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Similkameen Star 1903-06-20

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 Vol. iv.   No. 10.
PRINCETON, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1903.
$2 a Year.
MINING NOTES
Doings of Prospectors in the
Camps   Surrounding
Princeton.
Ben. Baker left early in the week for
a prospecting trip up Five-Mile creek.
Vic. Ryder and H'y McDianhid have
gone to Hedley camp to work on their
claim the Orpheno.
C. Willarson and P. Johnson have been
doing assessment on some Coppe moun-
Chas. Bonnevier has gone to Boulder
Camp to work for the Boulder Mining
Co. in the tunnel being run on the Cou-
W. S. Wilson has been working recently
on a fine showing of arsenical iron ore
on his claim, the Rocky PoiutFractibn,-
in Hedley camp. Assays are being made
to determine its value.
D. M. Bongard and Neil McFadgen
came in Thursday from doing assessment
work on some Aspen Grove claims. They
have recently completed assessments on
the Sampson and Dewey claims on Kennedy mountain, which adjoin the Home-
stake and Copper King claims. On the
Dewey the work consisted of a 14-foot
cut which exposed some good ore.
Bert. Thomas returned Wednesday
from doing work on the Rival claim on
Holmes mountain belonging to Robert
Stevenson. He reports striking some
fine looking ore which will run well in
copper.
Obituary.
It is our sad duty this week to have to
record the death of Mrs. Jeston Beaver
on Wednesday the 17th inst. at her home
on Wolf Creek mountain. The deceased
lady had been ailing for some little time
and early in the week her condition became so serious that the services of Dr.
Whillans were required. He pronounced
her case to be catarrh of the stomach an&'
administered the usual remedies, but hfs
efforts were unavailing and Mrs. Beaver
passed into a comatose condition Wednesday morning from which she never
regained consciousness. She passed
quietly away about 9 p. m. and was
buried on Friday following, a large number of friends and acquaintances attending the funeral. The Rev. Mr. Stewart
conducted the funeral services and Mesdames Murdoch, Spencer, Bell, Silverson
and Miss Whillans contributed beautiful
floral offerings as a token of respect to
the dead.
The body was interred on a green knoll
near the house.
During the last few days of her illness
the deceased was kindly cared for by
Mrs. Silverson who went out from Princeton to attend her.   Mrs. Beaver came to
this.district from Spokane with her husband, about two years ago and has resided here ever since. She was a woman
of many estimable qualities and enjoyed
the friendship and respect of those with
whom she came in contact. Her sorrowing husband has the heartfelt sympathy
of the whole community in his great
bereavement.
Annie L.
Claude Snowden reports that a partner
of Pat Kennedy's, named Smith, has uncovered a promising body of ore on the
Annie L. claim on Copper mountain in
doing assessment work.
He has run an open cut for forty feet
in a bluish quartz carrying considerable
iron and yellow copper. From appearances the ore would run from 2x/z to 3 per
cent in copper.
The quartz is very similar in appearance to that found on the Lone Pine
claim lower down the hill belonging to
Snowden Bros., from which gold assays
running  from   a   trace to $96  are   ob-
CONTINUE DRILLIMG
Vermilion Forks Co. Preparing to Further Explore Coal Lands.
Mr. Ernest Waterman, manager for the
Vermilion Forks Mining and Development Co., announces that drilling operations will begin Monday on the town-
site and the hole started last fall will be
continued down until the big seam cut
opposite the pit is reached. After this
has been done a second hole will be sunk
near the Tulameen river on the opposite
side of the town.
The company also hold several leases
about five miles up the Similkameen,
which they intend drilling on later in the
; Mr. Arthur Hickling, managing director of the company is expected to arrive
from England about the end of the present month.
The Lost Mine.
Robert Stevenson, the most widely
known prospector of this district, returned on Tuesday last from the coast,
where he has been spending the winter,
His youngest son accompanied him.
Mr. Stevenson states that he has inter
ested a number of New York men in his
famous "Dost Mine," which he re-located
last summer, up the Tuiamtun, and thaT
he expects tnem in shortly to examine
the property. Should it prove up to
their expectations, development work
will be started at an early date and ultimately a stamp mill built for the treatment of the ore. Assays were made on a
number of samples during the winter
and showed very* satisfactory values.
