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Similkameen Star Sep 6, 1902

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 Voi,. III.   No.
PRINCETON,  SEP.   6,  1902.
GREAT NORTHERN SURVEYORS.
/     Mr. Jas. Kennedy, with   his
I Mr. Ale*, M. Lupfer, came up the Sim-
1 ilkameen TasHjaturday, and left for Ash-
! nola Monday morning.  - 	
Mr. Kennedy secured a number of men
at this place, and with them, left Ashno-
I  Ja on Tuesday to continue  up t^ie-Simil-
|v'kameen.   He expects to spend a month
I or more in the
for   the   Great    Northern
Railway Company.
His principal work will be the taking
of altitudes and the forming of estimates
of the grades to be encountered.
The country through which Mr. Kennedy's party will work, was reported or
last year by Mr, Dewdney, the. engineei
in charge being Mr. H. Carry, who ex
plored from the mouth of Cambie Rive:
on the Roche, westward to Hope. Fron
Princeton to Allison Pass a line was rut
by Jas. Hislop, P.L.S., of this place. Ac
cording^tb'^Mr. Hislop the country be
tween the summit at Allison Pass and the
junction of the Roche and Pasayton
ers, 22 miles in all, is very favorable for
railway bfiilding. The most difficult
portion of the line would be from Whip-
saw Creek to the mouth of the Roche
River.
Mr. Carry calls the section from Allison Pass to Hope the Nicolum-Skagit
route, and estimates it would cost $33,-
000 a mile to build a railway over it.
The distance is 51 miles. The highest
elevation is Allison Pass at an altitude of j
' f' 4460 feet. Mr. Kennedy seems satisfied
that a lower pass than this can be found.
If the Great Northern builds over this
route it will bring Princeton within
miles of Hope. This is nearly 23 miles
further than by the route surveyed up
the Tulameen by the V., V. & E., but the
longer route is considerably the cheapest.
Besides, a railway building up the Tulameen would require to run a branch
line from Princeton to Copper and Ken
nedy mountains, a distance of 12 miles 01
more. By taking the route up the Sim-
j ilkameen, the main line will  give access
' to these important  camps and   also pro
vide transportation to Friday Creek and
Roche River camps, where some exceedingly promising prospects are  being de-
kane, also built without a bonus, atod to
further connect with the WashinjaWh &,
Northern at Bossburg, built without
either a bonus or a charter. Over these
lines Hill intends to haul coke from Fernie to Grand Forks for $1 a ton, which is
just half what the Canadian Pacific is
charging for hauling coke a less mileage
over the Crow's Nest, bonused to the extent of $3,000,000, and the Columbia &
Western bonused at $4,000 a miles. Hill
now announces that he would like to get
an opportunity to build from Grand
Forks to Coast without a bonus. This
a matter of foreign aggression which
should be brought to the attention of the
government without delay. If Hill gets
into the habit of building railroads without bonuses and then persists in giving a
50 per cent, reduction on the rates charged by railroads built with bonuses, what
is to become of the old battle cry ' Canada for the Canadian Pacific' "
RAILWAYS WITHOUT BONUSES.
The following excellent
way bonuses is taken from the '"Sandon
Paystreak, whose editor has just returned
home after his famous interview with the
Chief Justice at Victoria :
"Jim Hill built a railroad from Fernie
to Kalispell without a bonus, to connect
with the Great Northern which was built
without a bonus, to connect further wi'h
the Spokane Falls   & Northern   at Spo-
HAVE FILED PLA^S^
V. V. & E. Files   Plans  For  Main
Line to Similkameen.
The   Victoria, Vancouver   &   WW
Railway have filed   plans at   Ottawa
the construction of their road from  Midway to the Similkameen.'    The company
intends pushing the construction  of this
portion of the road as soon as the railway
committee of  the privy council gives its
consent.    The cry was raised   by the opponents of  th's road   that the   company
did not intend to build  amain
the piece   between   Cascade and  Carson
was simply for the purpose of securing 1
way of building to Republic.    When th(
company made application at Ottawa for
permission to build a branch   line
Granby smelter, the minister of railways
held   that   a   branch   line could
built from a main line which did
ist and held   up   the   application.    Now.
that the company have shown at least
earnest of their intention by filing  pis
for the   continuation of  the   road we
ward, it is possible that the objections
a   company building   railways   without
public aid of any kind will  be removed.
