inspectors cannot recommend release from quarantine unless disinfection
has been carried out in a satisfactory
manner and that compensation for animals slaughtered cannot be.paid until a
certificate of cleansing and disinfection
has been received by the Minister of Agriculture.
10. Horse owners should have nohesi-
tation in reporting to this Department or
to its inspectors the existence of actual
or suspected cases of Glanders. The disease has been spreading rapidly of late
years and it is a matter of public interest
that every fresh centre of infection should
be discovered and dealt with as promptly
as possible.        J. G. RUTHERFORD,
Veterinary Director-General.
Department of Agriculture,
Ottawa, March, 1906.
Synopsis of (Canadian Homestead
Regulations.
- Any available Dominion Lands within
the Railway Belt in British Columbia,
may be homesteaded by any person who
is the sole head of a family, or any male
over 18 years of age, to the extent of one-
quarter section of 160 acres, more or less. -
Entry may be made personally at the
local land office for the district in which
the land is situate, or if the homesteader
desires, he may, on application to the
Minister of the Interior, Ottawa, the
Commissioner of Immigration, Winnipeg, or the local agent receive authority
tor some one to make entry for him.
The homesteader is required to perform
the conditions connected therewith under
one of the following plans:
1. At least six-months' residence upon ,
and cultivation of the  land in each year
for three years.
2 Entry must be made personally at
the local land office for the district in
which the land is situate.
3. If the settler has his permanent residence upon farming land owned by him
in the vicinity of his homestead, the requirements as to residence mav be satisfied by residence upon the said land.
Six months' notice in writing should
be given to the Commissioner of Dominion Lauds at Ottawa of intention to apply
for patent.
Coal lands may be purchased at $10 per
acre for soft coal and #20 for anthracite.
Not more than 320 acres can be acquired
by one individual or company. Royalty
at the rate of ten cents per ton of 2 000
pounds shall be collected on the gross
output. W. W. CORY,
Deputy of the Minister of the Interior.
N.B.—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
NOTICE.
^OTICE is hereby given that sixty days after _
gg date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 640 acres of mountain pasture land
situate in the Nicola division of Yale district
anddescrited as follows: Commenting at post
No. 1 on east line of J. P. Frame's preemption,
No. 617, and running north about 60 chains to
N.E. corner lot No. 617, thence west 20 chains,
thence north 20 chains, thence east 20 chains,
thence north 20 chains, thence east 60 chains,
thence south 100 cha'ns, thence west 60 chains to
initial post of Nora Laplante.
PAUL LAPLANTE, Agent.
Witnsss : J. P. Frame.
April 24th, 1906.
NOTICE.
May Bell mineral claim.   Situate in the Similkameen mining- division of Vale district.    Where
located ; In Aspen Grove camp.
Take notice that I, F, W.  Groves, acting"  as
agent for W. A.  Dodds   free miner's certificate
No. B76997. intend sixty days from date he: ecf,
'o apply to the mining recorder for a certificate
of improvements,  for the purpose of obtaining
a crown grant of the above claim.-
.iiid further take notice that action, under sec-,
tion 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 22nd day of March, 1906.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given, that sixtj days after
date I iutend to apply to the Hon. the Chief commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 160 acres more or less of pasture land,
described as follows : Commencing at the N.W.
corner of lot 1156 and running east 40 chains
more or less to the N.W. corner of lot 1193, thence
40 chains south to the S.W. corner of lotii93,
thence west 40 chains more or less to lot 43G2,
thence north 40 chains to point ol commencement. Situate in Kamloops division of Yale district. R. W. ALLISON.
April 6th, 1906.
^
May 12, 1906
THE1SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
NOTICE.
Sixty days after-date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Work& to purchase 160 acres of mountain pasture land situate in Nicola division of Yale district, described
as follows : Commencing at the N.E. corner of
lot 1039, thence noith 20 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 20 chains, thence east 80
chains to the-point of commencement.
JAMES SNOWDEN.
Dated May 2, 1906.
"hTthe supreme court of
british columbia.
LICENSE NOTICE.
In the matter of Matt Evenson.
 :  DECEASED.
. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that by an
order made by His Honor, Alexander Henderson, local judge of this ^Honorable Court and
dated the 1st day of May, A.D. $906. the undersigned was appointed Administrator of all aud
singular the estate of the.above named Matt
Evenson, late of Otter Flat, in the District of
Yale, in the Province of British Columbia, who
died intestate on or about the 7th day of April,
A.D 1905.
All persons having claims against the estate of
the said deceased are required to send the same
with the particulars thereof duly verified to the
-unclt rsigned on or before the 1st day of July,
A.D. igoS, and all persons indebted to the said
deceased are required to pay the amount of such
indebtedness to the undersigned forthwith.
Dated this 4th day of May, a.D, 1906.
