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Similkameen Star 1904-10-29

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 m
i
Timx.
No Transcontinental Railway, No Development,
Railway Monopoly is the Scourge of Western Canada.
** The Grand Trunk Pacific will be Constructed in Seven Years."—Sir Wilfrid Laurier.   Contrast that Definite Statement wifh the Indefinite one:
14 I Believe that Sometime in the Future a Second Transcontinental Line, Owned and Operated by the People, will be Necessary!*—R. L. Borden,
Vol. v.   No. 20.
PRINCETON, B.C., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1904.
$2 a Year, in Advance.
Iron and Steel.
The existence of large quantities Of
native, hematite and magnetite iron in
the Nicola and Similkameen districts is
well known but little appreciated. The
necessity for handling iron ore on a large
scale with cheap transportation has concentrated attention and effort on the more
precious minerals here. But the day is not
far distant when crude iron ore will be
manufactured on the spot into steel, for
the coal is at hand and limestone in
sufficient quantity for fluxing the ore
is also at hand. William Blakemore, of
Nelson, contributes some valuable suggestions, as follows, to the New York
Mining and Engineering Journal:
"Is it possible to establish a steel-making industry in British Columbia which
would serve the west with appreciably
cheaper iron and steel and realize a profit
on its product ? Six conditions are necessary for the success of such an enterprise.
1. A sufficient market. 2. Transportation. 3. A suitable ore. 4- Flux. 5.
Fuel. 6. An assembling point of the
raw material where it can be converted
economically. These conditions Mr.
Blakemore believes exist today.
As to the market, he estimates that
with the railway mileage now under contract and to be completed within the next
five years west of Winnipeg, there will
be a demand for not less than 100,oco
tons of steel rails annually, besides the
demand for light rails for mining purposes, which may be estimated at 3,000
tons annually. In addition there would
be a ready marKet for rails in the adjoining western states. The question of
transportation involves a decision as to
the assembling point of the raw material
. and its conversion into the finished product. The cost of coke would be about
$5 per ton and of coal $5. Pig iron can
be manufactured at from $10 to $12 per
ton. The market and the natural resources are ready to hand ; it only requires capital and brains to convert a
great possibility into an assured success."
MINING PARAGRAPHS LOCAL AND GENERAL
Boundary Ore Production Increasing  and   Another
Smelter Wanted.
Fast Season Very Quiet in the Similkameen Owing to Absence
of Railway.
Weekly Grist of Town
District News Notes
Boiled Down.
and
The
ping mines
Copper   Mountain  Boad Ready
Traffic—"Spuds" are Scarce-
Ore Exhibit.
for
Railway Nearly Completed.
Patrick Welsh, the Great Northern railway contractor, says £he spur to the
Granby smelter from Grand Forks is
practically complete and the grading of
the line to Phoenix will soon be done,
when the rails will be laid and the contract concluded very quickly. Some 30
miles of new railway have been built.
About the middle of November the 1600
men engaged in the work will be paid off.
During the month of September the pay
roll on construction amounted to $125,-
000—a comfortable swag for Princeton to
get away with when the railway boom
hits her.
latest addition to the list of ship1
in the Boundary district is
the Senator, which had not been sending
ou^ ore for several months.
The past season has been the quietest
in mining and prospecting that has been
known since the placer days in the Sirn-i
ilkameen. Fewer prospectors have been
in the field, which resulted in less development work and less trade from that
source. It is all traceable to the absence
of transportation facilities. There are a
thousand coal and ore properties which
could have been shipping if the railway
had hove in sight. The only retrieving
feature in the season's operations has
been the successful mining and milling
business of the Daly Reduction Co. at
Hedley.
About 70 men are employed on the
Brooklyn mine in the Boundary and the
ore shipments have recently been increased.
There was considerable truth in the
rumor that the C.P.R. had secured control of the Cascade Power Co. A Montreal despatch announces that such control has been secured by the C.P.R., and
that a smelter to rival the Granby plant
at Grand Forks will be built at Cascade,^
where Boundary ore will be treated.
C. O. French is inwardly thanking his
iguiding spirit for having a mineral claim'
near Granite creek which contains the
"real thing" in such quantity as to make
it a "thing of beauty and a joy forever."
There is a large body of it and strange to
say hundreds of prospectors have passed
oyer it without noticing it. That Granite
creek will yet regain some of its pristine
glory is the belief of many and the well
grounded hope of Mr. French.
Jim Snowden has a remarkably fine
specimen of bornite or peacock copper
ore which he found in a disusedtunnel
qn Friday creek. Another instance of
the need of development and a railway.
For the month of September the ore
tonnage for Kootenay and Yale amounted to 115,000 tons.
