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Similkameen Star 1903-06-27

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Full Text

 SIMILKAN
Vol. iv.   No. 11.
PRINCETON, SATURDAY, JUNE 27, 1903.
$2 a Year.
COPPER GLANCE
Found on Hamilton Creek Ten Miles
South of Quilchena.
Neil Campbell of Aspen Grove, who
was in Princeton early this week, reports
making a good find of copper glance on
Hamilton creek, about ten miles south of
Quilchena. He located four claims,
which he calls the Montreal group. The
lead is about three feet wide and traceable through two claims. An assay from
a choice sample shows 41.4 per cent copper and $7.60 in gold.
The report has been made that the
Diamond Vale Coal and Iron Mines, Ltd,
owning ten square miles of coal lands on
Hamilton creek near Quilchena, has recently brought in a diamond drill with
which to test their ground.
Dr. Common
Mr. Ernest Waterman furnishes the
Star with the following item from the
London Times relative to Dr. Common,
chairman of the Vermilion Forks Mining and Development Co., who recently
died at his home at Ealing, England :
" Dr. Common was born at Newcastle
in 1841. He was a past President of the
Royal Astronomical Society, and he had
many large reflecting equatorials, includ
ing the largest of its kind in existence.
His claim to distinction rested rather
upon his achievements in making and
improving astronomical instruments than
upon Observatory work, though at his
private observatory at Ealing important
observations were at one time taken.
Since 1895 he had devoted his attention
to the improvement of sighting of guns
of all kinds, and he recently patented a
range-finder, which was taken up by the
Admiralty."
New Voters' Lists.
The last issue of the Vernon News con:
tains the following : ''When the proving
cial house dissolved the existing voters'
lists became extinct and now new ones
must be prepared. We wish it to be understood by all our readers that no man
will have a vote at the next election
unless he signs a new form. There were
no voters in B.C. when the legislature
dissolved. Instead of 38 members being
returned as before there will be 42 in the
next legislature. East Yale passes out of
existence, and is divided into the two
ridings of Okanagan and Similkameen.
Okanagan riding extends from near Mara
to a mile or so south of Penticton. To
r- become a voter it is required that a man
should be a British,subject of 21 years of
age, who has resided in British Columbia
for six months and in the electoral district for one month. He must sign a
form before a government agent or other
such official as is named in the Act.*''
Persons wishing to become naturalized
n time to have a vote at the coming elec-
;ion can get declaration forms at the STAR
MINING MATTERS
Tunnelling Porphyry   Dyke-
V.F.M. Co's Drill Starts-
May Build Mill.
Wm. Scruby, who owns mineral claims
in this district and has recently located a
fruit ranch near Okanagan lake, is in
town preparing to do assessment work.
I. Laugheed and J. B. Wood left for
Roche river Thursday. Mr. Wood will
work for a month or two on the Sailor
Jack claim in that camp on which he
struck ore last season carrying free gold.
The Davis-Calyx drill with which the
Vermilion Forks Mining and Development Co. is boring on the coal underlying the townsite, started work this week
near the Similkameen river under the
superintendence of Barr Hall, who
operated it last year.
T. A. Gallinger is reported to have
struck the Cousin Jack lead in the cross
cut tunnel he has been running on the
claim. The ore has the appearance of
being better than any yet found on the
property in the surface showings.
Ben Baker has located two claims in
Macintosh camp near the Buck claim on.
which he finds the specular hematite
characteristic of the camp and which
carries high gold and silver values on the
Buck.
J. B. Silverthorn of Aspen Grove, was
in town Wednesday accompanied by
Messrs. Berg and Osen. They are at
present working on the Mira Monte Mining Co's claims on the big porphyry dyke
between here and Granite creek. Some
fine looking quartz has lately been
broken into in the tunnel, from which
assays are being made.
Work has been closed down on the
Portland group in Aspen Grove camp
until machinery can be installed, the
water making it difficult to continue development with present facilities.
A. F. Gwin, a mining broker of Victoria, B.C., came in from the coast this
week and went up to Copper mountain
Wednesday with Robert Stevenson to
look over sofne properties there, Before
going out Mr. Gwin states he will examine the "Lost Mine" up the Tulameen
and if satisfied with the property proposes the erection of a small stamp mill
with which to treat ther ore, which is
largely free milling. Assays obtained by
him from samples taken out last year by
Mr. Ste-rfenson proved highly satisfactory.
Another three feet of ore has been
found on the Buck claim in Macintosh
camp, ten feet from the main lead and
below it. Whether it is a separate and
distinct lead front the one on which-the
work is being done or simply an offshoot
can only be determined- by development
LOCAL AND PERSONAL
Items of General Interest and
Personal Mention of People in this Vicinity.
