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Similkameen Star 1904-07-09

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 * r.
Railway in Similkameen will Increase Government Revenue by at Least $50,000.
Equal Rights, and No Surrender.
Similkameen Contains Large Area of Virgin Mineral Ground—Country Abounds with Fish and Game.
Coal is Mined in the Town of Princeton and Sold at $3 per Ton—The Rivers and Creeks are Auriferous—Vast Possibilities for Lode Mining.
Vol. v.   No. 13.
PRINCETON, B.C., SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1904.
$2 a Year, in Advance.
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BOARD OE TRADE.
Ore Specimens Exhibited Free at the
Spokane Interstate Eair.
At the board of trade meeting Thursday night a vote of thanks was tendered
Clark & Stewart for -free transport of ore
specimens to Princeton for Spokane fair.
In reply to F. W. Groves, P.L.S., the secretary of the Spokane fair writes :
"i. The fair does not charge for space
occupied by mineral exhibits. 2. The
fair pays for all benches occupied by exhibits. 3. The railroads have always carried mineral exhibits free of charge and
we expect the same arrangement this
year. In any event we will be willing to
pay the freight charges on all exhibits
donated to the fair. 4. The fair will be
held October 3rd to 9th."
The ore specimens from each camp or
locality will bear owner's name and also
that of claim and location. The board
urges intending exhibitors to forward
specimens as soon as possible. A public
meeting in furtherance of the exhibition
will be held next Thursday evening to
which all are invited.
Resolutions re wild cattle annoyance
and school of mines were passed and
forwarded by the secretary.
Dominion Day at Nicola.
The Dominion Day celebration at Nicola was the most elaborate in many years.
The programme would have been ample
for a much larger place, but the Nicola-
taines are whole-souled and enthusiastic
in all things and when it comes to sport
and entertainment their hospitality and
happy abandonment to innocent pleasure
know no bounds. Wives and sweethearts,
husbands and cavalier bachelors, all
were intent on their neighbor's pleasure
and everybody admitted "it was good to
be there." Racing, dances and athletic
sports, with happy reunions of tillicums,
made the day all too short. Pleasure
and prosperity attend all Nicola, is the
greeting from the Similkameen, and may
two bands of steel make it possible for
this greeting to be reassured by clasp cf
hand next Dominion Day.
A presentation by the scholars and a
commendatory letter from the trustees
were received by Miss Whillans, the retiring.teacher of Hedley school.
The wedding of Miss Belle Terrill,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Terrill, Granite creek, to Mr. Donald Macphail, is announced for Tuesday next, 5 p.m., at
the home of the bride's parents.
Owing to pressure of business Messrs.
Armstrong & Kiddie could not come to
Princeton, turning back at Otter Flat.
The deal for the Ellis property at Penticton will be closed this month at the
price of $400,000.
A strolling minstrel playing the "Prospector's Dream" and "Riding on a Railway," brought tears to the eyes of spectators on Bridge street, Thursday.
THE FRIEND OF MONOPOLY
F. C COTTON OPPOSES GREAT NORTHERN
He Would Leave  the Similkameen Without Railway Rather
than Permit Hill to Build—The Editor-Statesman
Inspired from Sanctum of C.P.R.—Province is Ruled from Montreal.
The News-Advertiser of Vancouver, of
which the Hon. F. Carter-Cotton, President of the Legislative Council, is editor
and manager, makes the statement in a
recent number that "James J. Hill and
his associates have secured a controlling
interest in the Granby Mining and Smelting Co." It also states that Hill has no
intention of building a through line from
the coast to Kootenay, and adds :
" Mr. Hill may, probably will, plan a
system of branches running into B.C.
like the fingers of a hand, but all having
for their objective the drawing of traffic
to the main system. This sounds like a
business proposition from the point of
view of the interests of that system,
whereas a line to the coast, through a
country difficult for railway construction
and with a rival company firmly in occupation at the probable terminus, has little
to recommend it to a shrewd railway
manager like Hill. It will be well for
us not to live in a fool's paradise and
think Hill's policy in B.C. to be actuated
by philanthropic motives. Rather, we
should take a leaf out of Hill's book and
show a little more statesmanship, energy
and sagacity in the manner in which we
carry out enterprises designed to develop
nature's resources."
It would be interesting to know if Mr.