W. C. Trumbull of Montreal is making
a tour of the Nicola and Similkameen
districts with a view to their mineral pos.
sibilities. He arrived in Princeton on
Thursday.
Rev. Jas. Lang writes from Peachland
that Rev. Mr. Campbell, Presbyterian
home mission convener, will preach in
Princeton on Nov. 6th. He also states
that an effort is being made to secure an
energetic missioner for this section.
j The new Hotel Similkameen at Hedley
is now open to guests.
H. B. Brown and wife returned on
Tuesday from the coast where they have
been for the past two months. Mr. Brown
was plied with questions about the Similkameen while away. He will reside at
Hedley.
Messrs. Stevenson,  Evans and  Brad-
Jshaw  of  Chilliwack   arrived    over   the
Hope trail with a band of cattle on Tuesday.
Miss McNeil of Hedley was a visitor to
Princeton this week.
Messrs. Campbell, Healey and McKel
lar returned from a  timber cruise to the
Roche river country on Tuesday and left
(Thursday morning for the coast.
Fred Baker held the ribbons on Wednesday's stage for the first time in six
weeks, having been laid off for repairs
which now find him in better health than
heretofore.
C. JSneas Shaw, P.L.S., left for Greenwood recently. He has been engaged
with surveys for E. Voigt on Copper
mountain.
W. C. McDougall of Olalla, accompanied by Mr. Armstrong, was in town on
LFriday looking over his mineral interests here. Mr. McDougall has some exceptionally fine locations here which he
'is anxious to further develop but he is
compelled to 'mark time' until the railway appears. Mr. Armstrong has recently disposed of his store to Mr. Pritchard
5of Keremeos.
>■  Potatoes are  scarce and sell readily at
F2^c. per lb.
The ore specimens for the Vancouver
/Tourist Association are ready for ship-
s ment by first wagon to Spence's Bridge,
■on which charges have been rebated for
that distance by Mr. Howse and the same
being done by Mr. Marpole over the
f C.P.R. to destination.
The road to Copper mountain is now
{finished and ore can now be hauled to
JPrinceton when required.
John D. Kearns of Fairview was in
town Thursday on a pleasure trip. He
long ago" acquired a lurking curiosity to
see Princeton and now he is captivated
by its charming location and handsome
girls. He is preparing for a professional
calling after which he will likely settle
down here. Mr. Kearns is a young man
of broad and Liberal ideas and belongs
to that type of manhood essential to successful nation-building. He is an all
round athlete and keen sport.
The Railway Policy,
From the Hon. Mr. Sifton's speech at
Winnipeg; "What,"  he asked, "is the
policy which the government presente to
you  for your endorsation or rejection ?
It is this : To build a line from ocean to
ocean wholly on Canadian soil; to absolutely control both the freight and the
passenger rates; not to grant to the Grand
Trunk Pacific a single acre of land, except for stations and roadbed—(cheers)—
not to  give  them  a dollar of exemption-
from   taxation   of   any   kind   soever—
(cheers')—not to grant them a vestige o£
monopoly, legal or otherwise, in any province  or territory   of   the   Dominion—
(cheers')—to have all the money expended by the people  of Canada  on the road
itself, and to do all this at a total cost of
some $13,000,000.    (Loud cheers.)   This,
gentlemen, is the government's policy."
Buoyant with Hope.
Arthur Hickling left on Thursday for
Vancouver, he having been in Princeton
tor the past two months in connection
with his large interests in the Vermilion
Forks Mining Co. Mr. Hickling has
greater faith in the future of the Similkameen than ever ; which is founded on nothing less than the accruing evidences of
research, exploration and development.
The coal drill has established beyond all
peradventure the existence of various
strata of large extent and the quality is
first class, as proven by scientific test and
practical use. Mr. Hickling is in a far
more buoyant frame of mind as to railway connection with the outside world
than he was a year ago. The stockholders in his company will, no doubt, share
with him the quickened pulse of hope
on receipt of his report. The Vermilion
Forks Co. own the choicest real estate in
Princeton and their mineral properties
are among the most valuable in the district. Like many other investors they
are simply awaiting the turn in the tide
—the railway. Mr. Hickling's departure was the occasion for many friendly
goodbyes and good wishes—his absence
causing a rent in social, religious and
political circles which cannot well be
mended.
The weather has been superb all the
present month and it may continue right
up to Christmas. The prophets predict
an open winter. The sign interpreters
also do; saying that grouse have little
covering for their legs; chipmunks and
squirrels have not laid by any store as
yet and wild geese have not gone south.
The fact that very few of the bachelors
around town have laid in a full supply of
potatoes may be taken as an indication of
a short and mild winter. In any case a
mild winter is due after two severe ones.
