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Similkameen Star Jun 6, 1903

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 HEMATITE IRON
A Large Deposit of this Valuable
Iron on Otter Creek,
C. Snowden and D. Cairnes returned
Monday from Otter Creek where they
were doing assessment work on the D.C.
claim, on which they have exposed
large body of hematite iron carryiug
$3.80 in gold. The lead is in the neighborhood of 100 feet wide and traceable
for a length of 1600 feet. It has been
posed by numerous open cuts. The
body lies between a magnesian 1
and a schist, and along one wall a band
of iron pyrites 10 feet in width parallels
the hematite. The iron pyrites is in a
quarcz gangue while the hematite is in £
matrix of lime. Small quantities of yellow copper are met with on one end of |
the lead, but the iron is fairly free from
deleterious impurities, taken on the
whole, and will doubtless improve when
depth is attained. None of the p>
open cuts are over four feet deep. F. W.
Groves, P.L.S., who wa°, out surveyi
the property, returned with Mesi
Snowden and Cairnes.
LOCAL AND PERSONAL.
F. W. Groves, P.L.S., left on Thursday
for Copper mountain, where he will su
vey the June Bug   claim   for   Snowdi
Bros.
W. C. McLean of Nelson, B.C., was
visitor here early in the week.
P. Johnson and C. Willarson have cor
pleted assessment work on the Bornite
claim on Kennedy mountain. This claim
adjoins the well known Red Buck
the work done disclosed a showing of
similar ore to that found on the latter
property.
The case for assault brought against E.
F. Voigt by Jim  Bole, a Chinese cook,
was disposed of on Thursday by Ms
trate Thomas, who fined the   defendant
$$ and costs, amounting in all to betw<
$14 and $15.    Mr. Voigt signified his
tention of appealing the case.
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Pigott have left for
the coast.
Barr Hall has finished painting his new
residence on Vermillion avenue.
H. H. Pitts came np the river Sunday
from Hedley and spent a few days at this
place and Ashnola.
Burr and Jones, who have been crown
granting properties on Copper and Kennedy mountains, left this week for the
Boundary.
The Ashnola bridge was carried away
by the high water on Sunday last.
W. G. Murray passed through town
Saturday on his way to Hedley.
School Inspector J. S. Gordon, of Vernon, came in last Saturday and inspected
the Princeton school. Miss Whillans,
the teacher, held a special session of the
school Saturday afternoon to allow Mr.
Gordon to leave by the outgoing stage
Sunday morning.
GOVERNMENT DEFEATED
Wells and Eberts Dismissed==McInnes Re=
signed==Premier   Prior   Loses
Control of Legislature.
/"VN A MOTION to go into Supply the Prior government was defeated on May
V 28th by a vote of 16 to 19. The defeat followed the dismissal of Wells
and Eberts and the resignation of W. W. B. Mclnnes from the cabinet. Wells
and Mclnnes both voted against the government while Eberts did not vote.
Col. Prior left the chamber to inform the Lieut.-Governor of the position ofl
affairs and on his return he stated the Lieut.-Governor had handed him a memorial
from Mr. Curtis stating that charges had been made against him (the Premier)
respecting the Chimney Creek bridge contract, and informed him that dissolution
was delayed pending an investigation.
The opposition to the granting of Supply was for the reason that if the Premier
succeeded in getting Supply, the Lieut.-Governor would be justified in granting
him a dissolution, which he otherwise would not.
A committee was appointed to inquire into the Chimney Creek bridge contract,
part of the materials for which were furnished by the E. G. Prior Co., Limited.
The all important question now being discussed is the selection by the Lieut -
Governor of a successor to Prior, the candidates for premiership honors being as
plentiful as dead leaves in autumn.
For the Liberals, Curtis, Oliver, Mclnnes and Martin are mentioned, while the
Conservatives are divided in their allegiance between McBride and Wilson.
With such a wealth of material to choose from the Lieut.-Governor may have
some difficulty in deciding upon who shall succeed Col. Prior.
In Vancouver, matters political appear to be badly mixed. There are likely to
be Martin Liberals, anti-Martin Liberals, McBride Conservatives, Wilson Conservatives, Socialists and Independents in the field.
The party line movement has gained considerable headway in the interior, but
the failure of both Conservatives and Liberals to unite on leaders is militating
against its growth. A new election can hardly take place in less than four months
as it will be necessary to prepare new voters' lists. In the meantime, conventions
and caucuses will be in order and the silver-tongued spell-binder will be abroad in
the land.