Hill ever divulged his plans to the editor, aforesaid, still more interesting would
it be to know how Mr. Cotton became
possessed of those sensational news paragraphs, of which, he says, "not a word
appeared on the subject in newspapers
on either side of the boundary line, and
but few persons were aware of it." It is
well known that Mr. Cotton and his paper
have for years been most friendly to the
only railway rival Mr. Hill has in this
province. In all that rival's squabbles
the News-Advertiser has never uttered a
phrase antagonistic to its interests. What
more likely then that his "news" and inspiration should come from the head
offices of said rival.
Again the cloven hoof of monopoly is
visible in Mr. Cotton's editorials. He
would slam the door in the face of Mr.
Hill and forever shut out all hope of railway competition. Once Mr. Hill is removed from the competitive field then
farewell to a railway in the Similkameen,
for neither the incapable government of
which Mr. Cotton is a member, nor the
monopoly with which he affiliates have
the remotest notion of building. Actions,
and not words lead to this conclusion.
Is there a vestige of hope in the promised
summer    railway      session ?     Colossal
financier as the friends of the president
of the council seem to think he is, he
could not get the loan of a sou on the
credit of the province for a government
built railway through the Similkameen.
The Canadian Pacific cannot build because it is preoccupied with the problem
of supplying railways to a country with
a phenomenal immigration and a wheat
yield which chokes traffic the year round.
Besides there are difficulties in the money
market which, perhaps, would not be
wise for any company to meet.
The editor-statesman says that Mr. Hill
is not actuated by philanthropic motives.
Is Sir Thos. Shaughnessy philanthropic?
Ask of the Boundary mine owners or the
Manitoba farmers. It is doubtful if Mr.
Cotton or his government is philanthropic
judging from the recent^ rise in taxes on
the poor individual as compared with
those on the wealthy corporation.
He revives the old bugaboo that trade
will be diverted to Spokane and other
American cities if Hill builds into the
Similkameen. With the present import
duties and the enforcement of export
tariff rates not a dollar of trade need ever
be lost to the country. Mr. Hill knows
this and it would be folly for him to
build a railway expecting to haul merchandise in and ores out, when an order-
in-council would shut off his freight.
But Mr. Hill is coming to the Similkameen for the internal tonnage that will
develop with the railway. Boundary
tonnage has a short haul and is most profitable for both the C.P.R. and G.N.R.
Conditions are almost identical in the
Similkameen with those in the Boundary.
Why should the Cambie street editor and
president of the council decry Mr. Hill's
railway project to the Similkameen ?—because he is the tool of a monopoly.
President Hill has interests in the
smelter project at Hedley and he also has
some good coking coal in Nicola. Custom ore tonnage is unlimited within a
radius of 50 miles from Hedley. He will
have all the freight he can haul on his
road without taking a pound into a "for-
eign country." This cry about foreigners is the ancient tory scare-crow stuffed
with bogus patriotism. A thousand times
more loyal to develop the Similkameen
with a foreign railway and make it a large
revenue producer than to retard progress
by hooting at Mr. Hill and get no revenue.
Come on with the railway Mr. President!
LOCAL PARAGRAPHS.
Wild Fruit is Plentiful—Anglers are
Having Good Sport.
Bunch grass haying has begun and the
crop is one of the best known.
Wild strawberries are abundant and
their flavor excellent. At present they
are the creme de la creme of table delicacies. Wild gosseberries, saskatoons,
raspberries and cherries are also plentiful.
The death of Mrs. G. N. Barclay of
Ashcroft from rattlesnake bite received
while picking flowers has caused great
sympathy for her husband and several
young children, also for Judge Cornwall
whose eldest daughter she was. She became comatose almost immediately and
in spite of medical aid soon passed away.
Mineral specimens continue to arrive
for the Spokane exhibition, the latest
being a fine one from Roche river and
taken from "Beige's" claim. C. E.
Thomas has also contributed specimens
of his well known Copper mountain properties.
The full complement of forty stamps
in the Daly Reduction Co's mill at Hedley are now in use.
Trout are now running freely in the
rivers and creeks and large catches reward all who diligently bait them. Ernest Waterman caught forty of these palate ticklers in a few moments the other
day.
On all former Dominion days it has
rained in'Princeton. This year, however,
there was no celebration and there was no
rain. The farmers are anxious about
their crops in consequence.
The Misses Edna Lyall and Myrtle
McLean were guests this week of Mrs.
Young, Wolf creek.
The Dreaded Rattlesnake.
