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Similkameen Star 1900-05-05

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Full Text

 PRINCETON, B. C, SATURDAY, MAY 5th, 1900.
$2.00 Per Year.
MING DEVELOP'MT
Kennedy and Copper Mountain Properties.
Work at Aspen Grove Camp—The
Vermilion Forks Co. at Work on
the Princeton.
The Vermilion Forks Co., have started
work on the Princeton claim on Kennedy mountain. Supt. Hall has a force
of men driving a tunnel which will tap
the ledge at a depth of 500 feet. The
rock in the face is heavily mineralized, native copper being found scattered
through the rock in several places.
The richest ore found on Copper
mountain comes from the Copper Bluff
claim. Solid kidneys of pure bornite
have been taken out in the late development done by Messrs.  Van Mil Is and Al-
Development on the Lost Horse is being pushed. The property is improving
rapidly with depth.     »
The Princess May has one of the richest copper showings in the Similkameen.
The Hidden Mystery group is looking
well. The shaft is down about 30 feet
the bottom of it being in solid ore.
.development of the east slope of copper"
mountain is showing that Sunset peal
has not the only mine by quite a few.
TheJVfcRae, Beaver, Morgan and other
properties are turning out some of the
finest ore yet found on the mountain,
^   ASPEN GROVEfCAMP
is now-one of the busiest camps in
district. Wells and Poullinere, Burr and
Jones, R. Cramer and several others ai
harcLat work developing their propertie!
On the "Cincinnati" the Bate boys are i
115 feet with the tunnel. This property
>s looking very well. H. Schmidt is developing his numerous claims, but ex-
Iff peers to concentrate his work on the banner showing  of the district "The Big
I
1
LATE ARRIVALS.
F. A. Devering, of Indian Reservation
Surveying department, arrived on today
Chas. Barker, representing Oppenheim-
er Bros., of Vancouver, registered at
Hotel Jackson today.
A. E. Howse arrived from Nicola
' .ays stage and reports- all well in
"ley.
Harry Fook, returning officer for West
:ale, came in by todays stage. He i
selecting polling stations for the riding.
PURELY  PERSONAL.
David Black left for Keremeos Thurs-
Chas. Harris  made  a  round trip  1
this week.
Kei
Herr Johann Keeffer, chef of the Hotel
Jackson, arrived on the stage.
The Hon. Premier Martin and the
Hon, Smith Curtis are expected in
Princeton early next week.
Mr. Harry Cleasby, of Nicola, drove to
Princeton this week accompanied by
Mrs. Pooley, of Nicola, and Mrs. H.
Hunter, of Granite Creek.
Mr. J, D. Anderson, P. L. S., of Trail,
has completed the surveying of the Similkameen Copper Co's property on Copper mountain and left for home  Thurs-
Wm. Allan and W. L. Lawry, of Rossland have spent the week in making a
thorough examination of Copper mountain. Both gentlemen express astonishment at the wonderfully rich showings
they visited.
Mr. Robt. Wood, ex-mayor of Greenwood, returned home via Keremeos yesterday,. He is greatly impressed with
the wonderful resources of the Similkameen country and has implicit confidence in Princeton being its mining
and commercial centre.
W. C. McDougall, Supt. of the Kere-
Syndicate with headquarters at
is at the Hotel Princeton. While
he intends visiting his ranch on
Wolf creek and will probably make a
trip to the Pacific coast via: Spencer's
Bridge before returning to Olalla.
A. Francis, representing the Vancouver News Advertiser, was a welcome
visitor at the Star office this week. Mr.
Francis wh ile here will take the opportunity of visiting the Copper and Kennedy mountain mines, about which Van-
couverites have heard many good reports
lately.
British Columbia Acts Disallowed.
OTTAWA, April 25.—The Dominion
government has disallowed the following bills, passed by the B. C. Legislature
in 1899: An Act relating to Liquor
Licence: An Act relatingto__tbe^Mid-
way and Penticton Railway, and an acl
Act.
The Placer Mining (Alien) Act, which
it was 'claimetf was aimed tfirectlv at
United States citizens, has been vetoed,
because it is ultxaTvires. There are some
ten bills effecting private companies in
them preventing the employment of Japanese which the government has allowed
to pass because they do not wish to interfere with the organization of the companies affected.
PRESS NEWS IS EXCLUDED.
Conjectures as to the Losses of the Boer
Retreat by the War Correspondents Do Not Agree.
A late London dispatch says: The rigorous censorship has excluded press news
from the Free State for twenty four hours.
The war correspondents, owing to the extensive dewelopment of five divisions
and two cavalry brigades, have with one
or two exceptions, returned to headquarters at Bloemfontein, and their conjectures respecting the direction of the
lines of the Boer retreat and British operations have not been in accord.
Gen. Roberts in a midnight dispatch
presented a brief summary of the situation as he understood it at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon, but left several points in
doubt. General Hamilton, with the
mounted infantry and one brigade of the
North division, had reached Thaba N'Ch
where Gen. French joined him with his
cavalry brigades yesterday morning,
Rundle's division being a few miles
south. The Boers were still holding the
eastern outlet of the town, and French
and Hamilton were preparing to
them out. Both Hamilton and French
had made fine forced marches, but it
not clear whether the main body of the
Boers had retired to Thaba N'Chu from
Dewetsdorp or had gone acroi
try toward Constia to effect
with Olivier's forces retreating from Wepener. The former theory was more probable, but even in that case
certain the Boers had remained in force
or had left a rear guard in the town.
Gen. Roberts reported that Gen.
bazon, with the yeomanry cavalry, had
gone as far as Wepener and returned
Dewetsdorp, where Chermside's division
was still halting. Pole-Carew's division
was either at Dewetsdorp or was marching toward Thaba N'Chu. There was
nothing from Wepner, and no official
news except a few causualties and a report of an outpost affair near Bethulle.
Gen. Roberts' operations are now conducted on so large a scale that the public
here is dazed by them, and requires some
definite result, like another Paardeburg,
in order to be convinced that he is making progress. The experts regard his
masterly.
Freight House and Depot Wrecked.
