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Similkameen Star 1906-10-13

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I
Princeton is the  Coming Town in this Valley==Boqst Her
Published in the interest of Princeton and Similkameen district.
Vol. vii.   No. 20.
PRINCETON, B.C., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, \ 906.
$2 a Year, in Advance
MINING NEWS
i     BRIEFLY TOLD
Butte Mining Expert Looking
Over the Ground in this
District.
THE GAME ACT.
A Busy Time in the Mines is Looked
for Next Year—Development
Work Going on.
■ Although there is nothing startling to
report in the minging line this week, it
is satisfactory to know that development
work is going on at the different camps
with highly pleasing results. The mines
are being put in such shape that when
the railway does come shipping can commence almost immediately. Prospecting
also continues and good finds are being
•made. With winter coming on the
search will of course drop off, to be re:
newed again in the spring.
Fred. T. Greene, a mining expert from
Butte, Mont., arrived in town last Sun
day and is spending the week investigat
ing the mining possibilities in this lo
cality. He represents men of millions
who are anxious to invest here if things
are favorable. Mr. Greene evidently is a
top notcher in his line, and is ?oing
about his business is a quiet, unassuming
manner. It is his intention to return in
tbe spring and continue his work. If
his reports are favorable unlimited money
will come in. Next to railway communication, mbney is what is required to
prove the Similkameen the richest mineral belt in the Province. Mr. Prank
Bailie, who is well acquainted with the
lay of the land, is piloting Mr. Greene
around.
Jim Snowdon and Dave Day have returned from Copper mountain, where
they have been busy doing assessment
and development work. They brought
back samples of copper oie taken
from the Oriole, running #9.16 in copper
and gold. Of this they have a clear 100
foot lead.
Sam Spencer and Robt. Stevenson are
in from the Hope Summit and report
satisfactory results from work done there.
Nels. Johnson and John Holn, who left
here a short time ago for Spokane, have
returned, and after purchasing supplies
proceeded to Bear Creek where they have
a group of valuable clairhs. It is understood they intend pushing development
work this winter.
J. M. Wright and C. O. French returned on Friday from Granite Creek,
where they have\been doing assessment
work on the Star and examining the
Lucky Boy and Spokane.   They report a
Evidently Mot Understood—Strict Enforcement Needed to Prevent Game
Being Exterminated.
That part of the game act relating to
the close season for mountain sheep does
seems to generally understood and to
make it clear the following quotations
from the Game Act are made: "Deer,
mountain goat, mountain sheep (ram)
may be shot in October, November and
part of December." BUT—there's always a but buttiug in—by order-in-Coun-
cil a close season is declared in certain
districts, and that certain district is "all
that portion of the Province to the south
of the Canadian Pacific Railway from the
coait as far east as the Columbia river,
from Revelstoke to the International
boundary." Indians are subject to this
law as well as the whites.
While on this question it would be interesting to know What the game warden
for this district is doing (if there is such
an officer). It seems to be pretty well
known that the Indians are killing the
sheep right along. Not only Ihis but
that trappers are simply slaughtering all
kinds of game and fish in and out "of
season for baiting purposes. If this is allowed to continue unceecked it will not
be many years before our forests and
streams are depleted of their wild and
festive inhabitants.
Chas. Wilson, of Greenwood, representing the Pat Burns Co., visited Princeton
this week. Mr. Wilson took a trip up to
Boulder Creek where he has a likely
bunch of claims, and as soon as the railway is open for business they will be
developed.
Mr. A. Bell, general merchant, is erect-
a building 24x40 on Vermillion avenue
near Bridge street, to be used for a store,
his present premises proving to small for
his growing businesss. The building
will be two stories high and wi.l add to
the appearance of Vermillion avenue.
Messrs. French and Day have a rich
bunch of claims on Copper mountain.
They also have a piece of ground right in
town that is assaying abormally high in
tubers, commonly called spuds. This
piece of ground was planted with little
baby spuds on June nth, and received
very little attention or inducement to
grow up and do well, in the way of cultivation. In spite of this they took a
liking to mother earth and have grown
up to be gians, tipping the scales at
\% lbs. each in a good rn^ny instances
They would take first plajee^?1, any exhibition. \
well defined vein of gold bearing quartz
9 feet wide traceable for a mile,. Clearing has been commenced on the townsite
of Welldo.
