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Similkameen Star 1903-10-17

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 Mineral Products of the Similkameen and Nicola Districts are Gold, Platinum, Silver, Copper, Lead, Iron and Coal.
Twice-a-Week Mail; Agricultural and Timber Lands; "Water Power; Splendid Fishing; All Kinds of Game; 144 Miles to Vancouver.
Vol. iv.   No. 27.
PRINCETON, B.C., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1903.
$2 a Year.
LOCAL PABAGBAPHS.
Brief News Notes and Personal Mention of the " Passing Show."
T. A. Connelley and John   Speck arrived down from Rabbit mountain last
week.   They have been developing the
Red Bird property all summer but were
obliged to quit on account of snow.   They
drove a tunnel 120 feet and have 75 tons
of ore on the dump.    They have had
assays as high as #36 per ton in copper
and gold.   The vein is 10 feet in width.
/       Sanson French slung a gun  over his
I   right shoulder the   other evening and
I   took a stroll down by the river.   In a
I  little cove around the bend he espied
j  seven  plump teal.   All   he did was to
)  pull the trigger,  the shot did the rest.
1  Seven juicy ducks fell to his deadly aim
I and he with his friends are now pulling
\ wishbones to  know when the railroad
J  will be into Princeton.       .,'.
.      Word was received by Sam Spencer
1   last mail that H. C. Killeen, government
~ proad surveyor, expected  to be in Princeton shortly to begin work on the Copper
j  mountain road.     -'/^ J*~»; ■&■•
Al Johnston, Bill Allison and wivei
out on a combined fishing and hunting
I   expedition.   They go   as   far  as Trout
I   creek across country, where the toothsome "kickannies" are running in great
j   schools.
I       Victor Voigt left for Po tland recently
to spend the winter at college.
James Stott, with his daughter Mattie,
1   arrived last Saturday via Hope mountains.     Miss Stott has   been attending
St. Ann's convent. New Westminster, for
I  some years.    Considering  that   it
her first ride in saddle she stood the
I   camping out journey remarkably well.
The marriage   of   A.  W.  Beaver,   of
Princeton, to Miss Julia Thorndike took
place at Spokane recently.
The sale of the T. Ellis estate at Pen-
I   ticton is again declared  off.   The music
J   of bellowing bulls, bleating sheep and
squealing swine has too great a charm for
the "old man" to now be weaned of it.
I   It is not likely this large estate will be
j   sold until Nature claims its own from the
W. E. Thompson, real estate agent of
Vancouver, is making a leisurely visit to
Princeton. He was much surprised
seeing the coal mine of the Vermilion
Forks Mining Co. within the town precincts. He was further astonished to hear
I the price of the coal was only $3 a ton,
j In Vancouver it is $15 per ton..
A. E. Howse and J. D. Breeze came in
from Nicola on Sunday last. Mr. Breeze
is general agent of the Confederation
Life at Vancouver and has been in
province about fifteen years. This is his
first visit to Princeton. Like many others
he fell in love with it at first sight. He
is amazed at the great mineral and other
resources of the country and "so much
to do and so little done" in the way of
development or procuring a railroad.
MINERAL RESOURCES OF THE SIMILKAMEEN
PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS
Almost Every Combination of Minerals Found—Unlimited Ore Bodies and  Coal Areas=-All the
Water Power Necessary  for  Cheap
Production—Interesting Letter from a Prospector.
Editor Star—Sir: Your earnest endeavor to attract attention to this district is heartily appreciated by all. After
all that has been said there is still groundwork for more than one could write in a
mouth to do the Similkameen district
justice.
The Similkameen can offer what mining investors are wanting particularly,
large bodies of ore. In this district 46
to 50 feet is an ordinary width for one of
the low grade ledges and there are a few
much wider and carrying good pay in
gold and copper.
Taking the Similkameen river from
its mouth to the summit at Railroad Pass
on the head of the Tulameen, or the
east fork of the Similkameen, a distance
of about 125 miles, the minerals are
found to be of almost every combination.