Spokane, April 23.—Japs accidentally
set fire to the powder house at Lind, a
small station on the Northern Pacific,
sixty miles west of here, tonight, causing
5,000 pounds of dynamite to explode.
The freight house and depot were blown
into the air and the drug store was badly
shattered, Telegraph poles and line
were leveled for some distance. Fortunately the few inhabitants of the place
had time to flee to a safe place. No one
was injured.
JOE'S NEW MINISTER
Mr. J. C, Brown of Westminister Selected.
Terrible Explosion in Utah—400 Rilled-War News Scarce—Ottawa in
Distress,
SCOFIEI.D, Utah, May 3.—A terrible
explosion in a mine took place here yesterday. There were between 300 and 400
men in the mine at the time the explosion took place and it is supposed all are
Later—Three hundred bodies have
been recovered. The cause of the explosion was a keg of powder in the mine.
The Martin candidates in Vancouver
are Joe Martin. McPherson, Gjlmore and
McQueen.
London, May 3.—No war news of importance from the front today.
Victoria, May 3.—[Latest]—J. C.
Brown, of Westminister, was^sworri in as
finance minister in the Martin ' cSJirew ^
today. This, in the populous centers of
B. C, is. looked upon as placing the Mar-
tinites largely in the ascendency.
Maniixa, May 3.—A reconoitering
party of Americans at Leansbano were
surrounded by Phillipinos. Four Americans killed and 16 wounded were left on
the field. The remainder of the party
escaped.
The Ottawa Eire.
About 20,000 people are left homeless
by the Ottawa fire. There was $20.000,-
000 worth of property destroyed. 2000
buildings went up in smoke. The Eddy
paper factory, match factory and wood
yard was burned. There was four lives
lost. Lord Strathconna has given $25,-
000 to a relief fund and donations   are
»*fCounty Court in Princeton. ix
Mr. H. Hunter, mining recorder, has A
received a letter from Mr. G. Tunstall,
gold commissioner, informing him that
Judge Spinks will hold a session of the
county court at Princeton, and will inform as to day and date when he arrives
in Nicola to hold court there.
<^Te
cattle drive from the lower J*-
country takes place next week. Mr. C.
Richter, of Keremeos, is now busily engaged in fencing in 700 acres of grazing
land on the hill opposite Princeton.
About 3,000 head will be turned loose on
the upper Similkameen range this year.
mJ
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
h^\
The World's Copper Supply.
Written for Mines and Minerals, by H. J. Sc*
All-rail shipments of copper
heavier now ..than .at the begins ng ofl
the winter season, and the opening of]
navigation on.the .great lakes, ibout
May ist, will find the docks nearly as
. bare of copper as was. the case last spring.
The Calumet and Hecla is accumulating
the usual winter store of "mineral," or
the   eastern   smelters  at   Black   Rock, |
Buffalo,ybut beyond this reserve of un-
r, the«
ttle
ipn
nd so did copper,
rill prob-
d the "unfavorable collapse of the near
ture" are devoting more time and
ldy to Wall street and the methods of
: tha
to
per mining shares but there is anoticable
lack of evidence of like effort in the actual mining or marketing of the metal.
There are no large surplus stocks of metal
piling up at any point in the world.
There is no evidence that large interests
have bought copper,at any time  to sus-
: tain prices, and the production of the
metal is being absorbed by manufactures
as rapidly as produced.   In view of these
. facts which are incoutestible and could
be easily ascertained by anyone wishing
to learn the truth, talk of manipulation
is ridiculous. There is merely the
■usual skirmish between the buyer and
•seller, each   desirous  of obtaining the
. best possible terms. Neither is re"K>rt-
ing to unusual tactics or the employment
of vast sums of money in order to force
water uphill or make the laws of trade!
controvert themselves. Copper is standing on its-merits and the price is made
by a strong and legitimate demand which
is crowding the mines, of the world to
fully meet. That the present price cannot be permanently held is not only possible but altogether probable, but the
break will not come until production begins gaining materially on consumptij^&.
When this will happen no man can foretell, but present conditions and prospects
indicate that it will be several years before the many new mines will add so
materially to the worlds copper supply
as to disturb the nice balance now existing between the mining and the use of
the metal. Of all the new mines of the
Lake Superior district, into   which   raft*
. lions of money have been poured in the
past three years, the entire number will
not produce 2 per cent, of the copper
mined in the district during the present ]
year. It will be three to five years before
the production of the new mines collectively will add very appreciably to the
tonnage of the district. The opening of
new native copper mines in the Lake
Superior district is a nutter of years of
time and millions of dollars. To a somewhat similar .extent, -.though perhaps less
time and money .is required elsewhere,
copper ore mines in other American fields
are slow and costly in development In
the aggregate the supply from the world's
new mines is of importance, but relatively the increase from both old and new
mines is smaller than the most of the
other metals. According to the most reliable figures at hand, which are fair approximations, though not final and au-
thoritave, the world's copper production
last year was 475,000 tons as compared
with 424,000 tons in 1898, while the output of the United States was 265,000 tons
in 1889 as compared with 254,000 tons for
the preceeding year. This gives an increase of 13 per cent, in the output of the
United States and of 12 per cent, for the
entire world, while the increase outside
of the United States was only 5 per cent.,
the United States making over 55 per
cent, of the copper of the world. The
increase of 13 per cent, in American copper production was less than the increase in consumption of this country,
while the increase of 5 per cent, for the
balance of the world was absorbed by
Europe, despite the higher range ofl
prices, which necessarily restricted consumption in many lines of industry.
An effort has been made by the European trade and financial press to prove
the charge of manipulation of the metal
because of the importation of copper
from England and Wales to this country
at the same time that America was exporting half her own copper production
to the various European markets. The
currents and cross-currents of finance and
commerce are most puzzling, and the
theorist who navigates such dangerous
seas in the security of his snug office in
England or New York, by the aid of
charts and logarithms, necessarily makes
some strange blunders—errors which
would send his craft to the bottom of]
the sea, were he not doing his naviga-]
tion in theory only. The simultaneous ]
exportation and importation of copper]
from this country would apparently sup- j
port the theory of a manipulated market, I
yet the facts discredit such an opinion.
