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Similkameen Star 1902-08-16

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Full Text

 SIMILKAM
Vol. III.   No. 19.
PRINCETON, AUG. 16,  1902.
*£>£&€*&-
TWO
STRIKES
OF GOLD ORE.
One on Roche River and One
On Porphyry Dyke.
J. B. Wood, owner of the Sailor Jack
claim on Roche River, is showing specimens containing free gold, which he
struck   lately in sinking   a shaft   on his
The gold is contained in specimens of
the white quartz characteristic of Roche
River camp, and appears to be associated
with bornite, which occurs in bnnch<
through the vein filling.
Mr. Wood says the lead on the Sailor
' Jack is two feet wide and traceable for
close to 1000 feet. The formation in
which it occurs is described by him as a
hornblendic schist. Two shafts have
been sunk, one io and one   12 feet deep.
TULAMEEN STAR.
Geo. McCoskery reports having obtained an assay of $9.00 in gold from the Tulameen Star, located on this end of the
big porphyry dyke, about four miles
from the properties of the Mira Monte
Mining Co., from which assays of $248.
were recently obtained. The gald
found in a white quartz carrying large
quantities of iron pyrities. Ed. Tingley,
owner of the adjoining claim, called the
Klondyke, gets assays of $7.40 in gold
and 2 per cent, copper. The ore bod\'
appears to be a very large one. It is the
intention of Messrs. McCoskery and
Tingley to spend the greater part of the
winter working on their properties.
A NEW TOWNSITE.
J-
r-Campbell of
I camp, was a visitor to Princ/i
I week. He reports considerVH
in that camp owing to the der
Nickel Plate owners to erect a stamp mill
jfor the purpose of treating their ores...——
I Mr. Campbell, and his associates iu the
/ enterprise, Messrs. Schubert, Welby and
Yates, are preparing to put a new town-
site on the market. The ground selected for the purpose is on the Sunset
claim, within three claims of the Nickel
Plate mine. No name has yet been chosen for the new metropolis.
f      A party from Grand   Forks, consisting
of Messrs. A. Wright, Geo.   Murphy, M.
D. White and   Donald   McCallum, c
up the  river   early in   the week.    They
>ukinterested in a number of coal claims on
' One Mile Creek.
On Sunday there will be service at
Ashnola at 11 a in., and at Princeton in
the frame building next to Hotel Jackson at 7:30. Everybody heartily invited.
Sunday school at 3 p.m. On the following Sunday service will be held at Granite Creek. *
RICH SILVER-LEAD ORES
H    Of SUMMIT CAMP.
Satisfactory Results of Development Work in
the Slocan of the Similkameen*
f Mr. Frank "Latgjjeijt, the owner of a
prornising'claim in Summit camp, was a
'visitor to Princeton this weeic. He speaks
very enthusiastically of the big leads of
Summit camp and the richness of its ores,
and confidently looks forward to the
time when the Coast-Kootenay railway
shall make it one of the banner camps ofl
British Columbia.
On his claim, called summit No. 2, Mr.
Lambert has run an open cut on the lead
150 feet long which shows ore the entire
length, and he has also exposed ore at
another point 300 feet away. Besides
open cutting and stripping, a 30 foot
crosscut was run to reach the lead at a
suitable place for tunnelling, and a drift
was made for 18 feet en the ore. The
vein in the face of the tunnel is over four
feet wide, and from five assays shows average values of $128 to the ton.
Besides silver and lead the ore carries
fair values in copper and gold. About
60 tons of ore are now on the dump
Some difficulty was experienced with
water owing to Sutter Creek, running
parallel with the vein, and it was found
necessary to make a ditch in order to
keep the workings dry.   •,
Jas. Keljy has beien doing assessment
work on Summit No. 1 claim, belonging
to Mr. Robert Stevenson. This was the
second claim located in the camp. The
work done consists of a number of open
cuts and a shaft, exposing a 7 foot lead,
four feet of which runs $142 to the ton in
all values.   ;;$SjxJ2?