The large ledges being of iron and copper carrying gold and silver, the ledges
from three to fourteen feet and over
carry copper in some proportion almost
invariably, with values in silver, and
mainly carry so much in gold as to make
it the chief constituent in value, as on
Granite creek, where this last summer
there has been found #50, average, in
free milling gold ore, and also as on
Bear creek where there has been uncovered twelve feet of $40 to $20o-smelting
The galena in Summit camp is usually
rich in silver and the lead value ranges
as high as 70 per cent. This ore also
carries in parts some gray copper, which,
when associated with iron, carries good
gold values.
It is well known that the Similkameen
produced considerable platinum in the
placer days. Now it has been proven
beyond a reasonable doubt that the iron
ores of this district, in ledge or deposit
form, do carry platinum and value in
that metal may be looked for. The ores
of this belt are almost universally refractory and of good grade. The exceptions are those on the old placer belt of
Granite creek and some large porphyry
dikes along the wagon road, which promise to rival the celebrated Treadwell.
Recent developments, however, have
shown high grade cyaniding ore in different parts, occurring in most instances in
fissures in the granite, syenite, dionite,
andysite and schist, with an occasional
one in porphyry, often cutting through
several of these rocks, but are also in
contact between two of them, or between
one of the granitic rocks and a dike
of porphyry or calcite.
The presence of cue of these ledges is
generally indicated by a capping of iron
and sometimes by a cemented conglomerate or by a metamorphosed greenish
schist. Those cappings are often of great
width and thickness.
Among the above mentioned forma
tions occur broad belts of slate and sandstone which, in places carry coal from e
few inches, clean, to six and eight feet
with slight partings of slate.
The hills, which are round and easy of
access are clothed in timber for all pui
poses. The presence throughout this
whole mineral belt of innumerable rapid
streams which will furnish cheap power
to operate mining machinery and reduction works cuts no little figure. Compare this with Australia and South Africa
where no water power exists, and n<
of the other advantages for deep expl<
tion and cheap treatment of ore. Also
consider our bracing climate, our lakes
and hills teeming with fish and deer respectively.
All these things have been known by
various governments for several years
and yet no railroad. Only 616 votes in
the whole Similkameen district, where
there should be 6,000.
That mining is destined to fill a leading place among the industries of B.C.
there can be no diversity of opinion. It
will have a decidedly beneficial effect on
the general prosperity of the province,
for it brings with it a number of lesser
industries and furnishes a ready cash
market for the products of the farmer,
manufacturer and stock raiser. It tends
to diversify industry and thus prevents
undue reliance of a community on any
single means of support. It engenders
a healthy, active life and makes a sturdy,
independent, self-reliant race of men.
No miner is jealous of his neighbor, for
the better his neighbor strikes it the better it is for himself.
They say that "mining is a gamble."
That is trite but not true.   It is only a
ble when     a   man unfamiliar with
[Cor
lirdpage.]
FATAL ACCIDENT.
Former Besident of Princeton Instantly Killed in Idaho.
John McAlpine, a well known logger
of Priest riyer, Idaho, was instantly killed
at the Idaho-Continental mine there on
the 8th instant. While engaged in sorting ore near the blacksmith shop in
which a quantity of giant powder had
been deposited for the purpose of thawing, it exploded with terrific effect, demolishing the building, seriously injuring three other men and the above fatal
result.   A horse was also killed.
The deceased was here some few years
ago prospecting and has two brothers and
a sister, Mrs. D. Voung, living here at
present, for whom sympathy is expressed
by many friends. His parents reside at
Maple Lake, Minn., and he was the
eldest of ten children. He was a member of the I.O.O.F.
Why Not be Citizens?
It is hoped that the large number of
Americans now resident in tnis district
will find good and sufficient reasons to
satisfy any qualms of coflscience they
may have as to becsssning citizens and
voters in this country. A man having
proprietary interests here should be in a
position to better protect those interests
when it comes to a "show down." moreover, there ought to be sufficient gratitude in every man toward the country
that gives him his bread and butter to
assist in all the duties and responsibilities incumbent on all good citizens. Canada opens the door wide to all foreigners.