A handy remedy for rattlesnake bite,
it is stated, is the application of baking
soda to the wound ; another is overdosing
with intoxicating liquor. Cauterization
and cutting away poisoned area of flesh
are also said to be preventatives. Death
has been known to follow in a few minutes after the bite, in some cases hours
elapse, in others the patient recovers. If
bitten on a large vein death is almost
certain as the poison attacks the vitals at
once. Rattlesnakes are most active in
hot weather, hence more dangerous, in
cool weather they are sluggish and in
winter torpid. . Hogs are fond of them
and will soon clear them of their haunts.
They are the only animal specie unaffected by rattlesnake poison. There are
no rattlers within twelve miles east of
Princeton, the apparently reasonable
theory being set up that the earth is too
highly mineralized for their comfort or
propagation. Be that as it may there is
a remarkable absence of snakes about
Princeton, only a few in a state of liquefaction being rarely observed.
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THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
July 9, 1904
i
V
The Similkameen Star
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON, B.C.
—BY—
The Princeton Publishing Co.
A. E. Howse, Manager.
One Year,
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
Payable in Advance.
$2.00
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reporting any change in address or
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one mouth
advertising.
All cheques to be made payable to
A. E. HOWSE.
MILITARISM IS CANADA.
The recent dismissal of the General commanding the Canadian military forces for having made a public speech in which slighting reference was made of the department
of militia, will merit the approval
of all unprejudiced persons. Lord
Dundonald, the ex-commander, fell
into the same error that his predecessors, Generals Hutton, O'Grady-
Haly and Herbert did. They were
all high salaried officers of the department of militia and as such
were subject to its control and responsible to it alone. But these
men made the fatal mistake of
assuming that their voices and wills
were supreme while yet employees.
There is, however, one higher
than they who is responsible to
the people of Canada for the efficiency of the forces, hence their
dismissal.
If these commanders thought to
establish a sort of military despotism in Canada they mistook the
soil in which it was to grow. For
the Canadian has not been reared
in a military atmosphere that
continually echoes with the drum
. beat of real or mimic war. His
ideals tend to the utility of things
and he sees little in the glamor and
swagger of militarists to imitate.
In old countries the martial spirit is
indigenous, in new countries it is
exotic. Here the peaceful pursuits
of commerce, agriculture and mining require all the men and money
available for their development. Jt
is well, therefore, that Lord Dundonald and his successor should
learn that large expenditures for a
great military establishment in Canada cannot be recommended. The
militia department did wisely in
refusing to carry out many of his
expensive military schemes. It
also acted in the best interests of
the militia when it refused to sanction his appointment of officers to
a new regiment who were all related
by marriage or birth, one of whom
had not the slightest qualification
for the position.
More than any military display
or establishment Canada requires
development of her vast uninhabited
wilds and unexplored regions. Her
prairies have only been colonized
in fringes, her mountainous districts
await the prospector and railway.
Thus, it will be observed, there is
scope for every dollar of revenue in
opening up the country. To spend
large sums of money on a mere
plaything and non-productive military system while the country is
starving for railways, canals, telegraphs, educational institutions and
exploration seems unwise. Enough
has already been spent on the military forces of Canada and it is time
to call a halt, Militarists and jingoes should have no quarter in
Canada, much less should they be
found in the position of commanding officer whose inflammatory
speeches and indiscreet criticisms
might do mischief.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Soon it will be dog days and yet
there is no sign of that promised
summer session. Richard, where
art thou ?
Missionaries are being sent to
China and the isles of the sea, but
one to Princeton—never. Sky
pilots must be scarce.
The need of a resident doctor in
Princeton is admitted by parents
and others. The subsidy of $300
yearly granted by the government
is intended for this locality and will
be disbursed here as soon as a doctor can be induced to locate.
The Tory press gloat over Sir
Wilfrid's lapsus linguae of the word
"foreigner." Have they forgotten
already that their leader, Mr. Borden, made a lapsus manus by reading from a stolen document during the G.T.P. debate? Before
they ever attempt to "guiltify" the
Premier and lie as to his use of the
word in the Dundonald debate they
might clear up the mystery surrounding that stolen document.
The Dominion of Canada is 37
years old and contains one-third of
the whole area of the British Empire. It has a million square miles
of practically unexplored territory.
Its wheat growing area in the west
is, according to Prof. Saunders,
171,000,000 acres in extent and has
only 5,000,000 acres under cultivation. Including the Similkameen
and Nicola districts, Canada has
100,000 square miles of coal area.
And British Columbia is considered
by experts the greatest undeveloped mineral country in the world.
In view of these facts would not
railways be of greater benefit to
the country than a showy military
force ?