Miss Whillans, principal of the Princeton public school, leaves on Tuesday
next for Edmonton, N.W.T., where shev
will spend the summer vacation.
A. F. Macdonald of Grand Forks, and
Luke Gibson of this place, returned Saturday last from their trip to the Fraser
T. A. Rogers and W. A. Clark of the
Mira Monte Mining Co. examined a number of Copper mountain properties this
week. Mr. Clark, who is on his first
visit tojthis district, was greatly impressed
with the immense showings of copper
ore on a number of the claims examined
and believes the mountain has a great
mining future before ibwhen given trans-
Miss Summers of Portland, Ore., came
in Saturday on a visit to her brother, C.
Summers, the "Pat Burns" of the Upper
Similkameen.
Jas. and Claude Snowden will leave
tomorrow for Summerland on Okanagan
L. W. Shatford of Fairview left here
Saturday last for Aspen Grove, where he
went to look after some mining property
in which his brother, W. T. Shatford of
Slocan City is interested.
Duncan McRae left for Vancouver thi
week, going out over the Hope trail.
A. E. Raab of Hope, came over th
trail last week and reported it clear of
T. C. Revely of Penticton arid W. F.
Revely of Hedley City were visitors to
town last Saturday. Chas. was kept busy
renewing old acquaintances. He is getting in" training for the athletic meet
at Vancouver in August next, where he
will make a try for some Pacific Northwest championships. He now holds the
eighth and quarter mile championships
for B.C. His many friends join in wishing him success.
F. W. Groves, P.L.S., has been suffering recently from a severe attack of
rheumatism in the neck.
Victor Voigt, son of E. F. Voigt, who
has been at the Hill Academy, Portland,
Ore., arrived home on Wednesday and
will have a vacation of^three months.
The young man is taking a scientific
course in the Academy.
Henry Kelm of Spokane, a son of the
late Mrs. Jeston Beaver by a former husband, came in this week on- a bicycle.
He heard-nothing of his mother's death
until hereached Bromley's.
C. A. R. Lambly of Fairview, has been
appointed collector of votes for this riding.
DOMINION DAY
Canada's Natal Day- Will be Loyally
Observed in Sport and Event.
A meeting is being held tonight in the
Hotel Tulameen to make final arrangements for the celebration here on July
ist. Judges andstarters must be arranged
for and a secretary-treasurer appointed to
disburse the prize money. The subscription list, in the able hands of D. O. Day,
"shows a healthy growth, which promises
Following is a list of events arranged
Entrance $efoto per cent in all
races except those marked free. Three
entries and, three to start. 'VPtnaSrs
barred in horse^Rjftp§T.    N; '■    r.       ■•■ ^-t
ATHLETIC SPORTS
—Commencing at 9:30 a.m.
50 yds. Boys' rage, under 14 years, free,
ist, #2.50; 2nd, $1. •
50 yds. Girls' race, under 14 years, free,
ist, $2.50; 2nd, $1.
100 yds. Foot race, ist, $10; 2nd, $5.
50 yds. Potato race [potato every three
feet] 1st, $5; 2nd, $2.
,;   25 yds. Sack race, ist, $5; 2nd, $2.
""'So yds.  Old Mens' race,  free, ist. $5;
2nd, $2.
50" "yds. Three-Legged race, $5.
50 yds. Klootchmens' Foot race, free,
ist, $2.50; 2nd, $1.
100 yds. Chinamens' Foot race, free,
ist, $2.50; 2nd, $1.
Running High Jump, $5.
HORSE RACES
—Commencing at 1 p.m.
Cowboy race, 200 yds, three turns, rst
$10; 2nd, $5.
X-Mile open, three heats, ist, $25; 2nd
$10.
X-Mile Prospectors' Saddle Horse race,
owners up, three heats, free, ist, $10; 2nd
15-
X-Mjle Pony race, 14 hands or under,
open, three heats, ist, $15; 2nd, $$.
X-Mile Klootchmens' race, three heats,
free, 1st, $7.50; 2nd, $2.50.
X-Mile Saddle Horse race, owners up,
ist, JS10; 2nd. $5.
SPECIAL EVENTS
—Commencing at 5 p.m.
Drilling contest, free, ist, #iof 2nd,
$5-
Chopping contest, ist, |ro; 2nd, #5.
Tug-of-War, Princeton vs. All-Comers,
free, $15.
Grand ball in the evening.
Bell Fraction.