In this riding the sentiment appears to be in favor of a candidate resident in
the constituency, and the Liberal or Conservative tag on him will cut little figure.
What the electors are anxious to have is a member of clean record who can be
trusted when he goes to Victoria to uphold the interests of the province in general
and the district in particular.
Hira Monte Mining Co.
T. A. Rogers, of the Mira Monte Mining Co. and W. A. Clark, of Mountain
View, Cal., treasurer for tbe company,
were in Princeton on Saturday last. This
is Mr. Clarjc's first visit to the Similkameen and he expresses himself as highly
pleased with the properties acquired by
his company in this section. The scenic
beauty and climatic conditions prevailing
here also called forth his praises.
t Mr. Rogers states that it is the intention of the company to continue the tunnel on the big porphyry dyke between
here and Granite creek and to carefully
sample different portions of the dyke for
pay shoots. The place from which the
large assay of $248 in gold was obtained
last seasou will be paid, particular atten-
High water in the rivers is rapidly subsiding. Danger from floods is about over,
Government-Owned Railways.
Hon. Mr. Blair delivered his statement
on the Intercolonal railway on May 28.
He spoke in favor of a government line
to the Pacific coast, and announced a surplus for the current year on the Intercolonial of $ 125,000. He made a long argument in favor of government ownership, and spoke of the high state of
efficiency of the road Mr. Haggart
severely criticised the road and said that
Mr. Blair's management did much to
destroy the confidence   in government
A General Banking Business
Is transacted by the Bank of Hamilton.
It has a reserve fund of over three-fourths
of its capital. Interest allowed on Savings Bank deposits of one dollar and
upwards from date of deposit to date of
withdrawal. A. H. SKEY, Agent, Kamloops, B.C.
ASPEN GROVE
Big Surface Croppings of Copper Ore
Found on the Portland.
Stripping on the Portland, which has
been carried on since the work was
stopped in the shaft through an influx of
water, is said to have resulted in the exposure of an immense body of copper
ore, over 80 feet in width and of similar
character to that on which the shaft was
sunk. A. W. Wright, of the Portland
Mining Co., is now in the camp and is
accompanied by a mining engineer from
Terre Haute named French.
Starwalt and Murray have finished
work on the Buckhorn group on Bare
mountain for the season and report good
results. They have sunk an incline shaft
50 feet, in the bottom of which is three
feet of ore carrying copper glance, native
and red oxides of copper, and running
$7.50 in gold. On the group of five
claims between 90 and 100 feet of open
cutting has been done, disclosing in most
cases ore of like nature and grade to that
found in the shaft. The claims are about
twenty miles  from   here   via Summers
HEDLEY NEWS.
Work is progressing steadily on the
flume and stamp mill of the Nickel Plate
Co., the framework for the latter being
about all up.
Brick for the company is being burned
about two miles from Hedley ou the eastern end of the Similkameen townsite.
When the mill is completed, work will
be commenced on the smelter, for which
Indian reserve land lying1 between the
stamp mill and the Similkameen river
was lately secured. This will probably
not be for some time. The smelter and
stamp mill will be the property of the
Yale Reduction Works, which will be in
the market for custom ores (especially
yellow copper ores) when the plant is
ready for operation. The copper ores
will be needed in smelting the arsenical
iron of the Nickel Plate mine.
Danger from high water is considered
very slight, the only accident so far being
the washing away of a small cabin on
the creek bank last Saturday.
Huston & McLean have opened a new
hotel called the Commercial and are
doing an excellent business. The house
is up-to-date in every respect and well
deserves the large share of patronage it
is attracting.
Work is expected to commence on the
Kingston mine some time within the
present month.
F. M. Gillespie, the lately appointed
postmaster and mining recorder, has
fitted up a neat office in J. A. Schubert's
store, of which he is the manager.
The average maximum temperature for
the week ending Wednesday, June 3rd
was 73.28 and the average minimum 42.87.
The thermometer registered as low as 34
on May 28th and as high as 86 on the
30th.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
PRINCETON,  B.  C,
ME  PRINCETON  PUBLISHING CQ.
