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Similkameen Star 1904-07-16

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Railway in Similkameen will Increase Government Revenue by at Least $50,000.
Equal Rights, and No Surrender.
There are 3.000 Square Miles of Mineral Area in this District, Not One-Tenth of which has Ever Been Prospected—Fish and Game Abound.
Coal is Mined in the Town of Princeton and Sold at $3 per Ton—The Rivers and Creeks are Auriferous—Vast Possibilities for Lode Mining.
Vol. v.   No. 14.
PRINCETON, B.C., SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1904.
$2 a Year, in Advance.
RAILROAD PRATTLE
Competition Foreshadowed in
this District for Its
Ore Tonnage.
Discovery of Scheelite in  Cariboo—
Mining Men at Kamloops
Revive Outlook.
The Boundary Creek Times says : "It
is not to be supposed that the C.P.R. is
going to sit idly by and allow that awful
man Hill to gobble all the good things1
in the way of freight in southern B.C.
and before snow flies again it is more
than probable that the big company will
do a little railway building on its own
account. While Hill is busy in the
Boundary there is nothing to prevent the
C.P.R. building from Spence's Bridge
through the Nicola coal fields, Aspen
Grove, Tuiameen, Princeton and Hedley
as far east as it cares to go. Harry E.
Macdonnell, general freight agent of the
C.P.R. is going into the Similkameen and
Nicola' on a voyage of discovery. He
will probably inform the officials of his
company that here is a district where the
railway that gets there first is sure to do
■a large and profitable business and would
have the cream of the trade in a district
which is bound to become the banner
camp of the province."
One thousand men are employed on the
Phoenix branch of the Great Northern
arJfi there are no idle men in the Boundary. Contractors figure to finish in
October.
President Hill of the Great Northern
passed through Ottawa on his way west
last week from a fishing excursion to lake
St. John. If Mr. Hill could be induced
to try the waters of the Similkameen he
would have good sport and easy grades,
pvlgentleman with the initials "C.P.R."
has had pressing invitations to fish here
but as his feet are tender and he cares for
nothing but suckers he will get left.
There is immediate need of a soaking
rain if the hay and grain crops are to be
benefitted. The drouth has been long
and excessively hot, the thermometer
hovering around 90 degrees for many
days at Princeton and soaring as high as
105 at Otter Flat. It is now cooler and
rain has fallen, but not enough to wet
the parched ground deeply.
About a dozen applications hare been
received for the position of public school
teacher here. Some of the applicants
are graduates of universities with first
class certificates and high testimonials.
Fires have been raging in the vicinity
of China creek, about two miles from
town. There is a law against setting out
fires during the summer season and the
penalty is very severe when fully meted
Already considerable destruction   .,..,,     ...... ■,...,   ,
fbimilkameen Attracts Visitors
from All Poinfs of
the Compass.
out.    Great precautions should be taken
by  campers and  others to prevent fires
from running as great damage  might be
done.
.has been caused by fences being burned
E. Voigt is energetically doing a lot of
preliminary work on his large mineral
holdings on Copper mountain in which
Portland capital is chiefly interested.
Mr. Voigt will be one of the first ore
shippers from that camp with the advent
of the railway to Princeton. There are
few difficulties in constructing an electric tramway from here to his properties
and the generating power of coal or
water is without limit. He has great
faith in the future of Princeton.
MINING NOTES.
Chinamen Work Placers in Kootenay
—Bonding Nicola Coal.
Johnson and. Fry, gold miners and prospectors, have discovered a rich deposit
of scheelite in the Willow creek region
of Cariboo. The provincial mineralogist
says it is more valuable than gold. Hitherto the only place in the world that
scheelite has been found is northern Australia Johnson and Fry say they have
an immense deposit of the stuff, which
they will work at once. It is the mineral
from which tungstic acid is manufactured. The original discoverer was K.
W. Scheels, the Swedish chemist.
The last week at Kamloops witnessed
an influx of experts, engineers and operators representing wealthy corporations
and private funds ready for investment
in suitable mining properties. Coal Hill
and Cherry creek camps received careful
examination.
One hundred Chinamen are engaged
in saving placer gold from White Horse
creek in east Kootenay. Last year they
saved $20,000 and this year is expected to
yield $30,000.
A mining engineer has recently been
in Nicola district bonding coal properties. As Nicola coal is valuable for coke
its demand will be large. Henry Hewett
of Tacoma is also examining coal properties with a view to investment. He is
a large shareholder in the Tacoma smelter.
The fooo.ooo-cyaniding plant at Republic, Wash., which was to treat the ores of
the once famous Republic mine, as well
as the ores from other mines of that camp,
is to be sold at public auction on Saturday, August 6th.
