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Similkameen Star 1903-06-13

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 Vol. iv.   No. 9.
PRINCETON, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 1903.
$2 a Year.
RODGERS TO BUILD
Electric Power and Light Plant Near
Hedley City.
M. K. Rodgers of the Nickel Plate Co.
is reported to have purchased a J>ioo,ooc
electric plant from the Wcstinghouse
people of Seattle, which will be installed
near Hedley on the Similkameen ri
It will furnish power for the stamp mill
and will probably also supply light for
Hedley Citv.
Amending Assessment Act.
A. L. Belyea, Secretary of the Provincial Mining Association, is sending the
following letter to branch
throughout the province :
" The Executive Committee wish that
the utmost publicity be given to the following extracts from the act just passed
amending the " Assessment Act.'
erence is made to the date (June 30th)
when time for filing affidavits of work
expires, and to the provisions for exemption from taxation where work is done
upon one or more of a group.
"Assessment Act Amendment Act,
1903."—" Section 6 (amending old
19.)—Provided, however, that if the
owner of any such claim shall establish,
to the satisfaction of the assessor, that the
sum of two hundred dollars has been
pended upou such claim in mining
development work during the y
ceding the date when the tax becomes
payable, then the tax shall not be levied
in respect thereof; and in order to entitle
the owner to benefit by this provision he
must produce to the assessor a detailed
statement showing the nature of the
work performed and the amount expend
ed upon said claim, duly sworn to as true
and correct, before the assessor
tice of the peace, and this statement must
be filed with the assessor on or before the
said 30th day of June in each and
year in which he claims exemption from
" Provided further, that any owner of
adjoining crown granted mineral or
placer claims not exceeding eight in
number of such claims, shall be allowed
to perform in mining development work
during the year preceding the date when
the tax becomes payable, upon any one
or more of such adjoining claims the full
value,at the rate of two hundred dollars
per claim, to entitle all of such claims to
exemption in lien of the tax, but subject
however, to said owner producing to the
assessor a detailed statement showing the
nature of the work performed and the
amount expended, duly sworn to as correct and true before the assessor or a justice of the peace, which statement shall
be filed with the assessor on or .before the
said 30th day of jpne in  each and every
F. W. Groves, P.L.S., returned early in
the week from surveying the June Bug
mineral claim on Copper mountain for
Snowden Bros.   •       If
M'BRIDE PREMIER
House Prorogued—Dissolution
Will Follow—Martin Resigns Leadership.
The charges brought against Col. Prior
by Smith Curtis, member for Rossland,
in regard to the Chimney creek bridge
contract resulted in the dismissal of the
first minister by the Lieut.-Governor,
who called upon Richard McBride, member for Dewdney and leader of the Opposition in the legislature, to form a gov-
Contrary to the expectations of many
the new premier selected a Conservative
ministry throughout, consisting of Hon,
R. G. Tatlow, minister of finance and
agriculture; Hon. R. F. Green, minister
of mines ; Hon. A. E. McPhillips, attorney-general and Hon. Chas. Wilson,
president of the council.
The premier retains for himself the
portfolio of lands and works. The post
of provincial secretary has not yet been
filled.
The legislature prorogued on Friday,
June 5th, and a dissolution is expected
shortly. It will take several weeks to
prepare voters' lists, so that an election
need hardl3' be expected before Septei
ber next. When it comes, it will be held
to a great extent on party lines.
With the particulars of the formation'
of the McBride government comes also
the news of Joseph Martin's resignation
from the leadership of the Liberal party
in British Columbia, his object for sc
doing being to unite the Liberal party ir
the province—a condition felt to be impossible so long as he retained the position of leader. Before the house prorogued the estimates were passed.
No Use For Robertson.
The following letter, received by the
secretary of the Princeton branch of the
Provincial Mining Association, from the
secretary of the Nicola Valley branch,
relates to the resolutions regarding the
provincial mineralogist and the appointment of mine inspectors which were
passed by the Princeton association a
short time ago:
" G. E. Winkler, Esq., Princeton, B.C.
Dear Sir,—In reply to yours of the 13th
inst., I beg to state that your resolutions
s brought   before  a meeting of this
branch of the P.M.A. held at Lower Nicola last evening.   The one sponsored by
yourself   was    unanimously    endorsed,
while Mr. Knight's was laid over until
ie next meeting,  the  opinion of the
eeting being that it was asking rather
o mnch from the government.