FIRE FIGHTERS §
1      AT PRACTICE
Princeton Fire   Brigade Have
Exciting Run  on Monday  Night.
With a Little More Practice Chief
Campbell Will Have a Fast Lot
of Firemen.
LOCAL NEWS NOTES.
The first practice of the Princeton Volunteer Fire Brigade since the new hall
was built, some three months ago, was
held on. Monday night. The alarm (the
excuse for which was a hot bunch of fire
doing business with a pyramid of old
boxes, straw, etc., at the south end of
Vermillion avenue near the brewery—a
real nice place for a fire to open up)
was' turned in by Captain Summers
thumping the triangle suspended from a
pole at the fire station, until it was blacic
in the face.
Under Chief John Campbell the brigade
got off in fine style, and continued to do
nicely until their supply of wind gave
out and breaths came in short pants.
But being true sports they were determined to do or die no matter how painful.
On finally reaching the scene of the fire
it was discovered that the element mostly
used for washing purposes and extinguishing fires—water—had not been provided for, and the brewery being closed,
it was decided to return to quarters and
thirik it over. Here they were met by
Trainer Ed. Grrham and escorted to the
Hotel Jackson where they were ban-
quetted, and a pleasant time spent. The,
b'hoys were "treated" so well that they
threaten to turn out again most any
time.
SPARKS.
Geo. Wardle made such a fine showing
that he has been promoted to keep cases
on the water wagon.
C. Thomas looks well doing the push
act.    ,
Neil Houston is there all the time.
J. Oswald Coulthard is an artist striking matches. In recognition of his services he has been elected a life member
of the brigade.
It has been decided to send a hose reel
team to compete at the world's fair at
Seattle in 1907.
Any cne contemplating having a fire
will please notify the Chief a few days
ahead so he can gather up his men.
Hugh Hunter, Government Agent, is
enjoying a two weeks' holiday, the first
in several years. He left on Wednesday
on trip to Otter Flat and before returning
will visit all the mining camps in that
section.
Things Doing In and Around Town
—People Coming and Others
Going.
Jas. Milroy, of Roche River, is in town.
H. Campbell, Ashnola, is staying- at
the Jackson.
Anugus Lamont was in from Ashnola
on Wednesday.
Mrs. Cook and family are in town from
Granite Creek.
Mr. and Mrs. Gulliford were in town
this week on business.
Mrs. and Miss Alice Allison paid
Princeton a visit on Wednesday.
Mr. Voigt, of Copper mountain, is reregistered at the Hotel Jackson.
Mrs. James is building a residence on
her ranch near Granite.
A. E.. Jackson, manager of the local
branch of the Bank of Commerce, is
back fiom a week's hunt.
Word comes from Spokane that grading will be commenced from Keremeos'
to Hedley within three weeks.
Mrs. D. McPhail was a passenger from
Otter Flat last Saturday and proceeded
on to Hedley Sunday morning.
A. Murchie is busy taking views in the
vicinity of Granite Creek, Welldo, Otter
Flat, taking in the mines in this locality.
Chas. Harris was in town on Wednesday from his ranch. He brought in a
load of oats, of which he has a  fair crop.
Chas. F. Daw, one of the principal
shareholders of tbe Similkameen Mining
and Smelting Co., Bear Creek, is in town
on business.
Mr. A. Baldwin, chief of the V.V. & E.
survey, left on Thursday for Hedley,
where he will meet Mr. Kennedy and
other railway officials.
Robt. Stevenson and Sam Spencer and
wife have returned frctn the Hope Summit. They report the weather in that
direction to be somewhat moist.
Jack McConnell of the Sovereign
mine, Aspen Grove, is in town on his
way to the coast via the Hope trail. Mr.
McConnel will spend the winter in Vancouver.
Sam Cassidy was in town this week renewing old acquaintances and making
new ones.   Sam is one of the b'hoys.
J. Oswald Coulthard, who has been in
Princeton for the past three weeks, looking after his mining interests, will leave
for New Westminster on Sunday, by
way of Nicola. Mr. Coulthard expects
to return in the spring, when active operations will be commenced on the
Roanie mine.
tiam
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
October 13, 1906
The Similkameen Star
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON, B.C
—BY—
The Princeton Publishing Co.
One Year,
A.  E.  Howse, Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
Payable in Advance.