F. W. Groves, P.L.S., states that in
doing work on his claim, the Bell Fracr
tion, on Copper mountain, Messrs. Willarson and Johnson uncovered a four foot
chute of ore carrying yellow copper.
The fraction adjoins the Princess May
claim, which is well known as one of the
best on the arountain.
The Coast-Kootenay railway bill has
passed the Dominion house of commons.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
June 27, 1903.
The-Similkameen Star
The Princeton Publishing Co.
A. E.  Howse, Manager.
GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP
The rapid and persistent spread
of the government ownership idea
. as applied to public utilities is ont
• ot the most marked features of recent times. As the London Times
remarks in a late editorial the trend
' of legislation throughout all civilized countries is today socialistic,
and the indications are that this
movement toward the collective
ownership of what must be collectively used will receive a still greater
impetus during the new century
on which we have entered.
It is becoming generally recognized by political economists of all
nations that to balance our immense
modern productiveness we must
solve the problem of a more equitable distribution of what is produced, otherwise disorder is apt to
ensue. To accomplish this the profit feature of production and distribution must be either abolished or
curtailed.
Already the government operates
our postal system, (not for profit
but for use) and does it more effectively and cheaply than could be
done by any individual or corporation. In England the government
owns and controls the telegraph
lines of the country and in Germany, Russia, Australia and New
Zealand many of the railways are
state owned.
In this country, on the contrary,
railways have, as a rule, been constructed by the public and handed
over to corporations. As a result,
after paying, for the roads we do not
own them, but must pay extortionate toll for every mile we ride over
them and for every pound of freight
we ship by them. Their one object
seems to be to squeeze profit from
the people who created and sustain
them.
As a nation we are now profiting
from our bitter experience and our
most progressive legislators are advocating the restitution to the people of what was so foolishly parted
with.        ,	
While the political volcano is
emitting much smoke from its eruptive and corruptive centers at the
coast all is peaceful and hopeful in
the Similkameen. Death to corruption and victory for political
purity is the watchword here.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
Hedley City has shown a commendable spirit in refraining from
holding its celebration on the same
day as Princeton. July ist has
always been celebrated here and the
citizens of Hedley very properly
considered that this place had the
best right to the day. How very
much better is this than the clashing of Fairview and Keremeos in
both celebrating May 24th, although only 12 miles apart! Hedley will probably celebrate Labor
Day.
A recent Vancouver paper contains news of the arrival at that
port of 1200 tons of fire clay and
fire brick from the United Kingdom which has been imported for
the British Columbia Goldfields
Company at Frank, Alberta, where
it is to be used in the construction
of coke ovens. Many British Columbians are not aware that in this
portion of the province there exists
good seams of fire clay almost identical with the best Scotch and English fire clays, and equal if not superior to any yet found on this continent. Once transportation facilities are afforded th?re will be no
necessity to import fire brick from
England as this district can furnish,
not only this province, but the
whole Pacific slope.
CHURCH NOTICE
e 28—Pf
Service, 7 p.m. S.S.
NOTICE.
[otel and Saloon Kei
'T'AKE NOTICE that anyoi
NOTICE.
EDWARD TINGLEY, Locator.
;orth, back to post, in all 640 a<
C. O. FRENCH, J
Located June 23, 1903.
NOTICE.
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
fS^OTICE is hereby given that the partnership
dersigned, as hotelkeepers in the town of Hedley
'?h  Columbia,   has  been  this day dissolved by
Dated at Hedley City this 15th day of May,
,.D. 1903.
Witness        j        CaRL NELSON,
tbve McKay, j       AMBROSE McDERMOTT.
NOTICE.
1MOTICE is hereby given that thirty days after
V date I intend to apply to the Chief Commis-
-toner of Lands and Works for permission to
"AVm^68 °«,lan? commencing at post
NOTICE.
THIRTY days after date I  intend to apply t
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Work
e to prospect for coal on the followin
on Nine Mile Creek, west of Lang'
t. MURDOCK.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
NOTICE.
THIRTY days from date we intend to apply t
1 the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Work
quarry lease on the following describe
iated on the east bank of One Mile Creels
Dated May 25,1903.
G. E.WINKLER.
Located 25th May, 19:3.
And,  west  of French's  location,  running 80
Located 25th May, 1903.
NOTICE.
THIRTY days after date I intend to apply to
_*  the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
ic'ribed lands :—
iituate on the south bank of the Similkameen
.ocated June 11,1903.
E.N. OUIME
NOTICE.
>uth of the Helen
1, for  the  purpose  of o
love claim,
take 1 otice that a
DOMINION
DAY
CELEBRATION
JULY 1st, 1903
—AT—
PRINCETON
Grand   Ball    Wednesday
Evening.