A. E. HOWSE,  - Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION RAT]
All cheques to be made payab
A. E. HOWSE.
DEFEAT   OF  GOVERNMENT
The defeat of the Prior administration on a motion of the Premier's
to go into supply marks the finish
of as disreputable and self-seeking
an aggregation of politicians as
ever burdened a young and struggling Province
All parties and governments re-
cbgnize and reward to some extent
the services of followers, and as a
result the " spoils system," as it is
generally designated, obtains in.all
parts ot the world where responsible government exists. ' It is usually regarded as a necessary evil
apd while not generally or openly
advocated or defended is winked .at
by politicians of all parties.
Though it cannot be said to be a
satisfactory method of filling government appointments, it must be
conceded that it is a very natural
one under our present governmental
system.
When, howeyer, in addition to
those perquisites to which the ruling party considers itself justly
entitled, we find a government
making deals with land grabbing
railway companies for the spoliation of the province, and favoring
grafters of all kinds and conditions
who profit by the dishonest alienation of the people's property, it is
time to call a halt and drive such a
government from power and its
members into oblivion.
In the case of the Prior government such a course should have
been followed long ago, and the
only reason it was not done was
because of venal elements in the
legislature greedy for bribes, i
valuing the loaves and fishes of
office above the principles they
were elected to uphold.
Let the electors mark carefully
their representatives that failed so
signally to stand for honest government and at the opportunity rapidly
approaching retire all such from
public life. The people of B.C.
have surely no wish to see a repetition of our late political rottenness.
The Island clique is smashed.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
The Prior government is a thing
of the past.
There will now be a chance for
the Mainland and the inauguration
of better things politically.
Mclnnes quit the Prior adminis?
tration like a rat deserting a scuttled ship.
Martin has a hard time explain^-
ing his inability to understand Bill
87". The electors of B.C. have
formed an opinion ere this of Joe's
unusual stupidity in this matter.
It has made him an impossibility as
leader of a united Liberal party in
this Province!
All honor to John Oliver, the
member for Delta. British Columbia owes him an everlasting debt of
gratitude for exposing one of the
most corrupt deals in the history of
this or any other Province.
Wells and Eberts were .fired—
Mclnnes quit: the Province as well
as the Premier would be well rid of
the three.   '
What's the matter with forming
a new party to be called the "People's Own" with John Oliver as
leader. If it took up the cause of
the people against the professional
politicians it would be sure to win.
Watch  Houston  of Nelson  and
lison of East Yale  getting under
the mantle of the Conservative party
n order to save their skins.
Whitewashed.
Last >ear Smith Curtis made certain
charges against the Dunsmuir Government and Mr. Justice Walkem was appointed a commission to enquire into
them. The commission proved to be
rse than a farce, it made a mockery of
th, it was a travesty of justice and its
abrupt termination was a fitting climax
to the miserable pretence that it was.
That the belated report of the Commissioner, just presented, should exonerate
the government is only what was expected, but it means nothing. The facts
brought out in the evidence, and the
:thod of conducting the  investigation
rob the
propriate   termination
episode.—Inland Sentif
^alue
It is
;andalous
used the expression " dainty, shell-like
ears," and the printer became mystified
over DeWruyter's horrible chjro'graphy
and made it '"dirty, shawl-like ears."
CHURCH   NOTICE.
—Princeton: Service  11 a.m., S.S.
2 p.m.    Granite Creek, 7:30 p.m.
Service 3 p.m.   S.S.
NOTICE.
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
n the Distri<
NOTICE is hereby given that the partnership
heretofore subsisting between us, the un-
hotelkeepers in the town of Hedley
this day dissolved by
Dated at Hedley City this 15th day of May,
Witness        )        CaRL N]
teve McKay, j
NOTICE.
NOTICE.
By Order,
HUGH HUNTER,
Registrar County C01
Princeton, May 16th, 1903.
NOTICE.
Take Notice that wf, William Al
nd Alfred Joseph Cooper, Free Mir
ates B54742   and   B54743   respective
thirteenth day of May, A.D. 1003.
WILLIAM ALFRED COOPER.
ALFRED JOSEPH COOPER.
NOTICE.
JOTICE is hereby g:
the Chief Commis-
F. W. GROVES,
. COIJv., SC.  D.,
Civil and Mining Engineer
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
UNDERGROUND SURVEYS.
PRINCETON.     -   -     B. C.
Where located:—Wolf JLake, South Fork
Similkanieen River.
Take  notice  that I, Ernest Waterman, agent
for the Vermilion  Forks g and Develop-
obtaining a Crown Grant of the above chum?