HAS A  BIG YIELD.
Le Roi's Profits for July Amounted
to $100,000.
A cablegram received in London from
Manager Mackenzie, says: "Shipped
from mine to Northport smelter during
past month 14,500 tons of ore,
ing 8400 ozs. of gold, 14,000 ozs. of silver,
672,000 lbs. of copper. Shipped from
dump to Northport during the past
month 1677 tons containing 1000
gold, 1350 ozs. of silver^ss.ooo lbs. of
copper. Estimated profit on this 1
$100,000."
June returns: Shipped 11,475 tons,
timated profit  $72,641, and   from dump5
3353   tons,   estimated   profit   $21,761.-
Rossland World.
WITH THE PROSPECTORS.
W. Wilson   is   up from Hedley Camp
this week where he has been  busy doing
c on the Rocky Point Fraction.
I Messrs. Hitchings, Spearing and Ten-
nison have been prospecting for the past
two weeks on Railroad Creek, near Summit Camp.
Mr. Robt. Stevenson left for Hedley
oh Friday to do assessment work on
two promising claims he owns in the
leading gold camp of  the Similkameen.
/ Pouwels and Bonnevier have returnee
'from Roche River. They report a con
siderable improvement in the Red Stai
claim as a result of   the work   done this
I M. W. Kempt was down from Coppei
Mountain this week. He has been work-
Tng'ontbe C6fCiS?lo'-group in that camp
and says that he has exposed the ore
I body for a width of 90 feet.
B§ NSJKS[ has been received of the finding
of a very rich specimen of free gold
iquartz on Bear Creek. A number of|
prospectors are now trying to locate the
(lead from which the float came.
R. Cramer has returned from Aspei
Grove camp where he went to do assess
ment work on the St. Louis claim ii
which he is interested. The St. Louis
has a good sized lead carrying fair
ues in copper and gold.
The Portland Mining Co. are now
down over 100 feet on their property.
Bate Bros., who have been doing the
work were preparing to commence 0
cutting at the 100 foot level early in
week. The ore taken out in sinking the
shaft is said to run between 12 and 15 per
cent, copper.
Samples for the Mineral Museum at
Victoria have so far been received froth
the following claims : Red Star, Roche
River; Summit No. 2, Summit Camp ;
Diamond B., Wolf CreeK. Mountain ; Mogul, Kennedy Mountain ; and Jubilee,
Copper Mountain. To make the collection representative, specimens should be
included from Boulder Creek, Hedley
Camp, and Aspen Grove.
LOCAL AND  PERSONAL.
Mr.   A.   F.   MacDonald   returned   to
Grand Forks this week, leaving here
Sunday last..
/ D. Day and Tucker French have gone
(on a fishing expedition to Trout Creek
ion Okanagan Lake. This is the m<
the kickinnies run up the streams flowing
pnto the lake.
J. Chas. Mcintosh and W. Murray
drove in from Nicola Lake last Sunday.
Wm. Wilson has taken the contract I
for .finishing C. E. Oliver's assay office at
Hedley City. He says Mr. Oliver is going to have the office fitted up in first- /
class shape, outside and in.
Mr. Green, the Keremeos surveyor, assisted by Mr. Yates of Hedley " Camp,
have been engaged in surveying a number of coal claims for the Similkameen
Valley Coal Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Richter drove up
from Keremeos late last week.
W. A. McLean left early in the week )
for Penticton with two teams, to bring in \
the furniture for his hotel at Ashnola.
Chas. Bonnevier, Fred Revely and. I
Luke Gibson; have gone up the Similka- \
meen River with the Great Northern j
surveyor:.