ALEC. D. MaCINTYRE,
Official Administrator for the County Court District pFYale Kamloops, B.C.
CERTIFICATE OF THE~ REGISTRA-
TION-OF AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
- COMPANY.
Take notice that I, Mrs. Alice James of the
Granite Ci eek hotel, intend to make a pplication
to the License Commissioners for Nicola district
for permission to transfer her hotel license of
the said hotel at Granite Creek toChas. DeBarro.
MRS. ALICE JAMES.
Dated Granite Creek, May 10,1906.
GOOD
RIGS
"Companies Act, 1897."
Wfe' I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "Holland Gold-Copper Mining Company" has
this day been registered as an Extra-
Provincial Company under the ''Companies Act, 1897," to carry out or-effect all
or any of the objects of the Company to
which the legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is situate at Spokane, Spokane County, State
of Washington.
The amount of the capital of the Company is one million   dollars, divided into
.   one million shares of one dollar each.
The head office of the Compaq- in this
province is situate  at Princeton, and'W.
/€-   Lyall,  Merchant,  whose   address   is
Princeton, is the attorney  for  the Company.
The time of the existence of the Company is fifty years from the 27th day of
November, 1905.
Given under"my hand and seal of office
at Victoria,  Province of British Columbia, this 23rd day of April, one thousand
_ nine hundred and six.
- [LS.]        S.'Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies
The objects for which the company has
been established and registered are, for
" the purpose of locating, purchasing, de-
veloping.^and trading in mining claims
containing valuable mineral deposits, and
doing each and every act and thing in
anywise connected with, or pertaining
to, milling operations.
G. MURDOCH
BLACKSMITH
 AGENT FOR	
Cockshutt Plows, Deering
Mowers & Rakes, Arm=
strong Buggies, Wagons.
Orders Promptly Attended to.
j PRINCETON.      -       -       -       B.C.
HUNTER':
FEED S UVERV>o"°EK
• Thos. Hunter, Proprietor.
F. W. GROVES
A. R. COLL., SC.  D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
rPROVINCIAl IAND SURVEYOR.
Map of Surveyed Claims on Copper
and Kennedy Mts. and Surveyed
Lands around Princeton: Price, $2.
PRINCETON.     -       -,        B.C.
Corbould & Grant
Barristers, Solicitors, &c.
Ne w Westminster, B.C.
G. E. CORBOUED, K.C.
J. R. GRANT.
Fa^cy
Tobaccos
or all Lovers of the Weed
The People s Choice
by reason of its
purity and flavor
--      IS
WATSON':
.Celebrated Scotch
I
pi
You cannot miss it when you select
from Our Fine Assortment. We
have them in all kinds and at
very reasonable prices.
fie Cll| ftang
J. R
PRINCETON
CAMPBELL.
SOLD BY ALL DEALERS
ASK FOR IT
son's Bay Company
SOLE AGENTS
THE
Montreal
Capital all paid up, $14,400,000.     Rest, $10,000,000.'
Balance to Profit and Loss Account, $801,855—Total Assets, $158,232,409.
HONORARY PRESIDENT, Rt. Hon. Lord Strathcorra and Mount Royal G C M G
PRESIDENT, Sir Geo. A. Drummond, K.C.M G
_ ,   VICE PRESIDENT and GENERAL MANAGER, E. S. Clouston
$8m       HEAD OFFICE—MONTREAL.'
/ST
ft
4§| ^
Savings Bank Department fT%Z&" tTJst
credited- twice a year.    Withdrawals without delay.
Banking business of every description undertaken.
Rank-illf*" bv  Mail  DeP°sits ^av be made and withdrawn by mail.   Out of town ac
*-'«***"f»*-»S#«'j'   ita«*m» counts receive every attention.
The Nicola Branch is now Open.
.A.W.STRICKLAND, -        ...       Manager.
BANK OF
THE CANADIAN BANK
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000.     Reserve Fund, $4,500,000
HEAD  OFFICE,   TORONTO
B. E. WALKER, General Manager ALEX. LAIRD, Asst. Gen'l Manager
AMERICA
CAPITAL—$4,866,666
RESERVE—$2,141,333
HEAD OFFICE IN CANADA   -   -   MONTREAL
ISSUED AT THE FOLLOWING RATES I
$5 and under     3 cents
Over $5 and not exceeding $10     "6 cents
"    $10        " " $30    10 cents
$30        " " $50    15 cents
These Orders are Payable at Par at any office in Canada of a Chartered Bank
(Yukon excepted), and at the principal banking- points in the United States.
NEGOTIABLE AT A FIXED RATE AT
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE, LONDON, ENG.
They form an excellent method of remitting small sums of money with safety
and at small cost.
PRINCETON BRANCH—A. E. JACKSON, Acting Manager.