The V., V. & E. survey passes within
four miles of this claim, and it should
some day become a great mine.
Adjoining Summit No. 1 claim and 800
feet lower down the mountain, is located
the Sutter claim, which was staked on
the 8th of August, 1896, being the discov
ery claim cf the camp.
This lead has been prospected by
means of a tunnel and open (Jtft, and a
four foot body of ore has been uncovered
from which assays of $205 to the ton are
obtained. This property was once sold
to a Terre Haute company, but owing to
a mistake made by them in trying t'o relocate the ground, the claim was involv
ed in litigation for a period of two years.
This has now been settled, the American
company having bought off the othi
claimants, and they are now preparing to
develop on an extensive scale. It is said
they have signified their willingness to
assist the government in building a road
from.the camp to Hope on the C. P. R.
main line, a distance of 24 miles, the
building of which will enable them to
ship ore from the grass roots.
The leads of Summit camp are found
in a lime dyke, about one mile wide
and eight miles long, which cuts the slate
formation. Small stringers of white
quartz cut into the pre, which appear to
carry the gold values   contained   in the
On one side of the slate belt lies an immense dyke of quartzite showing considerable quantities of iron.
Mr. Lambert complains of the condition in which he found the trail between
this place and Summit Camp, the last
seven miles from the mouth of Sutter
Creek up, being almost impassable,
found it necessary to spend two days
ting out fallen timber before he could get
through. He thinks $150 would put the
trail in fairly good shape, and expresses
the hope that the government will have
the matter attended to without delay, as
under present conditions a great hardship is worked on prospectors developing claims in the camp.
HOTEL ARRIVALS.
MJL, NICOLA-LAKE.
E P Lowe, W Chisholm, J Richards,
W M Blewett, Aspen Grove; A W Harding,' Kamloops; *K Pollard^ Quilchena:
Miss Black, Victoria.
HOTEL   TULAMEEN, PRINCETON.
*^W AJJavis, Neil Ca1apbell.jC0pper.Mt:
Geo Howe, Allison; D_G Hacknej.jfedj
ley Cityj A Sharp, J Hamilton, Bromley
Creek; fiP Cook, GranjteXreek.
HOTEL JACKSON.
B   Small, Nicola; George   Murphy, A
Wright, M D White, D McCallum, Grand
Forks; J Smith, Sterling Creek; Hugh
Kennedy, Kennedy Mt; Thos Gibson,
Portland, Ore; J Jamieson, Five Mile; C
B Harris, One Mile.
Dnncan McRae, P Johnston. O Willqr-
son, T Arnold, M W Kempt, Copp_fir_Mt:
W Alder. Why ton] J B Wood, Roche
River; P Mark, Hedley; J T Robinson, J
L Brown, C A Tunstall, Kamloops; R S
Blackwell, Vancouver.
Offers will   be received by J. H. Duncan up to Saturday 23rd   August, for the
purchase of a new No. 3 Brantford n	
er in good repair.
COPPER GUNCE
ON^ JUBILEE.
Found in Shaft   at   Depth of
Nineteen Feet.
Messrs. Davis and Campbell, while doing work on the Jubilee claim on Copper
Mountain, for the owner, Mr. Robert
Stevenson, opened up a rich chute of
copper glance about 12 inches wide, that
will run close to 50 per cent in copper.
Samples shown compare favorably with
anything yet found in the district, and
were pronounced by the local assayer to
be of better grade than the average ore
of  the Big Sioux claim at Aspen Grove.
Mr. Stevenson states that only a little
copper stain showed on the surface where
the shaft was started. At a depth of five
feet yellow copper commenced to come
in, and as the shaft went down, bornite,
red   oxides, and   carbonates   of  copper
When a depth of 19 feet had been
reached a little copper glance was struck.
This was followed down another 7 feet
and was found to widen steadily, and
when work was discontinued showed
about 12 inches in the bottom of the'
shaft.
