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Similkameen Star 1902-08-02

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Voi.. III.   No. 17.
PRINCETON, AUG. 2,  1902.
ELECTION IN  THE AIR.
&&£ facets* /* u&f
Joe Martin Says It Will Proceed An
other Session.
. Joseph Martin, K. C, M. L. A., declined to talk to newspaper men on curren :
topics of the day while on his recent flying visit to Rossland, but to his friend
in that city he was not so reticent, ac
c. rding to the Miner, and some of his
statements and predictions anent the political situation are of considerable interest.
Mr. Martin is of opinion that there is
bound to be a general election in the
province before another session of the
legislature convenes. He takes this view
of the situation on the ground that the
government cannot hope to face the
house with a majority at next session.
He states that the delays in the last session of the house were not caused^ by the
desire of Opposition membfetrttrhampe
the transaction of business, but by the en
. tire lacK of preparation by the government and the slowness they manifested
in bringing down legislation. The i
on for this was the government did not
know where it stood at any stage of the
p jlitical game, particularly on the railroad bills. Mr. Martin takes unto himself the credit for having bowled out the
Canadian Northern land grant.
The ex-premier does not think much
of the personnel of the provincial cabinet. He is said to have made the statement that Mf. Dunsmuir was the only
man of honor in the cabinet; any of the
. other members would pledge themselves
in the morning and go back on the
pledge before night.
Party lines in the next provincial general election is Mr. Martin's panacea for
the legislative ills that have beset British
Columbia. Asked what part the labor
party might be expected to play in a
contest on party lines, Mr. Martin expressed the opinion that one or other
party must join hands with the labor
"men and make a straight issue in
campaign.
GEANBY   COMPANY
TO BUILD  FACTOEY.
A visitor from the Boundary brings the
I information that the Granby Company is
j  contemplating   the   erection   at   Grand
'  Forks of a factory in which  to manufacture the product of their mine  into  copper wire, copper rivets, etc..''	
Thi^eonrpany-haS^arned a reputation
for carrying its plans out to the letter,
and it is hoped that the present one will
succeed.
It will mark a new era in the mining
and industrial progress of British Colum-
If  the people of  the coast   cities had
been alive to their possibilities, extensive i
iron and steel works might now be in op-
ion in B. C. that could bid success-j
fully for the trade of the Orient.
In the same way the silver and lead
products of the Slocan might well have
been refined and manufactured in the
province.
But it has been left for the Granby
Company to point the way. They have
already succeeded in mining and smelting ore at a less cost than any other company on the continent, and the businesslike way in which they have gone about
it, without a single 6trike or lockout, has
elicited the admiration of all citizens of
the province interested in its progress.
It is a fitting climax to their work of the
past five years that they should now lead
in the inauguration of that industrial development for which B. C. is waiting.
SUMMIT   CAMP-
NATIVE SILVER FOUND
Messrs^Kemp   and   Comer of  Green
wood have   been doing assessment work
on the Celtic Chief and  Imperial  claii
in   Summit   Camp, for the owners, Mes-
Urs. Cowings and Cornell.
A ten   foot   tunnel was   run  on   each
On the Celtic a promising showing of
copper was found, and some very fine gi
lena was encountered on the Imperial i
which a little native silver \
ally met with.
Mr. Kemp has been working for the
past three years in the Sunset mine in
Deadwood camp, near Greenwood.
He reports business in all lines very-
quiet in the Boundary on account of the
coke famine, which has necessitated the
closing down of the smelters.
Before returning home Messrs. Kemp
and Corner will do assessment work on
the Noonday, on Copper Mountain, be
longing to Parker and Patterson.
AN OLD DISCOVERY RE-L0CAT1JD
Robt. Stevenson and Ole Benson have
just returned from a ioo mile trip, in the
course of which they staked four claims
onJDeer Mountain 18 miles southwest of
Granite Creek, on a lead which was disr
covered by Mr. Stevenson about 25 years
ago and staked by him at the time. The
country in which the claims are located
is'so rough and difficult of access that little or no work was ever done on them,
and they were held for years by re-staking. The lead is about six feet wide, of
white quartz, much discolored by f
stain, and carries besides a little copper
and silver, high values in gold.