Yours very truly,
H. S. Cmusby."
Coutlee, B.C., May 27,1903.
GREAT  NORTHERN
Manifests   Anxiety   for   Passage   of
Expropriation Bill.
Alex.   F.   MacDonald,   railway   contractor of Grand Forks, came in late last
week and is a guest at the Hotel Prince-
Mr. MacDonald states that the reason
for the vexatious delay in building the
Great Northern spurs into Phoenix and
the Granby smelter has been occasioned
by the refusal of a number of property
owners to sell the railway company right
of way across their gi ound.
The company is building these spurs
without a charter and is therefore cc
pelled to   purchase its right-of-way
advance.    In most province.', a railway
company is allowed to cross property and
settle afterwards for such damage as may
be done, but it appears that in B.C. such
a law does not exist.    In order to remedy
this defect,   which   allows a rival <
pany to block   the building of a
indefinitely if it be so disposed.   Smith
Curtis brought in a measure calculated
permit the building of lines the same
in other provinces.   This bill has passed
its first and second readings, but the dissolution of the legislature will prevent
it becoming law for some time.
Bon Garcon.
Mr. Ernest Waterman, resident 1
ager for the Vermilion Forks Mining and
Development Co. is receiving a downpour
of congratulations from many friends
on the arrival of a ten-pound baby boy
on Monday the 8th inst. Mother and
child are both getting on nicely and th<
is a rich pay chute of joy in the house
Liberal Convention.
The Liberals of Keremeos issued a call
for a convention to be held at that place
on June 26th to select a candidate to contest this riding in the Liberal interest.
Owing to the fact that the Fairview Liberals desire the convention to be held at
Fairview something of a deadlock seems
threatened. No doubt an agreement will
shortly be arrived at and a convention
held at some place agreed upon by all.
The water has been higher this sej
than for some years, the warm weather of
the past few days having melted the
7 in the Hope range very rapidly.
Both the Similkameen and Tulameen
:s threatened to become dangerous
jre now subsiding slightly, having
apparently reached their highest point
this year.
A resolution was brought before the
Vancouver city council asking the Do-
on government to grant a subsidy to
the Coast-Kootenay line. The resolution
pointed out the great benefit such a railway would be to Vancouver in giving it
direct communication with the great
mining districts of Similkameen, Boundary Creek and Kootenay.
LOCAL AND PERSONAL
Brief  Local News Items and
Personal Mention of People Here and There.
Jas. Hislop, P.L.S., was out Sunday to
Al. Johnston's Five-Mile ranch laying
out an irrigation ditch.
The thermometer reached its high
mark for the week on Wednesday last,
registering 95 ° in the shade. The mean
temperature was 86 ° and the
40.42 °.
The sitting of the county court has
been postponed to Monday, June 15th.
Gus Pouwels and Gus Spearing killed
two large cinnamon bears on Monday
last, one on Kennedy mountain and the
other on the Stevenson meadows.
T. W. Wirth has taken the place of J.
Roadhouse on the Welby stage running
between here and Hedley, Mr. Roadhouse
being required at Penticton.
A number of cattle are reported to
have been killed by eating a poisonous
weed on the range south of the Similka-
Wv S. Wilson of Hedley City paid
Princeton a visit this week.
John McFarlane of this place is in receipt of a letter from the collector in
charge of the ore exhibit at the Spokane
fair, who expresses a desire to have a
fresh collection of ores from the Similkameen for this year's exhibition.
The Princeton branch'o the Provincial
Mining Association will hold its next
meeting on Thursday evening June 18th
at 8 p.m. in the dining room ot the Tula-
The Vancouver Boaid of Trade passed
a resolution at a recent meeting endorsing the granting of a subsidy to the
Coast-Kootenay line by the Dominion
government.
Angus K. Stuart, writing to A. E.
Howse of Nicola Lake, urges that a good
exhibit of mineral specimens should be
sent to the St. Louis Exposition and
points out the value of such an exhibit
from an advertising standpoint. The
Nicola and Aspen Grove claim owners
have already got together an excellent
collection, but as yet nothing has been
this end of the district. Prospectors can leave specimens at the Star
oflice, where they will be cared for and
forwarded.