Seventy men are at work on the Slocan
Star mine at Sandon and the mine is
shipping 500 tons of silver and lead ore
and 600 tons of concentrates to the
smelter at Trail each month. The Slocan
district is showing up well and a number
of new prospects are being opened up.
The 40 stamp mill of the Daly Co. at
Hedley is running smoothly and the ore
is coming regularly over the steep tramway. It may now be classed as one of
the permanent industries of the Similka-
LOCAL AND GENERAL
Running Eires do Considerable Damage in this Vicinity—Drouth
is Serious.
Hugh Campbell is in the hills in search
of the  ever alluring metal.    Though 70
-L,years old  Mr. Campbell  is as frisky as a
colt and as tough as rawhide.    Good luck,
old boy!
W. E. Butler, thoroughbred stock raiser
of Ingersoll, Ont., is a visitor .to Princeton and is pleased with the country generally and the town in particular. Mr
Butler thinks the climate and grazing
conditions are very favorable for horse
raising in this valley.
G. L. Mason, formerly of Princeton,
now a Presbyterian missioner to the natives of Grande Prairie, is having vacation and revisiting his friends here.
Messrs. Horton and White arrived in
Princeton Saturday last from the Slocan
country where they have been mining for
the past several years. They report fair
times in the Slocan and there are no
unemployed from lack of work. They
are the advance guard of a lot of miners
and prospectors who are looking toward
the Similkameen with wistful eyes. Both
Mr. Horton and Mr. White are practical
men and have engaged with the Nickel
Plate manager to work. They are both
struck with the climate and location of
Princeton and will gravitate toward it as
soon as conditions are favorable for a railway depot.
A. Morrison and W. Schaefer of Vancouver were in Princeton Monday after
having made a tour of Cariboo, Chilco-
ten, Nicola and a portion of the Similkameen. They are agriculturists. The
Similkameen suited them all right, especially the range country about Dog Lake
and Osoyoos. They intend to go into
cattle raising and mixed farming and expect to have a large home market wyKtSj
a short .period, a conclusion which seems
amply justified by the evolution in prospect from pack horse to locomotive.
W. A. Davis, alias  "Podunk,"  was  in
jtown Sunday   and  will  make his headquarters here in future.
A. Gallinger and T. A. Rogers came
down from Otter Flat Sunday. They say
that they ran into a belt of mosquitoes
below Granite creek that fairly made
their blood curdle. Both gentlemen had
seen and felt mosquitoes in the swamps
of their native Wisconsin, but for real
torment and ready adaptation to business
they have not experienced anything
like those encountered Sunday." Work
is progressing   steadily   on   the Cousin
Jack mine and everything indicates that
it will be a large dividend payer when in
operation. There will be a liberal exhibit of Cousin Jack ore at the Spokane
fair.
Hotel Jackson, always up-to-date and
studious of guest's comfort, is enlarging
sitting room during the lull days and
preparing for the railway boom.
F. W. Groves, P.L S., is surveying
Fred. Baker's ranch, and he has also
recently surveyed Mr. Norman's.
C. E. Oliver of Hedley was in town
this week on a periodical visit. He had
the misfortune to lose his seat from a
fiery broncho and received some severe
contusions and slight abrasions of his
epidermis. He is delighted with Princeton and always dislikes leaving it.
The death is reported of W. J. Snod-
grass of Okanagan Falls while on a visit
to relatives in Washington.
C. O. French came in from Granite
Saturday where he is developing mineral
properties and prospecting. There are
unmistakable evidences of mineral wealth
around the old camp and it would not be
surprising if it should retrieve some of
its old glory and renown as a gold producer. Old prospectors say that is simply a case of seeking and finding, so
firm are their convictions of buried treasure being there. Mr. French brought
down some ore specimens and will contribute others for exhibition purposes.
Luke  Gibson  has a  fine  crop of hay
and had just started in to make some the
other day  when  his hired man lost his
grip on a span of skiitish steeds attached;
to a rake  resulting in a mass of tangled
steel, iron  and   a   couple  of  involuted
wheels resembling the skeleton of a parachute.   Jack Lyall and Claude Snowden '
are now helping Mr. Gibson and no more 1
runaways are expected.
Mrs. Daly, daughter and neice, of Keremeos, were-recent visitors to the United
Empire mineral property, which is being
developed by D. Coutenay.
Miss Olive Lyall has recently accepted
the position of assistant and amanuensis
for the A. E. Howse Co., L'd.
D. J. Starwalt came in from Aspen
Grove recently and is camped in the suburbs.