$2.00
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reporting any change in address or
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month
advertising.
All cheques to be made payable to
A. E. HOWSE.
SATURDAY, OCT. 13, 1906.
CANADA'S    MINERAL
DUCTION.
PRO-
(News-Advertiser).
As the leading raining  Province
in the Dominion, any facts relating
to the mineral production  of Can
ada must be of interest to  the peo
pie of British  Columbia.    A   brief
resume of the report  issued  by the
Geological survey of   the   mineral
production of Canada for the year
1905 will, therefore, not be without
interest.    From the report   it   appears that the total value of all the
minerals mined in Canada for the
past year  was $68,574,707.    This
total is the largest in the history of
the country and   is   a   satisfactory
proof that mining in common with
our other great industries  is progressing.    In 1901 the value of the
minerals was $66,399,158, the highest value attained  until surpassed
by that of last year.    From   1901
there was a gradual  decline   until
1904, when   the   output  was only
$60,073,879.    Last year's  production shows, therefore, a  veiy substantial  advance of  over   14   per
cent., a satisfactory proof of the development of our mineral resources.
Up to 1901 there bad   been  a continuous increase from the year 1866,
when the  value  was $10,291,253.
This had grown  to $20,648,694 in
1895, and to $61,618,268  in   1900.
These figures prove that no branch
of industry can show more satisfac
tory signs of progress.    More than
this the growth is likely  to   continue in   an   even   greater   ratio.
From all the mining districts come
reports   of  development;   of new
mineral bodies being discovered, or
of improvements made in  the manner of treatment of the ores, whereby economics are effected,   so that
while there is a greater margin  of
profit on the grade of the ores that
have previously been worked, it is
now  possible   to   mine   profitably
those of lower grades.
The Geological Survey's report
divides the product into twoclasses;
metallic and non-metallic. Tbe
former class—the metallic—has the
first place in the value of tbe output, and this is likely to be main-
• tained and the percentage of value
over   the   non - metallic   products
gradually   increased.      The   total
value of the metallic class for   1905
was $37,150,830, or 54.2 per cent,
of the whole production.    Of this
gold- contributed $14,486,833  and
silver $3,605.    Gold  continues   to
lead in value   of  all   the   metals,
chiefly through the production, of
tbe Yukon district, the value of its
output of  the  precious   metal for
1905   oeing given   as   $8,327,000.
This, of course, is a very considerable reduction from the Yukon output of former years and is to  be attributed to the exhaustion   of  the
easily    worked    placer    deposits.
With the change to hydraulic and
dredging methods it is to   be  expected that the Yukon district will
return to something like the output
of the earlier years of the industry.
Copper figures in the report of the
value  of $7,420,451, this   amount
being reached at   15.59  cents   per
pound of the estimated quantity in
the ore and matte.    Nickel exceeds
copper   in   value,   the   production
being estimated at $7,550,526.  The
value of the lead  was $2,634,084.
Iron has not yet taken  that   place
in our  mineral production  which,
from the number and magnitude of
the deposits of iron  ore, it  is   destined   to hold   before many years
have elapsed.    Iron and   iron   ore
exported is given for 1905 as of the
value of $1,172,000.    Cobalt,   the
mineral that has made a section of
New Ontario   known   throughout
the world, only figures for $100,-
000 in the report, but  is   likely to
occupy a more important   place   in
the report for tbe current year.
The non - metallic category is
credited with a value of $22,266,-
615. Of this, as usual, coal contributes the chief amount, the 8,-
775,000 tons raised being valued at!
$17,658,615. It may be of interest
to note that the value of the coal
trade has doubled in the last seven
years, while petroleum figures as a
declining industry.
Necessities
Alike on the farm and in the
town these four Ryrie articles come
nearer to being necessities than
luxuries :
THERMOMETERS-Our full and
reliable line ranges in price from
50c. to $2.50.
FIELD GLASSES—Our high-power
"Ryrie Special," with 12 Lenses
in Aluminum Mountings will be
delivered to you for $12^50,
charges prepaid.
BAROMETERS—These may be had
at from $5.00 to $50.00. Our
Barometer Book is yours for the
asking.
POCKET COMPASSES — Tested
ones—$1.00 to $3.50.
Drop us a postal card and we mill
send you free ofcharge,ourlargeillustrated catalogue.
