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Similkameen Star 1907-08-14

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Full Text

 Published in the interest of Princeton and Similkameen district/'
Vol. viii. No. 32.
PRINCETON, B.C.,   WEDNESDAY, AUGUUST J4, 1907.        $2 a Year, in Advance
■
^%
COKING COAI FOUND
Near Granite Creek in Large
Body==Wiil be Impoatant
Factor in this Camp,
Property Now Bonded by Colorado
Capitalists Who Will Prosecute
Development Work.
A fine sample of coal, coal that cokes,
can be seen at the Hotel Tulameen. The
sample comes from the latest coal find,
at the north fork of Granite Creek, 4%
miles from the historic old town'bearing
that name. Coal was discovered several
years ago in that locality by the well
known prospector Pete Gunderson, who
was afterwards killed in Collins Gulch.
Attention was drawn to coal indications
through the agency of mountain beaver,
which in their burrowings had uncovered
coal in several places.
The property is now owned by Vancouver and Otter Valley parties Recently
a 200 foot tunnel has been run which
shows an excellent quality of coal in an
apparently large body. Tests made in
the open camp fire and in the stove show
thai it cokes readily, and of a fine clean
quality. If a good quality of coking coal
proves to exist in large bodies, it means a
big thing for the Similkameen country,
enabling an abundant supply of coke to
be had right at hand for the use of the
smelters that will be built here. The j
coal at Princeton, though an excellent
fuel and steam coal, does not coke, so far
as has been seen, and this Granite Creek
article, within such a short hauling distance of Princeton makes it possible for
a cheap supply to be had for the smelters
that will undoubtedly operate in this im
mediate vicinity, especially if the Granite
Creek coal turns out as indicated.
The Penticton Presshas quite a lengthy
article on the Tulameen district, referring to samples of high grade ore shown
in that town by Mi. Reilly. It touches
on the coal in that vicinity, a continuation of the seam found at Granite Creek,
' and saj's: "That whfch was probably of
the greatest interest however, was a large
lump of peacock coal which Mr. Reilly
had with him. Peacock coal is so named
from the colors it presents, like those of
the feathers in a peacock's tail and is
found in only two or three other places
in the world. One pound of it is said to
be equal to three pounds of the best
Crow's Nest product, and to possess su
perior coking properties."
A Colorada company has a bond on the
property and some of the principals are
now on their way here to arrange for extensive development.
THE WORST EVER.
"I know this man of old, a sillier fellow
you will scarce behold."
When Byron penned these words he
must have had the editor ofthe Gazoote in
his minds eje. If you don't believe it
just read that delightful mix-up in the
last number of the Hedley paper under
the heading, "A Cause for Perplexity,"
in which the Gazoote man tries to square
himself for publishing that false report
about grouse being put on the protected
list for three years. Puts the blame on
the Vernon News. Wonder who will get
the blame for the following gem, appearing under date of July 25, in the Gazoote: *§lfc
"With the placing of prairie chicken
and grouse of all kinds on the protected
list for a period of three years should
come an increase of bounty on coyotes.
To make provision for an increase of
winged game is to make the coyotee food
supply easier. A bounty on owls would
also help materially towards attainment
of the object for which winged game are
protected. Every owl that is killed will
save the lives of numerous grouse duriag
the course ofa year." etc.
It will be a wonder if the owls in their
owlishness don.'t hoot some after that, and
it won't be difficult to imagine what they
are saying, either Among other things
they will likely suggest that a bounty be
placed  on  the Gazoote man.
GLOOMY PROSPECTS.
Private advices received here state that
owing to the backwardness of the season
in the Northwest the wheat crop will be
somewhat of a failure. The great boom
which has attended Edmonton is said to
have collapsed, and the corporation has
been compelled to abandon all civic
work owing to the inability to dispose of
city bonds. In consequence of the gloomy
outlook people are said to be leaving in
hundreds, most of them heading for British Columbia.
HAWTHORNTHWAITE REBUKED
The noted Socialist and labor leader in
the British Parliament, at present on a
tour of Canada and the United States,
spoke to a large audience at Vancouver
last week and made a very favorable impression. Mr. Hawthorthwaite, that disgrace to Socialism in British Columbia,
was present and according to reportjmade
the usual mess of himself by 'a vicious
attack on R. G. MacphersonCM. P., calling him a humbug as well as a Liberal.
Keir Hardie gave a dramatic touch to the
incident, when after Hawthornthwaite's
speech he addressed the crowd, expressing deep regret at Hawthornthwaite's
abuse and openly rebuking the Socialist
leader for his reckless expressions.
BILL Mm ESCAP
Fr-eSgn^ Penitentiary   at   New
Westminster   on   Friday
Afternoon Last.