From five tests made in Vancouver
Seattle, Mr. Stevenson got an average of
$108.75. The gold is partly free milling
and partly contained in tellurides.
^""The claims are only about 30 n
from here if it were possible to go direct
from Granite Creek, but this route could
only be made feasible by the cutting of
trail, so Messrs. Stevenson and Benson
were compelled to travel a distance of 50
miles in orde'r to reach them.
CHANGE IN MAIL SERVICE.
Rumors have been circulating to the
effect that a semi-weekly mail service
would shortly be inaugurated between
this place and Penticton.
Enquiries made of Mr. C. E. Thomas,
the local postmaster, elicited the information that no notice had been received
of such an arrangement, and that the
only reason for believing that such a step
was contemplated, was the receiving of a
letter from the Post Office Inspector, asking the probable cost of a weekly service
between this point and Granite Creek.
It is hoped the Dominion Government
will lose no time in furnishing us with
better mail facilities than at present exist between this place and the lower Similkameen. The present arrangement is
altogether inadequate.
>     HIGHLAND VALLEY.
John Y. Cole, Rossland, has been
spending two months in the Highlanc.
Valley, where he has, in common with
George Novack' important mining intei
ests. The Highland Valley is reached
by leaving the main line of the Canadian
Pacific at Ashcroft. The valley parallels
Nicola Valley and appears to contain
numerous promising mineral showings.
Mr. Cole regards the Highland anc.
Transvaal groups as extremely promii-
ing copper properties. Their greatest
obstacle is the ever in-evidence lack of j
transportation facilities. Petitions for
road improvements have recently beer
addressed to the Chief Commissioner of|
Lands and Works, and should bare some
fruit when it is borne in mind that there
are several properties interested that have
ore in sight which it will pay to ship.
HOTEL ARRIVALS.
HOTEI,
Robt Stevenson, Copper Mt; Dan McLeod, One Mile; J Peterson, Tulameen;
J Knowles, Siwash Creek; C E Oliver,
Hedley City; J M Sharp, Olalla.
HOTEL   TULAMEEN, PRINCETON.
I Laughead, Nine   Mile; F W Groves,
J V Lee, Copper Mt; J H Bromley, Brom-
lte3' Creek; E A   Norman,   Oxbow, Assa;
F P Cook, Granite Creek.
HOTEI, JACKSON.
Jno Williamson, Greenwood; T A Rogers, Capt Brigman, Granite Creek; W
Small, J H Duncan, Nicola; R Cramer,
J B Silverthorne, Gus Spearing, Granite
Creek; W Green, P Rowlands, One Mile
Rev A E Small, Lytton. .
LOCAL AND   PERSONAL.
J. H. Duncan returned on Saturday's
stage from Nicola.
Smith Curtis, M. P. P., is expected to 1
visit this district shortly.
Capt. Brigman is leaving on Sunday's
stage for his home at Oakland, Cal.
C. E. Oliver, assayer . of Hedley City, |
was in town Friday for a short time.        viJilisjH
W. Wilson made a quick trip from 20-
Mile to attend to necessary business. He
returns again Monday.  *" ^HU.a ^-t-**  ^
French Bros, and Day are doing assessment work on a claim of theirs located on Holmes Mountain.
F. Tennison and Gus Spearing are doing assessment work on the Olympia
claim on Rabbit Mountain.
Mr. J. M. Sharp of Olalla, came in over the Hope trail on Thursday, and left
for his home at Olalla on Friday.
Messrs. Kirby and Hine of Keremeos, \
have bought from D. Coutney a two- \
thirds interest in the Tulameen claim.
Rev. A. E. Small, Episcopal minister
of Lytton, arrived in town Friday and
will hold service in the School House
at 11 a. ni. Sunday morning. Everyone
is cordially invited to attend.