The election of officers and annual reports will be the chief business to be
transacted at the board of trade meeting
next Thursday night.
fc
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
October 29, 1904
§1     The Similkameen Star
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON,  B.C.
—BY—
The Prince{5n Publishing Co.
^a.. E. Howsi, ^Manager.   *'
! One Year,
SUBSCRIPTION RAT^E:
Payable in Advance. I
$2.00
Subscribers will confer a1 favor on this office by
promptly reporting^Shy change in address or
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices io and 5 cents per line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month
advertising.
All cheques to be made payable to
A. E. HOWSE.
THE yOIGE^F REASON.
Before j another'weel£A'i?a's flown
the die will have bee$. cast for good
or ill—the •judgment=qf3the people
.will haveJaeen given on the widely
sundered policies of the Liberal and
Conservative leaders. It is a momentous period in the history of
Canada. The budding nation has
arrived at that stage in its triumphant journey of the recent half
dozen years where the parting ways
call for serious consideration, lest a
road be taken which will cause the
people to sigh for the days of plenty,
progress and prosperity which they
now have.
The history of any nation of
dominion shows plainly that on the
choice of a wise and trusty leader
the harmony and advancement of
its citizens depend. On the other
hand, disunion andcomrnercial stagnation are the invariable accompaniments of weak and vacillating
.rulers and leaders. To drop the
pilot of the good ship Canada, now
sailing on an unruffled sea of contentment and prosperity, would be
the act of men who shun reason
and prefer their party's triumph before the country's good.
Will. the people of Canada on
Thursday next reject Sir Wilfrid
Laurier, whose statesmanship haa
raised Canada from an insignificant colony to the fairest jewel in
the diadem of empire ; or will they
accept Mr. Borden, who is a novitiate in statecraft and whose multiplying railway schemes bloom and
fade with the daily morning's sun ?
It cannot be !
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Nothing could be simpler than the
railway policy which the government presents to the people for their
endorsation or rejection. Yet it is
the subject of gross misrepresentation by the Tory press and is
the one particular subject on which
Opposition speakers lash themselves
into rage because of its unassaila
ble conditions. No fairer, or more
businesslike proposition was ever
presented to the people of Canada
or any other country. The railway
opens up an immense tract of new
and unsettled country Which no reasonable person will deny is well
worth the government aid proposed
to be given. Its connection with
the Grand Trunk railway in Ontario and Quebec ensures tonnage
for it from the day of its completion. Eastem;v;manufacturers will
have a new fieldfor business and
western' grain growers and\British
Columbia products will have competitive railway rates to markets.
Prof. Bryce, the great English
publicist and political economist,
thus spoke of Canada at Toronto
recently : "You have a magnificent
destiny before you, and when we
contemplate that destiny may we
not be stirred to think that .there is
something higherand better for us,
which ought to make us admire the
empire, than merely the sense of its
extent and its wealth and population ? It is the moral mission which
Providence has given to the British
race that constitutes the greatness
of the empire. I will venture as a
last word to say thaHn all that Canada has to do toward the accomplishment of the mission of the
British race it will have all tbe help
and all the sympathy that Britain
can offer, for among all the glories
which Britain counts as hers there
is none higher than that she has
been the mother of such a daughr
ter as Canada." The first mission of
Canadians is to consolidate the empire by preferential tariffs the first
of which has been given by Sir
Wilfrid Laurier to the motherland'.
Some ranting Tories are making
use of the ..racial cry against the
premier of. tbe Dominion because
he is a French-Canadian. They
forget that the premier of Great
Britain a few years ago was a Jew.
In a new.country such as Canada,
made up as it is by every race and
creed under the sun, no man is debarred from the highest position in
the gift of the people by reason of
his origin. Canada knows no class
nor race among her heterogeneous
subjects. Having a good character
and ability the humblest citizen is
eligible for office and emolument.
Mr. Blair, as chairman of the recently instituted Railway Commission, has resigned. Like Mr. Tarte
he is an uncertain quantity. Because he could not have all his own
way in" the department of railways
he bolted. In order to embarrass
the government in the crisis of a
general election he has again resigned from a high party appointment. Should he now enter into
the political campaign he need not
wince if the term "traitor" again
fastens to him.
If the great Canadian railway
monopoly should, be so fortunate in
having a government favorable to
its schemes elected, then farewell to
the Grand Trunk Pacific, the Great
Northern and to all competition
in the Similkameen and elsewhere.
NOTICE.