A General Banking' Business
A general banking business transacted
by the Bank of Hamilton. Capital
all paid up, $2,229,280.00. Reserve fund
and surplus profits, $2,067,080.95. Interest allowed on Sayings bank deposits of
one dollar and upwards from date of de-*
posit to date of withdrawal. A. H.
SKEY, Agent, Kamloops, B.C.
NOTICE.
HPHIRTY days from date I intend to apply to
* the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal on the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post marked A. Green's
J^-S. 3, and %-S. 4, placed on east side of Cold-
water river, at out 3 miles south of Coutlee.
And running 40 chains west, 80 chains south, 80
chains east, 80 chains north, and then 40 chains
west to point of commencement, containing 640
acres. Wrcx-iAM Rice, Locator.
Charles Stirling, Agent.
Nicola, May 20, 1904.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to purchase
160 acres of mountain pasture land, described as
follows • Commencing at a post situated on the
south side of Similkameen river, about 8 miles
from Princeton and opposite the mouth of Whip-
saw creek marked T.C.R's S.W. corner, thence
north 80 chains following the meander of Similkameen river, thenee 20 chains east, thence 80
chains south, thence 20 chains west to initial post.
T. C. P.2VELY,
W. F. REVELY. Agent.
Princeton, B.C., April21st, 1904.
NOTICE.
Kenley mineral claim, situate in the Similkameen Mining Division of Yale district.
Where located : Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, Ernest Waterman, free
miner's certificate No. B72039 for myself and for
Edwin Barr Hall, free miner's certificate No.
B72040, intend sixty days from the tlate hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate
of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining
a Crown grant of .the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 9th day of April, 1904.
NOTICE.
Olympian mineral claim, Eituate in the Similkameen mining division of Yale district. Wheie
located: On Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves acting as
agent for Joseph Wright, free miner's certificate
No. B75373; J. S. C. Fraser, free miner's certificate No. B42433 and L. G. Barron, free miner's
certificate No. B57500, intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a certificaie of improvements for the purpose
of obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
ofsuch Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 25th day of April, A.D. 1904.
NOTICE.
Great Republic mineral claim, situate in the
Similkameen mining division of Yale district.    Where located    Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, John P. McLeod, free miner's certificate No. B80240, for myself and as
agent for Charles H. Bohter,-free miner's certificate No. B75510, intend, sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the mining recorder for a certificate of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 18th day of April, A.D. 1904.
j. p. mcleod.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to purchase
eighty acres of second class land, situated in
Osoyoos district: Commencing at a post marked
J.L. situated about forty chains north of northeast corner of John Kearns' preemption lot 3098,
thence 20 chains east, thence forty chains south,
thence 20 chains west, thence forty chains north
to point of commencement, containing 80 acres
more or less.
-JOHN LOVE.
Fairview, B.C., April 13, 1904.
NOTICE.
I^OTIOE is hereby given that sixty days after
f 2 date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 160 acres of crown lands for agricultural purposes, commencing at a post marked
C. A. Joyner's N.W. corner, thence running 40
chains east, thence 40 chains south, thence 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north to place of
commencement. C. A. JOYNER.
Dated April 8, 1904.
50   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a slteteh and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communications strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive
special notice, without charge, in the
Scientific jjmerfcam
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Lnrgest circulation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a
year; four months, $1.  Sold by all newsdealers.
MUNN & Co.3e,Broadwa'New lorn
Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C.
NOTICE of FORFEITURE
To ARCHIBALD GRANT or whomsoever he
may have transferred his interest in Klon-
dyke mineral claim, situate on Copper
Mountain, and about ten miles from Princeton, in the Similkameen mining division of
Yale district.
Take notice that after the publication hereof
once each week for ninety days, 3 ou fail or refuse to contribute your portion of the expenditure required by section 24 of the " Mineral Act,"
being chapter 135, Revised Statutes of British
Columbia, 1897, in respect of the Klondyke
mineral claim, situate on Copper mountain in
the Osoyoos Mining Division of Yale District, British Columbia, together with all costs of
advertising, your interest in said claim shall become vested in your co-owner, Thomas F.
McAlpin, of Princeton, Free Miner, who has
made the required expenditure.
The amount due by you in respect of each of
the said mineral claims, not including costs, is
$25.62}^.
Dated this4th day of June, 1904.
THOS. J. MCALPIN.