Noted Train Robber Makes  His Escape in Clever Manner with Other
Prisoners—Still Pree.
About as nice a looking piece of rock
as you will see in a long time is shown by
Hugh Hunter, coming from the Poulder
Mining Co.'s property on Boulder creek.
The ore runs very high in copper and
gold.
Bill Miner, the notorious train   robber
and all   round crook, has escaped  from
the   penitentiary at   New Westminster.
When Bill received his  life   sentence   a
little over s year ago, for holding up the
C. P. R. express at Ducks,   the  majority
looked upon it as   the   last   act   in   his
eventful career, firmly believing he  was
destined to live the balance of  his days
behind prison walls.    Others there were
however who maintained so long as Miner breathed the breath of life   he would
scheme and plan   to gain   his   freedom.
And he did not wait long to attempt it.
Miner, being a foxy old  rougue, took
his   confinement   quite   philosophically
and behaved himself well apparently resigned to his fate.   In this way he gained
the confidence ofthe prison keepers.   So
when last Friday he asked to be allowed
to work outside, on account of  his   feet
having become sore   from   confinement,
his request was granted and he  was  put
to work in the brickward, which is situ
ared at the rear of Ihe   prison   and   near
the northern wall.    From what   can   be
learned it   appears   Miner   and   several
other prisoners were working with  pick
and shovel, being partially obscured from
their guard by the smoke that emenated
from the engine house,   the   wind   undoubtedly favoring them   in   what   was
evidently a  well   planned   scheme.    In
this way several   of  the   prisoners were
enabled to busy themselves in excavating
under the wall unnoticed, and  disappear
one by one until some   four   had   made
good their escape.    This   was   about   4
o'clock in the afternoon.   Just how long
the guards were in discovering the escape
of their famous prisoner is   not   known,
but the   prisoners were enabled   to   get
clear.    Word from the coast this   morning states that four of the men have been
recaptured, but so far Miner is breathing
the air of freedom, but the chances are he
will be taken, as a large force   of  armed
men are on his track.
It is incomprehensible how the prison
authorities could have been led to take
such chances with such a character and
lose sight of him and his movements for
a second. An investigation will likely
be made when something sensational
may be brought to light.
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
Webb, the New Zealand sculler, has
defeated Charles Towns, Australian, iu
a rowing race for the championship of
the world.
It is probable that with the opening of
the Canadian branch of the Royal Mint
the Government made to decide to coin
a nickel penny. The nickel coin would
offord a market for the large areas of this
metal known to exist in Canada. It is
anticipated the new mint when in full
operation will turn out 16,000,000 coins
of all kinds per year.
Frank Martyn and Harry Walker, employees of the Triangle Ranch, Quilchena, were drowned in Nicola Lake on
Tuesday evening, the 6th, while out fishing.
It is stated that the next session of the
Dominion Parliament will be called for
October and that dissolution will follow
quickly and an appeal made to the country in March next.
The Le Roi mined has closed down the
ship of ore, and will remain closed until
a plentiful supply of coke is forthcoming.
The smelter has also ceased operations.
F. W. Groves, C. E., leaves this week
for Okanagan Centre to make a report on
a large irrigation scheme to be undertaking by Maddock Bros., Manitoba capitalists, who have lately acquired a large
tract of land in the Okanagan.
If the Princeton baseball team expect
to hold up their reputation at Hedley on
Labor Day, it might not be a.bad idea if
they would wake up and turn out to
practice. The time is comparatively
short and they will need all the practice
they can get in the meantime.
Prof. Arthur Lake, a noted geologist of
Denver, Col., arrived in Princeton last
week and is the guest of Mr. Ernest Waterman, resident manager of the V. F. M.
Co. Mr. Lake will spend a fortnight here
in geological research.
Chas. P. Coey, of Rockford, Wash.,
the chief bondholder of the Reco, arrived
in town yesterday and proceeded to the
mint this morning. He was accompanied
by E. S. Mendels, of New York.
Reports from Bear creek show satisfactory results being obtained by the miners tuere and the Swede groupe large
buttons of silver have been found.
Bert Thomas has in hand the work of
gravelling Bridge street, which when
finished, will be a great improvement.
TELEGRAPHERS STRIKE.
There is a general strike of telegraph
operators through the United States
which threatens to cripple business.
Word was sent out from Vancouver yesterday that all business east and to Portland, Seattle, and San Francisco would
not be received with ' any guarantee of
immediate delivery. If the strike should
continue for any length of great loss and
inconvenience will be experienced.
mv
 rngtrmmw
August 14, 1907
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
August 14, 1907
The Similkameen Star
B.   STONE  KENNEDY
Editor and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
One Year,
Payable in Advance.