The exports of American copper, both
native from the lake and electrolytic
from Montana, as well as the. blister copper and mattes from other western fields
which go to Swansea for smelting are
permanent exports, and the copper so
sent abroad does not come back. The
imports of copper brought to New York
from Great Britain are all, or practically
all, in the shape of Chile bars. These
are supposed to be refined copper and
for all practical uses are "G. M. B.," as
"good merchantable brands" of refined
copper are known to the trade. Industrially, the Chilean bars are good
copper but metallurgically they are impure, containing a considerable quantity
of silver, which the smelter of Swansea
cannot extract from the baser metal.
Blacksmithing
and
Horseshoeing
Wagon Repairing a Specialty.
Shop on Harold Avenue.
PRINCETON, B. C
Q. flurdoch
TAX NOTICES.
XKAMHKN DIVISION j
Octal Revenue Tax and all
u»*es leviea unaer ihe Assessment Act, are 	
due for the year 1900, All .the above-named
collectible within the Similkajnceu Divisi
Yale District are payable
Three-8fths of.
Two and one hi
(wild land."
before June 30th, 1900:
In assessed value'of j
ureal property.
ine-half of one percent on personal property.
in so much of the income, of any person as exceeds one thousand dollars, the following rates,
viz: Upon such excess of income, when the same
cent; when such excess Is over tea thousand dol-
exce'ss'isovertwenty thousand dollars', one a
If paid on or after ist July, 1900.
Pour-fifths of one per cent on real property.
Three per cent, on assessed value of wild lai
ceeds one thousand dollars, the following rates,
viz,; Upon such excess, when the same is no
more than ten thousand dollars, one and oik
twenty thousand dollars, one and one-half of on
and dollars, one and three-quarters of one pe
Provincial Revenue Tax, $3.00 percapita
NOTICE.
rs Certificate Number 7767I
nd as agent for J. B. McA
ertificate number 79777A, \
I days from the date hereof to a]
g Recorder for a Certificate of im
:  the purpose of obtaining a
ince of such Certificate of Imp
CLIVE
A April 17th, 1900.
CLAIMS STAGE
UNE
Leaves Kamloops for Quilchena and
Nicola I<ake every Monday.
Leaves Nicola Lake for Kamloops
every Friday at 6 a. m.
PRINCETON ROUTE.        |
Leaves Spences Bridge for Nicola,
Coutlees, Nicola Lake, Granite
Creek and Princeton every
Thursday at 6 a. m.
Leaves Princeton for Spences Bridge
and intermediate points every
Sunday at 7 a. m.
Carry flail and  Express.
SMOKE
Tucketts
TOBACCOS, CIGARS and
CIGARETTES.
Tphey are the Purest
£» certainly the
Oest in the market.
Geo.tTuckeitasoi.co.
HAMILTON, ONT.
A. L HOWSE,
General
Merchandise
The Largest and Best Stock of.
General Merchandise in the Similkameen.
Agent For The
Sherwin William's Co.,
PAINTS, OILS and LEADS.
 There are none better.	
Mining Supplies a Specialty
A Complete Line of Hardware
Builders' Supplies and Tools of
Every Description.
Just Arrived
A Carload of Nails.
Mining Outfits
can be furnished
on the shortest
notice. ,
A SI
Parties coming
to Princeton...
having Baggage, H. H,.
Goods, or Freight of
any description
CAN ADDRESS
same in my care to
Spences Bridge on
the Canadian Pacific
Railway, where my
Freight teams load
regularly for
Princeton.
Freight of this description
is always given the preference and will be rushed
through to destination.
Stores at
Princeton and Nicola;]
 THE 8IMILXAMEEN STAB.
Hudson Bag Co.
MEW GOODS.
Up-to-date and Great Values in Ladies Blouses, Printed Cambrics, Printed Muslins. Costume Lengths in Dress Goods.
Orders promptly filled, for any part of the Similkameen Country.
Hudson Bay Stores.,
Kamloops, B. Cm
( MVVW^^^^^^^^^^^r^^^r^^^^^V^I
SIMILKAMEEN
BUTCHERING QO.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Dealers in Heats.
Orders Filled for any Point in the Similkameen Valley.
Princeton Branch      Cm Summers,
Manager,
jr.
Queens Birthay Sports.
A mass meeting of the citi
Princeton was held in the Harris-Mcli
tosh building on Tuesday evening to
arrange for the celebration of her
Majesty's Birthday on the 24th of May.
A large and enthusiastic crowd attended.
J. C Mclntc<sh was appointed chairman
and J. Anderson, secretary. It was mov- j
ed and seconded that the sports be held
a Vermilion avenue and Messrs. Hislop
Hunters9
and Parian
e appointed, as
oitte to clear and gradi
e purpose, with power to levy
interested for assistance.    The following
mmittees were appointed.   Finance;—
essrs. Anderson, Adams, Harris; sports,
§ Messrs.   Mcintosh,   Heath,   Budd, Dr.
Whillans and Fred Howse; advertising,
[  Messrs. Anderson, Hill and Day; gen-
It eral business and managing committee,
f  Messrs. Thomas, Webb, Jackson, Wallace,
Bell, Howse and E. Waterman.
James Anderson was appointed Secre-
The general committee will meet on
Monday   afternoon, the 7th inst. at 4
o'clock, to consult with and receive the
report of the finance committee.     Every
member is urgently requested to attend.
The Townsite Co. have given a donation of $50.00 and other liberal contributions are promised.    All that is required
to make a most successful celebration
possible, is a concentrated effort on the
j part of everyone interested to further the
o^work of the committee as far as lies in
slbheir power.     Keremeos, Twenty Mile,
Hixranite Ceeek and   Otter Valley have
/been notified and a large crowd
pected to visit Princeton for the
The sports will commence on Friday
afternoon and continue on Saturday forenoon until the arrival of the mail stage.
OTTER FIAT HOra
THYNNE & DEBARRO.
PROPRIETORS.
Sawand Planing
~ww MILL
Located 3 Miles from Princeton.
A full stock.....
Of Rough and Dressed
Lumber.