-Mr. Emil Voigt   has   a force of  eight
-HietfwTMungonTEis~ Copper 'Mouptuitfi
properties.    A  party of  Oregon   people
who are   interested  in the   claims  have
been visiting the camp during  the past
Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Richter of Midway,
are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Richter
of this place.
Mr. and Mrs. Butler and family of
GreeWood, who are driving through the
district on a combined land and pleasure
hunt, came up. the river on Thursday
last from Keremeos.
HOTEL ARRIVALS.
HOTEI, JACKSON.
W   D Young   and Wife, Wolf  Creek-
Wm Green, One   Mile; I Eastwood, Aspen Grove; R Cramer, Aspen   Grove- G
Spearing, Otter Flat; J H  Dickson, Ash-
HOTEI,   PRINCETON.
H Stumbles, Nicola; Jno Dalby Victoria; T J McAlpin. Allison; Fred Baker
Hedley; M W Kempt, Copper Mt; R L
Cawston, Keremeos; Robt Stevenson
Hedley.
HOTEI,   TUI.AMEEN, PRINCETON.
E Dewdney, Victoria; Jas H Kennedv
Grand Forks; Alex M Lupfer, Kalispel'l
Mont; J C Mcintosh, Victoria; W G
Murray, Nicola; T J Smith, 20 Mile; J V
Lee, Five Mile; Wm Wheeler, Five Mile-
Hy Chatmell, One( Mile; F Wampole'
Copper Mt.
DRIARD HOTEI,, NICOI.A UKE.
R Pollard, Quilchena; G H Hadwen
Duncans; J Bulman, Stump Lake- J p
Allen, C Murphy, Aspen Grove; a' Pot-
ocki, Ten Mile Creek; M C Hidden Wm
McPeak.JA Dailey, Terre Haute, Ind-
D M French, Princeton; J Price, Aspen
Grove; M P SteWart, Kamloops; J Mur-
chison, Coutlee;  J Chas   Mcintosh, Vic-
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON, B. O.,
THE  PRINCETON  PUBLISHING CQ.
A. E. HOWSE,      -    Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION F
Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reporting any change in address or
Advertising rates famished on applici
, legal notices io and 5 cents per line.
• Certificates of Improvement notices
for legal life of notice.
ARE   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES
NECESSARY ?
The idea has been prevalent
among Canadian tax payers that it
is necessary to b'onus railway companies to build lines to open up
new territories. The reason usually set forth is that the road will be
a losing investment for the first few
years, and that a bonus is required
to re-imburse the shareholders for
the loss incurred during this unproductive period.
As a rule members of both our
Provincial and Federal governments have been altogether too
ready to listen to the arguments advanced by companies seeking bonuses to build railways, and.as a result the system has been grossly
abused.
The case of the C. P.R. is a good
example. This company was given a completed railway worth
thirty-five millions, a cash bonus of
twenty-five millions, and a land
s ibsidy of twenty-five million acres,
which at a conservative estimate is
worth $3 per acre. In all, the people of Canada gave the Canadian
Pacific Railway Co. land, cash and
railways, to the value of about one
hundred and thirty-five millions of
dollars, and this for the building
and equipment of a line that the
company estimated would cost
ninety-one and a half millions.
A good part of Canada's national
debt was incurred to build this
line of railway.
One would naturally expect that
a road so heavily aided by the state
would be able to give better freight
and passenger rates than one that
had been entirely constructed by
private capital.
What do we find to be case ?
Instead of the C. P. R. apprec:
ating. .the nation's generosity in
building and equipping a road and
handing it over to them with a few
extra millions .as a present, we find
it charging higher rates than road!
on the American side that were
built without state aid; and attempting to control our governments for
the securing of further favors and
the crushing of competition.
It has been a • constant source of |
political corruption ; a bane to the
public life of the Dominion.