Ed. Tingley of Granite Creek was i:
town Friday.
GOLD AND SILVER
In Specular Hematite Found
in Granite Belt on Five
Mile Creek.
Camp Macintosh, in honor of its discoverer, can best be reached by going up the
Five-Mile trail to Al. Johnston's ranch,
from which point the trail to the Buck
can be discerned going up the bare hill
side east of the Five-Mile creek.
What appears to be one of the most
promising mineral discoveries made for
some time in ' this section is a lead of
white quartz carrying large quantities of
specular hematite assaying high in gold
and silver which has been found by John
Macintosh in the big granite belt lying
between Five-Mile and Twenty-Mile
creeks. The discovery was made last
fall by following pieces of float up an
adjacent stream. Only one shot was put
into the surface croppings of the lead at
the time and specimens were taken out
for assay.
From these specimens Mr. Macintosh
reports having got an assay showing
$103 in all values. The ore contained \yi
per cent, copper ; $43 in silver and about
$56 in gold. He returned this season
and has already built a trail up from the
Five-Mile and put up a cabin and a blacksmith shop. He has also started to sink
a shaft on the lead which he intends
continuing to a depth of 50 feet.
The lead is of white quartz, betweeen
four and five feet wide where the work is
being done, and is traceable the whole
length of the claim, which is called the
"Buck," and into two other claims, the
Iron Horse, owned by Hugh Finnegan,
and the Ida B. owned by Al. Johnston.
Only four claims have been located in
the camp as yet and only one other lead,
a small one lying parallel with the main
vein and about 450 feet distant, has been
discovered. A hopeful feature of the
lead is the fact that it runs diametrically
opposite to the formation,' the granite
lying east and west while the ore runs
north and south.
The silver occurs in the form of a chloride and looks like a yellowish stain on
the ore. The gold does not appear to be
free, but associated with the hematite,
of which the vein contains a great deal.
The copper is found as azurite and malachite in bright green and blue crystals
adhering to the quartz.
The vein dips into the hill at an angle
of °45 or °5o. Samples of the ore are
being brought down to Princeton and
will be sent to the St. Louis Exposition,
the Spokane fair and the Mineral Museum at Victoria. The find is important as
indicating the existence of rich leads in
the belt of granite and pegmatite lying
between the Five-Mile and Twenty-Mile
creeks, and will doubtless stimulate prospecting in a section that has heretofore
been much neglected. It is a difficult
country to prospect on account of down
timber and small pines.
The new camp, which has been named
Morning Star.
S. Mangott, who some time ago bonded
the Morning Star in Fairview camp to af
copmpany of New York capitalists, represented by Dr. Wells of Columbia University, came up from Fairview on Fri-
Mr. Mangott states that about twenty-
men are working on the Morning Star
and that a shaft has been sunk 300 feet
on the lead, which is from 8 to 15 feei
wide. Drifts are now being run both
ways from the shaft at the 125 and 250
foot levels and some nice ore is being
taken out showing free gold. The ore'
will average between #5 and J>8 per ton.
Some years ago 2,700 tons of ore were-
mined from this property by Mr. Mangott and associates and treated by one of
the stamp mills in the camp. It averaged $12.50 per ton.
LOCAL-PERSONAL
Brief News Notes and Personal Mention of the Moving Throng.
Judge Spinks, of Vernon, G. C. Tun-
stall, gold commissioner, of Kamloops;'
and A. E. Howse of Nicola Lake, drove
in. on Saturday last to attend court one
Monday. No cases were called and
Judge Spinks returned to Vernon via
Keremeos and Penticton. Mr. Tunstall
and Mr. Howse also left Monday for
Nicola Lake.
H. Webb made a trip to Hedley this
Fred Billings, barrister, of Vernon,
came in on Saturday to attend the sitting
of the county court.
Chas. Richter was up from Hedley City
on Monday.