See Program of
Sports and Races
NOTICE.
Miner's Certificate No. B51146, in
from the date hereof, to apply to
corder for a Certificate of Improv
claims.
And further take notice that ac
of such Certificates of Improveme
Dated this 29th day of April, A.
ntofi
3. 1903
xtydays
NOTICE is
1~   date I it
sionerof  La
NOTICE.
tend toapply to th«
CMcf
perm
Sss
A Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods   Milling  Co'y,
Try Best Patent Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
TlOtflTS
Myrtle
Navy
Tobacco
Largest Sale in Canada <
For    Connoisseurs   Only.
Can be had at all first-class hotels throughout the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,ld.
VICTORIA,'B. C,
Sole Agents*
 JUNB 27, 1903.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
ABOUT HELL
A Treatise on the Hereafter as Understood by Many Nations.
There has not been a more extraordinary book published in London in many
months than the weighty tome which
James New has just published on the subject of "Hell." Of late the infernal regions have been enjoying what' almost
might be described as a "vogue" on
other side of the water—no less than
three famous dramatists having written
plays containing scenes laid in Gehenm
and it must be said for this remarkable
book concerning Hades that it supplies
every scrap of information that is a
able regarding the dread place of future
punishment. In his work, which he
desdribes graphically enough as a "Primer of Ancient and Modern Hells," the
author has brought together a region of
final retribution—and uncommonly fantastic and interesting most of them are.
Perhaps the most striking thing about
this book is the way in which it shows
not only how universal is the idea of a
literal place of torment beyond the
grave, but how like are many of the ideas
whi;h widely separated people have held
as to its characteristics. For-.iiistance,
the ancient Egyptians' idea—asCrevealed
in their "Book of the Dead"—of a serpent spewing fire and venom over the
damned, and other condemned folk
swimming about in a fiery lake, is not
much different from Bunyan's "sulphur
ous sea, with sulphur seijjpentSy gnashing,
teeth, knotted whips of :burning steel,"
and the rest of it. The Brahmin's hell
is a place where the wicked are rent by
swine, sawn to pieces, and suffocated in
evil smelling mud ; that of the Buddist
a region where hot irons dissect the unrighteous who then are frozen together
b> intense cold.-
The Burmese cherish-an agreeable vision of a hell where folk.who have treated
their parents unkindly" float in a.sea'of
filth and are bitten by worms as big as
elephants. But the dweller in Burma
has also to dread a hell of hooks, a hell
of crows and vultures and a hell of burning ashes. The disciples of Buddha can
give you even the exact measurements
of their hades. They say it is 40,000
miles deep and built in consecutive tiers
like a pyramid. In this hell the unit of
time'is a "kalpa," which is a mere trifle
of 1,344,000,000 yearsr^-which reminds
tae of the famous sermon in which Jon-
OThan Edwards estimated how hot hell is.
Furthermore, Mr. New has discovered a
Protestant writer who computes the number of devils- in Gehenna as exactly
44,435.556.
It is interesting, too, to note that
whereas white people who believe in
devils conceive them to be black, all
black-skinned folk who take stock in
evil spirits are certain that they are
white. In China one is in danger of
hell if he marries for money, steals a letter, gets deeply into debt, or fails to bid
his children be kind to animals and insects. And as might be expected of a
people peculiarly skilled at inventing
tortures, the Oriental hades is an infinitely disagreeable place where the eyes
are gouged out and bone:: broken.
He Is a Necessity.
The promoter is frequently a much
maligned man and many are so inconsiderate, or so superficial, as to condemn all
promoters because of the- sins of some,
says an exchange. Yet, the promoter is
the John the Baptist of Industrial development. Every cause needs a voice
crying in the wilderness and his is the
voice that sounds the propaganda of material progress. He rallies the dormant
or scattered forces of capital   and puts
them on the track of well defined creative
endeavor, and when honest and capabli
—and he is as much these things, on th
average, as men in other lines—he deserves the approbation and encouragement of all.—Kettle River Journal.
What the intending investor in a r
wants to know is, how much metal the
ore contains, the amount of ore availabli
the cost of mining and of reduction, an
the probable length of time required t
exhaust the visible supply. He care
little about the genesis of the ore deposit
or how the gold or silver or coppe
other metals came into the ore. He wi
to know how to "get it but in the Shortest
possible time at the, least cost, If promoters' reports dealt more with substantial facts and less with fancy and un
necessary scientific information', the man
with money and he would sooner come
to an understanding.-^-Rossland Minen
A General Banking Business
Is transacted by the Bank of Hamilton,
It haf|.a ijeseiye fund of over three-fourths
of its capital.'- Interest allowed  on!
ings Bank   deposits   of one   dollar
upwards from datt   of deposit to date:bf-
withdrawal.   A. H. SKEY, Agent, Kamloops, B.C.