Without restriction or reservation anyone
an adult may take land or mineral claims
whereas Uncle Sam requires one to "declare intentions" and be resident five
years before free grants are issued. Will
"cousins" put on the full robe of citizenship or do they prefer to remain half
clad, out in the cold? Naturalization
papers may be had on request at govern-
With the return of glorious weather  j
and the presence of  fair women lawn
tennis has revived.
The mixologist of the Hotel Jackson, j
has begun a small zoo in the courtyard |
of the house. He has got a wall-eyed
lynx and some prolific hares to begin
with and is negotiating for a trained
bone-polisher, "Toby," to keep the lynx
company and give it exercise. The lynx
was nearly lynched by monkeying with
the clothes line the other day and only
for the timely arrival of Tuck, his trainer,
he would have gone the way of all missing links!
A twice-a-week mail service between
Princeton and Penticton, it is understood
is about to. be begun. W. E. Welby, the
present contractor, is in negotiation with
the P.O. department and, if satisfactory,
will begin at once. So far as known now
the mail will go out on Tuesday returning on Wednesday, out on Saturday returning on Sunday.
 *fr
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
October 17, 1903
The Similkameen Star
Published Weekly at
- Princeton, B. C. —
The Princeton Publishing Co.
Payable Invariably in Advance.
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office
promptiy reporting any change in address
rregularity In receipt of their paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Four weekly insertions constitute one mot
All cheques to be made payable to
A. E. HOWSE.
SIMILKAMEEN GRIEVANCES
In a district such as the Similkameen, far removed from transportation facilities, the first requisite to
enable and encourage settlement
and development is the building of
roads. No matter how great the
natural wealth of the Similkameen
and the adjoining district of Nicola
may be, without these arteries for
travel and traffic progress is greatly
retarded if not stopped altogether.
The districts named have now attained the limit of development
under the tardy conditions prevailing in the government of this province. Individual enterprise and
progressiveness have far outstripped
the moribund governments with
which this province has been afflicted for the past score of years. Yet,
patent as all this is to the people
and their representatives at Ottawa
and Victoria, the man has not been
found capable of carrying out reform in the public works departments be they federal or provincial.
The same slipshod method of half
making roads and leaving the other
half to be paved with the anathemas and curses of those who have
-to haul or ride over them still prevails as twenty years ago. No systematic or determined effort for improvement has ever been made by
legislators. The people's money
has been frittered away without any
permanent beneficial results. So
far as the people of the Similkameen are concerned the limit of
endurance has been reached. There
must be roads built immediately and
a railroad to follow, in these are
. summed up all the hopes and all the
politics of residents of this district.
Ante-election promises have been
made by the various candidates who
sought political preferment from
the people here but there has never
been any pretence of fulfilment.
Some have never even visited the
district. How can any man intelli-
igently represent an important district such as this without having
come into personal contact with its
people and . observed its physical
make-up ? The thing is too absurd
and palpable to require argument.
-Doubtless our representatives have
heard that telephone or telegraphic
communication is sorely needed;
they have been told repeatedly that
direct mail service from Princeton to
McKinney and Midway is urgently
required ; they know, if they know
anything, that a railroad is an absolute necessity for the life and development of the district. Liberal, as this paper is, it will never
attempt to palliate or apologize for
its party or any of its legislators who
are guilty of such stupid, heartless
iglect of a struggling community,
such as the Similkameen is, but
will ever expose wrong whether
under the aegis of the Liberals or
the more fertile soil of the Conservatives. Promises and hysterical
oratory on the platform are as void
of meaning as the hypocrite's kiss,
ntended only to deceive. Action,
not words, performance, not promises, will only assuage the righteous indignation of the people of
Princeton and the district.
A matter in which the people are
much concerned and which has occasioned no little adverse comment
is the closing of the old main and
most direct road near Allison by
hich travel is diverted and a considerable detour  made.    By whose
uthority was this presumptuous
abuse of public rights perpetrated ?