And furth
r take notice that action, under s
Jfsuch Oer
Dated this
28th day of March. 1003.            m
-23
NOTICE.
La Reine M
ethat I,  Ernest Waterman, ag
<y
for the Vent
Uion Forks  Mining and  Devel
cate No. H564S6, intend, sixty days from the d
ply to the Mining Recorder for ac
iwn grant of the above claim.
And furth
r take notice that action, under s
be commenced before the issuai
28th day of March, 1903.              m
-23
NOTICE.
No. B564S6, Intend, sixf
of, to apply to the   Minii
ining a Crown Grant of tl
NOTICE.
——-
Dated this 28th day of March, A. D. 1903.    m-23
T?^^f/fyc^Zi^ne^tenli0n5«^
for a quarry lease on the following described
NOTICE.
Copper Cliff and Copper  Bluff Mineral  Claims,
Copper Mountain.
south, 20 chains west; back to post, m aUr4o.*eres.
G. E. WINKLER."
Miner's Certificate No. B51146, intend, sixty days
corder for a Certificate of Improvements, for  the
NOTICE.
. And further take notice that action, under sec-
T^^*7c^\a%^J&a\\^L%
ofsuch Certificates of Improvements.
Dated this 29th day of April, A.D. 1903.         j 20
described lands :—
Situated on Nine Mile Creek, west of Lang's
NOTICE.
y-nd running So chains north, 80 chains west,
in all 640 acres.
VTOTIOE is hereby given-that sixty days after
1~   date I intend to apply to the Chief Commis-
S SPENCER, Agent.
Located 25th May, 19:3.
the'NicSla Division of Yale District, described as
east corner of Lot  905, running thence  north 40
80 chains east, back to post, in all, 640 acres.
j. MCFARLANE,
Located 25th May, 1903.
Aspen Grove, April 21,1903.                           j-20
For    Connoisseurs   Only.
Can be had at all first-class hotels throughout the province.
R.P.RITHET&CO.,Ld.
VICTORIA, B. C,
Sole Agents*
 June 6, 1903.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
LAND   GRANT  GRAFT.
How the Dominion is Being Worked
by Private 'Railways.
Sir William Mnlock laid an interesting
statement before parliament the other
day. It was in answer to a question as
to how much of the lands voted for railway construction in Manitoba and the
Northwest territories were still reserved
for the various companies, and what area
has been patented to each company. The
following table gives this information in
a condensed form:
Manitoba. Reserved.
Canadian Pacific. Railway 600,000
Canadian Northern Ry. 5,432,000
Manitoba & Northwestern Ry.       41,000
Manitoba Southwestern Ry. 313,403
Total
Northwest Territory.
Alberta Ry. & Coal Co,
Calgary & Edmonton Railway
Can. Pacific (main line)
Can. Pacific (Souris branch)
Can. Pacific (Pipestone extension of Souris branch)
Manitoba & Northwestern Ry.
Manitoba Southwestern Ry.
Qu'Appelle, Long Lake & Saskatchewan
Red Deer Valley Ry
Canadian Northern Ry. 2
Total
6,476,403
22,048
304,288
>6i5,738
."9.350
200,320
,460,000
,044,685
.777,4io
322,500
,898,000
Manitoba.
Canadian Pacific Ry.
Canadian Northern Ry.
Manitoba & Northwestern Ry.
Manitoba Southwestern Ry..
Great Northwest Central Ry.
Northwest Territory.
Alberta Railway & Coal Co.
42,764.339
Patented.
1,939.844
5.693
535.o69
5.736
Calgary-& Edmonton Ry i,i39,54°
Canadian Pacific (main line) 8,645,644
Manitoba & Northwestern Ry. 523,577
Manitoba Southwestern Ry.
Qu'Appelle, Long Lake & Saskatchewan
'Great Northwest Central Ry.