Preparations are being made to celebrate the ist of July here. A program of-
horse races and athletic events is being
arranged. A fuller announcement will
be published next week.
The highest maximum temperature for
the week ending Wednesday was °94,
84.57, and  the
47-57-
Rumor has it that Premier McBride
will make the immediate construction of
the Coast-Kootenay the main issue in
the forthcoming election.
Robert Stevenson is leaving for Kelly
creek to do work on several claims he j
owns there.
L. W. Shatford of Fairview is a visitor
to Princeton. Mr. Shatford is mentioned
as a possible candidate for the Conservatives in the coming election.
A. Green, of Hedley, is up from that
place for a few days.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
JtTNB 20, 1903.
The Similkameen Star
Published Weekly at
— Princeton, B. C. —
The Princeton Publishing Co.
A. E.  Howse, Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
All cheques to be made payable t<
A. E. HOWSE.
AN OPEN LETTER.
Editor Mining Record—Sir : I
note in the June issue of the Mining Record a criticism of two resolutions recently passed by the Princeton branch of the Provincial Mining Association, on which the
executive committee was asked to
act. The first one, asking for the
appointment of five mine inspectors,
and having for its object the better
protection of the lives of mine
workers, you appear to condemn
because it comes from a section
where as yet there are few developed mines employing large numbers of men, and you intimate that
a move in the direction of improving our system of mine inspection
should properly come from districts
having large working mines.
In answer to this let me point out
to you that the Mining Association is very young and there has
been little opportunity as yet for an
expression of opinion on many
questions concerning the working
of our mines. The sponsor of the
resolution in question is a practical
miner of many years experience,
•who has worked in many of the
most important miniug camps ofl
the west, and is well qualified to
speak for mine workers on a matter
of this kind. His object in bringing the resolution before the Association was to induce the discussion
of the question by the miners of
the province, whose views on a vital
matter of this kind should receive
every consideration at the hands of |
the Association.
Regarding the second resolution,
for which I am responsible, I may
say that it was prepared, before the
sub-committee of the executive of |
which Mr. A. E. Howse was a
member, had waited on the mineralogist, or at least before word had
been received here of the interview
you mention.
While I agree with you that a
man in the position of the mineralogist must not be a "boomer " in
any sense, it does not necessarily
follow that he must judge an unde
veloped prospect as he would a mine
and such statements as he makes in
the report complained of regarding
" serious quantities of ore " in small
open cuts, &c, are the veriest twaddle. Who expects to see " serious
quantities of ore" on a claim covered largely with wash and having
perhaps two or three assessments
done on it ? Although you admit
that the mineralogist's reports have
in the past been too pessimistic, the
admission does not repair the harm
done us by the report of 1901, and
it seems to the people of this district that the province might spend
its money to better advantage than
in paying a man to go into new
mining camps  and disparage them.
As to claim owners proving their
properties, you must know that the
prospector's resources are limited,
and about all he can do is a little
shallow surface work. But working even as they have against heavy
odds, I maintain that the prospectors of this section have in many
cases proved the existence of valuable ore bodies, and it is a notable
fact that of the mining men who
have visited the district very few
but left with a good impression of
it. Our great difficulty in getting
the capital necessary for its development has arisen from our distance
from transportation and you will
readily see that the publication of
such reports as that of Mr. Robertson's would not hasten the building of a railway through this country.
Where development on an extensive scale has taken place the Similkameen will compare favorably
with other parts of the province,
the work done for instance on the
Nickel Plate mine in Hedley camp
having proved the existence of a
very large and valuable ore body—
—a conclusion one would hardly
reach by reading the mineralogist's
report on the property. The fact is
he did not thoroughly examine this
mine and left with a very inadequate idea of its immense value.
The large expenditures now being
made by its owners should be sufficient proof of its worth.
Yours very truly,
G. E. Winkler.
It is now generally believed that
the elections will not be pulled off
until late in October. This will
insure a warm time during the
chilly autumn days, says the Columbia Sun.
NOTICE.