For daring to point out .the shell
game that had been worked on
Canadian taxpayers by this enterprising syndicate and its stupid or
iminal accomplices that held the
reins at Ottawa, R. L. Richardson,
at one time member in the Domin-
House for Lisgar, Manitoba,
has been practically hounded out ofl
public life, both the old parties in
that province taking a hand in defeating him. Considering these
facts is it any great wonder that
Canadian voters are looking askance at the bonus system, or seek-
ng a solution to the railway problem in goverment ownership.
POOR FUEL.
The Phoenix Pioneer says :—"It
said that one reason C. P. R.
trains are now almost universally
late in this section, is that the fuel
being furnished from the Crow's
Nest is poor and will rot make
steam quickly."
This state of affairs will be remedied when the railway reaches
Princeton. The Similkameen coal
is one of the best for steam purposes }',et discovered in the province.
Subscribe for the Star and get
the latest mining news—only $2.00
per annum.
NOTICE.
'Certificate No. B54414
E. M. ALLISON ESTATE.
FOR   SALE
1 Set Bob Sleighs, 1 Long Sleigh,
1 Set Double Harness,     1 Plow,
1   Bath  Tub.
All tenders must be in by Sept. 13,1902.   High
Goods can be seen by application to
NOTICE.
NOTICE.
THIRTY days from date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal on the folio—1—
described lands :—
Situate west of Similkameen River, about
Improvement Certificates.
ingTDivision of Yale  District.   Where  locat-
Take notice that I, Thomas a. Rogers, Free
Miner's Certificate No. B632Q5, intend, sixty days
from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Re-
i further take notice that action, undei
37, must be commenced before the issi
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 23rd day of August, 1902.
THOMAS A. ROGEf
NOTICE.
Take   notice   tha
ty days from the date hereof, to apply
ing Recordea for a Certificate ! of Im-
s, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown
NOTICE.
Take notice that 1
gent for Hugh McRae
*o. B63249 ; John Mac:
ate No. B63364: Jshn
ereof, to apply to the Mining Re-
tificate of Improvements, for the
Notice of Forfeiture.
beinechapter i^Re'vUed Statutes of British f o'l
uinbTa, 1S97. in respect of the "Little Pittsburgh,'
Osoyoo^SMiningeDivision of Yale District.Britis]
Columbia, together with ail costs of advertising
fnyour co-owner, Thomas Bradshaw, ot   Fiftee:
Mile Creek Free Miner, who has   made   the r<
The
Vancouver
Breweries, Ltd.,
BREWERS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer
AND
Alexandra Lager
For sale  throughout   British   Col
umbi'a   in   all   the   first-class
Hotels,   Liquor   Stores
and Saloons.
THE VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.,
(The Amalgamated Doering & Marstrand
and Red Cross Breweries)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
F.-W. GROVES,
A. R. COLL., SC.  D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON,     -   -     B. C.
C. OUTHETT, A. R. C.,Sc,
Provincial Assap\
Analytical Chemist.
of
Control  Assays;   Complete  Analysis
Ores, Coal, &c; Concentration and
Amalgamation   Tests.
Results o( Assays toy return ot Stage.
Correspondence solicited.
Inland Assay  Office,
KAMLOOPS, B. C.
J. O'SULLIVAN, F. C. S.,
Provincial Assayer
BY EXAMINATION.
Assa3Ter tor 26 years with Vivian &
Sons, Swansea.
Complete Analysis of Ores, Coals, Etc.
Results mailed by return Stage.
Assay Office : Vancouver, B.C.
W. J. WATERriAN, M. E.
F. G. S. M. A, 1, n. E., Etc.
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
rand Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C.
...JAMES HISLOP..
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEER
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
.Princeton.B. C...
I    Wfltl't ALL WORK
I     YV clll   L Promptly Executed
Your        We can save you money
Watch ' on your Repairing.
Repairing."1
A full Line of Watches and the Latest Styles ol
Jewelery always on .hand.
W. J. KERR, Kamloops, B. C.
X
m
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
PAUL JOHNSON AT THE  COAST.
Give His Views on Coke Supply to the^
Webfooters.