THIRTY days from date I intend to,apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal aud oil on the
following described lands :—
Commencing at a post marked 7, S.E corner of
post No. 6, and running 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west, 80 chains north, back to
post, containing in all 640 acres.'...situated on
the Lumbum lake range in the Quilchena basin,
Nicola valley. JOHN LaMONT, Locator,
S. ANDREW HARTMAN, Ag't.
Dated Sept. 29, 1964.
NOTICE.
'THIRTY days from date I intend to apply to
. *■ the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a licence-to prospect for coal-and oil on the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post marked No 8 and running 80 chains south, 80 chains west, 80 chains
north, 80 chains east, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less,- Situatetl
011 the Lumbum lake .range, Quilchena basin,
Nicola valley.
 StANDREWHaRTMAN, Locator.
Dated October 1, 1904.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
date I intend to apply to the^CJhief Commissioner
of :Lands and Works for permission to purchase
640 acres of mountain pasture lard, situated and
adjoining Harris's preemption (Lot 966), starting
from his S.W. corner and following section line
to N.W. corner, thence 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east back to point of commencement, 640 acres.
G. BRANDT, Locator.
Dated this 1st of September, 1904.
NOTICE.
THIRTY days from date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license tc prospect for coal on the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post placed ten chains south
of the S.W. corner of lot 1042,
And running north 80 chains, west 80 chains,
south 80 chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
W. C. MCDOUGALL.
Dated July 23, 1904.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
date I iutend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission.to purchase
320 acres of mountain pasture land, described as
follows Commencing at a post marked a.J's
N.E. corner, thence 80 chains west, 40 chains
south, 80 chains east, 40 chains north, back to
initial post, in all about 320 acres. Situate about
n miles west of Princeton, and is bounded on
the north side by the meandering line of the
Tuiameen river.
ALICE JAMES,
C. O. FV ENCH, Agent.
Dated this 14th dayof August, 1904.
NOMCE.
Copper Glance, Azurite aud Alpine mineral
claims, situate in the Similksmeeu mining
division of Yale district. Where located:
On Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves, acting as
agent for John R McRae, free miner's certificate
No. B72143, and Hugh McRae, free mh;er's'certificate No. B62Q53, intend, sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the mining recorder for
a certificate of improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining crown grants of the above claims.
And further take j otice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 9th day of July, A.D. 3904.
NOTICE.
St. Lawrence, St. George and St. Helen mineral
claims, situate in the Similkameen mining
division of Yale district. Where located :
On Bear creek.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves acting as
agent for William Henry Armstrong, free miner's certificate No. B784Q8, and Charles F. Law,
free miner's certificate No. B7211Q intend
sixty days from the date hereof, to apply to
the mining recorder for certificates of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining crown
grants of the above claims.
.i.nd further take notice that action, under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificates of improvements.
Dated this 29th day of August, 11504.
NOTICE.
TAKE NOTICE that sixty days after date I
intend to apply to the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 100 acres of Crown lands for pasturing purposes : Bounded on the north by lot No.
969, on the west by lot No. 257, on south by Chas.
Asp's preemption on east by China creek, in all
100 acres more or less.
E. E. BURR, Locator.
Dated this 25th day of September, 1904.
NOTICE.
l^OTIOE is hereby given that sixty days after
J ~ date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to
ing purposes, commencing at a post marked
purchase 160 acres of mountain pasture land
situated in the Nicola division of Yale district,
north of and adjoining Boulter's preemption,
lot No. 1155, starting from his N.E. corner, thence
west 80 chains, north 20 chains, east 80 chains,
south 20 chains to point of commencement, and
containing 160 acres.
LUKE GIBSON.
Dated this 17th day of September, 1904.
NOTICE.
Northern mineral claim, situate in the Similka;
meen mining division of Yale district^
Where located : On Copper mountain.
Take'notice that I, F. W. Groves, acting as
agent for J. S. C. Fraser, free miner's certificate,
No. B42433, Joseph Wright, free miner's certificate No. B75373,:and L. G. Barron, free miner's
ceitificate No. B57500, intend sixty days
from the date hereof, toiapply to the mining recorder for a certificate of improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the above
claim. I
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
bf such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 13th day of October, 1904.
NOTICE?
'TpHIRTY days after date I intend to apply to
*   the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
Tot*ft«lii!ense *° prospect for coal on the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post marked E.S.N's southwest corner,
And running 80 chains north-, 8c- chains east,
80 chains south, 80 chains, west, to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, and adjoining J. Lang's locations on the east boundary.
  E.-S. NEAVE, Locator.
Ernest Waterman, Agent.
NOTICE.
Cousin Jack, Ymir, Morning, Oshkosh, Winnebago, Blackl ird and Berlin mineral claims,
situate in the Similkameen mining division
of Yale district. Where located: Boulder
creek Mountain.