The   Driest   and Clearest in the
country.
POST OFFICE
....STORE
C. E. THOHAS, Prop.
A full line of
Groceries
Hardware
Clothing
Boots and
Shoes.
Post Office boxes for rent,
Blue Ribbon Tet
Most Delicious in the Market
When a prospector returns to camp after a Ufflg
day in the mountains, there is nothing he teifes
forward to more than a cup of
<£<£*&
BLUE RIBBOK TEA,
THE.
HOTEL JACKSON, j
PRINCETON, B. C.
JOHN HA^RRY JACKSON, Proprietor.
All stage lines arrive at, and start from, the Hotel JacJcson.
Everyone recommends the HOTEL JACKSON as Headquarters
when visiting the Similkameen Mining District. The Hotel Jackson is the place to start from for Copper and Kennedy Mountain,
Friday Creek, Roach River, Summit, Boulder Creek, Big: Sue, 20
Mile, and all other mining camps.
If you want Good Meals, Good
Liquors and Good Beds, You
can be Supplied at the
Hotel Jackson
Hotel Princeton
JAMES WALLACE, Proprietor.
PRINCETONS PIONEER
<& m HOTEL «# «**.
The Resort
For Prospectors and Mining Men.
first Class Dining Room and Bar.
No trouble to talk to guests. The Boer
War and Fighting Joe's campaign discussed every evening.
Come and hear the Phonograph*
Seeds and Drugs
FRESH, NEW and GOOD.
The   Largest Garden Seed Dealers in the
PROVINCE.
3taS£L        The Nelson Drag and seed Co.
 100 Cordova St., VANCOUVER,
i
 h^i^
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
Published Weekly at
PRINCETON,  B. O.
THE PRINCETON   PUBLISHING CO.
to build a strong substantial bridge
from plans which will be furnished
by a competent engineer. Construction work will be started at
once and before long Princeton will
have a short and easy route to Copper mountain.
The building of a bridge i
thegove
ton delef
in  Febri
iate
., early
;overn-
um of
build i
"idge across the Similkemeen river,
his promise was confirmed by a
tier from the Hon. F. Carter-Cot-
n dated February 2 2d, in which
1 stated, "The Government will
ace in the estimates a sum suffic-
the Sim
lilda
•e VRead
nection to Copper mountain. Plans
will be forwarded to Mr. W. J.
Waterman as soon as possible so
that the townsite company and the
citizens will be able to complete th<
construction of the bridge before
high water. The plans promised tnat
did not arrive and it was fully a
month later when Mr. A. E. Howse
made a special trip to Victoria to
secure them. Unfortunately, however, for the immediate construction of the bridge, the directions
furnished by the government engineer were impossible to follow.
It is hard to understand why the
late government, and the present
one, retain the service of an official
who evidently is not in sympathy
with the administration. When a
public works engineer does everything in his power to retard neces-
/sary improvements in a new min-
i ig district, b/ issiing directions for
construction of a bridge which are
impossible to follow, and when asked for certain particulars, to answer
in such an evasive manner as to
make it an impossibilify to carry on
the work, he is evidently not in
touch with the government, or is
unfit for the position which he occupies.
After careful inquiry into the
facts we find that the principal
cause for the delay in the building
of the bridge across the Similkameen river, was the want of a government engineer who could issue
practical plans and help, instead of
retarding, construction. The Vermilion Townsite Company have
now been forced to throw aside the
>   EDITORIAL COMMENT.   J
It is too bad that Murphy's nami
is Denis.
Princeton's first political pow
wow was a success and candidate
Murphy expresses himself as being
perfectly satisfied with his recep
tion.
It is most unfortunate that Hon.
G. W. Beebe did not find it convenient to join Mr. Murphy in his
trip through the Similkameen, as a
political meeting is a very tame
affair when only one side of the
question is presented.
'Charlie the Critic' was-the most
attentive listener in the audience
and some of his remarks about
points in Mr. Murphy's address
were very amusing.
Judge Mcintosh is confident that
Mr. Murphy is a strong Martin
supporter, with a few little predju-
dices which he hopes his legal
friend will soon discard and become
of the elect.
iders of the Star will notice
th this issue it has been enlarged to ten pages. A general increase of business and the present
political campaign is responsible for
the addition. We would also call
attention to our late telegrams published every week, and we take this
opportunity of publicly conveying
our thanks to Mr. Harry Duncan
of Nicoja, who makes a special effort to get us latetelegrjjjgbic_Jaews/f
oyer the telephone line every P^jf-
day morning; Snabling^tts' to give
Princetonitestwo to three days later
news than can be obtained from the
outside papers which arrive on Saturdays mail.
The owners of the townsite of |
Greenwood spent over $40,000 in
making the town of Greenwood
what it is today. The townsite
company of Grand Forks have al-
read spent $50,000 in improving
the city and are still expending
large sums in securing for the city
the honor of being the metropolis
of the Boundary creek district.
Princeton requires the judicious expenditure of about $10,000 in building a bridge, grading streets and
other very necessary improvements.
It is a small sum for the townsite
company to spend on property
which will return a fortune if properly fostered. An English company may be a little slow to realize
government plans and will proceed J conditions   in a western   mining,
town but who knows what will
happen when they finally wake up
and grasp the situation.
G. L ALLAN,
Wholesale
Dealers in
BOOTS
AND
SHOES
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Try Our Own Mining Boot.
It is just right.
Palace Livery
& STABLES .*
**W*WVV*V*A**WVW*WVV
KEREMEOS, B. C.
D.J.INNIS,Prop.
Travellers from the Boundary
District can secure horses
through to Princeton.
Run in Connection with Keremeos Hotel.
City Baths
Shaving Parlor
P. V. HEATH, Prop.
SHAVING, HAIRCTJTTING,
SHAMPOOING, SINGEING...
IF YOU WANT GOOD BATH
CALL AND SEE US.
PRINCETON, B. C
Special Stage.
A Special Stage will leave
Spences Bridge for Princeton and way points every
Monday morning at 6 a. m.
arriving at Princeton Wednesday at noon.
Returning: Leaves Princeton Friday morning at 6
a. m., arriving at Spences
Bridge on Sunday.