The prospects for a record grain crop
in the Northwest and Manitoba are very
bright.
C. F. Law had an assay of $141.50 from
a recent strike, made on the St. George
on Bear creek. The strike has added
zest to the efforts of prospectors in that
neighborhood who now think that Bear
creek camp will rank with the best.
J. McFarlane and R. Cramer have completed their tunnel contract on the Boulder porphyry dyke and are now surveying in the Five-Mile country.
Isaac Skelton of Greenwood has been
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Hagerman for
a week during which time he has been
looking over the country with a view to
acquiring farm land.
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THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
July 16, 1904
1 /
The Similkameen Star
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON, B.C
—BY—
The Princeton Publishing Co.
A. E. Howse, Manager.
One Year,
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
Payable in Advance.
$2.00
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reporting any change in address or
irregularity in receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices io and 5 cents per line.
Four weekly insertions constitute one month
advertising.
All cheques to be made payable to
A. E. HOWSE.
RAILWAY VIA HOPE RANGE.
For sinister reasons and for the
. purpose of delaying the construction of a coast to Kootenay railway
certain newspapers lose no opportunity of parading the natural difficulties to be encountered along the
route. They magnify every obstacle and heap up imaginary and dire
destruction of the trade of the
province; industries will collapse
and the country denationalized,
they say, if a well known American
gentleman is permitted to build his
line into the Similkameen.
The writers hope by misrepresentation to create a sentiment
antagonistic to the project, thus enabling the monopolistic interests
which they serve to take the field
in their own good time and pleasure. It is only a few years back
that the local government sent a
survey expedition into the Hope
mountains at a cost of about $30,-
000 to report against the coast to
Kootenay all-Canadian route. That
expensive report was made by a
townsite boomster who relied on a
Canadian railway monopoly to help
.,make his town.
In verification of foregoing statements as to feasibility of Hope
mountains for a railway, quotation
is made from Frank Moberly, C.K.,
who. has had large experience in
locating railways in mountainous
districts. f$He says: ''Lack of
transportation has been caused by
an unfounded fear of the difficulties of railway construction through
the Hope mountains. To make
connection with the Kootenay and
the coast there now lacks the link
between Midway and the mouth of
the Fraser river and to make this
connection there are at least four
feasible routes through the Hope
mountains, viz : Via Allison Pass,
Skaist Pass, Coquihalla Pass and
Railway Pass ; and they vary in
length from 299 to 284 miles of the-
three first named. In regard to
cost of construction these different
routes figure out within a few hundred dollars of each other and average about $35,000 per mile, fully
equipped for traffic."
In the light of recent explorations and on the authority of eminent railway engineers who have
neither townsite, railway nor political interests to bias their personal
observations and examinations the
Hope mountains offer no difficulties
that are not common to mountainous districts. No one denies the
existence of tonnage. Then why
all this sparring for time ? It is
the old story of the fox and the
grapes. The American railway is
looked upon as an intruder in the
land .of the octopus, which has got
more new railway to build and track
to double than it can possibly manage. Paradoxical as it may seem
its great prosperity has been its
main drawback, and in trying to
corral the Dominion it receives
transcontinental competition, or
knockouts from the master hand
such as is observed in the Boundary
today.
The C.P.R. has had most pressing invitations from nature and
men to build from Spence's Bridge
to and through the Similkameen.
All unheeded and rejected by a
native enterprise those invitations
are now earnestly thrust into the
hand of an alien with every show
of their acceptance. The people of
the Similkameen cannot be blamed
if they resent the procrastination of
governments or railway corporations, for with them time is paramount and the essence of their
existence in this isolated region.
The cruelties inflicted upon them
have seared the finer sensibilities
of kinship and they now welcome
the stranger who will deliver them
from the agonies of slow death.
The salvation of the Nicola and
Similkameen districts rests solely:
on railway construction and the
man or company to first undertake
it will be hailed with gratitude and
loyal support.
Enough has been said and repeated to fully answer the imputations of the monopolistic and ultra
loyal press that the proposed route
"has little to recommend it to a
shrewd manager like Hill." Another engineer says, as a final confirmation of other professional opinion, that he will avow " the absolute reliability of his figures that
from Princeton to Tuiameen summit in the Hope mountains a uniform grade of 1.25 per cent, can be
obtained, and from Tuiameen summit to Hope an easy grade of 2.25
per cent., which is the maximum,
can be found. On other railroad
lines the grades are often double
those named."