THIRTY days after date I Intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal on the following
described lands :—
DougaU'scc
Located Jut
i north, 80 chains we:
E. N. WEIMETTE.
NOTICE.
j^OTICE is hereby given that thirty days after
sionerof Lands and Works for permission1 to
marked "G°Ma<^esSouUila,1f co™menci°S at P.0**
north 20 chains, thence west 20 chains, thence
tou, May 20th, 1903.
G. MURDOCK.
CHURCH   NOTICE.
June 21—Princeton: Service 11 a.m. S-S.
2 p.m.    Granite Creek, 7:30 p.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
_      „__ed to send in
ist day of July, 1903.
And Notice is hereby further given that aft
the last mentioned date the Administrator w
NOTICE.
Wallace, of the Princeton H01
W. Aldous,   of the Tulam
irles Debarro, of the Otter Flat Hotel, Tula-
S. Cleasby, of the Coutlee House, Coutlee.
insfer of Hotel License.—A. E. Howse, for a
fer  of Hotel  License from   Myles Silver-
NOTICE.
THIRTY days from date we intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a quarry lease on the following described
Situated on the east bank of One Mile Creek,
bout 7« miles north of Princeton:
Commencing at a post placed at the southwest
>ated May 25,1903.
NOTICE.
THIRTY days after date I  intend to apply t
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Wort
Tor a license to prospect for coal on the followin
described lands :—
Situated on Nine Mile Creek, west of Lang
And running 80 chains north, 80 chains wes
80 chains south, and 80 chains east, back to pos
Located 25th May, 1
J. MCFARLANE,
"*" ~"i, Agent.
NOTICE.
meen  Mining  Division   of Yale District
Where   located —On   Copper   Mountain
about 600 feet south of the Helen Gardnei
Mineral Claim.
Take Notice that w?, William Alfred Coopei
md Alfred Joseph Cooper, Free Miners' Certifi-
ates B54742  and   B54743   respectively,  intend
ixty days from the date hereof, to apply to
of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this Thirteenth day of May, A.D. 11303.
ALFRED JOSEPH COOPER.
F. W. GROVES,
A. R. COH., SC. D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON.     -   -     B. C.
NOTICE.
Copper Cliff and Copper
situate in the Simill
ion  of Yale   Distr
iff Mineral  Claims,
neen   Mining Divis-
Where  located:—
am the date hereof, to apply to the K
rder for a Certificate of Improvement
irpuse of obtaining a Crown Grant of
ining Re-
1, for  the
NOTICE.
ficola Division of Yale Disl
A Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods   Milling  Co'y,
Combine to produce the finest grade
of flour on the market.
Try Best Patent Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
TUCItfm
Myrtle
Navy
Tobacco
Largest Sale in Canada \
For   Connoisseurs   Only.
Can be had at all first-class hotels throughout the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,Ld.
VICTORIA/B. C,
Sole Agents*
 June 20, 1903.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
Poller Called Exchange.
I read  that  all  the funny stuff these
humorous fellers writes.
And laughin' at their foolishness is <
of my delights.
Sometimes they're sure too deep for
and I can't catch th' nub,
But I laugh at 'em anyway t' show I
ain't no scrub.
But of   'em all for writin' stuff, that
funny, quaint and strange
The best is that there chap that signs his
jokes an' things "Exchange."
When I go hikin' down th' page a-read
ing all th' fun
I always find a lot of his—a dozen   f
An' seems t' me there's none the rest
gets quite the sort o' twist
This feller likes to  give things; so in
making out the list
.  O' things to make  'em holler when it's
my night at the grange
I memerize a lot o' things writ by that
man "Exchange." .
Er mebby he's a woman ;   'cause he's
talking all th' time
A-gittin, off some foolishness or reelin'
off some rhyme.
I'd like to know what paper he's a-writin'
steady fer,
An' I'd sus-cribe an' get his jokes as fast
An' tother day I read a piece, "To Cure
a dog of Mange,"
An' when I reached the end I found 'twas
writ by that "Exchange."
He must be  'bout th' biggest chap they
is ; he's 'bout a mile
Ahead of this hyer Kiplin' that they say's
so versatyle;
They ain't  no  subject   goin'   that this
feller can't set down
An' tell you all about it, fer he's got th'
facts down brown.
