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Similkameen Star 1903-03-28

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 Voi,. III.   No.
PRINCETON, MAR. 28,  1903.
LIBERAL   LEADERSHIP.
The Vancouver Liberal Association decided at a recent meeting by a vote of 59
to 17, that it would be advisable to call a
Provincial convention at an early date.
The resolution in favor of doing so was
strongly opposed by Joseph Martin, who
claimed the only purpose of the movers
.was to depose him from the Liberal leadership. In spite of his strenuous opposition the association decided in favor ot
a convention, and it looks from the road
as though Martin's days were numbered
as leader of the British Columbia Liberals.
Ralph Smith, M. P., is mentioned as a
likely successor, and could no doubt unite the party to a greater extent than
would ever seem probable under Martin.
The result of the convention will be
awaited with interest. It is not expected
that " fighting Joe " will go down without a fierce struggle.
POLITICAL POT SEETHING.
Important developments in political
affairs may be expected almost immedi
ately.
A caucus of the government supporters
was held Mar. 7, when the present situation was laid before them. It is known
that Premier Prior will not permit Mr.
Joseph Martin to fill the role of dictator,
which position he held during the Premiership of Mr. Dunsmuir, and which he
now seems to be   shaping  his   policy to
Hon. Col. Prior would prefer a dissolution and an appeal to the country, but
there are reasons why this would not be
advisable at the present time, among
them are that the new voters'lists could
not be prepared for some time, and before an election the estimates would be
exhausted.
It is said that many favor a coalition
government for the purpose of passing
necessary legislation and an appeal at a
later date.
PROVIDENCE IN RICH ORE.
If it were not for the coke shortage in
Kootenay, times in the interior country
would be very good. The last car of ore
shipped from the Providence mine in the
Boundary country to the Trail smelter, is
reported to have   given a   gross value of
The exact smelter returns have not
been received, but the check assays made
by W. E. Segsworth, which in the past
have closely tallied with the smelter returns, show that the ore runs to this
high value. The values are 300 ounces
silver and $24 in gold. In addition to
the ore sent to Trail, a second carload of
second-class ore was sent to the Sunset
smelter. The net value of this ore is
about   $25   a   ton.   Another   carload of
first-class ore was loaded for the Trail
smelter, bringing the total for the mine
up to 368 tons.
Since August last ore to the value of
over $35,000 has been taken from the
Providence, and the vein is stronger now
than at any stage of the development.
As recent returns show, the values are increasing.
There are now 21 men employed at the
mine. The third payment of J5l2,50owas
due on March i,"and was paid, and the-
•final of the same amount falls due on
June 1.
AFTER THE PRICE.
Col. Prior made a trip to Vernon re
cently in order to have a heart to heart
talk with Price Ellison before the meeting of the legislature. The member for
East Vale seems to be in a "come to
me " position, and will probably not consent to aid in keeping the unpopular
Prior government in power unless, like
the Missourian, they can " show him."
Price can hardly be blamed for his hesitancy under the circumstances, as his
whole-hearted advocacy of the gallant
Colonel's policy would be apt to cost him
his job when next the electors of East
Yale get a say in the matter.
SECURING RIGHT OF WAY.
Charles A. DesBrisay, right-of-way
agent of the V., V. & E. Railway, or
Great Northern, has recently made several visits to Phqenix, to secure options on
the proposed right-of-way of the railway
into the town. It appears that the old
survey, made nearly two years ago, has
been abandoned and two new alternative routes selected, one of which will be
used. The line will come in on the west
end, and will follow up the bed of Twin
Creek, which flows through the city, the
depot and freight sheds being in almost
the geographical heart of the corporation. Several property owners whose
property is on the right-of-way, have
been approached.
Chief Engineer James H. Kennedy was
also in the city with Mr. DesBrisay, and
was looking over the ground with a view
to determining the best way to get to the
Granby mines.
KENNEDY MOUNTAIN.