The Star has an onerous mission
in this valley to ward off attacks
of the viper press and hostile corporations and expose political connivance therewith. But duty is a
pleasure where the general good is
sought and the permanent welfare
of the people aimed at. No political views or considerations can be
tolerated which do not first look to
the prosperity and progress of the
masses ; nor shall the despotism of
a great corporation be allowed to
stifle development without earnest
and vigorous protest.
NOTICE.
Copper   Glance,   Azurite   and Alpine mineral
claims, situate in the Similkameen mining
division of Yale district.    Where located:
On Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves, acting as
agent for John R. McRae, free miner's certificate
No. B72143, and Hugh McRae, free miner's cefti?
ficate No. B62053, intend, sixty days from the date
hereof,  to  apply  to  the   mining recorder for
a certificate of improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.
And further take 1 otice that action, under section 37, must be commenced befoajjfthe issuance
of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 9th day of July, A.D. 1904.
NOTICE.
'"THIRTY days from date I  intend to apply to
*   the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal on the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post marked A. Green's
5^-S. 3, and J^-S. 4, placed on east side of Cold-
water river, al out 3 miles south of Coutlee.
And running 40chains west,80 chains south, 80
chains east, 80 chains north, and then 40 chains
west to point of commencement, containing 640
acres. William Rice, Locator.
Charles Stirling, Agent.
Nicola, May 20, 1904.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to purchase
160 acres of mountain pasture land, described as
follows Commencing at a post situated on the
south side of Similkameen river, about 8 miles
from Princeton and opposite the mouth of Whip-
saw creek marked T.C.R's S.W. corner, thence
north 80 chains following the meander of Similkameen river, thenee 20 chains east, thence 8c
chains south, thence 20 chains west to initial post.
T. C. R2VELY,
W. F. RHVFLY, Agent.
Princeton, B.C., April 21st, 1904.
NOTICE.
Kenley mineral claim, situate in the Similkameen Mining Division of Yale district.
Where located: Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, Ernest Waterman, free
miner's certificate No. B72039 for myself and for
Edwin Barr Hall, free miner's certificate No.
B72040, intend sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate
of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining
a Crown grant of the above claim.
rind further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate^}/ improvements.
Dated this 9th day of ApriU'igo/j..
NOTICE.
Olympian mineral claim, situate in the Similkameen mining division of Yale district. Where
located: On Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves, acting as
agent for Joseph Wright, free miner's certificate
No: B75373; J. S. C. Fraser, free miner's certificate No;3B42433 and L. G. Barron, free miner's
certificate No. B57500,' intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a certificaie ot improvements for the purpose
of obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.
And further tak<2 notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
ofsuch Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 25th day of April, A.D. 1904.
NOTICE.
Great Republic mineral claim, situate in the
Similkameen mining division of Yale district.   Where located : Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, John P. McLeod, free miner's certificate No. B80240, for myself and as
agent for Charles H. Bonter, free miner's certificate No. B75510, intend, sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the mining recorder for a certificate of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 18th day of April, A.D. 1904.
j. p. Mcleod.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to purchase
eighty acres of second class land, situated in
Osoyoos district: Commencing at a post marked
J.L. situated about forty chains north of northeast corner of John Kearns' preemption lot 3098,
thence 20 chains east, thence forty chains south,
thence 20 chains west, thence forty chains north
to point of commencement, containing 80 acres
more or less.
JOHN LOVE.
Fairview, B.C., April 13, 1904.
NOTICE.
l^OTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
1 g date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lauds and Works for permission to
purchase 160 acres of crown lands for agricuUJ
tural purposes, commencing at a post marked
C. A. Joyner's N.W. corner, thence running 40
chains east, thence 40 chains south, thence 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north to place of
commencement..;: C. A. JOYNER.
Dated April 8, 1904.
ORINCETON   BOARD    OF   TRADE—Rooms
centrally  located.    Membership   solicited.
C. E. Thomas, E. Waterman,
President. Secretary.
A. Bell, Treasurer.
Advertise in the Star.
NOTICE of FORFEITURE
To ARCHIBALD GRANT or whomsoever he
may have ^transferred his interest in Klon-
dyke mineral claim, situate, on Copper
Mountain, and about ten miles*from Princeton, in the Similkameen mining division of
Yale district.
Take notice that after the publication hereof
once each week for ninety days, 3 ou fail or refuse to contribute your portion of the expenditure required by section 24 of the " Mineral Act,"
being chapter 135, Revised Statutes of British
Columbia, 1897, in respect of the Klondyke
mineral claim, situate on Copper mountain in
the Osoyoos Mining Division of Yale| District, British Columbia, together with all costs of
advertising, your interest in said claim shall become vested in your co-owner, Thomas F.
McAlpin, of Princeton, Free Miner, who has
made the required expenditure.