JAS. SMITH, Propr.
J. CIARLES MCINTOSH,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
AND
 NOTARY PUBLIC	
PRINCETON, B. C
W.J. WATERMAN, M. I
p. a. s. m. a. 1, n. e.,
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C.
H. A.   WMLLANS, M. D.
PHYSICIAN
and
SURGEON.
mcGill Graduate. Princeton, B. O.
. JAMES HISLOP	
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEER.
PROVINCIAI, I.AND SURVEYOR.
 Princeton, B. C	
PRINCETON
ASSAY OFFICE.
 C. B. HARRIS.
Assayer
and
Chemist*
Accurate results Guaranteed. Reports will be returned on stage bringing samples.
Correspondence Solicited.
Regarding    Mining   Properties  in   the
Simllhamcen District.
Properties   Carefully Sampled and Assayed.
R.H.PARKINSON
FAIRVIEW, B. C.
PRINCETON, B. C.
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR,
CIVIL ENGINEER
and NOTARY PUBLIC.
Surveys on the Similkameen Promptly
Attended to.
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAB.
M. MIS MRPflY
Addresses   Princeton's . First
"Lf     Political Meeting.
a Electors have had their first
opportunity of hearing an address by one
of the candidates for political honors in
West Vale. Mr. Denis Murphy of Ash-
croft, independentJopposTtfon candidate,
arrived in the city on Sunday afternoon,
and on Monday evening spoke
crowded meeting in the Harris-Mcintosh
block.
One hundred and fifty were present
!when Mr. Jas. Anderson called the meeting to order and asked Mr. Harry Richardson to take the chair.
Mr. Richardson in a few appropriate
words introduced Mr. Murphy, askin,
the meeting to give him a careful heai
ing.
Mr. Murphy commenced his address
by stating that he had invited Hon. G.W
Beebe to be present at the meeting. H«
read a letter which he received from Mr.
Beebe before leaving Ashcroft, in which
the Martin candidate stated that he
unable to attend owing to press of mi
terial duties.
Taking up the actions of Mr. Martin
from the beginning of his political a
in the province, he gave a brief re1
of the Premier's history as a cabinet i
ister, stating that while he gave Mr.
Martin credit for being one of the ablest
men who had ever entered the legislature, part of the legislation enacted while
he was attorney general was bad and he
could not be depended upon to control
the affairs of the province.
Taking Mr. Martin's address he proceeded to outline his own views on each
plank as follows:
Upholds the abolition of the #200 de-
Opposes the Torrens registry system as
being too expensive, claiming that the
province did not require its introduction.
Is strongly in favor of Redistribution.
Favors the reading and writing test ii
the labor regulation act and believes ii
f the exclusion of oriental labor if possible.
Believes in oflicial inspection of build-
£ ings, machinery, etc..
Stands by the 8 hour law as it stands
a the statute books.
Would support the re-establishing of
•ji the London Agency on new lines, but
k does not believe in appointing worn out
i politicians to the position.
f Believes in the exploration of the
Ji province and in the construction of roads,
I trails and bridges. Strongly in favor of
I competent supervising engineer, and
& holds that money should only be paid
out for public works done under corns' petent supervision.
I Condemns the government ownership
Kof railways in the province at the present
I time, and does not believe the province
would stand increased taxation.
B-( Upholds the curtailing of Lieutenent-
governor in council power.
||i%' The Alien Exclusion act should be re-
Ifpealed.
qm The   Deadman's   Island was a local
Hgiiestion and need not be dealt with out-
side of Vancouver.
Refering briefly to the composition cf
Mr. Martin's cabinet he allowed that Mr.
.Martin and Mr. Curtis were strong, able
men, but taking them away the balance
HraHe believed, in the importance of
Princeton as a mining centre and as a
most important factor in the riding. He
would have visited the city sooner but
had been waiting for Mr. Martin. If
Hlcted he would carry out his pledges or
never appear before the people again.
Mr. Murphy was accorded a good hearing, and his quiet easy manner of speaking made a good impression on his audi-
Mr. W. J. Waterman made a short
speech in favor of the government
struction of a railroad as outlined by the
administration. He beleived that if
private company could borrow the money
for such a scheme the government should
certainly be able to do so.
Mr. Anderson asked Mr. Murphy if he
would support the granting of a subsidy
for the construction of a railroad from
the coast to the interior via Hope and the
Similkameen. Mr. Murphy replied that
he would strongly support a
subsidy for a railway on these lines.
Hislop asked if Mr. Murphy would support the construction of the Hope wagon
road. In reply Mr. Murphy stated that
if at all feasible, it was a most necessary
road and he thought it should be built
Mr. J. C Mcintosh being called c
claimed that Mr. Murphy was a good
Martin man as his policy was almost
identical with that of the Premiers,
then explained the Torrens registry system, claiming that it had been found to
work satisfactorily in Ontario and would
be a great benefit to British Columbia.
A vote of thanks was then tendered Mr.
Murphy for his address and a hearty invitation was extended to him to return
to Princeton when Mr. Beebe held a meeting, so that the electors might be able to
hear  both sides of the question.
Mr. Harry Richardson also received
the thanks of the meeting for the acceptable manner in which he filled the chair,
Princeton
limber...
SfllJVGlE and
PUMNGMUS
A. E. HOWSE, Prop.
niJI and Office
Bridge Street,
PRINCETON..
frencMDagf
TINSMITHS
^EUTIBERS
GUNSHITHS
Our Camp Stove is the Boss for
Prospectors.
Repair work of Every Description.
Mb PrfoMflfl
Of Every Description
at the STAR office,
ON YOUR WAY TO
PRINCETON
You will Find a Comfortable Resting Place at tjj
15 Mile House
'BRADSHAWS'
Well Stocked Bar and Excellent Dining Room J
HEADQUARTERS FOR 20 MILE
CREEK. MINING CAMP.
<&<&
Stable in Connection
Princeton feed SfaWes
BUDD & CO., Proprietors.
Cayuses or High Priced Race
Horses Equally Well Oared for.
Opposite Hotel Jackson.