"E.W. GROVES,
A, R. COLL., SC.  D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON.     -   -     B. C.
oooooooooooooooaoooooooooo
Straight
Party
Lmes
WE ARE EXCLUSIVELY
SHOEMAKERS
AND CAN GUARANTEE
Style, Comfort and Durability
IN FOOTWEAR
MANUFACTURED
BY US.
TIHAME&
HOLBEN
Company
OF MONTREAL, LTD.
VANCOUVER   B.C.
00000000000000000000000000
J.PIERCY&Co,,
WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS
VICTORIA, B. C
MANUFACTURERS OF
Clothing, Top Shirts and
Underwear.
Hedley Meat Market,
CHAS. 1 RICHTER, Manager.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
—HEATS—
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Sii
"kameen.
.-.-.RUBBER STAilPS.-.-.
Seals, Stencils, Price Markers, Printing Wheels, Numbering Machines,
Band Dating and Numbering Stamps,
Check Perforators, Rubber Type, Printing Presses, &c, &c. j
. FRANKLIN STAHP WORKS,
Vancouver, B.,C.
Hedley City Stored
I
I
I
V A Complete" New Stock of General Herchan-
V dise always on hand,,
5 •   Consisting of a full line of
ft Groceries, Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes; also
P Builder's Supplies, Shingles, Doors, Windows, Paints, Wall
a Paper, Hardware, Stoves, Nails, Drill Steel,
i Harness and Saddlery.
l Headquarters for Enderby Hungarian Flour, Northwest Oats, &c   r
£ J. A. SCHUBERT.         J
Wood, Vaflance & Leggat, Ltd.,
HEADQUARTERS FOR
pners', Lumber and Mill Supplies.
WIRE ROPE A SPECIALTY.
B*   C*   Agents  for   Black  Diamond  Files*
Send us your orders by Mail, and they will re=
ceive Prompt and Careful Attention.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
MURALO WALL FINISH.
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its .dura-.-'
bility, pretty[tints, and the easy mode of mix=
ing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. As your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
•  VANCOUVER, B.C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
June 27, 1903.
SNOWSHOE BUSY
The Boundary Mine, with 100 Men
Ship* 2100 Tons.
The Snowshoe mine has the greatest
number of men employed in the history
of the property, with ioomen on the pay
roll. If coke can be had at the Boundary Creek smelter iu sufficient quantity,
the force will be still further increased in
the near future, as the ore reserves in the
mine were never in such good shape for
a large and increasing tonnage.
This week's tonnage is also the largest
in the history of the mine, the figures
being 2100 tons, which went to the Greenwood and Boundary Palls smelters. For
several weeks past the tonnage from the
Snowshoe has been steadily getting
larger, and it is fully expected that, with
normal conditions, it will soon be enlarged to 500 tons daily, which could be
maintained from the property without
trouble.
Gefaeral work at the Snowshoe has been
progressing most favorably of late. Ore
is being shipped from several parts of
the mine, including the new glory hole,
near the end of the new No. 2 railway
spur, which is said to be some of tl e
best in the mine. On the main incline
shaft the work of timbering it to the
third level and below is completed and
the pocket at the foot is also finished, so
that as soon as the rails are laid for the
two-ton skips to run on the shaft will be
ready for use. The new 150 horsepower
electric hoist, the first of its kind
the.largest of any kind in the Boundary
country, is all ready for use, and will
probably be placed in commission July
1st.—Spokesman-Review.
Bich Gold Ore.
A pocket of exceptionally rich gold
ore has been opened up on the Goldfinch
property, in the Camborne camp. It
was encountered in the main drift on the
vein and created quite a sensation. One
specimen of five pounds was almost solid
gold. Another piece of 150 pounds
weight was estimated to be worth $7000.
The latter piece was sent to Hancock,
Mich., the headquarters of the Calumet
& British Columbia Co. owning the
property. The usual run of the vein is
$20 per ton in free gold.—Kaslo Koote-
Poor Place for Prospectors.
Gold mining in the Transvaal lags for
lack of labor. If a prospector had any
chance there, there would be no trouble.
The mines are owned by big corporations and Kaffir labor is poorly paid.
Hence the scarcity. There is no inducement for white men to go into the
;s.—Tacoma News.
If you have never tried to make anyone
happy you have no idea of what you
have missed.