The amount due by you in respect of each of
the said mineral claims, not including costs, is
$25.62%.
Dated this 4th day of June, 1904.
THOS. J. MCALPIN.
WTICE of FORFEITURE
To W. E. WELBY and any person or persons to
whom he may have transferred his interests in
the Elbe, Sunset, Maid of the Mist and War
Cloud mineral claims situate at Camp Hedley
in the Osoyoos mining division of Yale district:
You are hereby required to take notice that we
have for the last two years done the whole of the
assessment work on the above mentioned mineral claims as required by section 24 of the mineral act and have paid for recording the several
certificates of such work, and ycu are hereby required to contribute your   proportion of such
work and expenditure together with all costs of
advertising, your said proportion amounting to
One Huudred and Fifty Nine Dollars ($159.00),
exclusive of costs.
If you.gail or refuse to contribute your said
proportion and all costs of advertising within
ninety days from the date of the first publication
of this notice in the Similkameen Star, which
date is hereunder written, your interests in said
mineral claims will become, vested in us, your
co-owners, under the provisions of the Mineral
Act and Amending Acts.
Dated this 4th day of June, A.D. 1904.
H. W. YATES.
J. F. CAMPBELL.
NOTICE of FORFEITURE
To PETER SCOTT and any person or persons to
whom he may have transferred his interest in
the Sacramento mineral claim situate at Camp
Hedley—20-Mile Creek—acjoining the Oro
Plato in the Osoyoos mining division of Yale'
district.-
You are hereby required to take notice that I
have, for the last four years caused to be done
the whole of the assessment work on the above
mentioned mineral claim as required by section
24 of the Mineral Act and have paid for recording the severaljcertificates of such work, and you
are herel y required to contribute vour proportion of such work and expenditure, together
with all costs of advertising, your said proportion amounting to two hundred and five dollars,
($205) exclusive of costs.
. .If you fail or refuse to contribute your said
proportion and all costs ofyacVvertising within
ninety days from theitlate of the first publication of this notice in the Similkameen Star,
which date is hereunder written, your interest
in said mineral claim will become vtsted in me,
your co-owner, under the provisions of the Mineral Act and Amending Acts.
Dated this 30th day of Aprik A.D. 1904.
DANIEL BRAITHWAITE.
NOTICE.
Tempest fraction mineral claim,, situate in the
Similkameen mining division of Yale district.   Where located : Kennedy mountain.
Take notice that I, Ernest Waterman, agent for
the Vermilion Forks Mining Company, free
miner's certificate No. B72038, intend, sixty days
from the date hereof, to apply to the M ining
recorder for a certificate of improvements for the
purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the above
claim.
And further take notice that action, under section 37, must be commenced before the issuance
ofsuch Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 13th day of April, A.D. 1904.
NOTICE.
Mogul, Mogul Fractional and Red Butte Fractional mineral claims, situate   in the Similkameen mining division of Yale district.
Where located : On Kennedy mountain.
Take   notice  that I, Charles Willarson, free
miner's certificate No. B63394, acting for myself
and Peter Johnson, free miner's certificate No.
B63393,  intend 60 days from the date hereof, to
apply to the Mining Recorder for Certificates of
Improvements, for   the  purpose  of obtaining
Crown Grants of the above claims.
And further take notice that action .under sec-:
tion 37, must be commenced before the issuance
ofsuch Certificates of Improvements.
Dated this 14th day of May, A.D. 1904.
NOTICE.
Ada B., Ada B. Fractional and Centre Star Fractional mineral claims, situate in the Similkameen mining division of Yale district.
Where iocated : On Copper mountain.
Take notice that I, Charles Willarson, free
miner's certificate No. B63394, acting for myself
and Peter Johnson, free miner's certificate No.
B63393, and Robert O. Cramer, free miner's certificate No. 63382, and William H. Morrison, free
miner's certificate No. 75486, and. Furman R.
Whitwell, free miner's certificate No. 72045,intend:
sixty days from the date hereof, to abply to
the mining recorder for Certificates of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining crown
grants of the above claims.
And further take notiiSS'that action, under sec-'
tion 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificates of improvements.
Dated this 14th day of May, 1904.
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July 16,1904
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
LOCAL AND GENERAL.
J. Edmonds and Geo. Cawston, Hedley's obliging butchers, were in town yesterday in search of some stray beef cattle.
The only enterprising newspaper in
Vancouver, free from the domination of
railway corporations, is the World. It
recently contained a 2-column article on
the Similkameen and Nicola districts
which is a credit to the paper and the
country.
L. F- Scholes, of Toronto, won the
Henley, Etrg., diamond rowing sculls in
the record time of 8 minutes 23 seconds.