Baiting by Mail—
Accounts    of   parties living   at
distance receive our special attention. Deposits can be made through the mail, and sums added
thereto and withdrawn at any time. Drafts issued payable at all points
in Canada and abroad.
HEDLEY BRANCH
L. G. MacHAFFIE, Acting Manager.
A. MURCHIE lacnSspes
PHOTOGRAPHER »"*»«*. «e
Photos of Families taken-at their
Homes—Views of Princeton
and Surrounding Camps.
Address   -    PRINCETON, B.C.
Otter Flat Hotel
CHARLES  DEBARRO, Prop.
TULAMEEN CITY, B. C.
Headquarters for Summit, Rabbitt mountain, Tulameen river, Boulder, Bear and
Kelly creek camps.
Good   Fishing   and   Boating
P. O. Address, ASPEN GROVE.
 ■ *    ^-:.^-       -     -- . .-.,..       .-^-..;::,,..,^7?^,r
4
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
May 12, 1906
Has now in stock and is constantly receiving large shipments of
General meitiitis
and is prepared to supply all
kinds ot goods at lowest prices
Mail Orders Promptly Fined
STORES AT
PENTICTON and HEDLEY
Vallance &
leggat|lj
HEADQUARTERS FOR |
SSierwin-wsssiasus'
Paints
*~~~^
V^
Limited.!
MRALO'S 1st quality^
Cold Water Sanitary Caldmo
VANCOUVER, B. C.
DRIARD HOTEL
NICOLA LAKE    .
BEST IN THE WORLD
The Hotel has&Seen thoroughly renovated and refitted,
■t^-Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars. Jill
TELEPHONE- ftPATHi   ||v ;
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Tines.
/#<
The Electric Process 1
TDCMTFS
50   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Desiiims
Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
-nui'cMy ascertain our opinion free whether an
'invention is probably patentable. Communica-
aions-Rtrictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
senfrfree. Oldest; neency for securing patents.
'■■   Patents taken -through Munn & Co. receive
special «otice,'wilhout charges' HI the
1
■%m
A handsomely illustrated weekly
culatton of any scientific joitrf
T.nrgest cir-
Terins, $3 a
Largest Me in Canada
year"~four niouths, SSI.  Suld. by all newsdealers.
'MUNN 1 JBo.-aeiBroad^,. lew York,
branch Ofn.rr-.Jf.'B F St.- Washington. D. r.
PRINCETON BOARD OF TRADE—Rooms
^centrally located. Membershi solicited.
E Waterman,
. President. Secretary.
H. Cowan Treasurer.
i
May 12, 1906
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
SMILES.
Teacher—Johnny, what is a hypocrite?
Johnny—A boy wot comes t' school wid
a smile on his face.
Contributor—Poetry is a gift. Editor
—Not here. You'll have to pay advertising rates to get this stuff in.
Caller—The least exercise seems to
overtax the hearts of some people. Mrs,
Hardup—That's the case with my husband when he tries to get his hand into
his pocket if I ask him for money-
"Yes; I attended the banquet." "What
' did you have to eat ?"    "We started with
proteids, followed  by carbohydrates and
nucleins, and wound  up with glucosides
and caffeine."
The Mistress—Mary Ann, has the fur
nace gone out ? The New Cook—If it
has, mum, it must have gone out through
th' cellar windy, cos it ain't come
through here, mum.
Caller—There is Mr. Henpex at the
window, and you tell me there isn't anybody at home ! Maid—Sure, then, an'
Mr. Henpex isn't anybody—at home.
Sir Henry Irving, in order to break a
"long jump" from Chicago to-another
city, was desirous of securing-for one
night the theatre of a town in Indiana.
Accordingly, Bram Stoker, his manager,
wired the proprietor and manager of the
playhouse in question requesting that
Sir Henry Irving be given a night's engagement. In a short while Mr. Stoker
received the following: "Does Irving
parade?" The distinguished Briton directed Stoker to reply that "Irving was a
tragedian, not a minstrel." The further
reply came "Don't want Irving unless he
parades."
Wife—Before we were married you
used to write to me letters eight and ten
pages long. Now, when you go away,
you just send me little notes of half a
page. Husband—Um, my dear, I am—
er—trying to economize on letter paper,
so as to have more money for my little
duckie darling to spend.
NOTICE.
Sixty days after-date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase 640 acressof-mountain
pasture land situate in the£"Nicola division of
Yale district and described as follows: Commencing at post No. 1 thence 20 chains south,
thence 80 chains west, thence 20 chains north,
thence 80 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 80 chains east thence 20 chains south,
thence 80 chains east, thence 20 chains to point
of-commencement. Located about 2 miles from
the wagon road on the west fork of Otter creek.
PAUL LAPJCANTE.
Witness: John Riddell.
April 16, 1906.