$2.00
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reporting any change in address or
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices io and 5 cents per line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month
advertising.
WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 14, 1907.
HON. W. J. BOWSER.
The following article copied from
the Victoria Times hits off the Hon.
Mr. Bowser to perfection and . we
give our readers the benefit of a
superb pen picture of British Columbia's new Attorney-General:
"The Colonist congratulates Hon.
W. J.  Bowser,   K.  C,  Attorney-
General, etc.,  on  his   election, and
expressed the hope that official  residence in the capital will prove  so
pleasant to the hon. getleman  that
he may  be  induced  to take up his
permanent abode here     If our contemporary had read the speeches of
Hon. Mr. Bowser, it would under-
stand how vain is the   hope   it   so
guilelessly   expressed.       The   Attorney-General has expressly stated
that he has no intention of residing
in Victoria.    He is not even going
to administer his department from
the   Government   buildings.     The
fact ofthe matter is the field here is
too narrow altogether for a man ot
Mr. Bowser's   tremendous  intellectual expausiveness.    Like the great
general whose poses he imitates and
whose  physical   conformation  and
contour he believes he has been endowed by nature with, Mr. Bowser
is a very ambitious man.. He thinks
he was designed by the  Creator  of
the universe to be a  leader  of   the
comparatively   puny   human   creatures by whom   he   is   surrounded.
He says Vancouver  is  destined  to
become one of the chief, if not   the
chief, of the cities of Canada.   What
that means when  we  consider  the
future that has been prophesied for
Canada the  public only  dimly realizes.    But if  Vancouver were  to
lose Mr. Bowser would she  not  be
shorn of her greatest glory?    What
would the park be if the splendor of
Mr. Bowser did not shed its   glory
through the trees and bring the joy
which it revealed in their countenances to the hearts  of the  animals
confined therein?    Is it not the  effulgence whirh radiates   from    Mr.
Bowser that causes the sun   to hide
his face for   so   many  days   in   the
year and the gentle rain to fall from
the sympathetic clouds?   Evidently
the Colonist does not know what it
is talking   about when   it  suggests
the possibility of Mr.   Bowser  forsaking Vancouver and joining his
personal and political fortunes with
such an insignificant   place  as Victoria.    We  know   him   better,  be
cause we have been fascinated by
the genius of his commanding personalty and overcome by the witchery of his vociferous eloquence.
Victoria is said to have captured
the Premier and we know it has
overcome the Finance Minister.
But then these two are mere men,
handicapped by the weaknesses of
men, while Mr. Bowser—is Mr.
Bowser.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
The Nicola Herald of Aug. 2nd
says "the Hon. H. L- Borden will
tour British Columbia from September 24th to Oct. ist. He will visit
Nicola Valle}7 during his trip west."
We suppose the Herald is referring
to R. L- Borden, leader of the Dominion Conservative party, who intends making an extended political
tour of Canada to personally acquaint himself with existing condi-.
tions and smile upon the ballot
markers with the hope of being
placed in power at the next Dominion elections. Vain are the hopes
of some men.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, and endorsed "Tenders tor Public
Building, Cumberland, B C," will be received al
this office until Monday, Aug. 18, 1907, inclusive,
for the cc nstruction of a Public Building, Cumberland, B. C.
Plans and specifications can be seen and fo:ms
of tender obtained at this Department and 011
application to the Postmaster at Cumberland.
Persons tendering are notified that tenders will
not be considered unless made on the printed
form supplied, and signed with their actual signatures.
Ea-.li tender must be accompanied by an accepted cheque 011 a chartered bank, matie payable to the order ofthe Honorable the MiuisLei
of Public Works equal to ten per cent (10 p.c.) of
the amount 01 the tender, which will be forf .-ited
if the party tendering decline to enter into a cou-
tiact when called upon to <1o so or if he fail to
complete the work contracted for. If the tender
be not accepted th" check will be returned.
The Department does not bind itself to accept
the lo .vest or any tender.
By Order,
HRED. GEWNAS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, July iq, 1907.
Newspapers inserting this advertisement without.authority from the Department will not be
paid for it. 32-33
Great SHii
MANLEY & SWANSON, Props.
First Class koom and
Board
Wines,   Liquors   and
Cigars
I'll stop your pain free. To show you
first—before you spend a penny—what
my Pink Pain Tablets can do, I will mail
you free, a trial package of them—Dr.
Shoop's Headache Tablets, Neuralgia,
Headache, Toothache, Period pains, etc.,
are due alone to blood congestion. Dr.
Shoop's Headache Tablets simply kill
pain by coaxing away the unnatural blood
pressure. That is all. Address Dr.
Shoop, Racine, Wis. Sold by J. R.
Campbell.