For some distance on either side of
this rich chute, bornite . ^nd yellow copper appear to be freely disseminated
through the rock. Copper Mountain has
usually been considered a low-grade
camp, but it can no longer be termed
such, when chutes' of "High grade ore
such as that on the. Jubilee are found
to exist.
LOCAL AND  PERSONAL.
Fred. Revely is doing work on the Red   )
Buck claim on Kennedy Mountain. ,.   [\^vHvi
Dr. Whillans left Monday morning for   \
Vancouver, going out over the Hope trail.   I
Messrs. Willarson and Johnston have
gone to Kennedy Mountain to do work
on the Mogul.
Mr. Thomas Gibson, a member of the
staff of the Oregonian, the leading paper
of Portland, Ore., visited Princeton this
week, coming over the Hope trail on a
bicycle.
J. T. Robinson, representing the New
York Mutual Life, J. L. Brown of the Inland Cigar Co., R. S. Blackwell representing G. F. & J. Gait and C. A. Tunstall, of Kamloops, drove in from that
place during the week, reaching here on
Thursday last.
Alexander Sharp, M. E., left for Vancouver on last Sunday's stage. Mr.
Sharp has completed his work for the
season on the coal lands of the Holt Syndicate. It is understood he will return
next year for the purpose of opening up
some of  the   seams   discovered   by the
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON, B. C,
THE  PRINCETON  PUBLISHING CQ.
A. E. HOWSE,
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Payable Invariably in Advance,
cribers will confer a favor on this office by
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices io and 5 cents per line.
Certificates of Improvement notices, $5 to
for legal life of notice. ^_ .„,„,_ „„. m„.
RAILWAY BONUSES.
As reported in another column,
Mr. J. J. Hill, President of the
Great Northern Railway Company,
speaking at Grand Forks en the
2nd inst., regarding the extension
of their road through the southern
portion of British Columbia to the
Coast, said his company were not
asking for any bonus. He hoped
that people would soon get through
voting .bonuses as there was a limit
to what people can promise, or at
least what people could perform.
Mr. Hill is one of the most successful railway builders in America
today, and he has constructed his
great system without asking or receiving one acre of public land or
one dollar of public money.
It was built strictly as a business
proposition, and the entire cost was
provided by private capital. It has
been a most profitable enterprise,
enriching the men who invested in
it.
The people of British Columbia
will do well to heed Mr. Hill's
opinion on this subject.
In the past the province has bonused railways indiscriminately, and
the bonuses as a rule have gone into the pockets of a few hungry promoters.
Instead of   recognising the   evil
effects of the system, the habit  appears to have grown on our   public
men, and it   reached the climax in
the recent  proposed   grants to the
Canadian     Northern   and    Coast-
Kootenay lines, which   were   only
prevented by a rapidly diminishing
majority   in   the   legislature,   and
a thoroughly hostile press and people- ________
LEAVE WELL ENOUGH
ALONE.
The Ashcroft Journal complains
that very little attention is being
paid to Carib io by the Minister of
Mines or the Provincial Mineralo
gist. Dealing with a letter from a
correspondent our contemporary
says : "The Minister of Mines, we
believe, wishes to be fair, but we
agree with our correspondent when
he intimates that Col. Prior has no
knowledge of Cariboo. Its the
same with the Provincial Mineralogist. He never visits the district,
consequently knows- nothing and
has to rely on his predecessor's re
port, which, by the way, if he
would study carefully, might be the
means of sending him here.
"The   Minister of   Mines   is
spectfully urged to   chase the n
eralogist out of his office and  point
him for Cariboo."
We would advise the Journal to
leave well enough alone.
Some crowd of promoters that
have a pull with the government
may be looking for a charter for a
railway to Cariboo, and in order to
get a subsidy of five or six thousand dollars and a few thousand
acres of land per mile, may find it
necessary to have the Provincial
Mineralogist instructed by the government to find the country quite
lacking in resources.
If the Journal is wise it will leave
the mineralogist right in his office
occupying a nice easy chair. He
is comparatively harmless there-.