John Bouchier, the well known chef,
came up from Healey last week and is
enjoying a vacation among the seductive
trout of Ashnola's rippling streams.
Geo. Aldous arrived from Vancouver
via Hope Pass on Thursday.
Constable Nesbitt of Penticton has recently prosecuted several persons for
shooting game out of season.
Emerson Woodward has gone to Hedley where he is an employee of the Daly
Reduction Co.
After looking over the Okanagan and
a portion of the Similkameen Ronald and
Gus Hewat have made up their minds
that Princeton district is the best place
to locate in. They have purchased a
I farming outfit and expect to settle on
land soon.
Frank Webb left for Vancouver this
week, going by way of Hope.
Thos. Smitheran, aCornishman, ranching near Keremeos, died, after a short illness, last week. He leaves a wife and
family and was highly respected.
D. O. Day, when last heard from, was
at Nelson.
H. McDiarmid has recently arrived
from outside points and is glad to be back
to sunny Similkameen where the prospects are brighter than in most sections.
Hon. Charles Fitzpatrick has introduced an amendment to the Election Act
providing that the returning officer shall
fix the dates for holding the elections in
ComOx-Atlin, Kootenay and Yale-Cariboo.
A General Banking Business
A general banking business transacted
by the Bank of Hamilton. Capital
all paid up, $2,229,280.00. Reserve fund
and surplus profits, $2,067,080.95. Interest allowed on Savings bank deposits of
one dollar arid upwards from date of dc •
posit to date of withdrawal. A. H
SKEY, Agent, Kamloops, B.C.
MifleralExhibit
Spokane Fair Oct. 3=9
Prospectors and others are invited to
contribute mineral specimens for an exhibit at the Spokane Fair. Specimens
should be of about 25 lbs. weight with
names of claim and owner attached. Specimens will be received by C. E. Thomas,
F. W. Groves and at the Mining Recorder's office. BY ORDER,
PRINCETON  BOARD  OF TRADE.
50   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
-tarVettttdp is probably patentable. Communications strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
sent tree. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive
tpecicU notice, without charge, In the
Scientific American.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir-
culation of nny scientific journal. Terms, ?3 a
year; tow months, *L Sold by all newsdealers.
MUNN & Co.36,Broadway New York
Branch Office. 625 F St* Washington, D. C.
R. Ha ROGERS
M.A., B.C.I,.
SOLICITOR
CONVEYANCER
NOTARY PUBLIC, Etc.
OLALLA P.O.
Simikameen, B.C.
ban
<&w.
s,
KG COOPER
Harness, Saddles, HpBJ
MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
Harness of any Description and any Price Made to Order—Send for Prices.
[Established 12 years in Vernon.]
KELOWNA, B.C.    1
gjmTFreight Prepaid to Penticton on all Orders front
Princeton and Vicinity.
>*>.■
F. W. GROVES
A. R. COLL., SC. D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL IAND SURVEYOR.
-UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON,     -   -     B. C.
PELLEW-HARVEY,
BRYANT   &    OILMAN,
PROVINCIAL
ASSAYERS
THE  VANCOUVER  ASSAY   OFFICE,
ESTABLISHED 1890.
Analysis of Coal and Fireclay a Specialty*
Complete Coking Quality Tests.
Reliable PLATINUM Assays.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
J. PIERCY & Co.,
WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS
VICTORIA, B. C
MANUFACTURERS OF
Clothing, Top Shirts and
Underwear*
JAS. CLARK
WATCHMAKER
and JEWELLER
ALL   WORK WARRANTED
Hedley and Princeton
A
Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods   Milling Co'y,
Combine to produce the finest grade
of flour on the market.
Try Best   Patent  Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
*-€>••
HEDLEY CITY STORE
A Complete New Stock of General flerchan-
dise always on hand,
CONSISTING OF A FULL LINE OF
jf
Groceries, Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes; also 9
Builder's  Supplies, Shingles, Doors, Windows, Paints, Wall J\
Paper, Hardware, Stoves, Nails, Drill Steel, T
Harness and Saddlery. w
Headquarters for Enderby Hungarian Flour,. Northwest Oats, &c l£
a J. A. SCHUBERT. . f
Wood,
Vallance &
Leggat,
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Sherwin-Williams'
Paints
Limited.
MCRALO'S 1st quality
Cold Water Sanitary Calcimo
VANCOUVER, B. C.
MffiH^In  WALL  FINISH
mlUrOlO   WALL   FINISH
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its dura-
bility, pretty tints, and the easy mode of mixing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. Ask your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
VANCOUVER. B. C.