"ASlyOIdFox;
Hotel Tulameen
The Largest and Most Homelike Hotel in Princeton is now
open for the travelling public.
Our bar is stocked with the
Best of Wines, Liquors and
Cigars. Special efforts will be
made in the Cullinary Department, and tables will be furnished with the best the market
affords.
PRINCETON,  B, C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
Just Opened
COMMERCIAL
HOTEL
First Class Dining Room
Newly Fitted
Hedley
City
Good Beds
 No Chinese Employed.	
^BEST BRANDS LIQUORS AND CIGARS ALWAYS IN STOCK
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO TRAVELLERS^
HUSTON & McLEAN, Proprietors
DRIARD HOTEL,
NICOLA LAKE,
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors andCigars.
TELEPHONE* BATH.
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines. ifcln
*+P*^p*^*p*^^*+^WP*^^*^^***^^+i+p+>p+>p»^*W
Hotel * Jackson
-~wv*The Leading Hotel-
This Hotel, having
passed into new management, will be found first
class in every department.      C5v **
Hot and Cold Water
Baths.     «* «*>
Hotel - Jackson
Princeton, B*C.
 June 27, 1903.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
NEEDED IN B.C.
Law to Bestrain Unscrupulous Promoters.
I Recently the following law for the
state of Washington went into effect says
the Kettle River Journal:
jj " Any superintendent, director, sc
tary, manager, agent or other officer
of any corporation, or anyone pretending
to be such superintendent, director, secretary, manager agent or other officer,
who shall wilfully subscribe, indorse,
verify or otherwise assent to the publication either generally or privately to the
stockholders or to other, persons dealing
with such corporation or its stock, any
wilfully untrue or wilfully fraudulently
exaggerated report, prospectus, account
or statement of operations, values, business, profits, expenditures or prospectus
or other paper or document intended to
produce or give or having a tendency to
produce or give to the shares of stock in
such corporation a greater value than
they really possess, or with the intention
of defrauding any party, person or persons generally, shall be deemed guilty ol'
an offense against the laws of the state ol
Washington, and upon conviction thereoj'
shall be punished by imprisonment in
the penitentiary not less than one or
more than five years, or in the county
jail for not more than one year or by a
fine not exceeding $2000, or by both."
A Marvellous Metal.
At a recent session- of the Chemical
Congress held at Berlin Professor W
Markwald, of . Berlin, showed to the
electro-chemical and physical section a
smudge of dark powder on a piece o;
paper, which was the first time that any
of those eminent scientists had seen the
metal polonium discovered by Prof, anc
Mme. Curie, of Paris. The latter doubted
whether polonium was a primary element, or related to bismuth, but Prof.
Markwald demonstrated that indeed it
was a primary element. He exhibited a
bit of metal weighing 15-1,000 of a grain,
which was produced from two tons ol'
uranium at a cost of $75. It is more
sparsely distributed in uranium than
xenon, the most rarified gas, is in the
atmosphere.
'   Prof. Markwald   proceeded to give a
remarkable exhibition of the powers of
his speck of polonium. It intercepted a
strong current of electricity pas
through the air from the generator to the
receiver, the air ceasing to be a conduc
tor for the flashes. The room was then
darkened,' and pieces of barium, platinum and zinc blende placed near the
polonium glowed with bright, greenish
light. The assemblage of scientists
were thrilled with astonishment. It
peared to be a miracle.
Knew the Pulse.
Old Doc Burns had been a valued citi
zen of a little western town; but had los :
his prestige through an extreme weakness for whisky. r "•
He was a first class doctor when sober
but he was so seldom in that condition
that he could not be trusted with the
chills. One day a man was taken sud
denly ill, and as the only other .doctor in
town had gone to the country to see a
patient a hurry call   was sent for Doc
He arrived, drunk as usual, but assum
ing a professional air, he began an exam
ination. In trying to find the patient's
pulse he got hold of his own hand, which
lying on the edge of the bed. The
fingers touched the pulse he
exclaimed:
"Why, the man's drunk!"—Detroit
Free Press.
.   A New Breakfast Food.
"Do you know the 'Autocrat of the
Breakfast Table,' Mr. Tinkham ?" asked
a lady of her   host  at  a rural dinner
" Well, really, now, I don't know," he
replied. "We've tried so many of them
breakfast foods I can't keep track of 'em
"Maria," he called to his wife across
the table, "have we ever tried the water
cracker of the breakfast table ?"
Why His Debts Worried Him.
Ned—I'm dreadfully worried about my
debts.
Jack—It must be very annoying to be
mtinually dunned.