NOTICE.
date I intend to apply t
siouer of Lands and Work
:t for coal on the followin;
NOTICE.
*    the Chief Comifiissioner of Lands and Work
On the left bank of Nine Mile Creek, about
lil s from its mouth.
iainS west, 80  chains south, °- -*--
BENJ.
1,80 chains
orth   <
of Ben
Notice of Forfeiture.
To GEORGE H. COLLINS, ofth
wood, British Colum
: requi
d by sec
:e your p<
'isedSl
t-slfBi
ipteri35, F ..^uHFjmom.
umbia, 1897, in respect of the 'Little P:ttsburgi
"Whale," "Bullon Heck" and "Florence" mm
al claims, situate on Twenty Mile Creek, in t
vour?nteres°t1n saiVclaims shall "become ve"
i 1 your co-owner, Thomas B: adshaw, cl Fifie
Mile Creek Free Miner, who has  made  the
.-.-.RUBBER STAriPS.-.-.
Seals, Stencils, Price Markers, Printing Wheels, Numbering Machines,
Band Dating and Numbering Stamps,
Check Perforators, Rubber Type, Printing Presses, &c, &c.
FRANKLIN STAHP WORKS,
Vancouver, B. C.
Improvement Certificates.
noticeT
trict.   Where  locat-
. Rogers, acting as
old Mining Comp-
tificate   No.  Basse,
NOTICE.
•   Where located :—On Kennedy Mountain.
Take notice that I, F. W. Groves, acting a:
igent for Hugh McRae, Free Miner's Certificate
io. B63249; John Mackay, Free< Miner's ^Cet&fr
purpose of obtaining a Cro
f such Certificate of Improvements
Dated this 6th day of August, 1902
A Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods   Milling   Co'y»
Try Best Patent Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
G. riURDOCH
Blacksmithing & Horseshoeing
Shop on cor. Bridge and Angelia
PR
Avenue.
[NCETON,
B. C.
Notice of Assignment.
tothe"Creditc
is hereby giver
nee on the 12th day of July, 1902.
lie creditors of the said Edgar
11 be held at the office of J. Char-
larrister-at-Law, Bridge Street,
hursday, the   31st .day of July,
» debts he shall
. D. 1902.
" Wi CHARLES McINTOSIL  .^^
NOTICE.
HUGH HUNTER,
Registrar Coun
,, July 12th, 1902.
F. W. GROVES,
A. R. COLL., SC.
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON,     -    -     B. C.
A. R. BARROW,
A. M. I., C. E.,
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
Steam  Plants  Indicated and  Fuel
Consumption Tested.
PRINCETON, B. C.
Q
HI PROVINCIAL
HE ASSAVERS
THE VANCOUVER ASSAV   OFFICE, |
ESTABLISHED 1890.
Analysis of Coal and Fireclay a Specialty.
Complete'Coking Quality Tests.
Beliable PLATINUM Assays, j
VANCOUVER, B. C
C. OUTHETT, A. R. C, Sc,
Provincial Assayer,
Analytical Chemlsl.
Control  Assays;   Complete  Analysis  of
Ores, Coal, &c; Concentration and
Amalgamation   Tests.
Results ol Assagsbn Man ol Stage.
Correspondence solicited.
/    Inland Assay  Office,
KAMLOOPS, B. C
W. J. WATERHAN, M. E.
F. G. S. M. A, I, n. E., Etc.
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
[and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C
 JAMES HISLOP	
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEER
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
...Princeton.B. C...
I Wan't ALL work
1    Wan  t Promptly Executed
Your        We can save you money
Watch   on  your Repairing.
Repairing.
A full Line of Watches and the Latest Styles ot
Jewelery always on hand.
W. J. KERR, Kamloops, B. C.
I
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
i^U=
MINE DEVELOPMENT.
Investors Expect a Prospect to Pay
i Too Soon.
It is hard to convince some investors in mining stocks that it is
impossible to develop a " prospect "
into a large dividend paying proposition in a few months, says an
Arizona correspondent of the American Mining News. Many seem
to think it is only necessary to erect a certain amount of machinery
and dig out a few tons of earth and
rock to uncover untold riches.