J. DANAHER & CO.
FOR MEN'S
Elji Class Tailor-made G»ens
Suits to Order or Ready=to=Wear
SUITS—$12, 15, 18, 20, 22, 25, up to 35
TROUSERS—$3, 3.50, 4, 4.50, 5, up to 7
OVERCOATS and RAINCOATS—$10 to 25
Samples and Self Measurement Blanks on Application
iBl Vancouver, B. C.
Corner Granville
and
Stomach trouble is but a symptom of, and no*
In itself a true disease. We think of Dyspepsia,
Heartburn, and Indigestion as real diseases, yet
they are symptoms only of a certain specifio
Nerve sickness—nothing else.
It was this fact that first correctly led Dr. Shoop
In the creation of that now very popular Stomach
Remedy—Dr. Shoop's Restorative. Going direct
to the stomach nerves, alone brought that success
and favor to Dr. Shoop and his Restorative: Without that original and highly vital principle, no
such lasting accomplishments were ever to be had.
For stomach distress, bloating, biliousness, bad
breath and sallow complexion, try Dr. Shoop's
Restorative—Tablets or Liquid—and see for yourself what it can and will do. We sell and cheerfully recommend
When
Restorative
Sold by J. R. CAriPBELL
A. MURCHIE "Eg"-
SB
1
Photos of Families taken at their
Homes—Views of Princeton
and Surrounding Camps
AMATEUR WORK PINISHED
Addrkss    -     PRINCETON, K.C
STRAPS
A new lot of Razor Straps just in—
just the the thing you need to put
your razor in working order.
DRUGS j
When buying   drugs  buy  them at
The City Drug store
J. R. CAMPBELL.
PRINCETON - B.C.
we say we have the best facilities in the
Similkameen for keeping meat fresh and
cool during the warm weathei we are
making no idle- boast. We have installed
up-to-date cold storage arrangements for
the benefit ofthe public, and there is no
necessity of cutting off your meat diet for
fear that it is not properly kept. We
want your business and trust us for the
rest.
SUMMERS 1 WARDLE
BUTCHERS
EiktM
TULAMEEN, B.C.
PRORIETOR
S»-»
tincelon Hi
JAS. WALLACE,   Prop.
:o:-
THE Popular Resort for
old timers, miners and
prospectors. The man you
are looking for can be found
here; also the latest mining
and other news.
LIQUORS and CIGARS
of the best brands to drink
and burn.
A Fresh. Stock of^
and
just received.     Also  nice  assortment, of   candies.
Everything first-class and large stock to choose from
— AT —
Af%fLaltaAlLm EMw,Lmai
GENERAL MERCHANT, Princeton
Co'
mmmt
JU
- £v
Free, for Catarrh, just to preov merit,
a trial size box of Dr. Shoop's Catarrh
Remedy. Let me send it now. It is a
snow-white, creamy, healing, antiseptic
balm. Containing such healing ingredients as Oil Eucaliptus, Thymol, Menthol,
etc., it gives instant and lasting relief to
catarrh of the nose and throat. Make
the free test and see for yourself what
this preparation can and will accomplish.
Address Dr. Shoop, Racine, Wis. Large
jars 50 cents.   Sold by J. R. Campbell.
Farming   Machinery
Now is the time to order your
MOWING MACHINES
RAKES and
HARVESTING MACHINERY
We can get them for ycu on shortest notice.
Ga MURDOCH, Agt a
SEEDS
TREES
Bulbs for
Fall planting
for the Farm, Garden,
Lawn, Boulevard or Conservatory. Acclimatised
stock.  Oldest established
or   a TTTC   nurserv on the Mainland.
rL AJN 1 O   Catalogue free.
Mm Jm Henry
3010   Westminster    Road,      Vancouver
Agricultural
Implement
Depot
ELLIS
STREET
Penticton
Wagons,        Buggies,
/Towers, Rakes,
Disc Harrows, Spray
Lawn Mowers,      Pumps,
Etc., Etc.
Repairs to Machinery, Machine Oil.
Sections, Binding Twine, Etc.
Mail orders promptly attended to.
In ordering repairs to machinerv,
please order by number if possible, giving name of makers.
Gramophones, Phonographs, Records
and Supplies.
Jos. A. Nesbitt, prop.
Vaccination for Blackleg and An-
thrax in Cattle.
The disease known as blackleg in cattle, although entirely unknown in many
extensive agricultural sections of Cans da
and not at all widespread in any district
or province, annually causes quite extensive losses to cattle raisers. Anthrax;
which is quite a different disea^e, although frequently confused with black
leg in the minds of cattle raisers, is also
the cause of serious loss of stock. The
former disease is almost entirely confined
to cattle under three years and is generally fatal. The latter attacks other classes
of farm animals and the human subject is
not exempt from its infection which generally results seriously.