Th' more I study on it w'y th' more th'
thing seems strange
That any feller knows as much as that
man called "Exchange."
—S.W.Gillian in the Baltimore American
Dabhy's Sagacity.
The typical Irish carman is a person ofl
much sagacity. One night the Rev. Jno.
Williams, a newly returned missionary,
took a car, in a dubious frame of mind.
He had been invited to dine with some
friends at the house of an acquaintance
whose name he had forgotten. He only
knew that his host lived on Harcourt
street.
" What am I to do ?" he asked of his
driver.
"Never mind, sor," was the reply.
" I'll find him for you."
"But you can't.   Vou don't know his
" Lave it to me sor. Lave it to me en-
toirely."
They drove to Harcourt street and the
man beginning at the top, knocked at
every door and made one inquiry. Half j
way down the street he gaily rejoined his
employer, and said, "It's all right sor.
It's here."
" How do you know?"
" I asked, sor, ' Does the riverend Mis-
ther Williams live here ? And the ma d
said, 'No, but he is dining here?' "
" I should like to know why," said the
Intellectual Grubber, money is called
'dough."
"Because," simpered the Cheerful
Idiot, "everybody kneads it."—Baltimore
American.
A General Banking Business
Is transacted by the Bank of Hamilton.
It has a reserve fund of over three-fourths
of its capital. Interest allowed on Savings Bank deposits of one dollar and
upwards from dat* of deposit to date of
withdrawal. A. H. SKEY, Agent, Kamloops, B.C.
DOMINION
DAY
CELEBRATION
Juiyisl
1903
—AT—
PRINCETON
Grand   Ball    Wednesday
Evening.
See Program of
Sports and Races
NOTICE.
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
l^OTICE is hereby given that the partnership
^ heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned, as hotelkeepers in the town of Hedley
"»*, in the District of Yale and Province of Brit-
:olumbia,  has been  this day dissolved by
ted at Hedley City this 15th day of May,
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Straight
Party
Lines
WE ARE EXCLUSIVELY
SHOEMAKERS
AND CAN GUARANTEE
Style, Comfort and Durability
IN FOOTWEAR
MANUFACTURED
BY US.
TJHAMES\
HOLOEN
Company
OF MONTREAL, LTD.
VANCOUVER   B.C.
•0000000000000000000000000
J- PIERCY&Co.,
WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS
VICTORIA, B. C.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Clothing, Top Shirts and
Underwear.
Hedley Meat Market,
CHAS.i RICHTER, Manager.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
—flEATS—
.-.-.RUBBER STAHPS.-.-.
Seals, Stencils, Price Markers, Printing Wheels, Numbering Machines,
Band Dating and Numbering Stamps,
Check Perforators, Rubber Type, Printing Presses, &c, &c.
FRANKLIN STAHP WORKS,
Vancouver, B. C.
PELLEW-HARVEY,
BRYANT   &    OILMAN,
M PROVINCIAL E||
ASSAVERS Li
THE VANCOUVER ASSAY  OFFICE,
ESTABLISHED 1890.
Analysis of Coal and Fireclay a Specialty.
Complete Coking Quality Tests.
I Reliable PLATINUM Assays.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Hedley City Stored
A Complete New Stock of General rierchan-
dise always on hand,
CONSISTING OF A FULL LINE QF
Groceries, Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes; also
Builder's Supplies, Shingles, Doors, Windows, Faints, Wall
Paper, Hardware, Stoves, Nails, Drill Steel,
Harness and Saddlery.
Headquarters for Enderby Hungarian Flour, Northwest Oats, &c
J. A. SCHUBERT.
Wood, Vallance & Leggat, Ltd.,
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Miners', Lumber and Mill supplies.
WIRE ROPE A SPECIALTY.
B.  C.   Agents  for   Black  Diamond  Files.
Send us your orders by Mail, and they will receive Prompt and Careful Attention.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
MURALO WALL FINISH.
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its durability, prettyjjtints, and the easy mode of mixing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. As your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
- VANCOUVER, B. C
nnnEjggngj
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
June 20, 1903.