Subscribe
for
fthe
Star
X.
m
AyifeBlOJ^ni
imifect
Tbwikf,(M.
NOTICE.
Sixty days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Worki to purchase roo acres of pasture land situate in the
Yale division of Yale district, described as follows : Commencing at the S.E. corner of lot
257, (hence north 36chains to lot g6g, thence east
18 chains more or less- to China creek, thence
south 40 chains more or less following China
creek to the north line of C. Asp's preemption
theme west 40 chains more or less to point of
commencement. E. I GROVES
Princeton, luly 14, 1906.        per F. W. Groves
NOTICE.
NOTTCE is hereby given that, 60 days after
date, I intend to app'
The Paper that Publishes Up-to-date
Mining and
General
News
Yeai
NOTICE.
apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works to purchase
ands situate in Yale division of Yale district and
on the Kiesilkwa creek in the west Yale
district: Commencing' at Pailroad Boundary Sur-   c.
vey at a post marked XV IIXXV, thence south So       ed in ,fle office of the Registrar of Titles for
chains, east 40 chains,, north 80 chains, west 40   the District or County of Yale at Kamlc
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the plan,
profile and book of reference of that section of
the line of the Vancouver, Victoria and Eastern
Railway aud Navigation Company's railway
from  Princeton to  Tulameen,  B.C., was duly
A. H  FEATHERSTONE.
 CO. French, agent.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
In asking Mr. R. E. Gosnell to
accompany him to Ottawa on the
better terms mission, the Premier
has done the next best thing to inviting Mr. Macdonald, K. C, to go
with him. Mr. Gosnell possesses a
fund of valuable information, is a
close reasoner and a hard student
of the situation between the Dominion and the Province. His presence at Ottawa will be greatly appreciated by Mr. McBride who
knows very little of the points in
dispute and could scarcely be relied on to present the case of the
Province ineelligently.—World.
chains, 320 acres.
August 5,
Commencing at the N.E corner of A. H. Fea-
therstone's application thence south 80 chains,
east 40 chains, ncrth 80 chains, west 40 chains,
320 acres. WM. FEATHERSTONE,
Aug. 5, 1906.  CO. French, agent.
Commencing at the N.E. corner of W. Feather-
stone's application thence running south 80
chains, east 40 chains, north 80 chains, west 40
chains, 320 acres.     W. J. FEATHERSTONE.
Aug. s, 1906.         C O. French, agent.
Commencing at the N.E. corner of W. T. Fea-
therstone's application therce south 80 chains,
east 40 chains, north 80 chains, west 40 chains,
320 acres. O. M. FEATHERSTONE.
Aug- 5. I9°6- C. O. French, agent.
Commenoing 20 chains south ot the N.E. corner of W. J. Featherstone's application, thence
80 chains south, 40 chains east, 80 chains north,
40 chains west, in all 320 acres.
M. E. FRYBERGER.
Aug. 7, 1906. C. O. French, agent.
UCENSE NOTICES.
TAKE NOTICE that I, W. C. McLean, intend
to make application to the License Commissioners for Nicola district for permission to transfer my hotel license of the .Ashnola hotel, at
Ashnola, to Hugh Campbell.
W. C. McLEAN.
Ashnola, Aug. 25,1906,
loops on
the 29th day of August, 1906.
Dated this 31st day of august, 1906.
A. H. MACNEILL,
Solicitor for the Vancouver, Victoria and
Eastern Railway and Navigation Company.
TIMBER NOTICE.
Take notice that within two months I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works ror a timber license on 640 acres of
land situated on the west bank of Similkameen
river, about four miles north of Copper creek in
thelSimilkameen district, described as follows:
Commencing at a post on the Roche river trail,
marked Smith Curtis's Timber claim, S.W.
angle, thence north 80 chains, east 80 chains,
south 80 chains, along said river, west 80 chains
to point of commencement.
. SMITH CURTIS.
September 3rd, 1909. H. Kennedv, agent.
NOTICE.
Take' notice that I, J. A. Lundy, of the Otter
Flat hotel, in'end to make application to the
License Commissioners for Nicola district for
permission to transfer my hotel license of the
above hotel to W. J. Henderson.
J. A. LUNDY.
Otter Flat, Sept. 14, 1906.
To me Board of licensing commis=
sioners for Hie Nicola License
Dfsfpicf.
■RJOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the under-
a^i signed will at the next meeting of the Com-
mls'>ioners apply for a transfer of the Hotel License granted in respect of the Hotel Jackson
situate on Lot 8, Block 4, Townsite of Princeton,
B C . from John H Jackson toL. A. Manly; also
to have the name of the said hotel changed to
the' Great Northern" Hotel.
TOHN H JACKSON,
L. A. MANLY.
Dated this 24th day of September, A. D., 1906.
Notice is herely given that sixty days from
date I intend to apply to the Honorable Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase 60 acres, more or less, of
land situate in Kamloops division of Yale district and described as follows ; Commencing at
the N.E. corner of lot 1192 and running along
survey line 60 chains south to the N.W. corner
of lot 940, thence east 20 chains, thence north 60
chains, thence west 20 chains to point of commencement. H. H. THOMAS.
.  26th July, 1906.
NOTICE.
■RJOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I intend
}•* to make application to purchase the following deecribed land situate in Kamloops Division
of Yale District, viz :—Commencing at a post
placed on the East bank of One Mile Creek; at
the South-east corner of Lot 932. thence North
80 chains to Lot 1193, thence East 50 chains more
or less to the North-west corner of Lot 968,
thence South 40 chains to tha Southwest corner of Lot 968, • thence East
20 chains more or less to the Northwest corner of Lot 1158, thence South 20 chains
to South-west corner of Lot 1158, thence East 20
chains to North-west corner of Lot 2048, thence
South 20 chains more or less to North-east corner of Lot 1836, thence West 60 chains more or
less along Northern boundary of Lot 1836, to
point of commencement, containing about 550
acres. JOHN M. SMITH.
Princeton, Sept. 15th, 1906.
I
October 13, 1906
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
DEATH OF JAMES CHENALL.
The death of J. Chenall in the Jubilee
Hospital, Victoria, on Thursday, Oct 4th,
will be learned with deep regret by his
many friends in Princeton and vicinity.
The late Mr. Chenall drove the Nicola-
Piinceton stage for some time, his last
trip being made on to Princeton on Saturday, Oct. 28th, 1905, and by his court-
eousness and good uature made friends
all along the line. Owing to ill health
he was forced to give up his work and
thinking a change of air would be beneficial went to California. In the spring
he returned to Nicola, since which time
he has been gradually succumbing to
that dread disease—consumption—passing away as above stated.
CLAUDET & WYNNE
1ASSAYERS
MINING ENGINEERS and!
METALLURGISTS
H, H. CLAUDET
Assoc. Inst. M. M., Mem.
Am. Inst. M.E.
ROSSLAND, B.C.
L. C. WYNNE
Assoc. Inst. M.M.
Late Assayer LeRoi.
PRINCETON, B.C.
What is known as the Dewdney mill,
operated by Mr Wardell at August Lake,
is at present kept busy filling orders.
Scarcity of labor prevent the mill running its full capacity.
Brothier, the Frenchman of unsavory
reputation and many  ways   and   means,
once more breaths   he   air   of  freedom
hiving been acquitted on the last charge
of forgery in Vancouver the other day.
A new disease known as loafallday
longitinitis has struck the coast cities
and an epidemic is feared. In case it
should strike Princeton, it is well to
know the symptoms, so that immediate
steps may be taken to check it: A desire
to avoid work of any kind; just wish to
stick around; even eating becomes too
strenuous; but the cup that cheers,
brightens the eye, quickens the pulse,
makes the backward come forward,
turns dark days into sunshine, drowns
sorrow, makes you shake hands with
yjurself, and tell everybody how it happened, making life seem one long
blissful dream, is ravenously sought for.
The only cure seems to be heroic treatment. Shoe leather properly administered is said to work wonders, and a few
stunts on a rock pile will help some.
NOTICE.
Sivty days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase 200 acres of mountain
pasture land situated in Nicola division of Yale
district Commencing at the north west corner
of N. Laplaut's purchase lot 1511, thence east 60
chains, thence north 20 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 40 chains, thence east 20
chains thence north 20 chains, to point of com
mencement.
PAUL LAPL-iNT.
Princeton, B. C, Oct. 2, 1906. 28ni2
Mines and Mills Examined, Sampled
and Reported on.
Samples   by   Mail   Receive Prompt
Attention—Correspondence
Solicited.