NOTICE of FORFEITURE
To W. E. WELBY and any person or persons to
whom hemay have transferred his interests in
the Elbe, Sunset, Maid of the Mist and War
Cloud mineral claims situate at Camp Hedley
in the Osoyoos mining division of Yale district:
'  You are hereby required to take notice that we
have for the last two years done the whole of the
assessment work on the above mentioned mineral claims as required by section 24 of the mineral act and have paid for recording the several
certificates of such work, and you are hereby required  to  contribute your   proportion  cf such
work and expenditure together with all costs of
advertising, your said proportion amounting to
One Huudred and Fifty Nine Dollars ($159.00),
exclusive of costs.
If you fail or refuse to contribute your said
proportion and all costs of advertising within
ninety days from the date of the first publication
of this notice in the Similkameen Star, which
date is hereunder written, your interests in said
mineral claims* will become vested in us, your
co-owners, under the provisions of the Mineral
Act and Amending Acts.
Dated this 4th day of June, A.D. 1904.
H. W. YATES.
J. F. CAMPBELL.
NOTICE of FORFEITURE
To PETER SCOTT and any person or persons to
wh(5m he may have transferred his interest in
the Sacramento mineral claim situate at Camp
Hedley—20-Mile Creek—acjoining the Oro
Plato in the Osoyoos mining division of Yale
district.
You are hereby required to take notic e that I
have, for the last four years caused to be done
the whole of the assessment work on the above
mentioned mineral claim as required by section
24 of the Mineral Act and have paid for recording the several certificates of such work, and you
are herel y required to contribute vour proportion of such work and expenditure, together
with all costs of advertising, your said proportion amounting to two hundred and five dollars,
($205) exclusive of costs.
If you fail or refuse to contribute your said
proportion and all costs of advertising within
ninety days from the date of the first publication of this notice in the Similkameen Star,
which date is hereunder written, your interest
in said mineral claim will become vested in me,
your co-owner, under the provisions of the Mineral Act and Amending Acts.
Dated this 30th day of April, A.D. 1904.
.   DANIEL BRAITHWAITE.
NOTICE.
Tempest fraction mineral claim, situate in the
Similkameen mining division of Yale district.   Where located : Kennedy mountain.
Take notice that I, Ernest Waterman, agent for
the Vermilion Forks Mining Company, free
miner's certificate No. B72038, intend, sixty days
from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
recorder for a certificate of improvements for the
purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the above
claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance,
ofsuch Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 13th day of April, A.D. 1904.
NOTICE.
Mogul, Mogul Fractional and Red Butte Fractional mineral claims, situate   in the Similkameen mining division of Yale district.
Where located : On Kennedy mountain.
" Take   notice  that I, Charles Willarson, free
miner's certificate No. B63394, acting for myself
and Peter Johnson, free miner's certificate No.
B63393,  intend 60 days from the date hereof, to
apply to the Mining Recorder for Certificates of
Improvements, for    the  purpose  of  obtaining
Crown Grants of the above claims.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
ofsuch Certificates of Improvements.
Dated this 14th day of May, A.D. 1904.
NOTICE.
Ada B., Ada B. Fractional and Centre Star Fractional mineral claims, situate in the Similkameen mining division of Yale district.
Where located: On Copper mountain.
.Take notice that I, Charles "Willarson,' free
miner's certificate No. B63394, acting for myself
and Peter Johnson, free miner's certificate No.
B63393, and Robert O. Cramer, free miner's certificate No. 63382, and William H. Morrison, free
miner's certificate No. 75486, and Furman R.
Whitwell, free miner's certificate No. 72045,intend
sixty days from the date hereof, to abply to
the mining recorder for certificates of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining crown
grants of-the above claims.
-ind further take notice that action, under sec-,
tion 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificates of improvements.
Dated this 14th day of May, 1904.
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July 9,1904
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
LOCAL NEWS NOTES.
H. C. Cooper, of Kelowna, came in on
Wednesday's stage. He is the successful and enterprising saddle and harness
maker of that very promising town and
is now casting his eye about with the
object in view of enlarging his business.
Mr. Cooper believes that the great latent
wealth of the Similkameen in minerals
is sufficient to induce railway construction at once. He admires the pretty location of Princeton and will take time by
the forelock and secure some real estate
for business and residential purposes.
He will be a very welcome acquisition to
the citizenship and business interests of
Princeton.
Willerson & Johnson leave for Nicola
tomorrow.
C. F. Law is sinking a shaft on the St.
George, Bear creek, which will soon be
all in high grade ore.
Five McCormick mowing machines and
4 rakes, sold by the A. E. Howse Co. this
season, prove that ranchers are making
hay and money too.