If a road is to be closed the usual
and proper course is to give due
public notice setting forth the reasons for so doing. But the arbitrary closing of a highway is an intolerable assumption of authority
that ought not to exist in a country where the people are supposed
to be sovereign. Near Penticton
the " lord of the manor " has three
gates in about a half mile on the
main road.    Whether it  be  royal
ail coach, freight wagon or rider
on horse, all must pay him (the
"lord") homage by opening and
closing the gates. Outside of B.C.
nowhere on this broad continent
would these nuisances be tolerated
for a day. These seemingly minor
things are very annoying to those
who use the roads frequently and
thus constitute real grievances.
kameen mining division of Yale district
inhere located: On Kennedy mountain.
_ _-te notice that I, F. W. Groves,, free miner':
certificate No. B72044 acting for myself and Joht
McLean, free miner's certificate No. B61810, in
* sixty days from the date hereof, to abply t(
lining recorder for a certificate of improve
Finally, a word of respectful counsel to the official or officials whose
duty it is to have the roads kept in
condition fit for travel. Whether
it be the government agent or the
road superinte»dent at fault you
have not failed to draw your salary
and neglect your duty at the same
time. The road between here and
Hedley is a menace to life and property, travellers and drivers having
frequently to roll trees, logs and
boulders out of the way. These
and other grievances yet to follow
are commended to the earnest attention of the member-elect, Mr.
Shatford, and the suggestion is accompanied by congratulations for
his recent accession to political hon
Dissolution of Partnership
Dated Otter Flat, Sept. 39th, 1903.
NOTICE.
THIRTY days aftei
■Chief Commissi
 following
Commencing at  a   stake (situate, lying anc
fng about fifty chains south from theTula-
:en river and on east bank of Cedar creek/ f"
Similkameen division of Yale district) marki
"".W. corner A. S. Jackson's coal claim,
And running 80 chains east, 80 chains sout
1   chains west,   80   chains   north, to place
>mmencement. a. S. Jackson, Locator.
Dated Otter Flat, Oct. 4th, 1903.
NOTICE.
'THIRTY days after date I intend to apply to
prospect for coal on the following
escribed lands:
Commencing a
V. C. Lyall's coaf
J—ining so
arked N
ide of A. S. I
ith 8
chains to point of co
W. C. Lyall, Locator.
J. H. Jacksoh, Agent.
Dated Otter Flat, Oct. 4,1903.
NOTICE.
enced before the
Dated this 3rd day oi
NOTICE.
1 Marquis of Lome 1
ce notice that I, Robert Stevenson, agent fo
Ernest Victor Bodwell, free miner's certificat
—     379660,  intend, sixty  days  from  the dat
 _>f, to ajpply to the mining recorder for a cei
tificate of improvements, for the purpose of ol
' lining a crown grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under set
on 37, must be commenced before the issuanc
r such certificate of improvements.
Dated this ist day of October, a.d. 1903.
ROBERT STEVENSON.
NOTICE.
located: On Otter creek,
McPhail's ranch.
;ent for tl
e No.
 /den,  free miner's ce
B72028 and Sydney R. Almond, free miner'!
ificate No. B74427, intend, sixty days from thi
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder foi
a certificate of improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining a crown grant of the abov    " !
 take notice that actio
>e commenced before
lay of September,
S. R. ALMOND.
TO THE PUBLIC
romthis date The Sin
1 not be responsible fc
3 incurred without the authority of "■'
or authorized agent.
HILTON KEITH,
The Similkameen Co., L't'd.
Secretary,
ucouver, B.C., 16th Sept., 1903.
NOTICE.
Thirty days after date I intend to
ChiefCommissionerofLandsau_ ...
ipect for coal on the  following
:. joining J.
ehainSi thei
ce west 80 chains;  the
chains: thence east 80 chains, back f
> initial post
J. A
Mohr, Agt.
Located S
•pt. 10th 1903..
NOTICE.
Thirty day
1    Chief C
s after date I intend t
> apply to the
>mmissioner of Lands i
prospect for coal on
:he followin;
A. Mohr's claim on th
a post on the S W corn
r thence run
ning nlrth
80    chains
thence sou
I180 chains; thence w
J. A. Mohr,
Agt.