Constitution and International.
Messrs. Pouwels and Spearing left early
the week to do assessment work on the
Constitution and International group in
Boulder creek camp.   This group is the
property of A. Klockman of Spokane.
A lead running 9 per cent, in copper
and carrying a little gold and silver, has
been exposed in former assessments by
open-cutting.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
' The Similkameen Star
— Princeton, B.C.	
The Princeton Publishing Co.
A. B.  Howse,  Manager.
All cheques to be made payable to
A. E. HOWSE.
B  C.  JUDICIARY.
Examples of the power of the
monied interests to influence our
judiciary have been furnished re-
. cently in the report of Judge Walkem on the evidence given before the
Royal Commission — appointed
through the instrumentality of|
Smith Curtis to enquire into Duns
muir's connection with the proposed
Canada Northern grant—and the
position of Chief Justice Hunter
in the inquiry into the causes of the
strike of Dunsmuir's coal miners
on Vancouver island.
In the first mentioned case
Walkem decided there was no truth
in the claim that Dunsmuir and his
government were giving an excessive subsidy to the Canada Northern
in order to enhance the value of the
E. & N. railway, (Dunsmuir's pro
perty) for the reason, mark you,
that the land grant was practically
worth nothing, not even ten cents
per acre.
The same specious sophistry was
used when the Canadian Pacific
Railway Co. was built through the
Northwest and as a result an empire of 25 million acres ol land was
alienated from the people and has
since served to make millionaires of j
a number of C.P.R. stockholders
Walkem knows as well as an}
reader of this paper that the mineral and agricultural wealth of this
Province are dependant on our sys-
, terns of transportation and that
lacking facilities for shipment our
, resources are valueless. This is as
true of northern B.C. today as it
was of Manitoba and the Northwest before railway lines developed
it, and the Canada Northern Co. in
asking for 20,000 acres of land perl
mile were bargaining for something
of great prospective value.
A very slight consideration of his
argument makes it plain that
Walkem was appointed for the sole
purpose of whitewashing the conspirators who attempted to foist the
reprehensible Canada Northern bargain on the country. This may
be a good thing for Dunsmuir and
his lately discredited colleagues, but
it leaves a nauseating taste in the
mouth of honest people who have
been taught in the past to look upon
our judiciary as incorruptible and
above reproach.
The evidence in the matter of the
strike showing still further the bias
of our judges and their willingness
to serve the ends of capitalistic
greed, occurred in the examination
of a miner named Barnes who testified that the men had had no confidence in Dunsmuir's agreements
unless there was a strong union to
compel him to live up to them, and
that the miners would not seriously
consider any proposal for a settlement of the strike, which insisted
on the surrender of the union.
He was replied to by Chief Justice Hunter in the following words :
11 can tell you what will happen
if you don't settle. Mr. Dunsmuir
ill employ non-union labor, and
where will you be then."
One would think from reading
such an answer that instead of being
I a member of an impartial commit-
| tee of inquiry the Chief Justice was
the hired agent of the Dunsmuir
interests, engaged for the purpose
of trying to force the men to make
terms favorable to the millionaire
coal mine owner.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
The annual report of the Minister of Mines for tne year ending
December 31st, 1902, is just out.
About one half of a page is devoted
to the Similkameen mining division in which the reader is referred
back to the report of 1901 no less
than four times. The impression is
conveyed that the Provincial Mineralogist would gladly have left us
out entirely, if possible. This
course would be much preferable to
the misleading report of the district
published last year.
CHURCH    NOTICE
June 14—Princeton : Service 3 p.m.  S.S.
1 2 P-m-
—Princeton: Service 11 a.m. S.S.
2 p.m.   Granite Creek, 7:30 p.m.
June 13, 1903.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Mve^T'o]?•,0^ec^•^?•wh0dled", the Month of
of liSStoSattoa    °"e effects Lett.
What would be thought of a
business man who only advertised
his goods once a year ? If it is
good policy for a business man to
keep his wares before the puolic eye
it should be good policy for the
Province to supply the world with
up-to-date information regarding
the discovery and development of
its mineral resources, and not be
giving news a year old, as is the
case in the report of the Minister
of Mines. The Mining Associa
tion very correctly called the atten
tion of the government to this matter and asked for the issuance of
quarterly reports.