Perley Russell is doing assessment
work for the Vermilion Forks Mining
& Development Company, on the La
Reine claim.
Pouwels and Bonnevier have been engaged sinking a shaft on their Copper
King claim, and report striking two feet
of good ore. The gangue resembles very
much that of the Sunset on Copper
Mountain, and the copper occurs entire
ly in the form of bornite, a rare thing on
Kennedy Mountain, where nearly all the
showings are of yellow copper.
An assay made from average specimens taken from the two foot pay chute
showed 4.81 per cent, copper, $6.20 in
gold, and 19 cents in silver.   The ore al-
but not  sufficient to   be of  commercial
RED  CHIEF.
J. M. Hitchings and W. Allison have
returned from doing assessment work on
the Red Chief claim near the Indian reserve in Hedley Camp, and report a g'-eat
improvement in the appearance of the
property as a result of their work.
The work in the past has been done
upon an iron-stained quartz lead where
it crops on the surface, between 8 and 10
feet wide, and carrying gold values of $8
and upwards to the ton. Messrs. Hitchings and Allison ran an open cut on the
north side of this quartz lead for the purpose of stripping the vein and finding the
wall on that side.
After digging through the surface
gravels and shooting into what they sup-'
posed was wall rock, they found they
were working in ore of apparently better
grade than the quartz lead.
A cut was run on this ore 15 feet long
and 6 feet wide.
Samples of the lock brought to town
show considerable quantities of iron pyrites, specular iron and galena. The matrix is composed of a peculi
quartz and slate.
NICKEL PLATE MILL.
Carpenters are now at work framing
timbers for the Nickel Plate stamp mill,
and a big force of men will be put to
work shortly building the flume that is
to bring water to the mill from Twenty
Mile Creek.
Tillman's sawmill is cutting the 300,-
000 feet of lumber that will be necessary
for the flume, and W. A. McLean has
taken the contract of hauling it from the
sawmill to the stamp mill.
A CONVENIENCE.
A checking account with a bank is a
great convenience, not only to business
men, but to others as well. More people
would keep such accounts if they knew
jnst how to go about it. We gladly assist
those who need help in getting started.
Deposits received by mail.—Bank of
Hamilton, Kamloops.
The C. P. R. is aiding the growth of
Canadian sentiment in the direction of
government ownership of railways, by
its arbitrary action in refusing to recognize the United Brotherhood of Railway
Employees.
LOCAL AND  PERSONAL.
George McCoskery drove up Monday
from Hedley City. E. J. Dunsmoor returned with him on Wednesday.
Frank Bailey returned ol Sunday last
to Similkameen City.
Jos. Armstrong passed through Princeton this week on his way to Aspen Grove
after spending some months at home, recuperating from the bad effects of his severe illness.
The first copy of the " Story of Mary
Mac Lane " reached town last week, and
has been the cause of much study and
discussion. Mary has already been elected an honorary member of the Dirty
Dozen, and a movement is on foot to
form a rival organization to the D. D., to
be known as the Mary Mac Lanes. The
Dirty Dozen are certainly back numbers
since Mary entered the lists.
W. Dunn was down last week from
Luke Gibson's ranch, at the head of Five
Mile Creek. He reports the snow very
deep in that part of the mountains.
Road Superintendent Arthur Stevenson came in on last week's stage on a
tour of inspection.
Princeton people were glad to see conductor Drigman of 'the overland limited
drive in about 11 o'clock on Sunday last, -
bringing a two week's mail. Absence
makes the heart grow fonder in John's
case all right.
The grippe epidemic seems to have
abated somewhat, and late sufferers are
now getting around again.
VERDICT EOR THE  DEFENDANTS.
The suit for damages brought by John
Love against the New Fairview Corporation, Limited, for injuries received in
the disastrous burning of the Hotel Fair-
view last October, was decided on the 5th
inst. in favor of the defendants, the judge
and jury taking the view that Love could
have saved himself without difficulty.