Located S
ept. 10th 1903.
NOTICE.
Thirty days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands, and Works for
*    prospect for coal on the following
ribedla
sand Joining G
thence running
chains; thence east!
Located Sept. 10th
1 post, In all, 640 ac
NOTICE.
MOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
g?   date ^intend to apply to the Chief Commis-
ind Works  for
iws: commencing
chains, thenc
Nicola, Auj
NOTICE.
1 apply to the Chief Com
NOTICE.
THIRTY days from date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
1 license to prospect for coal on the following
ribed lands :—
immencingat the N.W. corner post of Frince-
townsite, situated about a half mile from
starting,
NOTICE.
THIRTY days from date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
license to prospect for coal on the following
1 running 80 chains south, 80 chains west, 80
 .s north, 80 chains east, back to  post, in
all 640 acres.   To be known as the J   A. Gilker
NOTICE.
RTY days from date I intend to apply to the
:hief Commissioner  of Lands and Works
 license to prospect for coal on the following
described lands:—
rine-mile creek, one mile from the mouth of
Phipsaw creek,
And running 80chains north, 80 chains west, 80
lencement, and containing  640  acres  more or
laim. W. C. McLean, Locator,
Dated Princeton, Sept. 29,1003.
F. W. GROVES,
A. R. COLL., SC. D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON.     -   -     B. C.
TieitfTTS
Myrtle
Navy
Tobacco
Largest Sale in Canada \
 October 17, 1903.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
MINERAL RESOURCES.
[Concluded from First page.]
the business buys property he has
never seen or of which he does not know
the value. It is not a gamble if entered
into on business principfes with a full
knowledge of what he is buying, eithei
by his own inspection or through the report of an expert. There is no more rea
son why a man should buy a "pig in i
sack" in the mining business than in an}
other business. If he does, and find:
when he lifts the sack that there is no
thing in it he should not blame the min
ing business, but his own stupid way of
engaging in it.
In this district, as well as all other
districts of promise, there are a lot of
prospectors overloaded with prospects.
All of them have some good showings,
and now that winter is nearing it is a
good time for men with a little means to
buy. The prospectors would be glad to
sell some of their holdings for means tc
take them through the winter. I presume that prospects undeveloped can be
bought in the towns for less than they
could be discovered and located for.
There is a double motive in the above.
Besides helping to make the rough life
of the prospector a little smoother it
would be of benefit to the general public in circulating some money.
Now that the people have got their
choice of legislators to represent them in
Victoria, it behooves them to lend their
aid and support in every way to bring
about as soon as possible what is
mately sure to come to this distri
that is, booming good times—for they
have got the properties here in abundance to sustain such.
Prospector.
Messrs. Sloan & Davis leave for the
coast via Hope mountains. They art
undecided as to future movements bm
will surely return when the first blow ii
struck on the railroad.
Mr«. James, of the Granite hotel, Gran
reek  paid a  business  visit to towr
this
:ek.
Wm. Knight returned last Saturday
from doing his assessment work on
Invincible on Kennedy mountain,
claim is showing well and gives promise
of being a first class ore producer. It adjoins the well known Ingersoll Belle.
A number of inquiries regarding Olalla
have been received at this office from the
United States.
Richter Bros., who had been at the
coast with a bunch of horses, returned,
having disposed of all.
A. Findlay, representing the Hudson1
Bay Co., was in town last'week and too
some large orders
.     Angus McLean, "commodore" of the
) Welby stage line, Penticton, was in t
j last week.
A General Banking Business
A general banking business transacted
by the Bank of Hamilton. Capital
$2,000,000. Reserve Fund $1,700,000.
Interest allowed on Savings Bank deposits of one dollar and upwards from
date of deposit to date of withdrawal.
A. H. SKEY, Agent, Kamloops, B. C.
R* H* ROGERS
SOLICITOR
CONVEYANCER
NOTARY PUBLIC, Etc.
Hedley, B.C.
Also at FAIRVIEW, B.C.
.-.-.RUBBER STAHPS.-.-.