72,188
328,042
314,263
Total 12,115,374
Of the grant to the Canadian Northwestern in the Northigest Territories,
2,000,000 acres are along the Manitoba
and Hudson Bay railway. As the companies follow the practice,ofpatenting
their lands only as they sell them, it ma)
.be taken for granted that the Canadiar
.Pacific has sold more than half its original holdings. It has, however, secured
the charters of branches like the Great
Northwest Central ►and the Manitoba &
Northwestern, to which land grants have
dbeen given. The fact that the Canadian
Northern has over 5,000,000 . acres
land in Manitoba, of which less than
6,000 acres have been—patented, will be
learned with general siyprise. Tables
may easily be compiled which will giyi
some idea of the size of the area alien
ated.   For instance :
Area of Scotland 19,000,001
Assessed area of Ontario 23,000,001
Cleared area of Ontario 13,000,0a
Area granted to Mackenzie &
Mann 30,000.0a
Thus it will be seen that Mackenzie &
Mann have been given within two 01
three million acres of the combined area
of Scotlaud and the cleared part of Ontario. Their lands are more than twice
as extensive as the whole area which the
people of Ontario -have-rcieared in
one hundred and twenty years .which
have elapsed since the province began.
—Ozonogram.
Just Opened
COMMERCIAL
HOTEL
First Class Dining Room
Newly Fitted
Hedley
City
4    Good Beds
..No Chinese Employed..
^BEST BRANDS LIQUORS AND CIGARS ALWAYS IN STOCK
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO TRAVELLERS^
HUSTON & McLEAN, Proprietors
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^*S****W»AiWV^^^^i^^^*
Hotel I Jackson«
>~wv*The Leading Hotcl^-^w^
This Hotel, having
passed into new management, will be found first
class in every department.       §§ §§
Hot and Cold Water
Baths.     m m
iHotel 1 Jacksona
Princeton, B*C.
DRIARD HOTEL,
NICOLA LAKE,
The Hotel has been thoroughly renovated and refitted.
Everything First Class.
No pains spared to please the public.
Table supplied with best the market affords.
Fine Wines, LiquorsandCigars.
TELEPHONE' BATH.
Headquarters for Princeton, Spence's Bridge and Kamloops
Stage Lines.
Subscribe for the
CTAD   and get the Latest
JlAR,       flining News.
MURALO WALL FINISH.
This finish is more popular this year than
ever, and has won its popularity by its durability, pretty|tints, and the easy mode of mixing and ap^jlng. Put up in 23 beautiful
shades and white. As your dealer for a
color card or send direct to
McUlpJAN, McFEELY & Co., Ltd.,
Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants,
v?$$$ VANCOUVER, B. C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
June 6, 1903
HILL OR SHAUGHNESSY
Optimist vs.  Pessimist in B.C. Railway Building.
President Shaughnessy and President
Hill are both on the coast at the si
time.   Both have been interviewed.
President Shaughnessy says he will
build any   more railroads in B.C. until
jj the ones already constructed pay a dividend on their capitalization.
President Hill says he will build
the Granby smelter immediately, grade
to Phoenix without delay and cont
the Washington & Great Northern to the
cpast as fast as modern methods of railway construction will permit.
President Shaughnessy has received
bonuses, land grants or guarantees foi
every mile of railroad he has ever built
in the province.
President Hill built the Washington &
Great Northern from Cascade to G
Forks without  a bonus; land era:
tions and legal and ph;
al obstruc
junc-
of every kind.    Both 1
;he
courts, thi
i Do-
minion and Provincial
the corporation   of th
Forks bucked him at e
eg°
111
sand
spike was driven undei
Columbia to protest be
ment  of the   Province
•pr
$a
otest.
is  in  Bi
se the go'
iled tode
ritish
liver
him over 600,900 acres
of
coal land
with
which to defeat the Cro
w's
~Nest Pass
Coal
company.
.President Hill bought 55 per cent, of |
the stock of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal
company on the open market whil<
Shaughnessy slept.
President Shaughnessy is a knocker
who says the country is going to the
dogs through the interference and doini-
, j nation of labor unions. He cannot build
the hotel in Vancouver because of the
longshoremen's strike in Montreal,
cannot make any railway improvem
until the U.B.R.E. goes to work, and he
advises the people of British Columbia
*f to leave mining alone- and not get mixed
up with the Western Federation, but pay
all attention to agricultural-pursuits"in'
which there are no labor unions.
I Hill is an optimist; he says he has settled all   differences  amicably with his
■   railroad employees and harmony reigns
e supreme on his line from Lake Superior
to Puget Sound. He says that the country north of the international boundary
line is the richest country that lies out of
doors; that our mining resources are
stupendous: that the mines of the Pro
vince offer a safe and sure investment for
capital, and that the Boundary is due to
become one of the greatest copper camps
v Shaughnessy regards the boundary line
] as an impassable barrier. He would
sooner cross a divid? than pass a customs
office, and depends on the fetich of the
flag to work the people for an appropria-
Hill disregards all artificial barriers^
follows the natural grades, crosses the
boundary whenever he sees fit, and depends on good railroading for a profit.