Take notice that* Alexander Gallinger, acting
as agent for the Boulder Mining Co Limited,
free miner's certificate No. B72141, intend 60 days
from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Re-'
corder for Certificates of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining Crown Grants of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
ofsuch Certificates of Improvements.
Dated this 3rd day of October, A.D. 1904.
NOTICE.
'■phirty days after date I inter d to apply to the
* Chief Commissioner of I ands and Works for
a license to prcspect for coal and oil on the following described land:—
Commencing at a post marked J.G. at the
south-west corner of the Hamilton ranch, near
Coutlee thence north 40 chains, west 40 chains,
south 40 chains, east 40 chains to the post of commencement.
JESUS GARCIA.
Nicola Lake, Sept. 22,1904.
NOTICE.
Summit No.  1, Copper Head No. 1, Bullion No.
1  Yellow Jacket No. 1 Fractional, Nelly No". 1,
Nelly Fractional, Yellow Jacket No 1 mineral claims   situatein the Osoyccs mining
division of Yale district.   Where located : On
Bullion mountain, east  of the townsite of
Olalla.    " ■
Take notice that I, R. H. Rogers, as agent for
Robert Gaede, free miner's certificate No. B78828,
intend sixty days   from   the   date   hereof,   to
apply  to the Mining Recorder for   certificates
of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining
Crown grants of the above claims.
^nd further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificates of improvements.
Dated this 16th day of September, 1904.
Reginald H. Rogers.
NOTICE!
The O.I.C. fractional and Crackerjack mineral
claims situated in the Osoyoos mining division of Yale district.   Where located : ( amp
Hedley.
Take notice that I, Louis O. Hedlund, F.M.C.
No. B78963, for myself and agent for John Green-
hill, F M.C. No. B78964 and H. P. Nelson, F.M C.
No. B62074, intend, sixty days from date hereof
to apply   to   the    mining   recorder   for     certificates of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining crown grants of the above claims.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 19th day of September, 1904.
Louis O. Hedlund, Hedley. B.C.
NOTICE.
Hattie and Copper Jack mineral claims, situate
iu the Similkameen mining division of Yale
Isilistrict. Where located: In Aspen Grove
camp.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves, acting as
agent for J. S. C. Fraser, free miner's certificate
No. B75740; Henry S. Poulinier, free miner's certificate No. B72121 and Emerson E. Wells, free
miner's certificate No. B85508, intend, sixty days
from date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for certificates of improvements for the purpose
of obtaining crown grants of the above claims.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
ofsuch Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 29th day of August, A D. 1904.
NOTICE.
i
I
Take notice that sixty days after date I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase 320 acres of
crown lands for pasturing purposes : Commencing at a post marked F.LH's S.W. corner :
Thence running 80 chains west. 40 chains north,
80 chains east 40 chains South, back to point of
commencement, in all 320 acres. Situate about
12 miles west of Princeton and is bounded on the
south side by the meandering line of the Tuiameen river.
F. L. HAMMOND,
C. O. FRENCH, Agent.
Dated 7th September, 1904.
A
I
I
October 29 1904
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
It is stated that Ernest Mills, the Socialist candidate for Yale-Cariboo, intends to make a canvass of the constituency and will shortly present his views
to the electorate of Princeton.
Tommy Day returned from the Nickel
Plate where he had been caring for his
brother who was injured in a runaway
tram accident. The patient is almost
recovered. ^><r
Joshua Bell, a colored man, was found
guilty at Greenwood of murdering his
wife last winter and./will be hanged on
January 13th, 1905. i^j^rb l^f^iXJ,
John Gladden left on Thursday for
Hedley after attending to his large mineral interests in this section for the past
' few weeks.
F. W. Groves, P.L.S., is busy with field
work now and appreciates the fine weather.
Now the saw and the hammer may be
heard in making improvements, additions and new structures.
The pitiful ki-yi of the sneaky coyote
may be heard any evening on the suburban hills. They too will have to 'climb'
when the railroad comes, and may it
come soon and thus spare the tender
chicken and grouse from these beastly
thieves.
Canada possesses three times as much
arable land as the United States, and in
ten years will be able to raise enough
grain to supply the British market.
While last century was the century of tbe
United States, this century would be the
one for Canada if governed as in the past
seven years.
J. Empty of Greenwood was in Princeton on Monday last.
Mr. B. ,  rushing into the  editor's
room—'"Look here, you've got a paragraph in your paper about my retirement
from public life." Editor—''Certainly,
what's the matter with it?"    Mr. B..	