The Vancouver Breweries, Ltd.
BREWERS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer    & Alexandra Stout
Queen Beer      &> Alexandra Ale
For sale throughout British Columbia in all the first-
class Hotels, Liquor Stores and Saloons,
The Amalgamated
DOERING & MARSTRAND & RED CROSS BREWERIES,
VANCOUVEP, B. C
\
i
 (H
waaammm
amrn.
mmmmm
PRP
mam
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
MINING NOTES.
Improvements and additions to the
mine equipment of the Granby Co. at
Phoenix, which are now being arranged
for by the management, are expected to
require the expenditure of about $150,-
000 in this camp before the year is out.
Some of the improvements to be made
are two large ore bins to receive the ore
for shipping purposes from each of the
two tunnels, which will have a capacity
of some 3000 tons each.
Ore shipments from the different mines
of the Boundary for the year so far now
run considerably over 400,000 tons. For
the weiek ending July 2 the tonnage from
the several low grade mines is as follows:
Granby mines to Granby smelter, 12,180
tons; Mother Lode to Greenwood smelter,
3848 tons; Emma to Trail and Nelson
smelters, 103 tons4 Oro Denoro to Granby
smelter, 363 tons; No. 37 to Granby
smelter, 132 tons; total for week, 16,546
tons; total for the year to date, 413,007
tons. The Granby smelter has treated
a total of 312,795 tons sovfar this year.
A controlling interest in the Rockland
group-of .three copper claims in the Slocan country, four miles south of Silver-
ton, has been sold to eastern people, and
18 men will be put to work upon the property immediately. Jas. W. Hamilton,
of Spokane has been made superintendent. The .mine is one of the oldest •discoveries in the Slocan country, and about
$37,000 has been expended in development work. A vein 200 feet wide of low
grade copper ore has been uncovered and
800,000 tons, of ore are blocked out. The
mine has been idle for two years.
June 30th is the end of the fiscal year
of the Granby Consolidated Company,
when the annual clearing up at the works
and such repairs made as may be necessary. The smelter will resume in a few
days when 2000 tons daily will be handled".
Humorous.
Mr. Stubbs—Look here, Maria, why is
our daughter's head so full of nonsense
these days? Mrs. Stubbs—Why, John,
she's been putting her curls up in comic
papers.
Tom—But isn't your love for Miss
Plainum rather sudden ? Jack—I sup
pose so. But, you see, her rich aunt died
rather suddenly.
Mistress (to pretty housemaid)—By the
way, Mary, should my husband ever attempt, to kiss you, just box his ears
soundly. Maid—Shure, ma'am, he's felt
the weight of me hand twice already.
Fussy Man (hurrying into a newspaper
office)—I've lost my spectacles somewhere, and I want to advertise for them,
but I can't see to write without them,
you know." Advertising Clerk (likely to
be business manager some day)—I will
write that ad. for you, sir. Any marks
on them ? Fussy man—Yes, yes. Gold-
rimmed, lenses different focus, and letters
L.O.C. on inside. Insert it three times."
Advertising Clerk—Yes, sir. Five dollars, please; Fussy Man—Here it.is.
Advertising Clerk—Thanks. It gives me
sir, great pleasure to inform you, sir, that
your spectacles are on the top of your
head. Fussy Man—My stars ! So they
are. Why didn't you say so before?
Advertising Clerk—Business before pleasure, you know.
Yeast—He bought his automobile on
the installment plan. Crimsonbeak—
And the way he runs it, I expect to hear
of him being taken to the hospital in the
same way some day.
Joe—One of the carpenters who is
working on my new house drove 123 nails
in one minute yesterday afternoon. Josh
—Hush! Don't let the police hear about
it.   They'll arrest him for fast driving.
Just opened
COMMERCIAL
HOTEL
First Class Dining Room
July 16, 1904
Newly Fitted
Hedley
City    I
Good Bcos
July 16, 1904
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
m®
m
 No Chinese Employed.	
BEST BRANDS LIQUORS AND CIGARS ALWAYS IN STOCK
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO TRAVELLERS.
HUSTON & McLEAN, Proprietors
>
For CONNOISSEURS Only. |
Can be had at all first-class hotels through
out the  province.
F. P. RITHET & CO., Ld.
VICTORIA, B. m
Sole Agents.
1 ll villi 1 n
Largest Sale in Canada
Straight
Party
Lines
WE ARE EXCLUSIVELY
SHOEMAKERS
AND CAN GUARANTEE
Style, Comfort and Durability
IN FOOTWEAR
MANUFACTURED
BY US.
THAMES
HOLD EN
rf?j.      Company
OF MONTREAL, LTD.