The Canadian Pacific railway has cost
Canada three hundred million dollars in
land and money.
The Great Northern railway has cost
Canada practically nothing.
Shaughnessy was an American citizen
until he came to Canada.
Hill was a Canadian until he went to
the United States.
Within the next two years Hill will
undoubtedly be before the legislature ofl
British Columbia asking the privilege to
build more railways in this Province.
Shaughnessy will undoubtedly have his
agents working industriously to arrange
that the privilege be denied.
The question that presents itself to the
people of this  Province  is:   Which of |
these   two  men is British   Columbia'
Hill or Shaughnessy?—Ozonogram.
Over-Beaching Pat.
An English tourist on his arrival at
Dublin hired, an Irish cabby to take hii
and his baggage to one of the principal
hotels. When he arrived at his destination he gave the driver half-a crown.
The cabby looked at it in supreme contempt and asked him what that was for.
"That is your fare," said the English-
At this the Irishman became so violent
and abusive that the tourist threatened
to take his name and summon him.
"Do it if you can," said Pat.
The Englishman took out his note
book and walked round the car to look
for his name, and found it was scratched
1 obliterated,"
the tourist.
"Phwat?" says Pat.
s obliterated," said
Faith, then you're a liar," cried cabby
isn't, it's O'Grady."
On the Way.
3ow does you like de new preacher?"
asked Mr. Erastus Pinkley.
"Very much," answered Miss Miami
Brown. "He's got a good start. H<
knows a heap o''words, an' jes' as soor
as he gits 'em arranged in de propei
order he'll hab a mighty fine sermon."
Excusing the Dog.
"Madam,  your fierce dog here bit
just a moment ago."
"My dog?    Impossible!     That   dog
rouldn't harm-a flea."
"Perhaps he didn't know I had any,
Ruyter is not an author.   He'
chemist."
"Why so?"
"Every novel he writes becomes a drug
1 the market."
.-.-.RUBBER STAHPS.-.-.
Seals, Stencils, Price Markers, Printing Wheels, Numbering Machines,
Band Dating and Numbering Stamps,
Check Perforators, Bubber Type, Printing Presses, &c, &c.
FRANKLIN STAilP WORKS,
Vancouver, B. C.
I PIERCY&Co,,
WHOLESALE
DRY GOODS
VICTORIA, B. C.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Clothing, Top Shirts and
Underwear.
TICKCTrS
Myrtle
Navy
Tobacco
Largest Sale in Canada'
A Strong
Combination.
Manitoba Hard Wheat
and the Lake of the
Woods   Milling  Co'y>
Combine to produce the finest grade
of flour on the market.
Try Best Patent Brand.
JAS. J. LOUTIT,   Agent,
Box 158 Vancouver, B. C.
Hedley Meat Market,
CHAS. RICHTER, Manager.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
—HEATS—
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen.
Wood, Vallance & Leggat, Ltd.,
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Miners', Lumber and Mill Supplies.
WIRE ROPE A SPECIALTY.
B*  C*   Agents  for   Black  Diamond  Files*
Send us your orders by Mail, and they will receive Prompt and Careful Attention.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Hedley City Stored
A Complete New Stock of General flerchan-
dise always on hand,
CONSISTING OF A PULL LINE OF
Groceries, Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes; also
Builder's  Supplies, Shingles, Doors, Windows, Paints, Wall
Paper, Hardware, Stoves, Nails, Drill Steel,
Harness and Saddlery.
Headquarters for Enderby Hungarian Flour, Northwest Oats, &c
J. A. SCHUBERT.
'j
Advertise in the " STAR."
Hotel Tulameen
The Dargest and Most Homelike Hotel in Princeton is now
open for the travelling public.
Our bar is stocked with the
Best of Wines, Liquors and
Cigars. Special efforts will be
made in the Cullinary Department, and tables will be furnished with the best the market
affords.
PRINCETON,  B. C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
 June
THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
PROSPECTOR'S TRIALS
In Discovery of New Mining Regions
and Their Development.
The discovery of new mining districts
is no longer a result of accident, bnt the
intelligent search for mineral by men
trained by years of experience in this
business. The prospector is a man to
whom the mining world owes much. He
is a man of sanguine temperament, often
—usually—disappointed, but rising hopeful again he continues his search, across
desert plains, through rugged mountains,
and into almost impenetrable thickets.