"Matter with  it, you've got it under the
head of 'Public Improvements !' "
"I think," declared the little daughter of the widow to the millionaire who
was calling, "that you are a charming
and delightful man." "How nice !
What makes you say so?" "Mamma
told me to."
A fisherman was drowned close to the
shore and his body was not recovered
until the following evening. When it
was taken from the water a collection of
very large crabs clung to the clothing,
and these the minister detached and sold
to help the widow, who appeared to be
inconsolable. When the money was
being handed to the woman the giver
asked her how she wished the bodj' to be
disposed of. "D'ye no think," she said,
"we could do waur than just set him
again ?"
A General Banking Business
A general banking business transacted
by the Bank of Hamilton. Capital
all paid up, $2,229,280.00. Reserve fund
and surplus profits, ^2,067,080.95. Interest allowed on Savings bank deposits of
one dollar and upwards from date of deposit to date of withdrawal. A. H.
SKEY, Agent, Kamloops, B.C.
SALE OF HORSE.
Left at my premises by W. H. Wheeler, teamster, in March last, one roan horse, which will be
sold to cover charges, if not sooner paid.
CHARLES ASP.
Princeton, Oct. 28, 1904.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to purchase
40 acres of mountain pasture land, situated and
adjoining Brandt's purchase on north line and
running along C. Summers's (Lot 1157), thence
south 20 chains, west 20 chains, north 20 chains,
east 20 chains, back to point of commencement,
40 acres.
IVER PAULSEN, Locator.
Dated this 1st of September, 1904.
NOTICE of FORFEITURE
To STEVE M ANGOT or whomsoever he may
have transferred his interest in the Gold-
Platinum mineral claim, situate on Champion
creek, a tributary of the Tuiameen river,
in the Similkameen mining division of Yale
district.
Take notice that after the publication hereof
once each week for ninety days, 3 ou fail or refuse to contribute your portion of the expenditure required by section 24 of the " Mineral Act,"
being chapter 135, Revised Statutes of British
Columbia, 1897, in respect of the Gold-Platinum
mineral claim, situate on Champion creek, in
the Similkameen Mining Division of Yale District, British Columbia, together with all costs of
advertising, your interest in said claim shall become vested in your co-owner, Daniel Coute-
nay, free miner, who has made the required expenditure.
The amount due by you in respect of the
said  mineral   claim,   not    including  costs,  is
$35-33-
Dated this 24th day of October, 1904
DANIEL COUTENAY.
ROCHUSSEN & COLLIS
Yates St., Victoria, B.C.
MANUFACTURER'S AGENTS FOR
Mining Machinery
and Supplies
Tenders on Engineering Contracts
MINING BROKERS
Quotations on all kinds of machinery
WRITE US FOR PRICES
PELLEW-HARVEY,
BRYANT   &    OILMAN,
PROVINCIAL
ASSAYERS
THE  VANCOUVER  ASSAY   OFFICE,
ESTABLISHED 1890.
Analysis of Coal and Fireclay a Specialty.
Complete Coking Quality Tests.
Reliable PLATINUM Assays.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
R. H. ROGERS
M.A., B.C.L.
SOLICITOR
CONVEYANCER
NOTARY PUBLIC, Etc.
OLALLA P.O.
Simikameen, B.C.
J-
4- *>
,■ Mm
&/
.«
£
hi
<$?# 4
J
F. W. GROVES
A. R. COLL., SC. D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON.     -   -     B. C.
Advertise in the Star.
Wood,
Vallance &
Leggat,
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Sherwin-Williams'
Paints
Limited.
I MURALO'S 1st quality
Cold Water Sanitary Calcimo
VANCOUVER, B. C.
KI
KG COOPER
Harness, Saddles, Horsels!hings'
MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
Harness of any Description and any Price Made to Order—Send for Prices.
[Established 12 years in Vernon.]
KELOWNA, B.C.
^STFreight Prepaid to Penticton on all Orders from
Princeton and Vicinity.
LEY CITY STOlf I!
A Complete New Stock of General flerchan=      »
dise always on hand,
CONSISTING OF A FULL LINE OF
am
Groceries, Dr}r Goods, Men's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes; also 5
Builder's  Supplies, Shingles, Doors, Windows, Paints, Wall \
Paper, Hardware, Stoves, Nails, Drill  Steel, 7
Harness and Saddlery. w
Headquarters for Enderby Hungarian Flour, Northwest Oats, &c f
J. A. SCHUBERT. J
TUe Vancouver Breweries, ill
BREWERS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer    yg Alexandra Stout
Queen Beer      M Alexandra Ale
For sale throughout British Columbia in all the first-
class Hotels, Liquor Stores and Saloons.