The V. F. M. & D. Co. have a few men
at work building   a road   from   the east
end of  the   Similkameen   bridge to the
mouth of the tunnel on  their coal work-   \
ings.    Mr. Ba'rr Hall is in  charge of the    J
Mr. and Mrs. Richter, Mr. and Mrs.
Gibson and Mrs. Silverthorne, returned
Thursday from a fishing expedition to
Mr. J. Thynne's place in Otter Valley.
They report trout very plentiful in the
Otter.
Spencer and Lang have returned from
working on the Marion and Lily claims
on Five Mile Creek. A 5 x 7 shaft has
been sunk 20 feet on the Lily, and a
number of open cuts made on the Marion.   Some good looking copper ore was
On Sunday there will be service at
Ashnola at 11 am., and at Princeton in
the dining room of the Hotel Jackson at
7:30.—Subject: "The Race." Every'
body heartily invited. Sunday school at
3 p.m. On the following Sunday service
will be held at the Nickel Plate Mine.
Alderman and Mrs. Biggar of Hamilton, Ont., are visiting Mr. and Mrs.
Howse of Nicola. Mr^ Biggar is a prominent barrister of the ambitious city.
Mrs^Biggar is a sister of MrsJg»,„o„ an^
algo Mrs. Thompson. It is noteworthy
to see three sisters meet together so far
from their old home at Grimsby, Ont.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON, B. C,
THE  PRINCETON  PUBLISHING CQ.
A. E. HOWSE,
SUBSCRIPTION B
n, One Year,   .....
Payable Invariably in Adva
:s furnished on arjpllcat
YimERALOGISl
the provinc:
mAjeraixx
The annual report of the Minister of Mines for the year ending
December 31st, 1901, has just been
issued. As the provincial mineralogist visit£d-this_district last summer, his report on our mineral resources was looked for with considerable interest. A large number of
prospectors thought seriously of
leaving the district in case Mr.
Robertson^said anything _in favor
of it. His reports of older camps
that have since done so much to
prove British Columbia a rich mining country were so uniformly discouraging that it was felt almost
necessary to our future position that
we should be listed in the category
of ill-favored districts. We can go
forward now with confidence in our
future : prospectors will take fresh
heart, and mining investors will
feel that putting money into Similkameen mining enterprises is just
like getting money from home, the
investment will be so safe.
Seriously though, does it not
seem a strange thing for a new mining country like British Columbia
to pay a man $4000 a year to go
around to new camps and do the
little " knock " act?
If we must have some one to do
it, could it not be done cheaper ?
Does Mr. Robertson expect prospectors, who have a hard struggle
to make" a living and keep up assessments, to develop their properties into mines ?
If he does not, what does he
mean by saying after examining a
25 foot open cut and a 15 foot tunnel "that no ore in any serious.
. quantity has   yet been   exposed ? "
Who expects a serious quantity
of ore to be exposed in such workings ? A ten year old boy instructed in the first rudiments of mining
would hardly be guilty of such a
silly remark.
Then again, what does Mr. Robertson mean when he says, in describing property on Kennedy
Mountain, that he saw no minerai
amounting to any " commercial
value?" This is a very indefinite
term. No mineral of any kind
this district, (with the exception of
placer gold and platinum) can be
considered of any commercial value, situated as it now is far from a
line of railway. If this is what Mr.
Robertson means we will grant his
description to be correct.
If he means, however, that with
transportation facilities the property in question 'does not contain ore
of commercial value we feel compelled to contradict him.
A mining engineer reporting on
this property for his company got
an average assay of $12.00 per ton
in • all values from samples taken
across a width of 60 feet, and it is
a well known fact in this district
that several conservative mining
companies have made good offers
for the claim.
In speaking of another claim on
the same mountain Mr. Robertson
says he found kidneys of comparatively pure mineral, but not sufficiently large to be profitably mined.
How he expected to see mineral
sufficient quanties to be profitably mined, in a 20 foot cut, we
find it difficult to understand.
We must also find fault with the
provincial mineralogist's assays.
His samples were either very
carelessly taken, or else selected
with a view to getting as low an
assay as possible.
From the Freddie Burn group on
Boulder Creek he got assays of
$3.20 iu gold.