The Canadian Northern has sold
its Northwest land grant to ai
American syndicate for $12,000,-
000. The land was secured under
the cry of "Canada for Canadians."
11 there be any remaining crown
land worth having, give the publi<
a chance.—Vancouver Independent
NOTICE.
IllllllP^
NOTICE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty days i
x of VntSnd t°/SJ>ly to the chief Pom
'wM§MsM%
NOTICE.
chains thence west % chain!, then"   south 4°
oWi, thence east 40  chaius to   PO^t  of commencement W, A. DODDS.
Aspen Grove, April 21,1903. j 20
A Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods   Milling  Co'y,
Combine to produce the finest grade
of flour on the market.
Try Best Patent Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
TlCBfTFS
juijnie
Navy
Tobacco
largest Sale in Canada \
\ Helen Gardne
11 Alfred Coope
ling Recorder for a Certificate ottmprov
t fth y purp°se of obtaining a Crow
nd further take notice'that action, under se
uch Certificate of Improvement e ISSUam
ited this Thirteenth day of May, A.D. ipoq
WECUAM ALFRED COOPER
ALFRED JOSEPH	
NOTICE.
1VJOTICE is hereby riven that ti,,vt„^
lionet Vatdf aS|| |fSIT g
Princeton, May 2oth, I9o3.       | MURDOCK.
K W. GROVEST
A. R. COLL., SC.  D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON.     -   -     b. C.    I
For    Connoisseurs   Only.
Can be had at all first-class hotels through-
out the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,ld.
VICTORIA, B. C,
Sole Agents*
J
 June 13, 1903.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
SCIENTIFIC MARVEL
Photographing by Light Emanating
From Human Body.
The scientific world' stands amazed at
the discovery made by Prof. Arthur W.
Goodspeed, of the Randall Morgan Laboratory of Physics of the University of
Pennsylvania, that photographs ca
made from light emanating from the
human body.
Prof. Goodspeed, who has long been
recognized for his important researches
in the realms of the light ray, and who:
president of the American X-Ray Society,
has proven the existence of a hitherto
unknown ray, thrown out by human
beings, by means of which pictures can
be taken in five minutes, which is one-
sixth of the time required for the production of a radiograph by means of the
j X-ray.
The news of Prof. Goodspeed's achievement has spread throughout the length
and breadth of the land, and he is being
deluged by letters from scientists from all
r the o
fntry.
The indisputable proof of Prof. Good-
speed's remarkable discovery exists in a
photograph of a human hand taken by
means of the emanations of light from
the other hand.
Hereis Prof. Goodspeed's explanation
of the amazing phenomena revealed by
his discovery.
"All matter absorbs radio-active energy
in waves <Sf varying lengths and gives off
this same energy in waves of a changed
and definite length. The energy that
has thus been transformed is characteristic of the matter that gives it forth.
"The human body gives out the rays
or waves of this energy with comparative
freedom and force.
"It is to be presumed that the character of the human rays varies in an infinitesimal degree with the perspn, and that
each man, woman and child gives forth
not merely the characteristic human light
but a light that is absolutely unique •<
identifying.
"These rays from the human body
not sufficient to be appreciated by the
human eye. It may be that they
seen by the eyes of smaller anin
For instance, a mouse probably se
man in a dark room by the light 6f 'the
man himself."
Prof. Goodspeed conducted his experiments with the aid of a Crookes tube,
but the X-rays flowing from the tube
were not permitted to proceed toward'the
photographic plates. The object of using
the Crookes tube was to have Prof. Good-
speed's body absorb the X-ray waves and
transform them into a different kind of
ray, and from the latter the photographs
Prof. Goodspeed says, however, that
this process of absorption, transformation and diffusion of rays from the
human body goes on without the presence of a Crookes tube.
The Sudbury Nickel Mines.