Neil McFadyen returned from Aspen
Grove yesterday where he has been doing
assessment work on the Never SweaJ7
Last Chance and Olympian, all of which
have proved highly satisfactory.
Geo. Aldous left for Vancouver via
Hope Pass on Thursday.
Messrs. Bate and Armstrong came up
from Keremeos Thursday on their way
to Aspen Grove. They were doing assessment work in southern Similkameen.
Robert Stevenson went up to-Copper
mountain Thursday to work on the Victoria group.
Jim Snowden came in Wednesday from
Hope where he met Gus Savage and
escorted him over the summit, dropping
him there with his brother Claude and
coming on here with three pack horses
for some more "wittles." They intend
making a thorough prospect of the
Hope range. Jim says there is good fishing in the Skagit, he having hooked a lot
ot trout there. One, a big male Dolly
Varden, broke his line—he thinks it
must have weighed ten or fifteen pounds
—and carried away nine hooks in its gullet.   Try again, Jim.
Dell Young had a pet cayuse killed by
falling into a disused well this week. The
animal had been tethered too near the
dangerous hole and in cavorting with the
mosquitoes fell to its untimely end. It
is a wonder there are not more accidents
of this nature considering the number of
open prospect holes throughout the district.
Jas. D'Arcy came over from Summer-
land last Saturday on a business mission.
He reports everything lively in that
section and homeseekers arriving daily.
Small holdings for fruit growing are
going "like hot cakes."
A cattle drover on his way to Chilcoten
states that he had to pay $40 for veterinary inspection of his animals to a Fair-
view man. He says that he paid it rather
*:han be delayed but thinks he was
"held up." The Star will always help
to correct any irregularity on production
of all the facts.
Work on the Copper mountain road is-
progressing under foreman Goldsborough
and an efficient force of men working 10
hours per diem at $2.50.
NOTICE.
Copper Glance, Azurite and Alpine mineral
claims, situate in the Similkameen mining
division of Yale district. Where located:
On Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves, acting as
agent for John R. McRae, free miner's certificate
No. B72143, and Hugh McRae, free miner's certificate No. B62053, intend, sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the mining recorder for
a certificate of improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.
And further take rotice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before-the issuance
of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 9th day of July, A.D. 1904.
Ra Ha ROGERS
M.A., B.C.L.
SOLICITOR
CONVEYANCER
NOTARY PUBLIC, Etc.
OLALLA P.O.
Simikameen, B.C.
m
<v £
.1?
frs. mii w
%xm 1
t
F. W. GROVES
A. R. COLL., SC.  D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON.     -   -     B. C.
PELLEW-HARVEY,
BRYANT   &    GILMAN,
PROVINCIAL
ASSAYERS
THE  VANCOUVER ASSAY   OFFICE,
ESTABLISHED 1890.
Analysis of Coal and Fireclay a Specialty,
Complete Coking Quality Tests.
Reliable PLATINUM Assays.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
J. PIERCY & Co.,
"WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS
VICTORIA, B. C.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Clothing, Top Shirts and
Underwear.
JAS. CLARK
WATCHMAKER
and JEWELLER
ALL   WORK WARRANTED
Hedley and Princeton
A
Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods   Milling  Co'y,
Combine to produce the finest grade
of flour on the market.
Try Best   Patent  Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
KG COOPER
Harness, Saddles, HorseFsisWn§s'
MANUFACTURER AND DEADER IN ALL KINDS OF
Harness of any Description and any Price Made to Order—Send for Prices.
[Established 12 years in Vernon.]
KELOWNA, B.C
g^T Freight Prepaid to Penticton on all Orders from
Princeton and Vicinity.
i
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HEDLEY CITY STORE
A Complete New Stock of General Herchan-
dise always on hand,
CONSISTING OF A FULL LINE OF
Groceries, Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes; also
Builder's Supplies, Shingles, Doors, Windows, Paints, Wall
Paper, Hardware, Stoves, Nails, Drill Steel,
Harness and Saddlery.
Headquarters for Enderby Hungarian Flour, Northwest Oats, &c
J. A. SCHUBERT.
*%>%
Wood,
Vallance &
Leggat, 1
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Sherwin-Williams'
Pmints
Limited.
MURALO'S 1st quality I
Cold Water Sanitary Calcimo
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HMm *—*»§**   WALL  FINISH
3Wm§£m^€Mm€J wall finish
This finish : is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its dura=
bility, pretty tints, and the easy mode of mix=
ing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. Ask your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
The Vancouver Breweries, in.