DIED A GROCER
The Philosophy of Life as Viewed
from a Practical Standpoint.
A correspondent, says the Toronto
Globe, who describes himself as "one of
the unfortunates that make a living by
selling groceries," inquires as to the
meaning of the sentence in a recent editorial: ''Over too many-men the epitaph,
mutatis mutandis, might be inscribed,
ing is made plain by the related sentence:
"They devote themselves to their trade,
or business, or profession so selfishly or
so sordidly that many of their faculties
suffer atrophy." That is to say, a man's
life robs life of its dignity and misses its
mark who wastes and loses life itself in
the over-absorbing effort at making a
lvmg.
Busin
s circles are crowded with men
icrificing the essential elements
nanhood on the ruthless altar
:ade. It is not that the stress
on of their life is increasing,
n who has anything to do with
ity   life   feels the strain of it.
shu
mt
» the d
rounng
routine of his trade. To care for nothing
else in life, to shut out all large human
interests, to feel in no oneness witb, mankind, to cherish no hopes for one's self
or one's fellows or one's country, to be
content in being only a bit of machinery
in the great grinding mill of trade—that
iato
s trade
against a
and against himself. A man cannot do
the best for his occupation, dignifying it,
improving it, enriching it with new ideas,
and better methods, unless he keeps his
own manhood independent of and nobler
than the thing.: he does. Not to know
his manhood's worth is to belittle that
worth, and, changing the terms to suit
the individual,   the   old  time  epitaph
Just Opened
COMMERCIAL
HOTEL
First Class Dining Room
would serve
Professio
tothegrosi
school and
lan, died a grocer.
: in the same dan-
id their surrender
life the greater
educational career in
versity, if it were truly
, should safeguard them against
1, and even their professional
training should make for culture. But
in everyday life too many teachers and
physicians and lawyers and preachers
have little interest in the throb and passion of life outside their own little professional sphere. The books they read
are not to feed their own life, but to supply the needs of their profession. Their
interest in literature dies, and they stand
aloof from the social and intellectual life
of men. Their professional services suffei
because of their loss of vitality, and the
epitaph is theirs, too: Born a man, died
a—teacher, or physician, or lawyer,
preacher.
Generosity begets generosity,
merchant who is too niggardly to support
a newspaper with live ads. has himself to
blame when the public give him frost.
A country and its people are known by
the ads. in the local paper.—Ledge.
fl
IF YOU GET P
A CIGAR ONE HALF
AS GOOD AS THE
W<i
J'th
50N5&(0.
/ \0NTipL
1
Hotel Tulameen
The Largest and Most Homelike Hotel in Princeton is now
open for the travelling public.
Our bar is stocked with the
Best of Wines, Liquors and
Cigars. Special efforts will be
made in the Cullinary Department, and tables will be furnished with the best the market
affords.
PRINCETON,  B. C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
Newly fined
Hedley
City
Good Beds
 No Chinese Employed.	
^BEST BRANDS LIQUORS AND CIGARS ALWAYS IN STOCK
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO TRAVELLERS^
HUSTON & McLEAN, Proprietors
DRIARD HOTEL,
NICOLA LAKE,
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
TELEPHONE- BATH.
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines.
Hotel * Jackson
■^-vwv^The Leading Hotel--^^w^
This Hotel, having
passed into new management, will be found first
class in every depart-
ment.       •* **
Hot and Cold Water
Baths.     ** **
Hotel - Jackson
Princeton, B*C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
MINING PAYS
Oreat Wealth Amassed by the Proper
Investment in Mines.
Consider for a moment the possibilities
of the mining field as an investment.
The richest men in the world are mining
kings, many of whom have reached their
high mark through the proper application of what was originally very modest
capital, and it is a fact that while millions of dollars have been lost in the
railroads, industrial enterprises, and
building associations, the mining industry steadily advances and returns enormous profits to • those who go into it
properly.
It is not necessary that you should possess a prospect or a mine of your own in
order to share in the benefits of this
most natural process of acquiring wealth.