Paul Johnson, manager rof the
Greenwood smelter was over to the
coast recently, and was not backward about giving his ideas on the
aggravating coke situation. The
Victoria Colonist has the following :
The mines of the Boundary dist-
• rict are all right, for although the
ores are low grade, they are illimitable in quantity, transportation and
treatment to make them permanently profitable.
What the country requires, said
Mr. Johnson (and Capt. Gifford
heartily concurred with him) is
comrjetition in coal mijiing. It .is
deplorable that the whole mining
industry should be at the mergy of
one coal monopoly, which, at any
moment, through some trifling dispute with its employees, may paralyze the business of the country. If
two or more coal companies w
operating, a strike on one would
not be likely to tie up the others,
and the smelters would be enabled
to continue working.
Another reason why competition
should be encouraged is the fact
that while the Crow's Nest Coal
Company lives to the   letter of the
law in supplying coal at $2 a ton,
the quality of coal supplied at that
figure is generally so inferior that
people prefer to pay a higher price
for a better grade. Then the company is not limited by its contract
with the government as to the price
of coke, and consequently ^can
charge what it likes. Again, the
higher price which it can obtain ior
coke in the United States often
tempts the company to ship the
bulk of its output across the line tc
the detriment of the Canadian smelt-
s.
It has been estimated by a competent authority that the Crow's
Nest Company has in its deposits
$144,000,000,000 worth of coal at
$2 per ton, so that even at that
price, it must eventuaily make millionaires of every one of its directors. A corporation with such a
gigantic- monopoly should be
brought under control of the gov
ernnient, so that the interests of the
province would be safe-guarded,
A proposition is now on foot to
develop the coal measures at Blair-
more, and smelter and mine owners
are hoping that it will take definite
shape. There is also a report that
J. J. Hill has some intention of going into the coal mining business,
which will still further relieve the
situation. The C. P. R. has acted
very fairly in the way of   transpor
tation rates on ore, coal and coke,
and is doing everything possible to
assist in the development of the
country.
Our Judges.
A most remarkable state, says
the Toronto Moon, is that in which
the government and opposition in
Ontario find themselves. The general elections left the Ross government with a majority of one claimed, which is, as everyone knows,an
impossible working majority. Besides this, there are several seats
under protest, the decisions of
which will decide definitely wheth
er the Ross government is the
choice of the electors or not.
In most countries the decisions
of these protests would be considered of sufficient importance to demand their immediate decision.
Not so in Canada. Here it is thi
custom for the judges to take their
holidays at this season of the
On the tick of the clock, off they
go, leaving the people to cool their
heels till September, when they may
be pleased to resume work. Of
course their action is legal ; we do
not for a moment wish to hint otherwise (think of the fate of Mc-
Admas); but is this business ?
What business man would leave
his factory when an important
ter needed his attention, just because this happened to be the time
of the year when he takes his holidays ?
But—but—but we   shall   say no
ore in Canada.    There is  such a
dignity doth   hedge   a   judge, etc.
We   can   think   hard,   though !—
Rossland World.
Subscribe for the Star, only $2
per annum.
G. nURDOCH
Blacksmithing & Horseshoeing
Shop on cor. Bridge and Angelia
Avenue.
PRINCETON,    B. C.
TICMTrS
Myrtle
Navy
Tobacco
Largest Sale in Canada <
Princeton's Leading store!
LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED
STOCK OF GENERAL MERCHANDISE   IN THE SIMILKAMEEN DISTRICT.
Hardware, Groceries, Boots and Shoes, Clothing, Furnishings, Dry
Goods, Hats and Caps, Glassware, Crockery, &c, &c.
We make a specialty of Supplying Prosper
tors with everything they need in the hills.
Buy where your orders can be filled and wants promptly attended to.
A. E. HOWSE.
Lake of the Woods Flour Always in Stock.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
Sep.   6, 1902.
Platinum is More Valuable-
A report upon the production of
platinum in the . United States in
1901 has been prepared for the United States geological survey, and
will shortly be published. The output during the year aggregated
1408 ounces of crude platinum valued at $27,526, as .compared with
400 ounces valued at $2500 in 1900.