By the aid of science cattle raisers are
now enabled to protect theii stock against
these maladies.    As the human family is
vaccinated against smallpox, in the same
.manner cattle are rendered immune from
blackleg and anthrax.    The Department
of Agriculture at Ottawa, through   the
health of animals branch, is now in a position to supply preventive   vaccine   for
each of these diseases at the nominal cost
of five cents per dose.    Until recently, b\
special arrangement with extensive manufactures in the United States, these products were secured at a reduced cost and
were placed in the   hands   of   Canadian
cattle raisers at ten  cents   per   dose   foi
blackleg vaccine and fourteen 'cents  per
dose for anthrax vaccine.    It   is   due   t
the fact that ihese prepara: ions are  now
being made at the  biological  laboratory
in connection with the health of animal;-
branch that they can be supplied  at  five
cents per dcs.-.
The vaccine for blackleg may be administered by any intelligent person by
means of an instrument supplied by tht
Department at fifty cents. Anthrax vac
cine, which is also supplied at five cent
per dose, is more difficult to administe
requiring a qualified veterinarian to trea:
an animal.
Cattle raisers who have fear of an attack of either blackleg or anthrax would
do well to apply to the Veterinary Director General at Ottawa for the proper preventive treatment.
Piles get quick and certain relief from
Dr. Shoop's Magic Ointment. Please
note it is made alone for Piles, and its
action is positive and certain. Itching,
painful, protruding or blind piles disappear like magic by its use. Large nickel-
capped glass jars 50 cents. Sold by J.
R. Campbell.
F. W. GROVES
CIVIL AND
MINING ENGINEER
EXAMINATIONS     AND      REPORTS
MADE ON MINES AND PROSPECTS
HAS A THOROUGH KNOWLEDGE OF THE SIMILKAMEEN AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS
Plans of all Surveyed Lands and Mineral Claims
in the District. PRINCETON. B.C.
THOMAS   BROTHERS
General  Merchants
HATS HATS HATS
Of every description, shape and size.    Best bargains ever offered in
Princeton in headwear.    Dont's buy  before you   see   our   goods
Princeton, B. C.
1       -    F. P. COOK   -    1
t  THE PIONEER STORE.
Fruit, General Groceries, Hardware, etc.
(FRESH STOCK)
Scotch and New Zealand Jams and Preserves
BOOTS and SHOES
for Summer wear.   Something to keep
your feet cool and comfortable.   We
have the celebrated Foot Elm—keeps
your feet from swelling and makes walking easy.   See our stock at once
Stores s Princeton and Granite C'k.     €
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Similkameen Lumber Com, ud^
J, Fa Waddell, Mgr,
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ROUGH AND DRESpI) LUMBER
SHINGLES, DOORS AND WINDOWS
All kinds  of mouldings made.     Oordcrs promptly
attended   to.      For   further   particulars   apply   to
Lyall &  Macdonell,   Agents
Princeton, Bm C.
j^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^mmmm
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NICOLA GOAL ON MARKET.
The World says that Vancouver may
look for some relief of the coal situation
to the newly opened Nicola coal fields,
and the news is being thankfully received
by Vancouver householders. The C.P.R.
is building a spur into the mines and expect to have it completed in two months
when shipping to Vancouver will be
commenced. A unique and great advantage the mine posses is the fact that the
coal can be mined entirely by gravitation. The tunnel slopes upward from
the mouth. At present there is only the
one through which coal ie being taken
out, but another will meet it at right
I angles, and if the mine should become
I wet, water also will run out by gravitation without the application of any power. As a result of such advantages the
coal of this company can be mined for a
dollar a ton.
S\
\0
^H
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
August 14, 1907
TIMBER NOTICES.
YALE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Yai,b, B. C.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
1. Commencing at a post planted at the
N.W. cor. and at the N.E. cor. of David
J. Bangs timber limit No. 1, 2 miles
north of the mouth of Mamaloose creek,
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains.
Located 22nd day of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Jonas Oakes, Agent.
1, Nicholas Bangs, intend to applv for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the N.W. cor., 1 mile east of David J.
Bangs' N.E. cor. timber limit No. 1,
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; theuce
west 80 chains.
Located 22nd day of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS  BANGS.
By Jonas Oakes, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640!
acres of land bounded as follows: |
3. Commencing at a post planted at;
the S.W. cor., 1 mile east of David J.J
Bangs' N.E. cor. timber limit No. i,|
thence north 80 chains; thence east 801
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence <
west 80 chains.
Located 22nd day of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS  BANGS.