Ned—Oh, hang the duns ! What wor-
es me is the fact that I can't get any
ore credit.—Kansas City Journal.
If you want First Class Footwear
Insist upon   -----   -   -
J. D.   KING CO'S
BOOTS &  SHOES
Nothing equals them for Style, Fit, Finish and Wear.
riaple Leaf and King Quality Rubbers,
WHOLESALE   ONLY.
Vancouver, B. C. J. LECKIE CO., Limited.
The Vancouver Breweries, Ltd.
BREWERS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer
Ginger Beer
«i* Alexandra Stout
«a* Alexandra Ale
For sale throughout British Columbia in all the first-
class Hotels, Liquor Stores and Saloons.
The Amalgamated
DOERIM & MARSTRAND & RED CROSS BREWERIES,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Princeton's
Leading
store
We
are
Now
-Closing Out-
Some
ODD
LINES
to Make
Room
for
NEW STOCK
Arriving
THES
Am Em HOWSE
Company
^LIMITED
PRINCETON
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
June 27, 1903.
SNOWSHOE BUSY
The Boundary Mine, with 100 Men
Ships 2100 Tons.
The Snowshoe mine has the greatest
number of men employed in the history
of the property, with ioo men on the pay
roll. If coke can be had at the Boundary Creek smelter in sufficient quantity,
the force will be still further increased in
the near future, as the ore reserves in the
mine were never in such good shape for
a large and increasing tonnage.
This week's tonnage is also the largest
in the history of the mine, the figures
being 2100 tons, which went to the Greenwood and Boundary Palls smelters. For
several weeks past the tonnage from the
Snowshoe has been steadily getting
larger, and it. is fully expected that, with
normal conditions, it will soon be enlarged to 500 tons daily, which could be
maintained from the property without
trouble.
General work at the Snowshoe has been
progressing most favorably of late. Ore
is being shipped from several parts of
the mine, including the new glory hole,
near the end of the new No. 2 railway
spur, which is said to be some of tl e
best in the mine. On the main incline
shaft the work of timbering it to the
third level and below is completed and
the pocket at the foot is also finished, so
that as soon as the rails are laid for the
two-ton skips to run on the shaft will be
ready for use. The new 150 horsepowei
electric hoist, the first of its kind and
the largest of any kind in the Boundary
country, is all ready for use, and will
probably be placed in commission July
ist.—Spokesman-Review.
Rich Gold Ore.
A pocket of exceptionally rich gold
ore has been opened up on the Goldfinch
property, in the Camborne camp. It
was encountered in the main drift on the
vein and created quite a sensation. One
specimen of five pounds was almost solid
gold. Another piece Of 150 pounds
weight was estimated to be worth $7000.
The latter piece was sent to Hancock,
Mich., the headquarters of the Calumet
& British Columbia Co. owning the
property. The usual run of the vein is
$20 per ton in free gold.—Kaslo Koote-
Foor Place for Prospectors.
Gold mining in the Transvaal lags for
lack of labor. If a prospector had any
chance there, there would be no trouble.
The mines are owned by big corpora1
tions and Kaffir labor is poorly paid.
Hence the scarcity. There is no inducement for white men to go into the
ss.—Tacoma News.
If you have never tried to make anyone
happy you have no idea of what you
have missed.
ASlyOIdFox;
v *\      ,M0W* K 0OOD \ WZ W'-
Hotel Tulameen
The Largest and Most Homelike Hotel in Princeton is now
open for the travelling public.
Our bar is stocked with the
Best of Wines, Liquors and
Cigars. Special "efforts will be
made in the Cullinary Department, and tables will be furnished with the best the market
affords.
PRINCETON,  B, C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
Just Opened
COMMERCIAL
HOTEL
First Class Dining Room
Ncwlg fllle<
Hedley
city
Good Beds
..No Chinese Employed..
^BEST BRANDS LIQUORS AND CIGARS ALWAYS IN STOCK
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO TRAVELLERS^
HUSTON & McLEAN, Proprietors
DRIARD HOTEL,
NICOLA LAKE,
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors andCigars.
TELEPHONE- BATH.
Headquartei
for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines.
*i^^^»^V^»*^^^V
Hotel 1 Jackson
>~w^The Leading Hotel^~
This Hotel, having
passed into new management, will be found first
class in every department.      cx rsv
Hot and Cold Water
Baths.     «* **
Hotel - Jackson
Princeton, B*C.
 June 27, 1903.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
NEEDED IN B.C.
Law to Restrain Unscrupulous Promoters.