The Amalgamated
DOERING & MARSTRAND & RED CROSS BREWERIES,
VANCOUVEP, B.   C
I PIERC Y & Co.,
WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS
VICTORIA, B. C
MANUFACTURERS OF
Clothing, Top Shirts and
Underwear.
DRINCETON   BOARD    OF   TRADE—Rooms
*     centrally  located.    Membership   solicited.
C. E. Thomas, E. Waterman,
President. Secretary.
A. Beix, Treasurer.
50   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communications strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patents taken through Jlunn & Co. receive
special notice, without charge, in the
Scientific American*
A handsomely illustrated weekly. I.nrgest circulation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a
year; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers.
IKIUNH SCo.»«B«-*-». New York
Branch Office. 635 F St., Washington, D. C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
October 29, 1904
+0
L
ADDRESS.
To The Electors of Yai,e-Cariboo :
As the liberal  candidate in this electoral   district,   I   respectfully   solicit
your votes and influence.
No attempt will be made to discuss the
general issues of the campaign in this
address. Since receiving the Liberal
nomination in January last, I have visited
many parts of the riding and made myself thoroughly acquainted with its requirements. This work will be continued
until election day but owing to the large
extent of territory to be coVered it is.a
physical impossibility to visit all sections
or personally interview all the electors.
I therefore avail myself of this opportunity to ask for your suffrage.
Permit me to direct your attention to
some matters of local importance. Yale-
Cariboo fully warrants the expenditure of
public money in its development. The
government has already done much in
this direction. It has granted aid to several lines of railway ; government owned
telegraph and telephone lines have been
constructed ; the necessary money has
been voted to secure telephonic communication through the rich Nicola and
Similkameen districts, and telegraphic
communication between Vernon and
Kelowna. In order that the practically
inexhaustible mineral, timber and agri
cultural resources of the district may be
fully developed, this policy of governmental aid must be continued. It is important that Yale-Cariboo shall return as
its member one who can direct the attention of the government to matters of
vital importance to the district and who
will support the government in its
aggressive policy of development. It is
particularly important that the electors
of this riding should show their appreciation of the government's broad, statesmanlike plan of constructing another
transcontinental railway which will be
the chief factor in opening up the northern portion of the riding. Branch lines
to connect with the southern transcontinental lines will surely follow and the
whole interior of the province will be
opened up.
Briefly, my policy, so far as Yale-
Cariboo is concerned, is a policy of development of all its important sections.
With a leader whose record fills with
pride all people of this country, irrespective of party affiliations ; supporting
a government whose eight years of wise,
progressive administration has placed
Canada in a proud position among the
nations of the world, and at the same
time has more closely connected the ties
which bind us to the mother country,
and fully endorsing a policy which means
so much to the western portion of the
Dominion, and more particularly to the
district of Yale-Cariboo, I await with
confidence, your verdict.
Yours very sincerely.
Duncan Ross.
Greenwood, Oct. 6th, 1904.
igifrijh*M
October 29 1904
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
Fiwe
Flour
Whitest
Strongest
        Best
LAKE OP TBE WOODS Milling Company
JAS. I. LOTJTIT. Agent.
P.O. Box 153 Vancouver, B.C.
PRINCETON   BOARD    OF   TRADE—Rooms
L      centrally  located.    Membership   solicited.
C. B». Thomas, E. Waterman,
President. Secretary.
A. Bell, Treasurer.
Liberals and Conservatives
Get the Habit
I Of buying your goods where the prices
defy competition; where all goods are
||   fresh, clean and new,
Bought at Lowest Prices
and sold with careful consideration for
the pockets of our customers. m.
-:o:-
Fresh Groceries
New Rubber Goods
I     Boots and Shoes
-:o:-
Everything up=to=date at
Tk HOWSE j COMPANY
NICOLA LAKE AND PRINCETON
LIMITED
-:o:-
We Lead, Others Follow!   %
^^^^^^^^B^M^^^^^^^^^^^^R^^^^^S
OPERATION BY GOVERNMENT.
Borden's Railway Policy Exposed by
| Premier Laurier.
In his dying   extremity  Mr.   Borden
-j catches at any  "old"  straw that he may
keep his political head above water.till
after polling day on the 3rd of Noveni-
ber. First, he denounced a second transcontinental railway, then he advocated
the purchase of the Lake Superior section from the C.P.R., giving running
rights over it to the Grand Trunk, Canadian Pacific and Canadian Northern, now
he says government ownership and operation is the proper thing. The following
are Sir Wilfrid Laurier's views on government ownership and operation as expressed in his great Toronto speech on
the 15th instant:
"Governments can  build  railways—I
^ 3 have no fault to find with that—but gov-
■^ ernments      cannot     operate     railways.