A well known mining engineer
of ' this section, who assayed the
same showings a few days later and
before any more work had been
done, got an average assay of over
$6.00 to the ton on the first sampl-
nd $9.00 per ton on the second.
The Copper Cliff in Hedley
camp from which Mr. Robertson
got average assays of about $6.00
per ton in all values, has since
been sold to the Standard Oil Company for $52,000.00, and its former
owners estimated they had a . big
body of ore that would easily aver-
;e $10.00 per ton.
It is possible however that we are
finding too much fault with the report of the provincial mineralogist.
It is altogether likely that he had
instructions from the government to
ke as unfavorable a report as
possible in order to give them a
further excuse for doing nothing to
provide a railway through this district ; but the Similkameen will survive both the government and its
high salaried knocker.
Subscribe for the  Star, only $
per annum.
EXCHANGE  COMMENTS.
Four or five coal companies are
preparing to operate in the Similkameen and on the North Fork of
Kettle river. If they prove up
workable measures of marketable
black diamonds, the smelting industry of this section will not be at
the mercy of one source of supply
for their coke.—Phoenix   Pioneer.
There are a few companies operating in the Boundary that have
gone on in their business of mining
without friction and without paying attention to every little wind
that blows in the financial and 1;
bor world. Two of these are the
Granby and Snowshoe. They are
in the mining business for what
there is in it, and not to work the
stock markets.—Phoenix   Pioneer.
F. W. GROVES,
A. R,- COLL., SC.  D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer     ^
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR. &
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON,     -   -     B. C.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
1 ^ date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 80aces cf land on the Similkameen
River as follows:—Commencing at a post plant-
required for residential and othei
Notice of Assignment.
n the District of Yale anc
credits
of paying ratibly and proportionately, and with-
~-.id assignment was executed by the assignor
by the assignee on the 12th day of July, 1902.
meeting cf the creditors of the said Edgar
r Allison, will be held at the office of J. Char^
Mcintosh. Barrister-at-Law, Bridge Street,
iday, the   31st  day of July,
ir of tl
l   the
irtbl';rethe0raSssLffnreee(!Ufull p^icuters of*
[aims and the nature of their securities, if
eld by them, and notice is hereby given thi
:r the third tiay of September, 1902, the assi
/ill proceed to distribute the assets amonj
reditors of those whose claims or debts he
ave received notice, and that he will not b_ _ _
ponsible for the assets   or  any part   thereof so
NOTICE.
niCKETTS
MAR
GlIER
ITE
CIGARS
Largest Sale in Canada
A. R. BARROW,
;a. m. l, c. e.,
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
Steam  Plants  Indicated and  Fuel
Consumption Tested.
PRINCETON, B. C.
Hi
PELLEW-HARVEY,
BRYANT   &    GILMAN,
N PROVINCIAL Eli
ASSAVERS LI
I THE  VANCOUVER  ASSAY   OFFICE, j
ESTABLISHED 1890.
I Analysis of Coal and Fireclay a Specialty.
Complete Coking Quality Tests.
j Reliable PLATINUM Assays.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
C. OUTHETT, A. R. C, Sc,
Provincial Asssyer,
Analytics! Chemist.
Control  Assays;   Complete Analysis  of
Ores, Coal, &c; Concentration and
Amalgamation   Tests.
Results 01 Assays bg return ot Stage.
Correspondence solicited.
Inland Assay  Office,
KAMLOOPS, B. C
W. J. WATERflAN, M. E.
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
Eand Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C.
JAMES HISLOP	
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEER      t
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
Your        We can save you money
Watch   on your Repairing.
Repairing.
A full Line of Watches and the Latest Styles dt
Jewelery always on hand.
W. J. KERR, Kamloops, B. C,
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
PROFITS IN ONE DOLLAR ORE.
New Treadwell Process May Revolutionize Mining.
The improved method of mining
and milling adopted by the company owning the Treadwell mine on
Douglas Island, Alaska, which reduces the cost from $1.10 to 66
cents per ton, means a great annual
saving in the operation of the 800
stamps which the company owns.