Seals, Stencils, Price Markers, Printing Wheels, Numbering Machines,
Band Dating and Numbering Stamps,
Check Perforators, Rubber Type, Printing Presses, &c, &c.
FRANKLIN STAHP WORKS,
Vancouver, B. C.
NOTICE.
XiHIRTY days afterdate I intend to apply to the
1 Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a lieense to prospect for coal on the folio   '
Located Sept. 23,1903.
, back to post
:. O. FRENCH, Agent
coal location, an
Located Sept. 23, ic
corner, of D. M.  Pre:
eighty chains, north <
Located Sept. 23,1903.
C. O. FRENCH, Agent.
NOTICE.
Take notice that I, Herbert H. Thomas, fr<
niner's certificate No. B72023, for myself and i
Lgent for Arthur E- Thomas, free miner's certij
from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining R<
corder for a certificate of improvements, forth
purpose of obtaining a Crown grant of the abo\
And further take notice that action, under se.
tion 37, must be commenced before the issuanc
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 8th day of August, 1903.
HERBERT H. THOMAS.
J*PIERCY&Co*,
WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS
VICTORIA, B. C.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Clothing, Top Shirts and
Underwear.
A Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods   Milling  Co'y,
Combine to produce the finest grade
of flour on the market.
Try Best Patent Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
PELLEW-HARVEY,
BRYANT   &    OILMAN,
M PROVINCIAL CI
ASSAYERS El
THE VANCOUVER ASSAY  OFFICE,
ESTABLISHED 1890.
Analysis of Coal and Fife- j
clay a Specialty.
Complete Coking Quality Tes
I Reliable PLATINUM Assays, j
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Subscribe for the Star, only $2
per annum.
i Hedley City Stored
A Complete New Stock of General flerchan= f
dise always on hand, r
J CONSISTING OF A FULL LINE OF *
P Groceries, Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes; also 5
P      Builder's Supplies, Shingles, Doors, Windows, Paints, Wall j\
1 Paper, Hardware, Stoves, Nails, Drill Steel, f
1 Harness and Saddlery. w
I Headquarters for Enderby Hungarian Flour, Northwest Oats, &c f
I J. A. SCHUBERT. J
Wood, Vallance & Leggat, Ltd.,
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Miners', Logging and Mill supplies
WIRE ROPE A SPECIALTY.
B.C. Agents for the Canadian Steel and Wire
Co., Field Fence--=Prices on application
VANCOUVER, B. C.
MURALO WALL FINISH.
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its dura=
bility, prettyftints, and the easy mode of mix=
ing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. Ask your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
The Vancouver Breweries, lm.
BRFWFRS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer
Ginger Beer
*£ Alexandra Stout
<£ Alexandra Ale
For sale throughout British Columbia in all the first=
class Hotels, Liquor Stores and Saloons.
The Amalgamated
BOERING & MARSTRAND & RED CROSS BREWERIES,
VANCOUVER, B.  C
If you want First Class Footwear
Insist upon   =   =   =   =   =   =   =
J. D.   KING CO'S
BOOTS &  SHOES
Nothing equals them for Style, Fit, Finish and Wear.
flaple Leaf and King Quality Rubbers.
WHOLESALE   ONLY.
Vancouver, B. C. J. LECKIE CO., Limited.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
October 17, 1903
A "Boland."
Editor Star—Sir: A strange meteorological sight might have been seen in
the heavens by those who were abroad at
the noon of night on the 5th October.
The headlights, sidelights and occasional
flashes of a searchlight revealed a large
ship sailing through the air. Her deck
seemed crowded with passengers and by
the light that radiated from the great
search lantern their countenances could
be seen. Some looked scared, while
others bore the impress of hopeless despair. One man, with an American cast
of countenance, strode the ship's forecastle Napoleon-like. He was, evidently,
chewing the cud of bitter reflection and
looked like a man whose family and
friends had been butchered by the Turks.
The ship that bore this cargo of defeated
ambition and lost hopes was the same old
packet ship Vallamagoozle that has carried so many defeated candidates to Salt
creek—some to be laid away in the cold
storage of oblivion, others to be salted
down for future use. Ambition is a fine
thing in a public man when backed by
merit and directed in the best interests
of the country, but when misdirected it
has the faculty of reacting and burying
its misdirectors in shame and confusion.