PRINCETON and ROSSLAND, B.C.
Fancy
Tob
accos
For all Lovers of the Weed
You cannot miss it when you select
from Our Fine Assortment. We
have them in all kinds and at
very reasonable prices.
itte Oft Drag Store
J. R. CAMPBELL.
PRINCETON
B.C.
F. W. GROVES
A. R. COLL., SC.  D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
Pft&YJNCIAL UN» SURVEYOR.
Map of Surveyed Claims on Copper
and Kennedy Mts. and Surveyed
Lands around Princeton: Price, $2.
PRINCETON.     -       - B.lC.
SUMMERS & WARDLE
BUTCHERS
Princeton
Meat
Marker
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in all
Kinds of Meat.
PISH AND GAME IN SEASON.
A. MURCHIE "gup
PHOTOGRAPHER w"-""*, *<=
Photos of Families taken at their
Homes—Views of Princeton
and Surrounding Camps.
Address   -    PRINCETON, B.C.
/VHIf
HH
mmSm
? tors ^ s>
sSBm
GOOD
RIG5
FEED & U\mYCnTrt
Thos. Hunter, Proprietor.
FIVE ROSES FLOUf
The only Reliable Standard Brand made from the
highest grade of Manitoba
hard wheat,
LAKE OF THE WOODS
MILLING CO.
guarantee that no bleaching
either bv CHEMICALS or
ELECTRICITY is used in its
manufacture.
Accept no Substitute.
The People s Choice
t««U.UtfcJBMIMg^j^J» — ilJltjTfcM^gMMl
S333E2
by reason of its
purity and flavor
''    IS®      1     '
WATSON'S
(Celebrated Scotch
WHISKEY
SOLD BY ALL DEALERS
ASK FOR IT
Hudson's Bay Company
1
SOLE AGENTS
CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000.    Reserve Fund, $4,500,000
HEAD OFFICE,   TORONTO
B. E. WALKER, General Manager ALEX. LAIRD, Asst. Gen'l Manager
NEY ORDERS
ISSUED AT THE FOLLOWING RATES :
$5 and under     3 cents
Over $5 and not exceeding $10     6 cents
"    $10        " " $30    10 cents
"    $30        " " $50    15 cents
These Orders are Payable at Par at any office in f auada of a Chartered Bank
(Yukon excepted), and at the principal banking points ill the United States.
NEGOTIABLE AT A FIXED RATE AT
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE, LONDON, ENG.
They form an excellent method of remitting small sums of money with safety
and at small cost.
PRINCETON"   BRANCH—A- E. JACKSON, Acting Manager.
If YOU GET ^
A CIGAR ONE HALF
AS GOOD AS THE
^ Sons 6 (a
/ \0NTJpL
metaf-
 wppi
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
October 13. 1906
J. k SCHll
Has now in stock and is constantly receiving large' shipments of Hi
erciii*
Wood, J
Vallance
and is prepared to supply all
kinds ot goods at lowest prices
Man Orders Promptly Filled
e Electric Process
STORES  AT
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Sherwin-Williams'
Paints
tttURALO'S 1st quality
Cold Water Sanitary Calcimo
VANCOUVER, B. C.
NICOLA LAKE
!
■■J^^^'^mrv^m^
The Hotel.has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
If    TELEPHONE- ||BATH.
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines.
and HEDLEY
SO   YEARS*
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
 ^^„, Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
nuickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communications strictlyconlldential. HANDBOOK on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive
ypecial notice, without charge, in the
Scientific ' ~;* ..
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Lnreest circulation of aiiV scientitio journal.. Terms. $3 a
four; months, $L  Sold by all newsclenlters.
year
■ MUNN & !?o.38,Broadwo»-	
Branch Office^ (&Ii" St.- Washington, T>- E
Advertise in the Star.
i
Af/'fiSCH S™l£S°- pS Al^fnEAk
i
October
13, 1906
T H % S I M IL K AME E NIH T
G.MURDOCH
BLACKSMITH
 AGENT FOR	
Cockshutt Plows, Deering
Mowers & Rakes, Armstrong Buggies, Wagons.
Orders Promptly Attended to.
PRIJfCETON.      - »$tfSP:.
Offices .'Penticton
and Princeton.
Correspondence
Solicited
REAL
ESTATE and
MINES
Bought &Sold
Corbould "& Grant
Barristers, Solicitors, &c.