They do not realize that equipping
a mine is but its first stepping
stone ; that there are hundreds of
other steps to be taken, that will
consume a great deal of time, before the ore is even properly located.
When this preliminary work has
been accomplished, the  proposition
may be said to be fairly started up-
' on the road that leads to  dividends
^or failure, as the case   may eventu
'    ally prove.    But even when the on
has been   located, it takes  time to
mine it, to smelt it, to ship it, etc.,
so that before the profits can  be divided among the stockholders many
mouths, in some  cases years, have
It is just as unreasonable   to ex
pect a mine to return a large profit
during its infancy as it is to expect
a fruit tree to bear fruit the first
year the seed is plarted. Both
need care, toth take time to develop.
Another feature that is often lost
sight of is the amount of money
that it is necessaiiy to spend in a
mine before the expected results:
can be obtained. Mining machinery;
is expensive, so is labor ; in fact
the general equipping of a mine is
an exceedingly expensive -'under-
ing. But can any industrial
business De mentioned that is not in
the same category.
Take manufacturing, commercial
any business of a like nature
that requires a stock or a plant,
and its initial expense is enormous.
But, on the other hand, look at the
profits that a like amount of money
nvested in these different businesses will earn, and the investor will
find that the profits from mining
and its allied interests are so infinitely greater than from any ether
business as to stand in a distinct
class by itself.
Mining is, of course, speculative,
but so is every other business and
profession. In fact, we have only
to look at financial statistics to
learn that the losses in legitimate
mining are about 45 per cent, less
than iu   the other   businesses that
are usually termed " non speculative."
The mining investor should re-,
member that it " takes money to
:e money," and that " Rome;
was not built in a day," and therefore should give the development'
money time to germinate.
Suppose a man had a few thousand dollars and he had determined
o into trade. He would reason
it out that the first year he would
probably not more than meet his
expenses, but that be would establish a trade, and that by the end of
the second 3'ear he might reasonably expect a profit. The third year
would see the business largely increased, and if good business judgment has been used in the conduct
of his affairs, then comes success.
The same conditions apply to min-
ng. Here is a prospect. Prudent,
:areful development work in time
ought to produce results, and where
such work is done there is seldom
if ever, a failure. Mining is legiti
mate business in which,'when con
ducted rightly, yields larger returns
than any other industry or business
necting with the Great Northern at
New Westminster, and will build
through the Yale district, connecting with the G. N. R. at Kootenay,
without waiting for a bonus.
The above is from the B. C. Review, of London, England, and it
is to be hoped that there is something more than hot air in it. As
a matter of fact, the Boundary
ntry has been fooled so long on
this question, that nothing but actual   construction     goes     now.—
Same   Here
Pho
:Pioi
Subscribe for the Star
and
get
the latest mini
ng news—only $
j.00
per annum.
It is reported in the local press
that the promoters of the Vancouver, Victoria and Eastern railway
will proceed to build their road con-
Tucrarrs
Myrtle
Navy
Tobacco
Largest Sale in Canada <
JTOfW?"^
Princeton's Leading Store!
LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED
STOCK OF GENERAL MERCHAN«f
DISE   IN THE  SIMILKAMEEN DISTRICT.
Hardware, Groceries, Boots and Shoes, Clothing,  Furnishings, Dry
Goods, Hats and Caps, Glassware, Crockery, &c>, &c*
We make a specialty of Supplying Prospec=
tors with everything they need in the hills.
Buy where your orders can be filled and wants promptly attended to.
A. E. HOWSE.
Lake of the Woods Flour Always in Stock.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
i
Will Build Through Similkameen.
Grand Forks, Aug. 4.—Jas. J
Hill, president of the Great ANo/th
ern railway, responding yi Vgatur
day afternoon to a joint address of
the city^ council and_board of trade
of Grand Forks and Columbia,
madea"""nTTreworthy speech, outlining his policy of railway construction in Northern Washington and
Southern British Columbia.