The production for 1901 is the largest since the statistics have been
compiled in 1880.
The supply of . platinum in the
United States in recent years has
been obtained as a secondary product from gold placer deposits in
Trinity and Shasta counties, California. The occurrence of the metal has been reported in many other
gold placers of California as well ai
in - Washington, Oregon, Idaho,
Montana and Alaska, but the de-
posits have not been sufficiently
rich to place the extraction of the
metal on a profitable basis, although
eventually in the states named it is
thought it will be developed in larger quantities.
I The most noteworthy feature of |
the platinum industry in the United States during 1901 was the discovery of the metal in the copper
ores of the Rambler mine, near Encampment, in the Medicine Bow
mountains, of Albany county,. Wy^
oming. As a result of this discovery the survey calls attention to the
importance of examining all copper
ores for metals of the platinum
group.
The imports of platinum during
1901 were valued at $1,695,895, as
compared with $1,762:020 in 1900.
The world's annual, production of
platinum for the last few years has
ranged between 160,000 and 170,-
000 ounces, of which, as far as can
be ascertained, Russia supplies at
least 150,000 ounces, the remainder being obtained mainly from
South America.
During the last two years the
price of platinum has steadily advanced'from its lowest point in 1895
"of $10 an ounce to $21 per ounce,
-which was reached in the latter
part of 1901. The demand is in
excess of the supply, and it is believed the price will continue to advance.
Cautious   Orangemen.
A contemporary tells the story of
a cautious Orangeman of Belfast,
says the Westminster Gazette. Tl e
magistrates there bad announced
they would inflict a fine of 40 shillings on tny person expressing in
public too warm a regard for the
future state of any political antagonist. A policeman subsequently
came upon an Orangeman lying in
dignified ease in the gutter, and
muttering "To—," "To—." Apparently he could get no further
than the name of the destination to
which he desired to consign somebody or something, so the cc notable, with " a case " in view endeavored to help him out. " To where
with whom ? " he inquired, 1 ending over the Orangeman. But the
northern caution asserted ilself.
Rising into a sitting posture, the
Orangeman gazed upon the officer.
" Finish it yourself,'' he said, " It
is too expensive for me."   .
.RUBBER STAHPS.-.-.
Seals, Stencils, Price Markers, Printing Wheels, Numbering Machines,
Band Dating and Numbering Stamps,
Check Perforators, Rubber Type, Printing Presses, &c, &c.
FRANKLIN STAHP WORKS,
Vancouver, B. C.
Prospccrors
....StOPI
If you want to Outfit
cheaply and quickly,
do so at the	
KEREMEOS STORE
WM. HINE & Co.,
u can save time and
ike money by buying,
ar outfit at the point
u start prospecting.
Mining Supplies
of Every
Agents for
Celebrated Mason & Risch Pianos
J.A.SCHUBEftf
HAS OPENED A BRANCH STORE AT
HEDLEY   CITY,
i
1
1
1
%  And begs to announce that he will carry everything  required  in a  Mir
Camp.    A Complete New Stock at Modern Prices.
V    A Car of N. W. Oats and a Car- of Columbia Milling Company
Flour just arrived at Penticton.
Shingles and Builders' Supplies always on hand.
J. A. SCHUBERT.
—    MlSS I ON, BC.
Advertise in the g STAR."
Hotel Tulameen
The
Largest and Most Home-    ;
like Hotel in Princeton is now    j
open
for the travelling public.
Our
bar  is  stocked with the    |
Best
of Wines,   Liquors   and    j
Cigars.    Special efforts will be    j
made
in the Cullinary Depart-    j
ment
and tables  will be furn-    \
ished
with the best the market    i
affords.
PRINCETON,  B. C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
SCAL.3 OF PRICES ON LEGAL NOTICES.
words and under, per notice..
re for coal, mineral and land n
•s Must Invariably b'.