•Ne wWestminster, B.C.
G. E. CORBOULD, K.C.
J. R. GRANT.
Synopsis of Canadian Homestead
Regulations.
Any available Dominion Lands within
the- Railway  Belt in  British Columbia,
jjr|i|y be homesfceaded by any person who
is t-hfe sole head of a family, or any male
over 18 years of age, to the extent of one-
quarter section of 160 acres, more or less.
Igtetry. may be made, personally at the
local land office^ for ...the district in which
the land is situate, or if the homesteader
desires,  he  may,  on application  to the
Minister of   the   Interior,   Ottawa, the
Commissioner of Immigration,   Wjgijj'
p'egn^fethe local agent receive authority
lor-sotae one to make entry for him.
{ffitS^otnesteader is required to perform
the conditions.connected therewith under
one of-the following plans:
3L''-^fefejleast six months' residence upon
and cultivation of. the; land in each year
for th'rg'e years;  ■ . jAj,   \#Vp
<?. Ejjjry niirsfciser' made personally at
theApgjiJL land office for the district in
whichvthe land is situate.
$r$8£!&ie settler has his permanent resi-
denjce*Bpon farming land owned by )ftm
in ^-he-vicinity of his homestead, the requirements as to residence mav be satisfied by residence upon the said land."
Six -months' notice in writing should
be givento the Commissioner of Dominion I>ands at Ottawa of intention to apply
for patent.
Coal lands may be purchased at $10 per
acre, for soft coal and $20 for anthracite.
Not more than 320 acres can be acquired
by one individual ojt company. Rovajt)^
at the rate offten cents*per ton' of 2 boo
pounds: shall  be collected ojn the gross
DepjJtKjof the Minister of the Interior.
N.B.—-Unauthorized publication of this
adveYJ3sement will not be paid for.
FwfiCONNOlSSEURS Only.
Can be had at a|l fjirst-class hotels through-
out-the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO,Ld.
VICTORIA, B.C.,'
Sole Agents*
Lnotice.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works   for   permission to
purchase 320 acresjfoniSSr$iqr less, of pasture land
situate in tnie'i'Nicola diyisiftft,.<>f  Yale district
and!descril: ed as. follows : Commencing at  post
marked   John T.  O'Neil's S.E. corner and running 80 chains north, 40 chains west, 80 chains
south, 40 chains east to point of commencement.
JOBI*T^ O'NKIL.
AUgUSt l6th, 10gSft        ife;-tJ;X i«i2^»»i-
TIMBER NOTICE.
n-.Xak" notice thaU-wrrfffll-?twormonths I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a timber license on 640 acres of
land situated onJJutiijEmUkame-;n river between
tFtjtoa^ qreek ait5^Sktni'4ia£ *E£fisF*on theJtfrest
bank- of Similkameen" river, Similkameen district, described ad*fonbwsrV**'*
No. i.—Commencing at a post on west bank of
said river, marked Smith Curtis's Timber Claim
S E. angle,   thence   west   80  chains,   north   80
cha'ns, ^ea.st^^ifngins  to  said riverj&puth 80
chains to powtqf,jcojtnmencement
'   SMITH CURTIS, Locator.
Located Aug. 19,1906.      H. Kennedy, Agent.
No. 2.—Situated on, the Similkameen river on
Sunday*8reraE*otrflie west bank of Similkameen
river, Similkameen district, described as follows
Commencing at a post on the Roche river trail,-
marked Smith Curtis's timber claim, N.W. angle,
thence east 80 chains, south So chains, west 80
chains, north 8o chains t to; point of commence*
ment. jjJB&«S SMITH CURTIS, Locator.
:   August tg, 1906/ H. Kennedy, Agent.
Hand Tailored
NOTICE.
PL BRYANT & CO'
PROVINCIAL
JASSAVERS j
THE VANCOUVER ASSAY  OFFICE,
'"ESTABLISHED 1890.
Ai&lysis of .Coal and Ffre-
f||lay a Specialty.
Complete Coking Quality Tests.
Reliable PLATINUM Assays.
VANCOUVfe^TB. C.