He arrived shortly after 5 o'clock
Saturday afternoon, after a tour of
inspection of the Wasbington^and
Great Northern as far as Republic,
Wash.' Mr. Hill and party were
met by President Miner, of the
Granby Co., and were shown
through the big reduction plant.
Mr. Hill stated it was the most
modern smelting works he had ever inspected.
Subsequently Mr. Hill met a
large delegation of citizens at the
Yale hotel. Acting Mayor Harvey
presented an address of welcome,
which also .expressed the hope that
Mr. Hill would build_a_spur to the
Granby smelter and bjf^nchjines to
Phoenix and up the North Fork of
TTpftlpRivpr to thpToal fields.
. Mr. Hill said that it was always
a pleasure to him to meet people
who were engaged in a. country
where his interests were located.
It had been the work of his life on
the frontier to open new country.
His interests had been on both
sides of the line. Some of his auditors might know that for some
me he had been elgsfly interested
with the Canadian Pacific railway,
at one time he owned one-tenth,
but now be did not*^ own a aoHar,
though he sometimes got credit of
having bought it. He said a great
many people thought that because
they had commenced at this end
that they were going to end there.
What they wanted was to get a
good- road and, go ri.ght through to
the coast. They did not want,
howe^eTTto build a road consisting
of a series of toboggan slides. They
had to seek and follow the lines of
least*'resistance and lo»t«j£rades.
They.,:were not asking for any bonus nor. for anything more than an
Opportunity to demonstrate that
some things could be done. He
hoped that people would soon get
through voting bonuses as there
was a limit to what people could
perform.    As   soon  as   their engi
neers could find a feasible route
they were prepared to build through
from both ends.—Vancouver World
Mrs. Innocent—What did you
enjoy most about your fishing trip,
dear ?
Mr. Innocent—I got most excited when I was reeling in, my love.
Mrs.  Innocent   (bursting     into
tears)—And     to—to—think     you
promised me you wouldn't drink
drop !
The
Vancouver
Breweries, Ltd.,
BREWERS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer
AND
Alexandra Lager
For sale  throughout   British   Columbia   in   all   the   first-class
Hotels,   Liquor   Stores
and Saloons.
THE VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.,
Prospectors
...KSTOPI
If you want to Outfit
cheaply and quickly,
do so at the	
KEREMEOS STORE
WM. HINE & Co.,
fir outfit at the  point
a start prospecting.
Mining Supplies
of Every
Agents for
Celebrated Mason & Risch Pianos
»<»<■»<■» <*<■»<» <*-<%
J.A.SCHUBERT
HAS OPENED A BRANCH STORE AT
HEDLEY   CITY,
I
I
#»   And begs to announce that he will carry everything  required  in a  Mining    2
V Camp.    A Complete New Stock at Modern Prices. v
I    A Car of N. W. Oats and a Car of Columbia Milling Company's     f
Flour just arrived at Penticton. *)
i Shingles and Builders' Supplies always on hand. »
I J. A. SCHUBERT. I
For Connoisseurs Only. **
Can be had at the j^'-^
Hotels of
Princeton
I and all other first-class   hotels
" throughout the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,
LIMITED,
VICTORIA, B. C,
Sole Agents,
Hotel Tulameen
The Largest and Most Homelike Hotel in Princeton is now
open for the travelling public.
Our bar is stocked with the
Best of Wines, Liquors and
Cigars. Special efforts will be
made in the CulHnary Department, and tables will be furnished with the best the market
affords.
PRINCETON,  B. C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    St A&
SCALE OF PRICES ON LEGAL NOTICES.
.    subsequent one
Fees Must Invariably b(
Coal  Location   Notices.
NOTICE.
Whipsa* Creek, and joining  the  Scott  Ranch
containing 640 acres.
P. E. WILSON.
H..H. PITTS, Agent.