VANCOUVER   B.C.
DRIARD HOTEL
NICOLA LAKE
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
TELEPHONE* BATH.     ||
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines.
Subscribe
For   the STAR
For   the STAR
"A  GOOD H^ND
9%
AT CRITICIZING
aOGAB^-:
WILL ALWAYS
RECOMMEND
M
m
m
1        ;
v
/Vntreal'
Marvellous Cures by a Scotchman.
The marvellous cures effected by William Rae, a Scotch miner, living at Blan-
t}'re, a little village near Glasgow, has
created a sensation. Special correspondents have written columns telling how
the halt were cured and the deformed
made straight by an old man whose medical knowledge was limited by a cursory
study of a handbook. His cottage presented a remarkable sight daily. Crowds
of people, some on crutches, others hobbling aldng with walking sticks, but all
filled with hope of being cured, besieged
the former miner, who is devoting twelve
hours daily to treating patients. One instance of Rae's methods was given by a
highly veracious correspondent as follows : ''The patient was a little boy who
could not walk here. Said Rae : 'This is
a case of a dislocated hip; the doctors
call it disease, but it is not.' He made
the bo}' lie down; then suddenly seizing
the limb he gave it a jerk. There was a
sharp crack, a sharper cry f:om the boy,
and before the latter's mother, who was
present, could recover from her astonishment, her child was walking about the
room delightedly waving his discarded
weighted boot in the air. Another case
termed typical was described as that of
a girl who was a hunchback. In this instance the mother was not permitted to
be with the child, but a quarter of an
hour later the child came out of the cottage "straight as a die" and sobbed out
her happiness on her mother's shoulder.
To all alike he charges half a guinea.
A Novel Fire Alarm.
A good way to prevent yourself from
being burned to death in your house is to
have on hand a large supply of' dynamite
firecrackers. Commenting on this theory
Chief Horton of the Baltimore fire department says : About the best fire detectives are large dynamite crackers. I have
these distributed .all over my house.
The idea is decidedly practicable. One
of the crackers is attached to a length of
wire, and it is then suspended from some
place where it is likely to be useful. I
have these crackers hanging from the
roof of the cellar, from the ceilings of
the stairways, from under the padded
seats of the chairs and sofas—everv place
where they can be conveniently put and
are likely to be of use. The idea is simply this : If a fire breaks out it can't
make much headway before it reaches
one of the crackers, and the explosion
gives the alarm. There is no danger from
the dynamite cracker. It is a good plan
to keep a couple of them in a wardrobe
where there are a number of garments.
The probabilities are that if a fire took
place the force of the detective cracker
going off would extinguish the blaze. I
have fixed up hundreds of these crackers
for various persons and advise their use
where a fire is likely to get considerable
headway before it is discovered.
Mule Gives Birth to a Foal.
The offspring of two different species,
when such offspring is possible, is usually
sterile. It is this fact which renders *i
general mixture of species impossible,
and it was relied upon by the early op-
ponents of Darwin to show the falsity of
his theory of the origin of species. One
of our most familiar hybrids, the mule,
usually follows the law of species with
great rigidity. Much interest, therefore,
attaches to the news that an Egyptian
mule has recently given birth to a foal.
Even here, however, the father was not
another mule, but a donkey. Whether
the new hybrid will be the progenitor of
a species remains to be seen. Probably
the law of sterility, though suspended for
one generation, will appear in the next
and preclude such an interesting result.
—Literary Digest.
I
NTS
Of excellence which characterize the
McCORMICK
LINE   OF   MOWERS
are symetrical and staunch main frame, simple and
powerful gears, perfect and frictionless bushings, direct
stroke pitman, and. long steel wearing plates for the
knife. The McCormick line of mowers embraces the
Vertical Lift, New 4, New Big 4, and Little Vertical.
These machines are illustrated and described in detail
in the McCormick book for 1904, "It Takes the
Palm," which will be supplied free upon request.
Sold by THE A. E. HOWSE CO'Y
THE:
A. E. IfOWSE COMINY
NICOLA LAKE AND PRINCETON
^LIMITED
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
July 16, 1904
V
Lots for
• • •^^dLJ.^W' • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $10.
Per Front Foot.^e^
Size of Lots 50x \ 00
Ft. and 33x100 Ft.
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
BaL 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent, per annum, jfi
m
► EAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tuiameen Rivers. The' BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Ro*ehe River,  Upper Tuiameen and Aspen Grove.
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
ffWWffWfF W WifWifWif
Send for Map and Price List to WM, •£ *& & '*&
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.
31
B
I
ffl
1
m
jji

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