^>X}K days *fter date r inleudto apply to the
^hief Commjssipner op§ands!afliB'orks to uurT
chase 120 aoTeVof *arid, morl'ofTess, and described as follows: Commencing at a post at the
N.W corner of R. J. Wynne's preemption and
running east on his north line 60 chains, thence
north 20 chains, thence west 60 chains, thence
south 20 chains along the east line of Uutr's ore
emption to point of ccmmencement.
July 14.1906.   . ,,^.^^j e. E. BURR.
NOTICE.
. Sixty days after date I intend to apply to the
! Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the-following described
landiSituated.in Hie^agiUv#UeVri*MiKTJale
divisffinJm yhle HjsflHbt fend TOnlaminfe *2o
acresg jFCommencjng afo^he^nortn-east
cqrneVBf.totfe68■ thence north 40 chains, west 80
chains, south-40 effifins, east 80 chainsto point of
commencement. For agricultural purposes
7th July, 1906. F. w. GROVES
The garments made by the Lowndes Company Limited, Toronto,
and known from coast to coast^S? ** f'">'".'
126m century Brand
I fine Tailored   '    |
;8 ».;,.te^Mcnis for SRnjjJ ...M
and as the best ready to-wear clothes made in.Canada, are hand-tailored
in'the^tffielsPsierJse of tmtftrade term. Unlike most ready-to-wear cloths^,
ing, and absolutely unlike wSat areiknown as readj'-mades, 20th cSr«-:|
tury Bra-ritf 'are'riot'made in outside sweat shops or outside shops of any
kind. Every 20th Century Brand Garment is the product of the^^Qpm-
pany's own tjtijor shops,-tih&.lafgest and most modern in Canada, apd
'rflways"under personal supervision. This fact is important and explains
in some measure the satisfaction.in style, fit and wear that 20th Century
Brand Garments always give.
NOTICE.
We are Sole Agents for these Garments,
samples.
Come in and look over
Adverse in
the star
In the matter of the "Land Registry Act" and
in  the    matter   of the    Title    to    Lot   23
-BloSkjS.^Map   55,   town of PrincMc&jfoso*
.-Xyi)os Division of Yale Dimtlw'; :
Whereas certificate of title of Herbert Dent
being Certificate of Title No. 4&>6a,-to the above
jjtpjpditamenjbxb.&s been  lost or destroyed   and
1 application has been made to me for a duplicate
thereof:
Notice is herebvg^ye^Ui^^jaupJHate.eertifl-.-
cate ofi»aeWt|j^^above hereditaments'will be
issued at the expiration of;bjj»? month from'the
date hereof, unless in . the meantime valid objection totlifi'comitrary be made tome ih"w¥ftine
W. H EDMONDS,
District Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Kamloops, B.C., September 19th, 1.906.
A.E.HOWSE
COMPANY
NICOLA
Telephone connection to all parts.
Limited
PRINCETON
 U0H9
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
October i3, i906
l^^^^^%nd Tu!||een Rivers.   The BUSINESS CEN-
TREM0he followingfeinirig Camps:— r/i Copper, Mountain,
-Kenflpy.  Mountain, .Midayy  Boulde¥ -afad GtkniteSdreelbsL
Surimiit, Roche RiveiflfUpper Tulameen andi <AspeJi  Grove1
;1» a^i
» » Government
For the
■  ■-lai:..l.l ■>[(!!.
TPI
33'
*i. District
ki T      .;
JwirH
«*w-P
1
fcib IJ
If? ™
ft;
•ir.ai
im
OF   WAXBJi
Enormous Agricultural Area to Draw from —*—-
li rijifc   I I rn;| a tea
 "jit->hif-'»: «< «k
i I    ' ' i  -•■ •'■ 'j" •rTfit
m   LOTS  FOR^SALEi
PReIeiIt   PRICES   OF   LOTS=~From $3.00  to  $,o  ^^^^^
50 x,oo Feet and 331.00 Feet      Term,     On. iMPl H - &aW^^^aa
m interest at I Per J^I W fel W/tm ^ famd
«&
i . tiS/i   .i   l.-iij/:
littll I-i.r. -.lit-is.
Send for Map aril fee List Jo    ^Jl
ERNEST   WATERMAN,
■|| ^     Resident  Manager 'Wll "■
vtoiuoN   porks Fining and  development coir
Agents fo, the CANADIAN ORE CONCENTRATION, LIMITED (Elmore Oil Process.)  JBjfc-■
^
I
1
'!£;/
X

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