The candidate who for the first time
comes before the public asking to have
political honors conferred upon him often
makes himself believe that the country
is calling on him to fill a long-felt want
and that he is the particular Moses who
is to lead the people out of bondage. The
people do not always see the candidate's
fitness for leading, so they relegate him
to one of the storehouses on Salt creek.
Otter Flat, Oct. 5. Voter.
An " Oliver."
Editor Star—Sir: Notice is hereby
given that a political smutter will be sold
at the Indian reserve, Hedley city. It is
not new but it is in good running order,
except the slot for the money that is intended to buy loose votes and any other
old thing the man with the crank may
want. This smutter is an American i
vention, if I am not mistaken, and
patent has never been applied for on this
side of the international boundary,
not expected to sell to any free thinking
voter in this country but if the C.P.R. or
the Indians should want it in electing
their chiefs it will be only too gladly supplied. The last party that used it thinks
it is a failure with the working class but
it worked well with some of the old-
timers in the contest between McLean
and Shatford in the latter's interest, or
the C.P.R. There is a rumor that the
slot of this great political mud slinger
was "rolled" for $300 at Hedley. Oh !
Hedley, misguided Hedley. Shame to
take advantage of this poor, weak, nar-
row-guage single-track smutter. If the
C.P.R., the Conservative party or some
one with more money than brains had
not put the money in the slot there would
be no necessity for selling it now, but it
must be rid of the country somehow.
P.S.—May   sell the Fairview phonograph later on but fear I cannot find a
Yours truly,
Thb Jari,.
Keremeos, Oct. 5, 1903.
Hotel Tulameen
The Largest and Most Homelike Hotel in Princeton is now
open for the travelling public.
Our bar is stocked with the
Best of Wines, Liquors and
Cigars. Special efforts will be
made in the Cullinary Department, and tables will be furnished with the best the market
-affords.
PRINCETON,   B. C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
ASlyOldFox;
Just Opened
COMMERCIAL
HOTEL
First Class Dining Room
N(Wl| HUM
Hedley
City
GOOd BCdS
 No Chinese Employed.	
'"BEST BRANDS LIQUORS AND CIGARS ALWAYS IN STOCK
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO TRAVELLERS^
HUSTON & McLEAN, Proprietors
DRIARD HOTEL
NICOLA LAKE
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors andjCigars.
TELEPHONE- BATH.
Headquarters ifor Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines.
■*^^^^^^^^^WW ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^V^
Hotel j Jackson
•>~w^The Leading Hotel^^wv-
This   Hotel,   having
passed into new manage- )
ment, will be found  first ?
class   in    every   depart- ?
ment.       or* >
Hot and Cold Water <
Baths.     «"* «■* )
Good Stables
Hotel I Jackson
Princeton, B.C.
 October 17,1903.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
TAME BEAR PUT MEN UP TREE.
Lion Hunters from Jungles of India
Roosted on Limb all Night.
Now, that the political strife is over and
the hot air that overhung the field of |
political warfare has been dissipated by
the cold breath of reason, people have
returned to their daily routine of labor
With eye intent on this latter phas
everyday life I wended my way to Otter
Flat to take a hand in the duck shooting.
Duck shooting on Otter lake at this time
of the year is something to be remem
As I approached the Hotel Debarro I
noticed an unusual stir on the flat. Men
were driving stakes and putting-up tents,
in fact a little tent town was being built.
Two big freight wagons loaded with grub
and camping material stood close
by the tent pitchers. Packing cases j
scattered all around with men's name
large letters marked on them. Some
that I noticed were marked John Dewar,
Hennessy, Martell, and other names
which I have forgotten, all of which
denoted that a large and distinguished
number of notables were going to occupy
the new town. I noticed that an air oi
grave respectability pervaded the hotel,
Even the ' only McTodd was hushed to a
rat's whisper. I thought at first they
were holding a wake in the hotel, but as
I entered the sitting room I was enlightened as to the cause of this extra air ol
respectability. For a foreign looking
gentleman of distinguished appearance
had the floor and was holding forth to an
admiring audience on big game hunting.