Today there are good companies by the
score offering their stock for public subscription. The difficulty is not so much
in finding the right kind of a property,
as to associate yourself with promoters
sincerely intending to operate their mine
on a practical basis and who have the
knowledge and ability which will enable
them to carry out their plans along economical lines. There is no branch of
mining that may rightfully be termed a
back number. Just at present the idea
seems to be popular with a large portion
of the public that only gold mines pay.
The average investor will not listen to a
copper proposition because he thinks
that the red metal is a drug on the market.
He has jumped to this conclusion principally because of the sensational decline
in Wall street of the shares of these companies, not stopping to analyze the real
cause of that decline. In a commercial
sense, copper is the coming metal, and in
a few years from now the present insignificant little flufry will be entirely forgotten, and copper investments will be in
great demand.
Take the average man with from JS200
to $500 to invest, and he wants to know
right away what rate of dividends the
company is paying. If it is a mining or
an oil company, paying say one per cent
monthly, it is not good enough. Of
course if the stock of such enterprise is
for sale at from three to five cents on the
dollar, then, perhaps he will buy a few
shares.
But if you are a promoter and want to
sell stock for a" price anywhere near its
par value you will have to show dividends approximating 100 per cent annually—or keep your stock.
Now, if I had $500 to put into something in the money-making line, I would
not look for a dividend paying stock—
and I will tell you why.
A stock that is already paying on
two per cent monthly is doing about all
that can be expected of it. Such a stock
would represent exactly what I was looking for if I had two or three hundred
thousand dollars to invest, because then.
I would want employment for my funds
that would return sufficient interest to
provide me with a good income.
But, my dear friend, you cannot expect
to live in luxury on the income from a
capital of of $500. If you do entertain
such an idea get rid of it at once, and
come back to earth. Five hundred dollars is no good at all when it comes to
providing an income that will support
a family of ten—or even one. What you
must do with your #500 is something like
this:
Hunt up, first, a good enterprise.
Don't bother your head so much as to
the particular nature ot the business, but
ascertain if the men behind it are the
right kind. If you find that they are
people of good reputation, with experience in the line of work that is about to
be undertaken, then jump in with your
$500 and buy a lot of stock at cheap figures and before dividends are even
thought of.
Then, in a little while, you will find
that your stock is worth a great deal
more than $500. If you have used'good
common sense in your selection of a company your stock should be worth par
when dividends become a regular feature
and as you probably bought your stock
for about ten cents on the dollar, "when
it wasn't worth anything," your original
capital of #500 has now grown to #5,000.
But there is no sense in talking about
'"investing" $500, or any othet moderate
sum if you really want to make money.
Life is too short to get results in this way.
If it is interest you ate after, put your
money in a savings bank. If you want
your little pile to grow, put it into a good
speculation.—Western Mining World,
If you want First Class Footwear
Insist upon   -------
J. D.   KING CO'S
BOOTS &  SHOES
Nothing equals them for Style, Fit, Finish and Wear.
ITaple Leaf and King Quality Rubbers.
WHOLESALE   ONLY.
Vancouver, B. C. J. LECKIE CO., Limited.
The Vancouver Breweries, Ltd.
BREWERS OP THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer
Ginger Beer
|9g Alexandra Stout
<£ Alexandra Ale
For sale throughout British Columbia in all the first-
class Hotels, Liquor Stores and Saloons.
The Amalgamated
DOERING & MARSTRAND
RED CROSS BREWERIES,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Princeton's
Leading
store
We
are
Now
'Closing Out'
Some
ODD
LINES
to Make
Room
for
.NEW STOCK.
Arriving
THE^
Am Em HOWSE
Company
:^££S£LIMITED
PRINCETON
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
June 20, 1903.
The Town of
-: PRINCETON !:-
British Columbia.
Lots for
• • # Jdic • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $10.
Per Front Foot.*^*^
Size of Lots 50xJ00
Ft. and 33x100 Ft.
Terms: J-3 Cash;
BaL 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent, per annum. &
Government Head-
quarters For the Similkameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tulameen and Aspen GroveJ
FINE CLIMATE
and PURE WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
wwwwww W WWWWWW
Send for Map and Price List to 9f <& &• *& S>
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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