THE MOST COMMODIOUS HORSE
HOTEL IN THE SIMILKAMEEN «* j*
New General
mmmStOre
We have fust opened our new store and have
received a large cons||nment of Clothing,
Gents' Furnishings, Blankets, Stationery, etc*
We Have a well assorted stock of NEW GOODS
and are in a position to attend to your wants. We
shall also carry a full line of Ffrst-Cfass
Groceries
TRY OUR "HONDI CEYLON" TEA.
Bridge St.
Ronnie & Bell
Princeton  Meat   Market
WARDLE & TH0MA5
Orders  for Mining Camps  promptly attended  to
and delivered.
 THE 8IMILKAMEEN 8TAE.
BOM THE RECORDS.
MININO LOCATIONS.
IffWm.   Knight,   Copper   moun-
—P. Gilmore and D. McDonald,
hilkameen river.
hCBRY—Copper mountain  Perley
■ssell.
—Iron   mountain,   Gilmore and
|c Donald.
—Hamilton mountain   G. A.
Tiumons.
[ick—Hamilton   mountain, G. A.
tmmons.
ftNTo—Hamilton mountain, Frank
Inerio—Hamilton  mountain, F.
Bken.
b Alto, Hamilton mountain, £. N.
Northrop.
Jrprisk—One   Mile  Creek, A. F.
(bond Hitch—Otter   Creek, James]
fenowden, DeLorne Cairns.
Kland—Otter Creek, DeLorne Cairns.
M-hKR-go--Gai.lagher—One   Mile
Creek, J- Cameron.
ASSESSMENTS,
f JlRVISGTON—J. B. Wood.
1 LkRoi—D. O. Day.
I1 Honeysuckle—T. M. Day.
J Red Eagle—A. E. Thomas.
M Copper King—C. Bonnevier.
t Rambler—P. Johnson.
Moogul—P. Johnson.
krLuAND—S. L. Allison.
LELA—H. L. Jones.
|>KaY West—H. L. Jones.
Noonday—Similkameen Copper Co,
Alabama—J. L. Parker.
Frisco—D. A. Stewart.
Virgina—J. L. Parker.
Costillion Fraction—Hugh Ken-
NEDY.
Friday—Hugh Kennedy.
TuiiK^Perrey\lkus3ell.
Myra—J. B. Wood.  -•
San Jose—F. W. Sharpe.
D. C. (3 years)—James Snowdon,
■Copper Bluff—Van MfllB^i-* J
Copper Cliff—C. Van Mills.
Orphan—L. Gibson.
rEY Fraction—D. McRae.
Tincup )
transfers.
\ June Bug Fraction and Irish King-
interest, E. P. Wampole to F. W.
Groves.
Butte, Camp Bird, Anaconda, Bullfrog,
Calumet, Copper Boy, Molly Watson,
Mary Ann, Copper King, Delamere,
Grand View, Big Hump, Big Hump
No. 2, Jumbo, Jumbo No. 2, Henderson, George—X interest in each,
Jas. Alexander McDonald to Walter
L. Lawry.
Petrel and Blackbird—% interest in each
from W. Sullivan to Geo. B. Connor
and Perley ^Russell.
Costillion Fraction—% interest Hugh
Kennedy to J. B. Silverthorne.
Kent—^ interest, Wm. Sullivan to J. C.
Mcintosh.
Labor Day—H. S. O'Connell to P. B. O'
Connell.
Bullion—Thomas McHugh to P. B. O'
Connell.
Bob Evans—}i interest; Golden Eaglt
Combination, Ruby Day, Coppei
World, 15th of July, Copper Wondei
X interest in each, A. E. Hitchcock
to A. F. McDonald.
QULCHENA
HOTEL
EDWARD O'ROURKE, Prop.
The most renowned Up
Country Hotel in British
Columbia.
GRAND PACIFIC
.•..HOTEL....
KAMLOOPS, B. C.
The nearest hotel to the Railway Station. Headquarters for
all people ccming from Nicola
and the Similkameen.
Good Rooms. Good Table
Good Liquors, Good Sta-
J* blingin Connection. d*
P. A. BARN11AKT, Prop.
Granite
Creek
Hotel
D. McKAY
This Hotel has always been Famous
For the Excellence of its table.
The nearest point to the
richest Silver Lead mines
in B. C, '.Summit City."
There is more gold in Granite Creek
than has yet been taken out.
""fc
PRINCETONS
New
saw
Martin,  Harris
£ Hardwlok
Alt
NOW
Ready to Supply Lumber at the Lowest Prides*
E. HARDWICK, Manager.
1
^Ssaagaaaa^jL
i^feH^
 I
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
PLATFORM OF THE      JI
MARTIN^OVERNMENt.
The abolition of the $200 deposit
for candidates for the legislature.
2.   The bringing into force, as soon as
arrangements can be completed, of the
Torren's registry system.
I   The redistribution of the constitu-
' encies on the basis of population, allowing to sparsely populated districts a pro-
, wtofirtionately larger representation than
/jjtSvpopulous districts and cities.
i'Mj/t-   The enactment of an accurate system of government scaling of logs and
fJtvStk rigid enforcement.
5. The re-enactment of the disallowed
labor regulation act, 1898 and also on all
the statutes of 1899, containing anti-Mongolian clanses if disallowed as proposed
by the dominion government.
'figTo take a firm stand in every other
possible way with a view of discouraging
the spread of Oriental cheap labor in this
.MflMg,.' To provide for the official inspection of all buildings, machinery and
works,. with a view of compelling the
adoption of proper safeguards to life and
health.
8. With regard to the eight hour law
the government will continue to enforce
the law as it stands. An immediate enquiry will be made by the minister oi
mines into all grievances put forward., in
connection with its operation, with a
view of bringing about an amicable set-
', tlement. I If no settlement is reached
1 ;he principal of the referendum will be
ipplied and a vote taken at the general
slection as to whether the law shall be
repealed. If the law is sustained by the
vote it will be retained on the statute
books with its penalty clause. If modifications can be made removing • any of
the friction brought about, without
pairing the principle of the law, they
will be adopted. If the vote is against it
the law will be repealed.