Fifteen years ago the world's supply of
nickel was chiefly drawn from the mines
of New Caledonia, supplemented by the
Gap mine in Pennsylvania, and a few
isolated workings in Sweden and Norway ; today about one-half is derived
from the Sudbury district in northern
Ontario, where mining operations began
iu 1886 Some years ago experts employed by the United States navy department examined the Sudbury deposits
of nickel bearing ore (a pyrrhotite containing from iyi Io $% per cent of nickel
and from 2 to 4 per cent of copper, which
does not, therefore, deserve the name of
"kupfer nickel" or "goblin-copper,")
and reported that there were 650,000,000
tons of ore in sight, and since then other
important discoveries, some of which
already being developed, have been made
within an   area of about 2,000 squa
miles.   In 1900 the Sudbury district pr
duced 7,080,000   pounds  of   nickel   i
matte with   averages about ^spefcca
copper and 18 per cent nickel, ana thei
can be   no   doubt that its product will
eventually monopolize the world's markets, and   that  Sudbury is destined to
occupy much .the same position in'regard
to nickel mining that Kimberly holds in
regard to the   production of diamond:
Wherever ' strength,    malleability,   th
capability of taking a fine polish, and
freedom from rusting are required—as in
the construction of cannon, small arms,
armor 'plate,  boilers   and   machinery—>
nicJjeL^ste^I.' is in  recftieSt, and the fact
that the price of nickel has risen considerably in   the last two or three years
would appfear  to show that the supply
increased   pari  passij with the
demand.—London Morning Post. '
A General Banking Business
Is transacted by the Bank of Hamilton.
It has a reserve fund of over three-fourths
of its capital. Interest allowed on Sav-
ngs Bank deposits of one dollar and
upwards from date of deposit to date of
withdrawal. A. H. SKEY, Agent, Kai
loops, B.C.
NOTICE.
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
JSJOTICE is hereby given that the partnership
Dated at Hedley City this 15th day of May,
eve McKay, j       AMBROSE McDERMOTT.
QOOGOOQOQGOQOQOGQOOOQQQOOO
Straight
Party
Lines*
'WE ARE EXCLUSIVELY
SHOEMAKERS
AND CAN GUARANTEE -
Style, Comfort and Durability
IN FOOTWEAR
MANUFACTURED
BY US.
ThlAMES
HOLBEN
Company
OF MONTREAL, LTD.
VANCOUVER   B.C.
eooooooooooooooooooooooooo
J. PERCY & Ox,
WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS
VICTORIA, B. C
MANUFACTURERS OF
Clothing, Top Shirts and
Underv/ear.
Hedley Meat Market,
CHAS. 1 RICHTER, Manager.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
—HEATS—
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen.
.-.-.RUBBER STAHPS.-.-.
Seals, Stencils, Price Markers, Printing Wheels, Numbering Machines,
Band Dating and Numbering Stamps,
Check Perforators, Rubber Type, Printing Presses, &c, &c.
FRANKLIN STAHP WORKS,
Vancouver, B. C.
I Hedley City Stored I
j     A Complete New Stock of General Hercharu f
j dise always on hand, f
J CONSISTING OF A FULL LINE OF J
P Groceries, Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes; also fl_-
P      Builder's Supplies, Shingles, Doors, Windows, Paints, Wall J\
1- Paper, Hardware, Stoves, Nails, Drill  Steel, f
1 Harness and Saddlery. ■ £
Jf  Headquarters for Enderby Hungarian Flour, Northwest Oats, &c f
jj     ' J. A. SCHUBERT. J
Wood, Vallance & Leggat, Ltd.,
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Miners', Lumber and Mill supplies.
WIRE ROPE A SPECIALTY.
B*   C*   Agents  for   Black  Diamond  Files*
Send us your orders by Mail, and they will receive Prompt and Careful Attention.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
MURALO WALL FINISH.
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its dura=
bility, pretty tints, and the easy mode of mix=
ing and applying. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. As your deafer for a
color card or send direct to
McLENNAN, McFEELY & Co., Lt*L,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants;,
VANCOUVER, BrC.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
June 13, 1903-
SHAUGHNESSY'S
Statement  as to Non-Paying Lines
Questioned by Phoenix Pioneer.
The   following  . question     was    p
pounded to  Sir  Thomas Shaughnessy
president of the C.P.R., recently at Van
"When does the C.P.R. intend to com
plete the construction of the Columbia
& Western  road   from  Midway to Pen
Here is the answer that he is reported
to have made to this specific query:
"Just as soon as the company commences to secure some returns from the
lines already in operation. The company
will not build another mile of new roac
in the province of British Columbia and
those already built are paying. Our
lines constructed into the mining districts have proved very, very disappoint
ing."