Dated July 22, 1902.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given   that sixty days after
date I intend to apply tc the Chi.f Commissioner cf Lands   and Works for   permission to
Jun-7 CURRIE SgjUSiySR.^
Notice   of Fonreffur&|
urn cf (Jioo.'oo;
on 24 of the   i
Land Notices.
i NOTICE:
is hereby given that  sixty days
:H 20 chains; thence  t
Hie land Is required for residential and othe
RICHASD H. PARKINSON,
fcS      M        Agent for
fi IRENE M. PARKINSON.
irvleW,B.'e.;july22,i902.
j. o'sOllivan, F. C.S.,
Provincial Assayer
BY EXAMINATION. ;
Assa}Ter lor 26 years with Viviai
Sons, Swansea.
Complete Analysis of Ores, Coals, Etc.
Results mailed by return Stage.
Assay Office : Vancouver, B.C.
inder^Section 2j«St>g<ether with all cost cf jdver-
CANADIAN
V   PACIFIC
RAILWAY
Daily Service to and from     -
VANCOUVER,
VICTORIA,
MONTREAL,
TORONTO,
ST. PAUL,
And all points East and West.
Fast   Steamer   Service   from, Vancouver to
CHINA,
JAPAN,
AUSTRALIA,
ALASKA, WmjM
HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.
Ebr full   information   and   illustrated
pamphlets, &c, apply   to   any C. P. R.
E. J. Coyle, A. G. P. A.,
VANCOUVER, B. C
Similkameen Meat Market, tt,r,t$M&.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Heats.
Livery, Feed Stable and Pasture.
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen.
Subscribe for the STAR, a%£?nf ^stest
^THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
^$M&~      WITH WHICH IS AMALGAMATED
THE BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEAD OFFICE—TORONTO. •
PAID UP CAPITAL,    ....      $8,000,000
EESEKVE FUND, 2,000,000
'Aggregate Resources over $65,000,000.
£■  3 HON. GEO.  A.f; COX-^PR^sipENT. ; '^fk-a.-n
B.-E. WALKER, General Manager.     J. H. PLUM'mER, Asst!Gen. Managi
foLONDON 0FFICE-60 L0MBAED STEEET, E. C.
Savings Bank Department. t Interest at 3 per "cenk'pef annum will be a
Towed from August 1st, 1901.    Gold  dust  purchased,; and  every   description
banking business transacted. '■< & ....'"
C. W. ,'HAIXAMORE,    : . ? Manager "K1ml6c)ps,,Branch.
DRIARD HOTEL,
NICOLA LAKE,
UNDER NEW MANAQEMENT.
G. W. SIMPSON, (Late Steward C. P. N. Co's Steamers,)
*T~~    h !"fo~ 35 - - ■<;.'r,™    -fo '    srr
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated 'and refitted.
; Everything First Class.
• No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
f        TELEPHONE- BATH.
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge arid Kamloops
<<" Stage Lines.
Penlletoii store
ALFRED II. WADE,
Post Master.
Notary Public.
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY BY BUYING
Groceries; iiardivarc, Boo^s and Shoes,
Cl«lWB|fee<l and Oats,
AT LOWEST PRICES*ORCASH.
Agjent for Okanagan Flour Hills Co.
Nothing (Hit the Best on hand. ^&g, Estimates Furnished.
MURALO WALL FINISH.
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, arid has won its popularity by its dura=
bility, pretty tints, and the easy mode of mixing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades! and white. As your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
WEM VANCOUVER, B. C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
-: PRINCETON a
British Columbia.
Lots for
• • •A^CXm\\aZ « « «
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $ JO.
Per Front Fobt.d*«^
Size of Lots 50x tOO
Ft. and 33x100 Ft-
Terms: J-3 Cash;
Bal 3 and 6 months^
with interest at 6 per
cent, per annum. &
Government Head-
quarters for the Similkameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain,* Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River, JUpper Tulameen and Aspen Grovel
FINE CLIMATE
and PURE WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
wfwmw w wwwwww
Send for Map and Price List to <£ d* t£ *£ «£
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION   FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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