By Jonas Oakes, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
4. Commencing at a post planted atthe
N.E. cor. at the S.E. cor. David J. Bangs'
timber limit No. 1, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
Located 25th day of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Jonas Oakes, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
5. Commencing at a post planted at the
N.W. cor. at S.E. cor. David J. Bangs'
timber limit No. 1, thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains.
Located 25th dav of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Jonas Oakes, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640'
acres of land bounded as follows:
6 Commencing at a post planted at the
S.W. cor., 5 miles N.W. of the mouth of
Mamaloose creek, on west side of Cambie
creek, thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains.
Located 22nd day of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
I a special license to cut timber uoon 640
1 acres of land bounded as follows:
10. Commencing at a post planted at
the N.E. cor., 2_J^ miles north of the
mouth of Mamaloose creek and half mile
east of Cambie creek, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
Located 25th day of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
II. Commencing at a post planted at
the N.W. cor., 9 miles east of Cedar Flat,
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains.
Located 23rd day of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded»as follows:
12. Commencing at a post planted at
the N.E. cor., 9 miles north of Cedar Flat,
10 chains east of Cedar creek, thence
south 166 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains.
Located 23rd day of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
13. Commencing at a post planted at
the S.E. cor., 8}4 miles east of Cedar
Flat, hall' mile south of Cedar creek,
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains.
Located 26th day of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
14. Commencing at a post planted at
the N.E. cor., 2>%. miles east of Cedar
Flat and one half mile south of Cedar
creek, thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains.
Located 26th dav of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Amos McAbee. Agent.
laud bounded as follows:
21. Commencing at a post planted at the S.E.
coi., 5% miles east of the confluence of Skagit
river and Muddy creek, th.-nee north 40 chains;
thence west 160 chains: thence south 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains.
Located 6th day of August, 1907.
FREDERICK A. KRIBS.
By Douglas M. French, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for a special
license to cut  timber  upon  640 acres  of land
bounded as follows:
22. Commencing at a post planted at the N E.
cor., 3 miles south of the confluence of Cambie
creek and middle fork of the Roche river, 10
chains north ofthe middle fork, theuce west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
Located 7th day ot August, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
33-37 By Amos McAbee, Agent.
Synopsis of Canadian Northwest
Homestead Regulations.
TIMBER NOTICE.
I, Charles O. French, intend to apply
for a special license to cut timber upon
640 acres of land bounded as follows:
1. Commencing at this post planted at
mouth ofthe middle fork of Roche river
at 3 forks, 12 miles from mouth of Roche
river more or less, thence east 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 160
chains; thence north 40 chains.
Located 26th dav of July, 1907.
CHARLES O. FRENCH.
TIMBER NOTICE.
I, Charles O. French, intend to apply
for a special license to cut timber upon
640 acres of land bounded as follows:
1. Commencing at this post planted at
mouth of middle fork of Roche river at 3
.orks, 12 miles from mouth of Roche
river, more or less, thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
Located 26th dav of July, 1907.
31-35 CHARLES O. FRENCH.
TIMBER NOTICES.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for a special
license to cut timber upon 640 acres of land
bounded as follows:
15 Commencing at a post planted at the N.W.
cor., 5 miles east of Cedar Flat and on south side
ot Cedar creek thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains.
. Located 26th day of Juh , 1907.
NICHOLAS B.iN'GS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
7. Commencing at a post planted atthe
N.E. cor., 5 miles N.W. of the mouth of
Mamaloose creek, on west side of Cambie
creek, thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains.
Located 22nd dav of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
8. Gomtnencing at a post planted at the
N.W. cor., 3 miles north of the mouth of
Mamaloose creek, 2 chains north of Cambie creek, thence south 40 chains; thence
east 160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 160 chains.
Located 24th dav of July, 1907.
NICHOLAS  BANGS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Nicholas Bangs, intend to apply for
a special license to cut timber upon 640
acres of land bounded as follows:
9. Commencing at a post planted at the
N.W. cor., lyi miles north of the mouth
of Mamaloose creek and 3 chains west of
Cambie creek, thence south 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains.
Located 24th dav of luly, 1907.
NICHOLAS BANGS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Frederick a. Kribs, intend to apply for a
special license to cut timber upon 640 acres of
land bounded as follows:
16. Commencing at a post planted at the S E.
cor., 7 miles west ofthe confluence of Muddy and
Cambie creeks, thence west 160 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains.
Located 2nd day of August, 1907.
FREDERICK A. KRIBS.
By Amos McAbee, Agent.
I, Frederick A. Kribs, intend to  apply  for a
special license to cut timber upon  640  acres  of
land bounded as follows:
17. Commencing at a post planted at the S.W.
cor., 3 miles east ofthe confluence of the Skagit
river and Muddy creek on the north side of
Muddy creek, thence east 160 chains; thence
north 40 chains: thence west 160 chains; thence
south 43 chains.