(Cheers.)    The  reason  is  very  obvious.
Railways  have  been compelled to carry
passengers and freight, but it is an act of
commerce, and  I  say  to you, my fellow
countrymen,   that    governments   never
were intended to go into business as men
engage in  commerce.      It   is  no part of
-the  responsibility   of government to do
anything of the kind.    I am prepared to
discuss whether or not telephones or telegraphs should not be administered by the
postoffice.     The    postoffice   department
disseminates  written    intelligence,   ai d
there  would  be some  reason why thej-
should  disseminate  verbal  intelligence.
Railways are not the same thing.    Compare the  management of a  railway   by
governmeut with private enterprise.    Go
into  the  office of any  railway  manager
on this  continent, whether Canadian Pa
cific railway or Grand Trunk railway or
any other railway.    There  3'on find the
manager all the time thinking, planning,
to  reduce  the  expenditure and increase
the traffic.    Every day he has a report on
the road; every day he scans to see where
improvements can  be made.    If he finds
that there is a section   where there is no
g traffic and no  trade  because  there is no
agriculture,   no   mining,   or  lumbering,
but that there is fine  natural scenery, he
would put up a big hotel and  get traffic;
he immediately plans to build it in ordei
to bring traffic where he did not  have it
before.    Or, i'n another section there is a
forest in which settlers do  not go ; if he
knows there  is somewhere a young man
■   of-enterprise or energy he sends for him.
advances the money to put up a sawmill,
and therefore business comes to the road
Or(, if there is in any part of the railroad
a mining  camp  where  the freight rates
were too heavy to  ship  the ores, he puts
up a smelter, and then at  the other end
of the line, as has been  done  by the Canadian Pacific  railway,  as shall be done
by the Grand Trunk Pacific, he will provide a  flotilla  of ships  in  order to distribute his merchandise all over the ocean.
Do you think it would be possible for the
.government to do the same thing 1 (Cries
^of No !)     Suppose   Mr.    Borden  builds
that road, and though there may be beautiful scenery in that part  of the country,
and  there  is, do  you  think it would be
well if he proposed to  erect a new hotel
a^A an(j operate it ?   He would be laughed at.
Or, do you think he would be allowed to
put  up   a   smelter   or provide a fleet of
steamers ?   Sir, the thing is preposterous,
and you only have to consider it in order
to realize  that  it is preposteious.    (Ap
a,      plause.)
Straight
Party
Lines
WE ARK EXCLUSIVELY
SHOEMAKERS .
AND CAN GUARANTEE
Style, Comfort and Durability
IN FOOTWEAR
MANUFACTURED
BY US.
Just opened
COAMRCIAL
HOTEL
First Class Dining Room
Sieiey
Newly Filled
Good Beds
.No Chinese Employed.
BEST BRANDS LIQUORS AND CIGARS ALWAYS IN STOCK
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO TRAVELLERSj&§
HUSTON & McLEAN, Proprietors
THAMES
HOLBEN
OF MONTREAL, LTD.
NICOLA LAKE
"The Japs are better fighters." "Yes."
"And they are better equipped." "Yes."
"And have more confidence." "Yes."
"But don't you think the Russians will
win in the long run ?" "Well, that
seems to be their specialty."
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated andTefitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Winest Liquors and Cigars.
TELEPHONE* BATH. H    ;
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Dines.
^iih^finK** For the star
ouu^riDe For the STAg
f tjmjimes"
For  CONNOISSEURS Only.
Can be had at all first-class hotels through
out the  province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,Ld.
VICTORIA, B   C,
Sole Agents*
J./i/RSCH Sons 6 G>. Alras. Montreal
Wm
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
October 29, 1904
it
M
• • • *Z^ d I t • •'<'•'
-.■$■*<*•••*&<***•
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOfsf I
From $2.00 to $10.
Per Front Foot**£e^
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft. and 33xJ00 Ft.
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
BaL 3 and 6 months,
wi^i interest at 6 per
cent, pef^annum. <£
m.
m
:v;;;
livepiieil Head-
pariers For the
&L
.^vtsiimS***^ ©
M83
District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Simil-
P^ifteen and Tulameetflifers. The BUSINESS CEN-
TR^jfor the following Mining ;(|Smps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder* and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche Rive|>  Upper Tuiameen and Aspen Grove.
FINE CLIMATE
and PURE WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
Send tor Map and Price List to <& *& S> <& <&
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Residlat Manager VERMILION  FO$KS
MINING AND DEVELOPMiN j CO.
sflf! Agents fof the
j^ADIAN QR%C0NCp^RATI0N|4.IMI'pD,
(ESmbre dit Process. f\
*

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