As the ore averages less than $2
per ton, the new process means not
only a cut of nearly one-half on the
expense of the mine and mill operation, but it brings within the field
of profitable reduction a vast amount of quartz which under former
conditions would be classed as virtually barren and worthless.
The San Francisco Chronicle has
this to say on the matter: "The
new process will make one-dollar
ore profitable to work, and in the
case of the Treadwell mine the dollar standard will add millions of
tons of available quartz 'in sight' to
the corporation's stock. No one
save a practical miner can fully
comprehend the significance of a
profit in dollar ore. If the new
Treadwell process can De applied in
California, and it probably can, it
will bring into the field of operation an indefinite volume  of gold-
bearing quartz which now affords
no profit under the methods employed here.
" There are innumerable quartz
veins of enormous bulk in this state
which carry from $1 to $2 per ton
of gold, but with one or two exceptions the cost of mining and milling
has been higher than the value of
the mineral contents of these big
ore bodies. They have been condemned, therefore, as unavailable.
If a 66 cents per ton process can be
applied to them, these big quartz
deposits will possess a commercial
value which cannot be sneezed at,
and the gold-quartz resources of the
state will be tremendously expanded. If it can be applied to the
mines operated on the mother lode,
it will practically renew the lives of
those properties, because it will
make it profitable to extract every
pound of ore lying between the
walls of that great fissure vein, and
it will also pay to mine and reduce
much of the slate formation in its
neighborhood, which is gold bearing.
" The cost of mining and milling
on that lode has been cut down
from about $9 per ton twenty-five
years ago to $2.25 at present, and
now four-dollar ore is worked at a
profit. But there is a vast reserve
in the vein, carrying from $2 to $3
per ton, which nobody can afford to
touch with   a $2.25   process, all of
which will yield a big profit for
working if the new process of the
Treadwell mine can be applied to
it. Gold-quartz mining has reach-
a wonderfully fine point when
the cost of winning the precious
metal from its matrix is reduced to
66 cents per. ton."
its charge when a morsel of this
metal, weighing hardly a milligramme, is brought within a distance of one decimetre. A chemical
analysis of the new metal is render-
very difficult by the fact that one
ton of ore contains hardly one
gramme of it.
NEW ELEMENT DISCOVERED.
It is Called Radion. and is of Extraor
dinary Energy.
Prof. Mackwald of the Berlin
University announced at the last
meeting of the Psychical Society
that he had discovered a new element. The element in question is
called radion. It is active, and of
extraordinary energy. Prof. Mackwald has separatedJtixam-^adioac-
tive bismuth, so-called polonium
found in uranium ore. It consists,
as Prof. Mackwald discovered, substantially of ordinary bismuth, and
of a new metal in the proportion of
a thousand to one. The new metal can be separated by the electrolytic process. The rays it admits
are something like those of the
metal radium, but differ in being
almost completely absorbed by paper, as well as by glass. Prof. Mackwald has proved that a porcelain
tube heavily charged with electricity by rubbing, immediately lowers
J. O'SULLIVAN, F. C. S.,
Provincial Assayer
BV EXAMINATION.
Assayer tor 26 years with Vivian &
Sons, Swansea.
Complete Analysis of Ores, Coals, Etc.
Results mailed by return Stage.
Assay Office : Vancouver, B.C.
Don't Blame the Cook
If the Bread is Bad	
It may be the fault of the flour.
To insure good bread buy the  Best Patent Brand made of Manitoba  Hard
Wheat,   by   the   Lake   of    the
Woods   Milling   Company.
Remarhable for Strength and Purity
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
Q. riURDOCH
Blacksmithing & Horseshoeing
Shop on cor. Bridge and Angelia
Avenue.
PRINCETON,    B.C.
?^ww^
Princeton's leading store I
LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED
STOCK OF GENERAL MERCHANDISE   IN THE SIMILKAMEEN DISTRICT.
Hardware, Groceries, Boots and Shoes, Clothing, Furnishings, Dry
Goods, Hats and Caps, Glassware, Crockery, &c*, &c*
We make a specialty of Supplying Prospec=
tors with everything they need iii the hills.