Located 24th day of July, 1907.
FREDERICK A. KRIBS.
By Douglas M. French, Agent.
I, Frederick A. Kribs, intend  to  apply  for a
special license to cut timber upon  640  acres  of
land bounded as follows:
18. Commencing at a post planted at the N.E.
cor., 3 miles east ofthe confluence of the Skagit
river and Muddy creek on the north side of
Muddy creek, thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains; thence
north 40 chains.
Located 24th day of July, 1907.
FREDERICK A. KRIBS.
By Douglas M. French, Agent.
I, Frederick A. Kribs, intend to apply for a
special license to cut timber upon  640  acres  of
land bounded as follows:
19. Commencing at a post planted at the N.W.
cor.-, 3 miles east ofthe confluence of the Skagit
river and Muddy creek on the north side of
Muddy creek, thence east 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 160 chains; thence
north 40 chains.
Located 24th day of July. 1907.
FREDERICK A. KRIBS.
I By Douglas M. French, Agent.
I, Frederick A. Kribs. intend to apply for a
special lieduse to cut timber upon 640 acres of
land bounded as follows:
20. "Commencing at a post planted at the S.W.
cor., 3% miles east of the confluence of Skagit
river and Muddy creek on the north side of
Muddy creek thence north 160 chains; thence
east 40 chains; theuce south 160 chains; thence
west 40 chains.
Located 24th day of July, 1907.
FREDERICK A. KRIBS.
By Douglas M. French, Agent.
I, Frederick A. Kribs, intend  to  apply  for a
special license to cut timber upon  640  acres  of
I, Frederick A. Kribs, intend to apply for a special license to cut timber
upon 640 acres of land bounded as follows:
1. Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner two and a half
miles north of the confluence of Summers and Graveyard creeks, 9 miles noith
of Princeton on east side of Summers
creek and 20 chains west of the N. W.
corner of Lot 1510, in the Yale district
and Kamloops division, thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
Located 16th dav of Julv, 1907.
FREDERICK A. KRIBS.
By Charles O. French, Agent.
1, Frederick A. Kribs, intend to apply
for a special license to cut timber upon
640 acres of land bounded as follows:
2. Commencing at a post planted
at the north-east corner two and a half
miles noith of the confluence of Summers and Graveyard creeks, 9 miles north
of Princeton on west side of Summers
creek and 40 chains west of the N. W.
corner of Lot 1510, in the Yale district
and Kamlooos division, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
Located 16th day of July, 1907.
FREDERICK A. KRIBS.
By Charles O. French, Agent.
I, Frederick, A. Kribs, intend to apply
for a special license to cut timber upon
640 acres of land bounded as follows:
3. Commencing at a post planted
at the north-east corner three and a half
miles north of the confluence of Summers and Graveyard creeks, 10 miles
north of Princeton on west side of Summers creek, 2 miles west and 1 mile north
of the F. W. corner of Lot 1510, in the
Kamloops division of Yale district, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains.
Located 17th dav of Julv, 1907.
FREDERICK A. KRIBS.
By Charles O. French, Agent.
Any even numbered section of Dominion lands in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta, excepting 8 and 26, not reserved,
may be homesteaded by any person who
is the sole head of a family, or any male
over 18 years of age, to the extent of one-
quarter section of 160 acres, more or less.
Entry must be made personally at the
local land office for the district in which
the land is situate.
The homesteader is required to perform
the conditions connected therewith under
one of the following plans:
1. At least six months' residence upon
and cultivation of the land in each year
for three years.
2 If the father (or mother, if the father is deceased), of the homesteader resides upon a farm in the vicinity of the
land entered for, tbe requirements as to
residence may be satisfied by such person residing with the father or mother.
3. If the settler has his permanent residence upon farming land owned by him
in the vicinity of his homestead, the requirements as to residence mav be satisfied by residence upon the said land.
Six months' notice in writing should
be given to the Commissioner of Dominion Lands at Ottawa of intention to apply
for patent.
Coal—coal mining rights may be leased
for a period  of twenty-one  years at  an
annual rental of $ 1 per acre.    Not  more
than 2,560 acres shall be leased to one individual or company.    A  royalty at  the
rate of five .cents per ton   shall  be   collected on the merchantable coal  mined.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy of the Minister of the Interior.
N.B.—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that siitty days after
date I intend to make application to the Hon.
ChiefCommissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described land
situa'ed in the Yale division of Yale district :
Commencing at a post planted at the S.W. cor.
of the Government reserve of Tulameen City,
thence easterly 20 chains, along south boundary
of said reserve; thence south 20 chains; thence
north-westerly along left bank of Tulameen
River 20 chains to point of commencement, and
containing 20 acres, more or less.