Love's heroic attempts to save the lives
of others were commendable from a stand
point of humanity, but prevented the
making good of his claim for damages.
WEATHER REPORT.
Princeton meteorological   readings for
week ending Mar 25, 1903:
Maximum Minimum
Thermometer Thermometer
Thursday,   Mar. 19— 41 -6
Friday,-          "      20— 50 1
Saturday,      "     21— 49 5
Sunday,         "      22— 47 6
Monday,        "      23— 52 10
Tuesday,        "      24— 55 12
Wednesday,  "     25— 34 22
Mean 46.85 7.14
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
PRINCETON,  B.  C,
THE PRINCETON  PUBLISHING CO.
A. E. HOWSE,
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices io and 5 cents per line.
for legal lift: of notice.
All cheques to be made payable to
A; E. HOWSE.
MISTAKEN.
John Houston, of the Nelson
Tribune, is oftener right than
wrong in his editorial utterances,
but he makes a great mistake in
commenting on the West Yale election when he says: "Ex-Premier
Semlin won easily as he woulc
have against anyone that could be
put up against him. The personality of the man did the trick
The issues involved had little to do
with it."
If such were the case how is the
Princeton vote to be accounted for ?
Mr. Semlin has only visited the
Similkameen once during the whole
course of his public career, and it is
safe to say is not personally known
to over a dozen out of the 58 who
voted at Princeton on Feb. 26th.
The fact of the matter is, a great
many who voted for Mr. Semlin
thought a younger and more energetic man would be preferable, anc
their only reason for supporting
the ex-Premier was on account ol:
the tremendous issues at stake.
Only men of a low order of intelligence, or lacking in a decent
sense of honesty, could vote for the
Prior government when its record
and policy became fully known.and
it is utter nonsense for the Tribune
or any other paper to try and minimise the condemnation of the present government by the electors of
West Yale, by attributing the result
to Mr. Semlin's personality.
ONTARIO    SCANDAL.
Advocates of the introduction of |
party lines in B. C. will find food
for thought in the sensational charg
es brought against the Ross government by Gamey, the Conservative member for Manitoulin, who
recently exposed their attempt to
buy his support.
The consideration was $5000
The exposure has shaken the Ross
government to its foundations, and
may possibly result iu its downfall
Revelations of this nature should
be eye openers to the hide bound
partizans of both the old political
parties. Only by electing good
men—men possessing honesty, pro
gressiveness and intelligence, anc
imbued with public spirit, can a
good and stable government be
formed in B. C. or any other prov
ince.
Let us set a higher standard for
our public men, and insist on them
reaching it.
STRIKES.
The coal and railway barons of |
B. C. seem to have trouoles of their
own these days. Following the
Fernie strike the Dunsmuir mine
at Extension is closed indefinitely
because the miners insisted on join-
g the Western Federation of Min-
s.
Now the C. P. R. is going up
against the United Brotherhood of
Railway Employees, and freight
traffic is badly blocked.
When the workers get wise po:
litically, the dictation of monopolists and autocrats will be at an
end . In the meantime they must
suffer and learn.
FOLLOW THE ORE.
In the early stages of the development of a mine there is one safe
rule to be guided by. It is this
Follow your ore. The vein may
outcrop for a long distance and ore
may b; found at the surface, but
this does not justify a long cross-
tunnel to cut the vein at depth. By
far the wiser method of development is to sink a shaft or incline on
the vein to a depth of 100 feet, or
better 200 feet. This may usually
be done with little trouble from
water, but if water should interfere
then a series of prospect holes sunk
as deeply as possible on the vein
would be proper development. It
is only after the ground is wel
prospected along the course of the
vein to such depth as may be pos
"ble economically that the long
cross-cut tunnel is justified. The
object in mining should be the
same as iu any other business—to
get the best results for the least expense. Keep the asset (ore in I
sight) side of the account well
ahead of the expense account ifl
possible. When this is not possible then   make   the best   showing
possible with the money in hand
and this cannot usually be, in fact
is seldom, done by driving a long
cross-cut tunnel to tap a vein, the
value, dip, width, or even sometimes the strike of which has not
yet been determined. When the
vein has been developed from the
surface to some depth, the expensive cross-cut tunnel may be undertaken with some knowledge of wha :
may be encountered, but until the
vein is reached not one foot of pay
ground is developed, while pros
pecting on the vein rapidly increases the measurable assets. One of |
the first rules of mining, and a safe
one, is to follow the ore.—Spokane
Mining.