Buy where your orders can be filled and wants promptly attended to.
A. E. HOWSE.
Lake of the Woods Flour Always in Stock.
iA(**g^
jfcfcfc
 ~ ]"-' I
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
POETS AFTER TRACY.
A telegraph operator in Victoria
who was bothered by everybody
asking him for news about Tracy,
the notorious outlaw, finally became tired of being questioned, and
perpetrated the following verses
which he ticked over the wire to
troublesome inquirers :—
j NEWS OF THE BATTLE.
News of battle ! News of battle !
Hark, 'tis ringing down the street!
And the pavements of Seattle
Bear the clang of hurrying feet.
See the hordes of gallant warriors,
Armed and eager for the fray,
Hunting for the outlaw Tracy
In the wilds of Yesler Way.
See their cartridge belts and pistols,
• See their rifles, gleaming bright.
They won't do a thing to Tracy—
That is, while he's out of sight.
News of battle ! Have they caught him ?
Has death closed his path of crime?
Not quite—but he's now surrounded
For the ninety-second time.
Later bulletins arriving!
Hear the watching hundreds groan.
" Tracy has again levanted—
Present whereabouts unknown."
And they still are chasing Tracy ;
I He's the smoothest rogue unhung.
Pretty soon he'll have them crazy—
Go it, Tracy, while you're young.
Government Must Collapse.
• Smith Curtis, M. P. P., isVeport-
ed by Rossland World as as saying
in a recent interview :
" It is probable a general election will be held before another
session. The government cannot
hope if it meets the house again to
carry any legislation, because of its
small and often uncertain majority.
Its actions last session are so universally condemned by the people
that the opposition, which happens
to represent about 40 per cent,
more of the electorate than the government party of Dunsmuirites and
Martinites, will feel justified in obstructing and refusing to allow it to
do any business, especially as the
recently adopted redistribution act
shows how grossly unfair is the
present representation. ' The best
commentary on the worse than
weakness and incapacity of the government is shown by the fact that
from the very first week of the session the electors   looked   upon the
sitting of the legislature as a menace to the welfare of the province,
and many a fervent "Thank God"
was uttered when the house was
prorogued and the government was
balked for a time at least in its m
endeavor to give away the best part
of the people's patrimony to railway grafters and to friends of the
government cliques and  claquers."
Subscribe for the  Star, only $2
per annum.
The
Vancouver
Breweries, Ltd.,
BREWERS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer
AND
Alexandra Lager
For sale  throughout   British   Columbia   iu  all   the   first-class
Hotels,   Liquor   Stores
and Saloons.
THE VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Prospectors
...KSTOPF
If you want to Outfit
cheaply and quickly,
do so at the	
KEREMEOS STORE
WM.HINE&Co.,
You can save time and
make money by buying
your outfit at the point
you start prospecting.
Mining Supplies
of Every
j. A. SCHUBERT
HAS OPENED A BRANCH STORE AT
HEDLEY   CITY,
And begs to announce that he will carry everything  required  in a  Mining
Camp.   A Complete New Stock at Modern Prices.
A Car of N. W. Oats and a Car of Columbia Milling Company's
Flour just arrived at Penticton.
Shingles, and Builders' Supplies always on hand.
J. A. SCHUBER^fei
For Connoisseurs Only* m
Can be had at the ^3Sp*fe
Hotels of
Princeton
and all other first-class  hotels
throughout the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,
LIMITED,
VICTORIA, B. C,
Sole Agents*
Hotel Tulameen
The Largest and Most Home-    j
like Hotel in Princeton is now
open for the travelling public.
Our  bar is  stocked with the
Best  of Wines,   Liquors   and
j Cigars. Special efforts will be
made in the Cullinary Department, and tables will be furnished with the best the market
j    affords.
PRINCETON,   B. C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
 Aug. 2 1902.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
SCALE OF PRICES ON LEGAL NOTICES.
j words and under, per n<
each subsequent one,
\        Fees Must Invariably be
Coal  Location   Notices.