Surely the astute president of the C.P
R. must have been misquoted in some
way. The question referred directly to
the extension of the present line into the
Boundary, and the answer must have
been along that line also, it is reasonable
to presume. If Sir Thomas was properly
quoted, he has laid himself open to the
severest criticism, as follows :
In the yearOcgoi the C.P.RTfreceived
from one company alone in the Boundary
—the Granby ' Consolidated—the neat
little sum of $368,000 for freights only
These figures were made public over a
year ago and have never been questioned
The   Boundary railway, something like
125 miles with its spurs, is said to have
Cost in round numbers $4,000,000. It was
bonded for $35,000^ per mile, and receivec
a rich subsidy from, the government be-
Let us delve into figures a little, and
see how the C.P.R, president's re
statement tallies with the facts. One'
'mining company alone paid over $1
per day freight, Sundays included, to the
C.P.R. in 1901. That sum would pay
interest on the cost of construction of the
Boundary railway for that year at th<'
rate of five per cent, and allow enougt
over to pay for the cost of the rolling
stock. Then there are other sources o
income to be considered, that from the
other large and small mining companies
general freight and passenger service
express, telegraph and mail services, etc"
If Mr. Shaughnessy expects any one to
believe such statements he will be wise
to quote some figures to bolster them up
for in the light of these figures, here
given', the Boundary railway has
doubtedly been one of the best paying
pieces of road controlled by the C.P.R.
Come again Mr. Shaughnessy, and give
your real reason for not building beyond
Midway. It surely is not because th<
Boundary branch is such a poor payinj
piece of railway.—Phoenix Pioneer.
Some Tall Financing. '
A remarkable state of affairs obtains
at Armstrong. Its weekly paper, the
Advertiser, is a year old and does not
a dollar. Things are different in t
parts of British Columbia.—Phoenix Pio-
IP YOU GET P" fi$ j
FY A CIGAR ONE HALF
AS GOODAS&MEr
Hotel Tulameen
The Largest and Most Homelike. Hotel in Princeton is now
open for the travelling' public.
JDiff bar; .is^stoG^^j^itaiv^eij:
;Best~2fj^Kf^is,  LiquorsvaScf^
fcissaijs*   Special efforts will be
made in. the^alHlI&ry" department, and tables^kjjB; be furnished with the best the mar^K**
affwd?. , t';        Y**f-li
PRINCgTON,. B. C.
JlSt QKK4
COMMERCIAL
wHtz
First Class Dining Room
Ntwii met
Hedley
GOOd BCdS
..No Chinese Employed..
rBEST BRANDS LIfifDORS'AND CIGARS ALWAYS ^T STOCK
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO TRAVELLERS^
HUSTON & McLEAN, Proprietor*
DRIARD HOTEL,
NICOLA LAKE,
The Hotel lias been thoroughly•rcnovatccl'ahH refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, Liquors and-Ggars.
TELEPHONE' BATH.
Headquartei
for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines.
^^^^*^^^^*A^¥W^^^^^MVM*^*****A***d*M*****^*A
Hotel '* Jackson
-~w~The Leading Hotel^~^
This   Hotel,   having
passed into new management, will be found fiftfe*^-'
class T\it| 'gj&gty   department.       **jj e*-- ■
Hot and Cold Water
Baths.    "* **
Hotel i Jadfeson
Princeton, B*C.
 JUNB 13, 1903.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
LITTLE MEN
The    Most    Dangerous   Of All  in
Public Life.
In parliament and in the legislatures
of the provinces  the  little  man is the
danger point.   He is the vulnerable spot.
He may   not   be dishonest,   indeed his
loudest boast may be that he cannot be
bribed, but because of the  weakness of
. his character or the narrowness of his
' views he readily becomes the tool of the
wily schemer or the plausible corporation.   When he is corrupt as well as weak
he is doubly dangerous.   And so every
good interest of the country needs to be
saved from the tampering of little men.
Some men seem to have been designed
after a little plan. Their circumstances
were favorable, education and travel and
unusual conditions of culture were theirs,
but they have no outlook, no enthusiasm,
no ideals. Indeed, one of the marks of
the little man is his fine contempt for
those who see visions and dream dreams.
He calls himself a practical man, one
who deals with facts and not with fancies.