CHURCH   NOTICE.
Mar. 1. Princeton—Service n a.m.   Si
day School 10 a.m.
"       Granite Creek—Service 7:30 p.
Mar. 8. Nickel Plate mine—Service 2
p. m.; Healey City 7 p. m.
" 15. Princeton—Service  ir a. m.
NOTICE.
A sitting of the County Court will be
held at Princeton on Thursday, April 23,
1903.
By Order,
HUGH HUNTER,
Registrar County Court-
Princeton, Feb. 28th, 1903.
Notice   of Forfeiture.
ed»io
.50 in labour and improvements upon the
of the Mineral Act, and   if within ninety
daysf
om the date of this notice you  fail or re
contribute vour p. oportion of the above
the Mineral Act, 1900."
d at Princeton, B. C, this 7th day of Feb-
my-*
Jno. Patterson.
'       Granite Creek—Service 7:30 p.m
' 22. Princeton—Service 7:30 p. m.; S
Schcol 3:30 p.m.
1 29. Princeton—Service
School 1
3:30 p.n
Granite   Creek
.-.-.RUBBER STAriPS.-.-.
Seals, Stencils, Price Markers, Printing Wheels, Numbering Machines,
Band Dating and Numbering Stamps,
Check Perforators, Rubber Type, Printing Presses, &c, &c.
FRANKLIN  STAHP WORKS,
Vancouver, B. C.
Notice of Forfeiture.
To John Lamont and James Jacobs, or to wh<
Dated at P
rinceton, B. C , t
his 24th d
ay of Jan
1903.
Mic
TNO
Hpf
L Foy.
a-18
OB
Ryder.
NOTICE.
'THIRTY d
ays from date
inte
nd
ids
for a license
foUowimf
described la
ds:—
Situate in
nbia, about foui
n the east bank
ft th«
lilkameen
And runni
Q#re?.ch\alSSaim
the soutl
side of CO
, 80 c
s south, 80
Located this 5th day of March, 1903.
NOTICE.
I, J. E. Bate, Free  1
e above clai
: notice that acu<
mmenced before
F. W. GROVES,
A. R. COI.I.., SC. D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON.     -   -     B. C.
For    Connoisseurs   Only.
Can be had at all first-class hotels throughout the  province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,Ld.
VICTORIA, B. C,
Sole Agents*
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
NELSON LIBERAL ASSOOIATION
Requests the Government to Operate
East Kootenay Coal Reserves.
There was a good attendance at
the Liberal Association's special
meeting last evening for the purpose of discussing the resolution re
government operation of the coal
reserves in southeast Kootenay.
The resolution read as follows :
Moved by A. B. Docksteader,
seconded by James McPhee:
Whereas the mining industry in
the interior of British Columbia is
actually suffering retrogression
through the shortage of coal and
coke supply because of repeated
strikes by employees of the Crow's
Nest Pass Coal Company, and
whereas the Dominion Government have an ample reserve of excellent coking coal in east Kootenay ; therefore, be it resolved that
the secretary write the department
of the interior at Ottawa, requesting the Dominion Government to
develop and operate solely as a government undertaking, their coal reserves in East Kootenay, thereby
conserving a steady and sufficient
supply of coke and coal for the
smelting and mining industry
throughout the Province of British
Columbia.