In some instances the obstructions to his
progress are so great that several days
are required to reach some objective
point but a short distance away and
within plain sight. The discoverers of
the mines of Rossland were several days
in reaching the objective point of their
search after having made up their minds
to visit a particular red mineral-stained
hill. They were hampered b'y fallen
timber, dense thickets and deep torrents
of icy cold water, but they persevered,
found and located some of the best mines
in the district, though they did not profit largely by their find—the discoverers
of great mines seldom do.
Butler, the discoverer of Tonopah,
went into the desert of southern Nevada
when there was no unusual activity in
that district. He went, believing that in
that broad region, which had produced
bonanza mines before, there still remained a chance to make new discoveries of value. He made a discovery, the
Mizpah mine, and sold out at a moderate
price, sustaining the reputation the prospector has for disposing of great mines
. for:
uinal s
That the last great mine has been discovered in British Columbia, Nevada, or
in Arizona, Colorado, or California or in
any other great mining region, no one
believes, but what is required to stimulate search is the discovery and development of a rich mine. When this occurs
the immediate neighborhood is quickly
scoured by prospectors who search every
where, and take many chances which at
other times would not be given a moment's consideration. Claims are located
and shafts started upon nothing. That
there is no surface indication is apparent
but the hope of rich veins or deposits
below stimulates this class of prospecting and often satisfactory results follow.
Occasionally in old "mining districts,
where mining has been carried on successfully for years, a new find is announced where the existence of pay ore
was not even suspected. Discoveries of
this class are sometimes made in old
mines, where crosscuts are driven or diamond drill holes have been bored. A
discovery of this character has the same
stimulating effect upon an old district
that is so noticeable in a new one. And
this renewed activity in an old camp can
usually be measured by the value of the
initial new discovery. If it is a bonanza
development is given an impetus throughout the district, and this sometimes extends far beyond the immediate vicinity
of the new field. If it be of good but
not of extreme value, the result of the
stimulant is only noticeable locally.
Such great development as that of the
gold-bearing banket of the Witwaters-
rand has a stimulating effect upon the
whole world, but here, too, the ratio of
the value of the development to the intensifying of mining activity is proportional in the same degree that a more or
less important one would be.
The extensive development, equipment
and successful operation of such mines
as the Homestake in North Dakota,
Treadwell in Alaska and some of the
great copper mines has stimulated search
for large mines which will afford a
sonable but assured margin of profit.
Such operatious as these have done much
to place mining where it properly belongs, on a legitimate basis, and on the
same plane as other investments of equal
commercial     importance.   —  Rossi
Oh, merchant in thine hour of eee,
If on this paper you should ccc,
Take our advice and now be yyy,
And in this journal advertiii,
You'll find the project of some uuu,
Neglect can offer no exqqq;
Be wise at once—prolong your daaa,
A silent business soon dekkk.
The three causes:   "Congratulate!
old chap; I'm the happiest man on earth
today."     "Engaged,   married,     or
vorced ?"—Life.
lie Vancouver Breweries, LM.
BREWERS OP THE FAMOUS
Cascade Beer
Ginger Beer
S> Alexandra Stout
<£ Alexandra Ale
For sale throughout British Columbia in all the first-
class Hotels, Liquor Stores and Saloons.
The Amalgamated
DOERING & MARSTRAND & RED CROSS BREWERIES,
VANCOUVER, B. C
If you want First Class Footwear
Insist upon   --------
J. D.  KING CO'S
BOOTS &   SHOES
Nothing equals them for Style, Fit, Finish and Wear.
flaple Leaf and King Quality Rubbers.
WHOLESALE   ONLY.
Vancouver, B. C. J. LECKIE CO., Limited.
Princeton's
Leading
Store
We are
Now
^Closing Out-
Some
ODD
LINES
to Make
Room
for
MEW STOCK.
Arriving
THES
Am Em HOWSE
Company
^LIMITED
PRINCETON
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
June 6, 1903.
The Town of
-: PRINCETON!:-
British Columbia.
Lots for
• • CammSGLll %aS • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $10.
Per Front Foot.*£«^
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft. and 33x100 Ft.
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
Bal. 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent, per annum. <£
Government Head-
quarters For the Similkameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grovej
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
Send for Map and Price List to & *&> *& <& *&
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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