9. To re-establish the London agency
of British Columbia, and to take every
effective means of bringing before the
British' public the advantages of this
province as a place for the profitabh
vestment of capital.
10. The retaining of the resourc*
the province as an asset for the benefit
of the people, and taking effective
measures to prevent the alienation of
the public domain, except to actual settlers or for actual bona fide business, or
I  industrial purposes,  putting an end to
the practice of speculating
with the same.
n. The taking of active measures for
the systematic exploration of the prov-
112. The borrowing of money for the
purpose of providing roads, trails and
bridges, provided that in every case the
money necessary to pay the interest and
sinking fund in connection with the
loan shall be provided by additional taxation so as not to impair the credit of the
province.
13. In connection with the construc-
s.ttcmW government roads and trails, to
provide by the employment of competent
civil engineers and otherwise that the
government money is expended upon
some system which will be advantageous
to the general public, so that the old
system of providing roads as a special
favor to the supporters of the government may be entirely discontinued.
14. To keep the ordinary annual expenditure within the ordinary annual
revenue, in order to preserve intact the
credit of the province, which is its best
15. To adopt a system of government
construction and operation of railways,
and immediately to proceed with the
construction of a railway on the south
side of the Fraser river, connecting the
coast with the Kootenay district, with
the understanding that unless the other
railways now constructed in the province give fair connections, and make
equitable joint freight and passenger arrangements, the province will continue
this line to the eastern boundary of the
province. Proper connection with such
Kootenay railway to be given to the island
of Vancouver. With respect to other
parts of the province, to proceed to give
to every portion of it railway connections
at as early a date as possible, .the railway when constructed to be operated by
the government through a commission.
16. A railway bridge to be constructed in connection with the Kootenay railway across the Fraser river, at or near
New Westminster, and running powers
given over it to any railroad company
applying for same, under proper conditions.
17. In case it is thought at any time
advisable to give a bonus to any railway
company, the same to be in cash, and
not by way of a land grant; and no such
bonus to be granted except upon the
condition that a fair amount of the bonds
or the shares of the company be transferred to the province, and effective
means taken to give the province control of the freight and passenger rates,
and provision made against such railway
having any liabilities against it except
actual cost.
18. To take away from the lieutenant-
governor-in-council any power to make
substantive changes in the law, confining
the jurisdiction entirely to matters of detail in working out the laws enacted by
the legislature.
19. The establishment of an institution within the province for the education of the deaf and dumb.
20. To repeal the alien exclusion act,
as the reasons justifying its enactment
no longer obtain.
21. An amicable settlement of the
dispute with the dominion. government
as to Deadman's Island/Stanley Park and
other lands, and an agreement with Mr.
Ludgate, by which, if possible, a sawmill
industry may be established and carried
on on Deadman's Island, under satisfactory conditions, protecting the interests
of the public.
22. Proper means of giving technical
instruction to miners and prospectors.
Joseph Martin.
COOK & CO.
Princeton's
Pioneer Store.
 STORES AT	
PRINCETON GRANITE CREEK.
Princeton Express
*£ and Pack Train* *&
BAGGAGE, FREIGHT, AND
EXPRESS CARRIED FROM KEREMEOS
TO TWENTY MILE AND PRINCETON.
saddle Horses to any
Point in (he Similhameen.
Pack Train Leaves Keremeos every Monday
and Friday on arrival of stage from Fairview.
For rates apply to
HIND & MURRAY,
KEREMEOS
PRINCETON
fl. P. GORDON,
Manufacturer of and
Dealer in all Kinds of
~\
Furniture, Carpets, Oilcloths,
Window Shades, Curtains,
&amp Beds, Cornice Poles, Picture Framing.
Estimates for Hotel,   Office and all other   Furniture Furnished on
Application.
....Kamloops, B. C.
jt^
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
TOWN TOPICS.
a light bannock.
; If you want a good mixei
tue Hotel Jackson.
Use Blue Ribbon  Bakin
A new supply of Jessop st
cd at the Howse store.
Blue Ribbon Baking Pov
in Canada by Canadians.
[ For the best Paint, Oils a
ket go to the Howse
For reliable information in  regan
the Similkameen country subscribe for
the Star.
For Sale.—Five tons of good potato<
at $30 per ton delivered in Princetot
Apply to Jack Thynne,
Otter Valley.
. Mm
1 Billiti
the
Avenue is now under way. It is a handsome two-story building and will be
quite an ornament to the city. Mr. Wilson has charge of the work.
After a short delay the construction of
the Aldous-Bcvans hotel is in full swing.
Col. Joe Adams has six men at work and
it will not be long before Princeton's
third hotel will be ready to receive
guests.
The Princeton dai
early next week. M
his way from Nicola
:fc
Km,| P. ]
' will be running
Wood is no?
nth six fine c
e creek has been
ass barn and 1
>f accommodation
left for 20
lesday, where he will
igaged in running the boundry lines
of a new townsite, located by Mr. F.
Bailey. The land lies exactly half way
between Keremoes and Princeton and
will be the nearest possible point 1 - a
town-from the 20 Mile Creek mines.
The townsite company have given' Mr.
C. Barber a contract to clean the principal streets in the city. A great improvement is already noticable in the appearance of several cross streets and if the
company will only continue the good
work by grading them an increased sale
of residential lots will be the result.
Provincial Electors of
WEST RIDING OF YALE
*
Gentlemen:—I come before the people of this constituency as a member of
the government in perfect harmony with
and having the full confidence of my
colleagues, approving fully of the government platform as the ablest that has ever
been presented to the people of this province. I am a liberal out and out and
have no interest with any person or
party that is willing to steer the province
inot the bands of,the old clique and factions of conservatives that have for so
many years been controlling the govern-
I solicit the support of the people at
the forthcoming election on a clean,
clearcut statement of policy to be purused
so that people can readily understand my
position. I do not intend to impose upon the public as an independent or oppositionist, as I know that the wishes of
the people are to be considered rather
than allowing my personal motives or
ambitions to overide their wills. It is
my intention to see as many voters of
this riding as soon as possible. I consider myself a worker rather than a talk-
yet I will at some time during the
present campaign state my views more
fully to the people at public meetings to
be held at such places as will be convenient for them. I have the honor to be
gentlemen,
most obedient servant,
GEO. W. BEEBE.