Among those who took part in
the debate were Messrs. Docksteader, Beer, Buchanan, McDiar-
mid, Deane, Dr. Hall and Dr. Arthur. The majority of the speakers favored the resolution as it
stood. George O. Buchanan opposed it as being on the lines of
state socialism, and F. J. Deane expressed the opinion that in its present shape the resolution would not
assist in securing what the association was really after, an early so
lution of the strike difficulty, neith
er would it place the association
fairly on record as favoring government operation of coal mines as s
general policy, and to ask for exceptional treatment for British Columbia was to invite defeat. However, vigorous speeches in favor of
the resolution by Dr. Hall, W. W.
Beer and A. B. Docksteader carried the day and the resolution was
•adopted.
Copies will be sent to the
ters at Ottawa, to the member for
the district, and to all provincial
liberal associations for endorsement.
The debate thoroughly interested the large audience, and similar
discussions will be a feature of all
future meetings of the association
—Nelson News, Feb. 24th.
Discovery of Uranium.
One of the most interesting discoveries of mineral that have occurred in   eastern Washington  for
some time has lately been made by
Thomas Mulligan on the Pittsburg
group, says a Bossburg press correspondent. The metal is the rare
element uranium, in the form of
uranite.
The Pittsburg group is situated
on O'Toole mountain, on the divide
between Bruce Creek and Marble
Creek, 14 miles northeast from
Bossburg.
The mineral lies in a contact between granite and porphyry, with
granite the footwall and porphyry
the hanging wall. The development consists of open cuts and two
tunnels Tunnel No. 1 is in 200
feet and tunnel No. 2 is 300 feet
long, the depth of which is about
140 feet.
Apparently the new discovery
has sufficient magnitude to be of
considerable economic importance.
There is one foot of ore on the surface. The ore is also encountered
in different places in each tunnel.
The Pittsburg was located by Mr.
Mulligan, one of the present owners, an old Colorado miner who has
had some experience with uranium
in the Black Hawk mine, Gilpin
county, Colorado.
The incident which led to the
discovery of uranium in the Pittsburg group is rather unique. In
the lower tunnel of the mine there
is a stream of flowing water in
which the steel was tempered. The
extreme tension of the steel tempered in this water excited Mr.
Mulligan's curiosity. Knowing
the affinity of uranium for iron, he
concluded that the water contained
uranium in solution, which was the
cause of the tensile quality of the
steel, and, therefore, had the ore
tested for uranium.
Mr. Mulligan had the ore assayed by three different chemists, each
giving from 5 to 10 per cent, uranium.
DRIARD HOTEL,
NICOLA LAKE,
Boy Solves the Trust Problem.
George R. Jacobs, the 15-year-
old messenger in the assembly index clerks desk, who wrote from
Syracuse to Governor Odell and
wanted a job so he could stay here
during the winter and who got the
appointment, has discovered a solu
tion of the trust problem, and thuj
he explains it:
" Boycott the trust! That is the
way to drive them all to the wall.
Boycott the steel trust—be honest.
Quit the soap trust and go dirty.
Boycott the tobacco trust and the
chewing gum trust—and chew the
rag. Quit the sugar trust and
don't get sweet on anybody, male
or female. Quit the whisky trust
—drink butter milk and catnip tea.
Quit the oil trust and go to bed at
dusk. Boycott the coal trust—the
next world will be hot enough to
make up for all chilliness in this
one."—Jamestown, N. Y., Journal,
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
TELEPHONE- BATH.
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Dines.
Subscribe for the STAR, a%fn?„f£ewstest
MURALO WALL FINISH.
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its durability, prettyjtints, and the easy mode of mixing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. As your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
A convict at a French penal settlement, who was undergoing a life
sentence, desired to marry a female
convict, such marriages being ofl
common occurrence. The governor of the colony offered no objection, but the priest proceeded to
cross-examine the prisoner.
" Did you not marry in France
he asked.
" Yes."
" And your wife is dead ? "
"She is."
" Have you any document to
show that she is dead ? "
"No."
" Then I must decline to marry
you. You must produce some
proof that she is dead."
There was a pause, and the bride
prospective looked af the would-be
groom.