FRANCIS WILLIAM GROVES.
14th July, 1907. 33 41
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Ccmmissioner
of I ands and Works for permission to purchase
the following described land situated in Yale
division of Yale district:
Commencing at a post planted at the S.W. cor.
of Lot 393 thence south 20 chains; thence east 20
chains; 'hence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chainr to point of commencement, and containing 40 acres, moi e or less.
LOUIS JAMES.
F. W. Groves, Agent.
14th July, 1907. 33.41
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land, situated in the Yale division of Yale district:
Commencing at a post planted atthe N.W. cor.
of Lot 395. thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement, and containing 80 acres, more or less.
D. von CRAMER.
C. Summers, Agent.
10th August, 1807. 33-41
NOMCE.
SIXTY DAYS after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase 80 acres of pasture
land situate in the Ashcroft division of Yale district and described as follows:
Commencing at N. W. corner of Tulameen
townsite, thence south 40 chains; thence west 20
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence east 20
chains to place of commencement.
W. H. HOLMES, locator.
July 16, 1907. 3240
NOTICE.
AKE NOTICE  that   Dodds   Ranch,   Aspen
Grove is no longer open to the public as a
stopping place. 33.35 w. & ^,ca| *
Ty
NOTICE.
Certificate of Improvements.
Hattie. Kate, Clark Townsend, Moonshiner
Fraction Mineral Claims, situate in the Similkameen Mining Division of Yale District.
Where located: Porphry Dyke, Tulameen
River.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas A. Rogers, agent
for the Mira Monte Mining Company, Free
Miner's Certificate No. B9426, intend, sixty days
from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant ofthe above
claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 29th day of July, A.D. 1907.        30-38
\
August 7, 1907
THE    SIMILKAMEEN   STAR
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Great  Cash  Sale of  Dry
itewear. Boots an
oes
For the rest of the month we will offer the following lines at greatly re=
duced prices* This is the biggest snap ever offered in the Similkameen and
one you can't afford to miss*
Dry Goods and Whitewear*
Dainty Zephyrs, formerly 35c,   sale price        -        -        25
Ginghams, all colors and patterns, formerly 20 and 25c
sale price             -             -             - 15 & 20
Victoria Lawn, formerly 25c,   sale  price        - - 20
Persian Lawn, formerly   50c,   sale   price        - - 40
Allover Tucked Lawn, formerly 75c, sale price - 50
Spotted Swiss Muslins, formerly 25c, sale price - 20
Ladies' Corset Covers, fine white cotton, trimmed with
embroidery insertion and edging, formerly 65c
sale price .... gQ
Ladies' Lawn Nightgowns, yoke effect of fine hemstitched tucking, embroidery trimmed, formerly
$1.75, sale price        - $1.25
Ladies' Lawn Drawers, deep flounce, with five quarter
inch tucks, embroidery edging, formerly 85c,
sale price        ------ qq
Ladies' White Cambric Underskirts, double ruffle, five
inch Swiss embroidery, formerly $1.65, sale
Price -    '     $1.15
Ladies' Wash Belts, pearl buckle,   formerly  50c,   sale
price 35
Ladies' Wash Belts, brass buckle,   formerly  35c,   sale
price        ... - . . . 20
Boots and Shoes
For   Ment Women and   Children
We offer our entire stock at a discount of 2o pel*
cent, for Cash, and would especially call you attention to
our Ladies' and Gents' Canvas Oxfords.
Such slashing reductions in Footwear have never
before been offered in this Valley and if you don't take
advantage of this golden opportunity and invest, you'll be
sorry.    Come early and avoid the rush.
A glance at the following prices will convince you:
$6.00 Shoes selling for
$5.00 " |H |||
$4.00 I I
$3.00 I
$2.00 I I
$4.80
$4.40
$4.00
$3.20
$2.40
$1.60
No excuse for not buying because you live out of town* as we will give
mail orders the same prompt attention as if you were here personally to  buy*
Tell us what you want and we will fill your order*
The A. E. Howse Co., Ltd.,
The Big Store
"If we haven't got It, we can get it.''
Princeton,
B. C.
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THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
At
August 14, 1907
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SIMILKAMEEN  DISTRICT
uiameen Kivers
S nd for Maps
.«£....  ^    ^
and Price List to
erne:
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WATERMAN,
Resident    Manager
VERMILION    FORKS    MINING   AND     DEVELOPMENT    CO'Y
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f-'" -7iT"' • --^■1-Ttfi—r^-ii fr^Wnr f YjTiji- i' saaEBS
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