He had killed lions and tigers in all parts
of the Orient. His name was Sir John
Magurl, Bart. He had for companion a
man equally celebrated with himself.
A man, who, if his stories are true, should
be known to every trapper and hunter in
the west as the great bear slayer of the
Rockies. He was the Hon. Horace Skim-
pole of Boston, U.S.A.
They had a number of hired gillies
along with them to beat up the game.
These were the men who were putting up
the tents and while the gillies were making their quarters snug and habitable,
the Hon. Horace and Sir John took theii
rifles and strolled out to see if there was
a bear in the neighborhood.
As they did not return to camp at the
close of day nor yet when the curtain oi
night had put the light out, there was
a feeling of uneasiness among the people gathered at the hotel. Search parties
went out to hunt for the lost notabli
The gleam of lanterns could be seen fi
ting like so many fireflies in the woods.
Heavy rain came on and the searchers
had to return without finding the lost.
The search was again resumed at daylight.
Jim Pollock crossed the river and went
up the Collins gulch trail. When he had
gone up the ridge about a mile he found
a rifle lying across the trail. His heart
smote him. He felt that an accident had
occurred. In looking around for the
wounded man he found another rifle, but
no dead or wounded men. But he found
Barney Fillagin's pet bear sitting under
a scrubby fir tree, where he was protected
from the rain, intently watching another
tree, perched on whose branches, Jim
saw the two lost hunters.
A feeble cry for help smote his sympathetic ear. He assured them there was
no danger, bnt they would not come]
down until he had tied the tame bear up
to a sapling.
They arrived at the hotel in sad plight,
drenched to the skin and chilled with
cold. It took all the kindly influence of
their travelling companion, John Dewar,
to put life in them.   Jim got one of the
Dewar packing cases for his timely assistance. The warm smile that now radiates* from his genial Scotch face is
enough to clear the atmosphere of storm
The great men, the wonder of three
continents, are about to seek new hunting fields where tame bear do not interfere with huntsmen's records.—Com.
NOTICE.
Take notice that Frank Lambert, free miner's
certificate No. B77121, intend, sixty days from the
date hereof, to apply to the mining recorder fbr
a certificate of improvements, for the purpose of
of such Certificate of Improvements. .
Dated this 26th day of September, A.D. 1903
For   Connoisseurs   Only.
Can be had at all first-class hotels through
out the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,Ld.
VICTORIA, B. C,
Sole Agents*
00000000000000000000000000
Straight
Party
Lines
WE ARE EXCLUSIVELY
SHOEMAKERS
AND CAN GUARANTEE
Style, Comfort and Durability
IN FOOTWEAR
MANUFACTURED
BY US.
TJ^AMES\
HOLDEN
Company
OF MONTREAL, LTD.
VANCOUVER   B.C.
•0000000000000000000000000
THE-
A. £ HOWSE COY
;~£2£LIMITED
PRINCETON
Fall & winter
GOODS
A FULL STOCK OF
Blankets
Flannelette Sheets
Wool and Fleece=lined Underwear
Tweed and Wool Overshirts
Socks, Mitts and Gloves
Our   Stock of   Staple and
Fancy Groceries is
Complete
iifpl
5    1    8
op
k * k
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
October 17, 1903
■: PRINCETON I:-
British Columbian
1
&
i
L
• •
PW
Frc
Pe!
Siz
Ft*
Te
Ba
wit
cen
,ots for
BSENTPFICESOF
LOTS
>m $2*00 to $10*
•Front Foot* <£<&
e of Lots 50x100
and 33xJ00 Ft*
rms:   1-3 Cash;
♦ 3 and 6 months*
h interest at 6 per
t* per annum* «£
W                 W
Government Head-
quarters FOr the Simltfcameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River, Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove
FINE CLIMATE
and PURE WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
wwwwww w wwwwww
Send for Map and Price List to *£ <& m <£ *&
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO*

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