Recently the following law for the
state of Washington went into effect says
the Kettle River Journal:
i " Any superintendent, director, secretary, manager, agent or other officer
of any corporation, or anyone pretending
to be such superintendent, director, secretary, manager agent or other officer,
who shall wilfully subscribe, indorse,
Verify or otherwise assent to the publication either generally or privately to the
stockholders or to other persons dealing
with such corporation or its stock, any
wilfully untrue or wilfully fraudulently
exaggerated report, prospectus, account
or statement of operations, values, business, profits, expenditures or prospectus
or other paper or document intended to
produce or give or having a tendency to
produce or give to the shares of stock in
such corporation a greater value than
they really possess, or with the intention
pf defrauding any party, person or persons generally, shall be deemed guilty of
an offense against the laws of the state of
.Washington, and upon conviction thereof
stall be punished by imprisonment in
the penitentiary not less than one or
more than five years, or in the county
jail for not more than one year or by a
fine not exceeding $2000, or by both."
A Marvellous Metal.
. recent session- of the  Chemical
5 held   at Berlin Professor   W.
Markwald,  of Berlin, showed   to   the
electro-chemical and physical section a
smudge of dark powder on a piece of
paper, which was the first time that any
of those eminent scientists had seen the
metal polonium discovered by Prof, and
Mme. Curie, of Paris. The latter doubted
whether polonium was a primary element, or related to bismuth, but Prof.
Markwald demonstrated that indeed it
was a primary element. He exhibited a
bit of metal weighing 15-1,000 of a grain,
which was produced from two tons of
uranium at a cost of $75. It is more
sparsely distributed in urani
xenon, the most ratified gas,
atmosphere.
Prof. Markwald   proceeded
> give«
remarkable exhibition of the powers of
his speck of polonium. It intercepted
strong current of electricity passin
through the air from the generator to the
receiver, the air ceasing to be a conductor for the flashes. The room was then
darkened, - and pieces of barium, platinum and zinc blende placed near the
polonium glowed with bright, greenish
light. The assemblage of scientists
were thrilled with astonishment. It appeared to be a miracle.
Knew the Pulse.
Old Doc Burns had been a valued citizen of a little western town; but had lost
his prestige through an extreme weakness for whisky.
He was a first class doctor when sober,
but he was so seldom in that condition
that he could not be- trusted with the
chills. One day a man was taken suddenly ill, and as the only other .doctor in
town had gone to the country to see a
patient a hurry call  was sent for Doc
He arrived, drunk as usual, but assuming a professional air, he began an examination. In trying to find the patient's
pulse he got hold of his own hand, which
was lying on the edge of the bed. The
moment his fingers touched the pulse he
exclaimed:
"Why, the man's drunk!"—Detroit
Free Press.
A Hew Breakfast Food.
"Do you know the   'Autocrat of the
Breakfast Table,' Mr. Tinkham?" asked
a lady of her   host   at   a rural dinner
" Well, really, now, I don't know," he
replied. "We've tried so many of them
breakfast foods I can't keep track of 'em.
"Maria," he called to his wife across
the table, "have we ever tried the water
cracker of the breakfast table ?"
Why His Debts Worried Him.
Ned—I'm dreadfully worried about my
Jack—It must be very annoying to be
>ntinually dunned.
Ned—Oh, hang the duns ! What wor-
5S me is the fact that I can't get any
ore credit.—Kansas City Journal.
If you want First Class Footwear
Insist upon   -------
J. D.   KING CO'S
BOOTS &  SHOES
Nothing equals them for Style, Fit, Finish and Wear.
riaple Leaf and King Quality Rubbers,
WHOLESALE   ONLY.
Vancouver, B. C. J. LECKIE CO., Limited.
The Vancouver Breweries, lm.
BREWERS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer    & Alexandra Stout
Ginger Beer      |j| Alexandra Ale
For sale throughout British Columbia in all the first-
class Hotels, Liquor Stores and Saloons.
The Amalgamated
DOERING & MARSTRAND & RED CROSS BREWERIES,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Princeton's
Lending
Store
We are
Now
-Closing Out-
Some
ODD
LINES
to Make
Room
for
NEW STOCK.
Arriving
THES
Am Em HOWSE
Company
^LIMITED
PRINCETON
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
June 27, 1903.
■: PRINCETON I:-
British Columbia^
M
&
Lots for
• ••a^CLkC • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2*00 to $10.
Per Front Foot*«^«^
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft. and 33x100 Ft.
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
Bal* 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent* per annum. «£
W
Government Head-
quarters FOr the Similkameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, ! Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River, Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grovej
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
wwwwww wwwwwww
Send for Map and Price List to «£ & & *& &
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
.MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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