His mind moves smoothly in an ordered
area of things as they are, and never once
does he  ' '
"Yearn beyond the skyline
Where the strange roads go down."
The possibilities of an' undeveloped
country or the significance of a world
project are nothing to him, because he
has no eye for the things that are not.
Canada's greatest need today, in Parliament and out of it, i£ imaginative statesmanship, and for this reason we should
beware of little men.
Many men who were potentially great
have become actually small b> the limi
tations, often self-imposed, of their life.
They devote themselves to their trade,
business,  or profession so selfishly or
sordidly  that • many   of  their   faculties
suffer atrophy;    Over too  many men 1
epitaph, mutatis mutandis, might be inscribed : "Born a man, died a grocer."
A man is saved from littleness by cherishing great ideas, and keeping himself
alive to human interest, and devoting
himself to unselfish service. It is the
mind that makes the man, and whatsoever sets free the intellectual faculties,
and stimulates the higher emotions, and
awakens the nobler ideals, and strengthens the truer impulses, and quickens the
deeper sympathies makes greatness possible for man. And the surest safeguard
against little men is in the men who are
great-minded, wide visioned, and strong.
-Toronto Globe.
New Cure for Consumption.
What is claimed by its inventor as an
itirely new remedial treatment for con-
imption   is  attracting the attention of
ng specialists and the medical profes-
Dn generally.   It consists of the inhalation of a vapor produced by heating a
of eucalyptus oil, sulphur, and
charcoal, and it is stated that it is more
effective than any serum or other remedy
hitherto tried.
Rebert Schueider, a druggist of Berlin,
conceived the idea while travelling in
parts of Australia where the eucalyptus
tree grows luxuriantly. Consumption is
practically unknown among the inhabitants of these districts, and sufferers from
the disease who   go there speedily im-
Herr Schneider, upon returning to Ber-
a, communicated his idea to Prof. Som-
erfield, a physician' of repute, who experimented  in   several   hospitals for six
months.   As a result, sixty out of a hundred patients treated by him were completely cured.     The inhalation   of the
vapor  kills   the  bacilli.    In  some ca;
the -patients were kept in an atmosphi
impregnated "with   the fumes night and
day until they shewed signs of relief.
Dr.   Sommerfield will read   a paj
on the subjecf before the Berlin Medical
Society at  the   end of April, asserting
that the   new   curative agent,  which
advance in the treatment of tuberculosis. 	
"I never see John these days. Where
is he now?"
"He's off * somewheres a-learifin' of
Latin and Greek."
"And what's the old man doing?"
"Splittin' rails in dialect for to pay
John's bills.
Nell—Mrs. Rittenhouse Squeer says her
husband was a perfect nobody when she
married him.
Belle—And now ?
Nell—Oh, now he is Mrs. Rittenhouse
Squeer's husband.
A man may be able to paint the town
red without possessing any of the car-
If you want First Class Footwear
Insist upon    -------
J. D.  KING CO'S
BOOTS &  SHOES
Nothing equals them for Style, Fit, Finish and Wear.
riaple Leaf and King Quality Rubbers.
WHOLESALE   ONLY.
Vancouver, B. C. J. LECKIE CO., Limited.
The Vancouver Breweries, Ltd.
BREWERS OF THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer
Ginger Beer
*& Alexandra Stout
*& Alexandra Ale
For sale throughout British Columbia in all the first-
class Hotels, Liquor Stores and Saloons.
The Amalgamated
DOERING & MARSTRAND & RED CROSS BREWERIES,
VANCOUVER, B. C,
Princeton's
Leading
Sloro
We
are
Now
'Closing Out'
Some
ODD
LINES
to Make
Room
for
MEW STOCK.
Arriving
THE^
Am Em HOWSE
Company
^LIMITED
PRINCETON
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
Juito 131 i9°3-
-: PRINCETON!:-
British Columbia.
Lots for
• • • aa^CLlC • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $10.
Per Front Foot*^«j£
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft. and33xJ00Ft,
Terms: J -3 Cash;
BaL 3 and 6 months^
with interest at 6 per
cent* per annum* «£
Government Head-
quarters FOr the Similkameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grovej
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
WW
Send for Map and Price List to «£ <£ «£ *& *£
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Ipdent Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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