Finally he said : " I can prove
that my former wife is dead."
" How will you do so ? "
" I was sent here for killing
her."
The bride accepted him notwithstanding.—" Scotsman."
Rapid Change of Mind.
Mrs. De Mover—Good gracious
This is the noisiest neighborhood I
ever got into. Just hear those
children screech !
Maid—They're your own child-
ers, mum.
Mrs. De Mover—Are they ? How
the little darlings are enjoying
themselves !—Tit-Bits.
He Could   Prove It.
" My wife," he said proudly,
" can keep a secret as well as any
woman on earth."
"Why, man," exclaimed the
other fellow. " You know she tells
everything she knows."
" Well, isn't that what I said ?
Cockney.
"That Englishman Simkins is
very well fixed, isn't he? " inquir
ed Polk.
"Well," replied Jolk, "some
people think so, but I know he
hasn't a bit of property he can call
his own."
I Nonsense! He lives in his
own house."
" That may be, but he calls it
* 'is hown.' "—Philadelphia Press.
" Poor man ! " said the lady visitor, addressing one of the inmates
of the insane asylum, " don't you
often feel very sad to be shut up
here ? " " Oh, no," the patient
answered. "The lunatics who
come to look at us are very amusing."—Ex.
TlCffilTS
Myrtle
Navy
Tobacco
Largest Sale in Canada !
A Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods  Milling Co'y,
Combine to produce the finest grade
of flour on the market.
Try Best Patent Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C
Hedley Meat Market,
CHAS. RICHTER, Manager.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
—HEATS—
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen.
Wood, Vallance & Leggat, Ltd.,
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Miners', Lumber Mil Mill supplies.
WIRE ROPE A SPECIALTY.
B. C.   Agents for   Black Diamond Files,
Send us your orders by Mail, and they will receive Prompt and Careful Attention.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Hedley City Stored
A Complete New Stock of General Merchandise always on hand,
I CONSISTING OF A FULL LINE OF
Groceries, Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes; also
Builder's Supplies, Shingles,, Doors, Windows, Paints, Wall
Jj||; Paper, Hardware, Stoves, Nails, Drill Steel,
Harness and Saddlery.
Headquarters for Enderby Hungarian Flour, Northwest Oats, &c
J. A. SCHUBERT.
Advertise in the " STAR."
Hotel Tulameen
The Largest and Most Homelike Hotel in Princeton is now
open for the travelling public.
-Our bar is stocked with the
Best of Wines, Liquors and
Cigars. Special efforts will be
made in the Cullinary Department, and tables will be furnished with the best the market
affords.
PRINCETON,  B. C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
$2.00
PER
ANNUM
<£ .5 I
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5  « S3
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+* t I
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«£-« +■> »*z
$2.00
ANNUM
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r 28 i9*3.                                   THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
5
W$fr$ftWftWfr$$$$W
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Princeton's Leading store!
i\\                                    -   	
II
P
1              A Large and Complete Stock of
;
I       GENERAL
1
IS 1
MERCHANDISE-:
1
ALWAYS ON HAND.
1
1
I                           HERE IS THE PLACE TO BUY
1       Groceries,  Hardware, Clothing, Furnish=
I'               ings, Boots and Shoes, Hats and
I                         Caps, Flour and Feed.
ill
11    A Specialty is Made of Catering to the Pros-
II                   peetor's wants.
|             Lake of the Woods==The Best Flour in the
t\                         World, always carried in stock*
1
THE A. E. HOWSE CO., Limited.
H
>^^^^
£*
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
-: PRINCETON !:-
British Columbia.
Lots for
• • • 4^ell C • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2*00 to $10*
Per Front Foot*^^*
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft* and 33x100 Ft*
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
BaL 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent* per annum* &>
Government Head-
quarters For the Similkameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grovefl
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
WWWWW* I WWWWWrf
Send for Map and Price List to «£ «£. «# «£ *&
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION   FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO*

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