OTTER FLAT HOTEL
THYNNE & DEBARRO.1
proprietors.        1
j Pinn^i* [MUM
MMM Rn #• hut* iH
Shop!
=PHJHH§HbB11
HUGH COWAN, Prop.
The First Barber Shop Established in the
Similkameen.
,aTEST STYLES IN
Opposite Post Office.     Princeton, B. C
Hotel Driard
NICOLA LAKE.
JOHN CLARK, Propr.
Headquarters for Mining Men and Prospectors.
An Ideal Summer Resort.
Dining Room Service Unsurpassed.    Only the
JOB RICHARDS,
The Sunset copper Mining Co., Ltd.
Owning and Operating
The SUNSET Mane.
On Copper Mountain, Similkameen Mining District.
Everyone who has seen the property renders a unanimous verdict*
The Biggest and Best Mine in British Columbia*
Now is the TIME to BUY Stock in this Wonderful
nine. It is an investment! No Speculation! Ore
enough in sight to return ioo per cent, on amount
invested.   BUY TODAY before advance in price.
*  1
if
■, ■■]
APPLY TO
17. Am BROWN,
President and Gen'l Manager
Sunset Shares Will Make You Rich.
PRINCETON or Grand Forits.
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAB.
^fifrftifrifrifrMMAr^^
■*■
KEREMEOSI
The Centre of the Similkameen District.
A Mining and Agricultural Centre. . . .
...L0TSN0W ON THE MARKET...
BUSINESS STREET
THIRD AVE., ioo Feet Wide, Lots 30x120:
CORNER LOTS $150; Inside Lots $100.
rYTTLIClD CT*DniTT*C corner lots $100.00.
\J 1 flEJX k> 1 1\X1C 1 D  INSIDE LOTS $7500.
TERMS:   1-3 Cash, Balance in Three and Six Months.
1 BEALEY INVESTMENT & TRUST CO.
For Further Information Apply to:
R. H. PARKINSON, Fairview.
jjujjE. BULLOCK WEBSTER, Keremeos.
LIMITED.
Genor.iABonts Greenwood, B. O.
Local Agems: Tj,e ppfnceton Real Esfale, Mining and Assaying Office..
1     KEBEMEOS MINING NOTES.
Buchan and Lyons have a large body
of fine ore on the Black Diamond claim.
The shaft down about 60 feet and a c
cut 12 feet is all in ore, carrying rich
copper pyrites.
R. Wells has just secured a corne
in Olalla and will build a good   hotel.
The lumber has been ordered and is
being shipped.
Ed. Bullock-Webster will move
Dominion Meteorological Station, which
has been located at his ranch for the 1
eight years, to the Townsite office
Keremeos. A careful record of ma
mum and minimum temperature, t
rainfall and the barometer will be kept
Sforjfefference.
j.     New Strike on the Flagstaff.
Jas. Riordan, original locator and part
owner of the Flagstaff group, made s
- most-important discovery on the Flagstaff claim.   The ore is garnetite. carrying rich bornite and copper sulphides.
A butte rising about 150 feet high,
feet wide, and running several hundred
feet back to the mountain constitutes the
ore body;   being stratified with layers of
I rich mineralized rock which dip to' the
I principal ledge.   An open cut is being
I run on the main ledge and some very
■♦""■ugh grade bornite has been uncovered.
Eossland Ore Shipments.
^JmRossxand. B. C, April 28.—The ore
|1 hipments for the week ending today
|vere 2436 tons, namely 2,405 from the
,«*veRoi andHjhirty-one from the Evening
■ Star, all going to the Northport smelter.
7 This makeS!j| total shipment for the year
'   fofiaffiteof 37,591 tons.
We can save you
money on your
REP airing
I Want
Your
Watch
Repairing
A full line of Watches   and
L-atest Styles of Jewelery always
on hand.
W. J. KERR,
-<_Kamloops, B. C
KEREMEOS
LIVERY
...STABLE.
W. HINE & CO., Props.
vr?i^tTplass Saddle and Pack Horses.
Feed and Livery Stables.
Stage Line to Fairview.
We take the Best of
Care of-Transient
Trade.
Bring your horses to
Us.     We   guarantee
 prompt attention.
..Branch at Fairview... j
Prospectors
....STOP!
If you want to Outfit cheaply
and quickly, do so at the	
...KEREMEOS STORE..
WM. HINE & Co.,
You can save time and
make money by buying
your outfit at the point
you start prospecting.
Mining Supplies of Every
DESCRIPTION KEPT IN STOCK.
JOHN LOVE & CO.
DRUGGISTS AND
STATIONERS.
I F.ilRVIEW and CAMP McKINNEY.
Preoptions ^Carefully^ Compounded.
HOTEL
jjEBEMEOS.
JONH NEIL,
Proprietor.
Stables in Connection.
This hotel is Situated at
the Gateway to the
Similkameen valley. J>
Well Furnished Rooms.
Bar and Dining Room
Service First-Class.
We Cater Specially to
Mining Men
and Prospectors.
WM. OUTTRIDGE
PROSPECTOR
and GUIDE....
Has a thorough knowledge of the entire
Similkameen Country.
Address Princeton. B, C.
 •ooLots for Sale...
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similka-
'meen and Tulameen Rivers*    The business  centre  for  the
1 following  mining camps:-    Copper Mt, Kennedy Mt, Fri-
I day, Boulder, Granite and 20 Mile Creeks, Summit,
Roche River, Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove,
Enormous Agricultural Area to Dra^iroffl.
S|»«
Ciiiaie
pire ifsstr
Government Headquarters for
^   Simiikameen District   J»
PRESENT PRICES OF LOTS FROM
$2.00 TO   $tO.OO   PER FRONT FOOT.
SIZE OF LOTS 50x100 FEET AND 33-100 FEET.
Prices Will be Mdlwancedl 1st May*
™ond for map to
W. J. WATERMAN;
V Resident Manager V. 11
D. Co.
'/-

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