BREWERS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer    «£ Alexandra Stout
Queen Beer      & Alexandra Ale
For sale throughout British Columbia in all the first-
class Hotels, Liquor Stores and Saloons.
t
The Amalgamated
BOERINO & MARSTRAND & RED CROSS BREWERIES,
VANCOUVEP, B. C
1
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A
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
MINING NOTES.
It has been decided by the Supreme
Courts of several of the United States
that a tunnel cannot be driven through
the property of another to reach ground
beyond, s If A starts a crosscut tunnel on
his own ground, and undertakes to reach
a claim located beyond B's claim, B may
stop him if he is so disposed.
The diamond drill is valuable as a
means of prospecting, as it usually makes
it possible to examine the character of
the rock passed through by means of a
core. The prospecting holes should be
distributed systematically, as a single
hole, or several of them, directed in a
haphazard manner are of little value.
For prospecting sand or gravel a churn
or well drill may be used with good
effect.
When designing a stamp mill in which
concentrating "machines are to be operated, provision should be made for a separate means of power for the concentrators, to insure steady running. Concentrators. operated by the same power—
water wheel, steam engine or other motive power—are usually affected when the
heavier machinery starts or stops. Particularly is this noticeable with the intermittent working of the rock breakers.
The employment of the stadia method
of measurement in surveying is permissible over very rough ground or through a
country covered with dense thickets of
brush. With care, stadia measurements
up to 600 feet may be made with an
accuracy equalling the results attending
tape measurement under similar conditions. Attempts to measure distances
exceeding 1000 feet are likely to result in
small inaccuracies, due to difficulty in
close reading of the rod.
Valves on water pipes.should be closed
slowly or the "water hammer'' incident
to the sudden closing of a tap or valve
may cause the pipe line to burst at any
point between the valve and the reservoir or pressure box. This is due to the
sudden stoppage of the water in motion
■ and the danger increases with the increasing size of the valve. For this reason large val. ca or gates are so made that
they can only be closed slowly with a
screw.
If there is any suspicion that the fuse
being used is defective, make actual tests
of pieces from several coils. Cut the
pieces 3 feet or more from each coil and
light one end of all the pieces simultaneously and notice if there is a material
difference in the time of burning through
to the opposite ends. In case such discrepancy in time is very noticeable, the
fuse is unreliable. A second or two on a
short piece of fuse should not condemn
it, but half a minute or more on a 3-foot
piece is an indication that the fuse is irregular. Triple tape fuse is the safest
under any circumstances and should be
used in wet holes.
HJCKETT'S
Just Opened
COMMERCIAL
HOTEL
First Class Dining Room
JULY 9,   I904
Newly Fitted
Hedley
Good Beds
Largest Sale in Canada
Straight
Party   1
WE ARE EXCLUSIVELY
SHOEMAKERS
AND CAN GUARANTEE
Style, Comfort and Durability
IN FOOTWEAR
MANUFACTURED
BY US.
 No Chinese Employed.	
BEST BRANDS LIQUORS AND CIGARS ALWAYS IN STOCK
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO TRAVELLERS
HUSTON & McLEAN, Proprietors
DRIARD HOTEL
NICOLA LAKE
■ AMES
HOLDEN
Company
OF MONTREAL, LTD.
VANCOUVER   B.O.
I
"What constitutes a gentleman?" asked
the very young man. "That is hard to
say," replied the sage from Sageville,
' 'but it is a safe bet that the man who
says he is a gentleman isn't."
"De jackass," said Bruddah Sparks ;
"de jackass am a smaht beast in mo ways
dan one." "Huh!" grunted Remus
Green, rising from his seat. "Why, Ah
kin do anything dat de jackass kin."
Bruddah Sparks frowned. •'Yo* kin,-
hey? Den let me see yo' scratch yo'
haid wid yo' foot."
Mr. Thompson—Jones told me a secret
today. Mrs. Thompson (anxiously)—
What was it ? Mr. Thompson—The one
I told you last week.' Mrs. Thompson—
Oh, dear me ; that Mrs. Jones is such a
tattler, I'll never tell her anything again.
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
TELEPHONE* BATH. ||
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines.
Subscribe
For   the STAR
For   the STAR
For CONNOISSEURS Only
Can be had at all first-class hotels through
out the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,Ld.
VICTORIA, B. C,
Sole Agents*
Is The Verdict
f Every Smoker
FTER.HIS/
R5T
f
July 9, 1904
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!IV»«
THE DUNDONALD INCIDENT.