NOTICE.
THIRTY days from date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
chains north, So chai
it   80 Chi!
Said land is situated on the north bank of
Whipsaw Creek, and joining the Scott Ranch,
containing 640 acres.
P. n. WILSON.
H. H. PITTS, Agent.
Dated July 22,1902.
NOTICE.
k of One   Mile   Creek,
a, commencing at post N
NOTICE.
orks
THIRTY days from date  I intend to  apply
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and v—'
for a license to prospect for coal on the foll<
described lands :—
Situate on One Mile at the ifiouth of Summe
Creek, commencing at post No. 1,
80 chains north, 80 chains west, back to post,
NOTICE.
THIRTY days from date  I intend to apj
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and V
for a license to prospect for coal on the folio
described lands :—
Situate on the east bank of One Mile  Cr<
all 640 acres.
GEORGE BEaVER. Locator.
Dated June 23, 1902.
NOTICE.
MOTICE is hereby given that sixty days after
l~ date I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 160 acres  of mountain   pasture  land
at a point 20 chains east of H. H. Thomas' N. E.
June 5,1902.
Jun-7
CURRIE SCHISLER.
Notice   of Forfeiture.
dollars in labor
o hold said claim und<
if the   Mineral   Act. s
o hold
1 fail 01
expiration of 00 days of pub-
yested in the subscriber.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
Daily Service to and from
VANCOUVER,
VICTORIA,
MONTREAL,
TORONTO,
ST. PAUL,
And all points East and West.
Fast   Steamer   Service   from Vancouver to
CHINA,
JAPAN,
AUSTRALIA,
ALASKA
HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.
For full   information   and   illustrated
pamphlets, &c, apply   to   any C. P. R.
E. J. Coyle, A. G. P. A.,
VANCOUVER, B. C
Similkameen Meat Market, """'SSr.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Heats.
Livery, Feed Stable and Pasture.
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen.
A number of second hand saddles, blankets, ropes, cinches, and pack-saddles, for
Subscribe for the STAR, andn&t"iwtest
*THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
WITH WHICH IS AMALGAMATED
THE BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEAD OFFICE—TORONTO.
PAH) UP CAPITAL,    ....      $8,000,000
KESEEVE FUND,    -      -      -      -      -    2,000,000
Aggregate Resources over $65,000,000.
HON. GEO.  A.   COX—President.
B. E. WALKER, General Manager.    J. H. PLUMMER, Asst. Gen. Manager
LONDON OFFICE-60 LOMBARD STREET, E. C.
Savings Bank Department.   Interest at 3 per cent, per annum will be allowed from August 1st, 1901.   Gold dust purchased, and every   descriptioi
banking business transacted.
C. W. HALLAMORE,   -    Manager Kamloops Branch.
DRIARD HOTEL,
NICOLA LAKE,
JOS. R. A. RICHARDS, Manager.
8At the foot of Nicola Lake.    Best Summer Resort
in the Province.
Good Roorns^
Good  Tabk,
h • Good   Liquors*
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines.
Penticton Store
ALFRED II. WADE.
Post Master. Notary PuMIc
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY BY BUYING
Groceries, Hardware, Boots and Shoes,
Clothing, Feed and oais,
AT LOWEST PRICES FORCASH.
Agent for Okanagan Flour Hills Co.
Nothing but the Best on hand. Estimates furnished.
MURALO WALL FINISH.
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its durability, prettyftints, and the easy mode of mixing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. As your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
vancouvejrTb. C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
: PRINCETON!:-
British Columbia,
n
Lots for
• ••^dlC • • •
PRES||PRICESOF
llllTS
From $2.00 to $10*
Per Front Foot.*£*£
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft. and 3^)0 Ft.
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
Bal. 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent, per annum. *£
Government Head-
quarters fOr tfte Similkameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of ftge Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit,' fRodhe River, JUpper Tulameen and Aspen Grove*
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
wmmww w wmmm
Sjnl for Map and Price List to *£.*^ «£ & •£
ERNESXr^ATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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