Coal  Location   Notices.
NOTICE,
days f
: I intend to apply t
coal on the followin
NOTICE.
To James Anderson,
Late of Princeton.
wo bay mares and set of buggie harness
me for pasturage and storage for the
! and pay all expenses for feed, storage, <
1 after thirty days from the date of
:e, sell the same tq defray expenses.
CHAS. 1
nceton, B. C, August 20,1902.
DRIARD HOTEL,
NICOLA LAKE,
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT.
G. W. SIMPSON, (Late Steward C. P. N. Co's Steamers,) Manager.
Notice   of Forfeiture.
o WM. HOPKINS £
You are hereby noci
ie sum of.(JioacxOon
I   THOMAS GRAHAM.
i that I have expended
lold said claim under provisic
24 ot the Mineral Act, such being tne
t required to hold satd cla'm -for the year
I iqoi. And if at the expiration, of qo days of publication of this notice you fail or refuse to contribute your portion of the expenditure required
under Section 24, together with all cost of adver-
Dated at Keremeos this :nd day of  Tune. 1002.
. I Jun-7 By HALLIBURTON
Land Notices.
NOTICE.
date I intend to apt
nerof Lands and W
rchase80ac.es of lar
rer as follows :—Comr
1; thenc
; then
;othe
chai
river to point of co
80 acres more or less.
The land Is required for residential and <
RICHAUD H. PARKINSON,
Agent for
IRENE M. PARKINSC
A Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods   Milling  Co'y,
Combine to produce the finest grade
of flour on the market.
Try Best Patent Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
Daily Service to and from
VANCOUVER,
VICTORIA,
MONTREAL,
TORONTO,
ST. PAUL,
And all points East and West.
Fast   Steamer   Service   from Vancouver to
CHINA,
JAPAN,-     -
AUSTRALIA,
.     ALASKA,
HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.
For full   information   and   illustrate!
pamphlets, &c,.apply   to   any C. P. R
E. J. Coyle, A. G. P. A.,
VANCOUVER, B. C
Similkameen
Meat Market, mmag^.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Heats.
Livery, Feed Stable and Pasture.
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen.
:r of secondhand saddles, blankets, ropes, cinches, and pack-saddles
Subscribe for the STAR,
and get the Latest
flining News.
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
WITH WHICH IS AMALGAMATED
THE BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEAD OFFICE—TORONTO.
PAID-UP CAPITAL,    ....      $8,000,000
RESERVE FUND, 2,000,000
Aggregate Resources over $65,000,000.
HON. GEO. A.   COX—President.
B. E. WALKER, General Manager.    J. H. PLUMMER, Asst.Gen. Manages
LONDON 0FFICE-60 LOMBARD STREET, E. C.
Savings Bank Department.   Interest at 3 per cent, per annum will be allowed from August 1st, 1901.    Gold  dust  purchased,  and  every   description  oi
banking business transacted.
C. W. HAEEAMORE,   -    Manager Kamloops Branch.
h«£F
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
TELEPHONE' BATH.
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Eines.
PeificM store
ALFRED H. WADE.
Post Master.
Notary Public.
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY BY BUYING
Groceries, Hardware, Boots and Shoes,
Clothing, Feed and oats,
AT LOWEST PRICES FORCASH.
Agent for Okanagan Flour Hills Co. .
Nothing but the Best on hand.   . Estimates Furnished.
MURALO WALL FINISH.
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its durability, pretty ttints, and the easy mode of mix=
ing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. As your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
-: Princeton !:
British Columbia,
%* m
m
>ki                           &
Lots for
• • •**7cUw • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $10.
Per Front Foot. <&<£
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft. and 33x100 Ft.
Terms:   1-3 Cash;
Bal. 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent, per annum. S>
nil          mi
Government Head-
quarters For the Similkameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and, Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River, JUpper Tulameen and Aspen GrovejJ
FINE CLIMATE
and PURE WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
wwwwww w wwwwww
Send for Map and Price List to &&&<&&
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION   FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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