The relief of Lord Dundonald from the
command of the Canadian militia affords
another striking instance of the futility
of importing commanders from, the regular army. Previous commanders have
committed the same error as Dundonald
in trying to establish militarism in democratic Canada. It won't work. The debates in the House of Commons on the
"Dundonald incident" were spirited on
both sides.
Dr.   Russell (Hants)  said  he  felt like
apologizing for discussing a subject which
had beeniso thoroughly threshed out.   It
was  not   Lord  Dundonald  or even Mr.
Fisher that was  to be the issue.    It was
to be  the  one that Hughes used in clos
ing his   speech,  namely the word  'foreigner."    Everyone knows, said Dr. Rns
sell, the  way  in which the leaJer of the
house,  Sir   Wilfrid   Laurier,   used that
word.    The leader was making the argument that  Gen. Dundonald  had no local
knowledge to assist him in selectirg offi-.
cers.      Everyone   knew   that   he  was a
mean, an unspeakably despised creature,
who would  avert that word from its proper context! and place upon it a meaning
which  the  leader of the house never intended  it should have.    The hon. leader
of the  Conservative party would utterh
repudiate them if he could, but he (Borden) had to follow.    Dr. Russell said thai
Sir   Wilfiid    Laurier's   whole  politica'
career was a standing  rebuke  to thoie
who were misrepresenting him.    In cor-
cluding, Dr. Russell  declared in favor oi
government  control   over   the military
of Canada.   ,
Sir Wilfrid Laurier said : I have always
been an adherent of English institutions
(Cheers.)    I»say  more, I think I under
stand   British.institutions far better th;n
the  man   on   the  other side who assail;
me.    (Cheers.)    As  long   as the Libera
government ruled, the civil power would
control   the  military.    But  the member
for Jacques  Cartier says that the genera,
commanding should  have carte blanche,
in other words, the members of the gov
ernment were  to be recording clerks f r
the general.    There was a time when tin
military  did  reign in this country.    Sir
Wilfrid did not know what the people of
Ontario  would  say  if this system wert
returned  to, but  he was much mistaken
if the  government would not remembei
the  names   of  Brown  and   Mackenzie.
(Cheers.)     Referring   to  the use of the
words  "foreigner"  and  "stranger," Sir
Wilfrid said: Now, 1 may be  allowed to
say a word  about    myself,   personallj-.
Some days ago, speaking in this house, 1
made  use  of an  expression,   which was
not in my  mind, but  which came to tny
lips.    I  corrected  it immediately.    The
word  which  I  had in my mind was the
word  "stranger,"   but   I  used   another
word.    Sir,  in  my experience  of many
years I never heard it called in question
until  this  day  that a  man  may not be
allowed  an  opportunity to correct a slip
of the tongue.   T have heard slips of the
tongue  more  than  once.    I have heard
one  today.     I heard  one yesterday.    I
have  been   told  that my  meaning was
insulting and offensive.    I have been in
this house   for   many  years.    I am not
conscious that I ever deliberately used an
offensive  word  toward  any man or any
class.    (Cheers.)    I have been*told today
on  the floor of this house  twice   that
when   I  used the word 'foreigner' there'
was in  my heart a sinister motive, there
was in  my  heart a feeling which found
expression.    Sir, let  me say this only, I
disdain to make reply to such an insinuation.    If sixty  years of what I believe-
to be  after   all  an  honorable life, a life
which  has  certainly  been  one of loyal
devotion to  British  institutions, is not a
sufficient answer to such an insinuation,
I will hot attempt to make an answer.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
^1
OWERS
are symetrical and stauneh main frame, simple and
powerful gears, perfect and frictionless bushings, /direct
stroke pitman, and long steel wearing plates for the
knife. The McCormick line of mowers embraces the
Vertical Lift, New 4, New Big 4, and Little Vertical.
These machines are illustrated and described in detail
in the McCormick book for 1904, "It Takes the
Palm, I which will be supplied free upon request.
THE
THE A. E. HOWSE COT
A. I BOWSE COMPANY
NICOLA LAKE AND PRINCETON
.LIMITED
V
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
\j
July 9, 1904
A ^»<^<J
I
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T#te Town of
PRINCETON
Lots for
• ••a^ChlC •••
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $10.
Per Front Foot.^^
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft. and 33x100 Ft.
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
Bal. 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent, per annum. *&
W
W
British Columbia*
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tuiameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tuiameen and Aspen Grove.
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
Send for Map and Price List to M S> S> <& S>
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.
9
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