FIVE ROSES FLOUR
-The only Reliable Standard Brand made from the
highest grade of Manitoba
hard wheat,
LAKE OF THE WOODS
MILLING CO.
guarantee that   no bleaching
either   bv    CHEMICALS   or
ELECTRICITY is used in its
§|||     manufacture.
Accept no Substitute.
C M. BRYANT & CO'Y
PROVINCIAL
ASSAYERS
I
i
THE  VANCOUVER ASSAY   OFFICE,
ESTABLISHED 1890.
Analysis of Coal and Fireclay a Specialty.
Complete Coking Quality Testa. 6
Eeliable PLATINUM Assays.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
For  CONNOISSEURS Only.
Can be had at all first-class hotels throughout the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,y.
VICTORIA, B. C,
Sole Agents*
NOTICE..
Sixty days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works to purchase 320 acres of land situate in the Yale
division of Yale district and described as
follows: Commencing at a post at S.E corner of
lot 246 and western boundary of lot 299, running
80 chains south, 40 chains west, 80 chains north
and 40 chains east, back to initial post.
RICHARD NAGLE.
Princeton, April 28th.
NOTICE.
SIMMERS & WARDLE
BUTCHERS
Princeton
;■■-'-■■■•: Meal ffl   -
||V- Market.   <
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in all
Kinds of Meat.
PISH AND GAME IN SEASON.
Sixty days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase 200 acres of land in
the Nicola division of Yale district and described
as follows: Commencing at the N E- corner of
lot 936 thence south 60 chains, east 20 chains,
north 20 chains, east 20 chains, north 40 chains,
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
H, T. THRIFT,
C. M. Snowden, Agent.
April 2nd, 1906.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days aftei
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissionei
of Lands and Works for permission to" purchase
80 acres of land in the Yale division of Yale district, more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the S W. corner of lot No. 68,
thence south 40 chairis-Bforeor less to the northwest corner of lot No. 6q, thence east 20 chains,
thence north 40 chains, more or less, to the south
line of lot 68, thence west 20 chains to point of
commencement.
EDGAR B. TINGLEY.
Otter Valley, 26th April, iqo6.
NOTICE.
Red Buck and Boanite mineral claims, situate in
the Similkameen mining division of Yale
dsstrict. Where located : on Kennedy mountain.
Take notice that I, T. C. Revely, free miner's
certificate No. 879999, acting for myself and G.
WrAllison, free miner's certificate No. B78864,
intend, .sixty days from the date hereof
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
certificate of improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining crown grants of the above claims.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificates of improvements.
Dated this 23rd day of January, 1906.
THE:
A. 110WSC CO.
1
ajJVUTED
iNICOLA and PRINCETON
Making Dependable Statements
Fortunate is the store that has the
reputation for dependability.
Fortunate is the public that has
such a store in its midst. Mutual
confidence between a store and its
buying public means growth.
This store has grown, and is growing on just these lines.'
We have removed to our new
premises — directly opposite old
stand—where you will find an up-
to-date stock at prices to suit the
times.
THE:
A. E. IIISC €0,
:LIMITED
NICOLA and PRINCETON
am
WarnM
M
-    -----■-'-I
 ^"^~r^-^-77—Tr7-—'> ■ -■..".■. - -.-■■^-ir>^-:=:'-s:~y~ 7?^—-■ :• ~~
^m^ugK^m.
<mmm
rmmmm
THE    SIMILKAMEEllSSTAR
May 12, 1906
1
6
6
I
t
i
6
£
<>4«»i-» Oi^OL^OOO<*<-»<*<*<-»'
F^e Tovwn of
PRINCETON
British Columbia.
'?
i
I
i
1
m A^*^^^A**A^^^V¥*^^^v»^^-wvN^*^^^^^wv\^vyyvvww*»
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED<at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain,
Kennedy Mounta.\n, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove.
m I Government   Headquarters a i
:: ;l|||l|fFor the SimilkameeftiDlstriot §f-'■■'.'.<
FINE   CLIMATE IaND   PUREST  OF   WATER
Enormous Agricultural Area to Draw from
£.ors fo#? S4LF
PRESENT PRICES OF LOTS—From $3.00 to $10 Per Front Foot. Size of Lots
50 x 100 Feet and 33 x 100 Feet. Terms=«One-Third Cash; Balance Three and] Six flonths
with Interest at Six Per Cent Per Annum. ysw
Send for Map and Price List  to |p8|
1 * ERNEST   WATERMAN, S <£
■■ .
iResident  Manager
-4
I
11
«*--i
VERMILION    FORKSf MINING   AND   DEVELOPMENT   CO'Y
Agents for the CANADIAN 'ORE CONCENTRATION, LIMITED (Elmore Oil Process.)
IMiMtt
tmaalammamaam
Vim
Mi^'mm^M

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