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Similkameen Star 1901-01-12

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 SIMILKAM
PRINCETON, JANUARY, 12th, J90J.
\ ON 1ST DAY OF MARCH
'PERSONAL AND OTHERWISE.
The dog poisoner has been at work ii
Chief    Road    Superintendent
Killeen Promises.
That Work Will be Commenced on
that Date and Hurried to Completion.
The new chief supervisor of roads, M
Wm. Killeen, accompanied by Mr. Ai
thur Stevenson, road superintendent for
the district, drove into Princeton from
Spence's Bridge on Wednesday last. Th.
principal object of the visit was for the
purpose of making an examination of the
ed the Similkai
plai
rthe
of the
Leaving early Thursday morning the
party made a trip over the new road, going within io miles of Keremeos, td
which point the road is completed. John
Bromley, late foreman on construction,
accompanied the superintendents on
their tour of inspection. The inspector
changed the location of the road at 20-
Mile creek and laid out a plan for the
new bridge. Several changes were made
in the survey line, notably at the point
where the road" ran around the river side
of Capt. W. Holmes'ranch. It was
cided to take the road around the base of
the hiil which will assure a better road
bed aud easier grade.
In conversation with a Star representative last evening- Mr. Killeen said :
"It is one of the easiest pieces of road
to build that I have found since 11
been connected with the department. I
cannot understand why work was closed
down in November. There are no real
difficulties to contend with and just as
soon as possible, not later at an3' rate
than the ist day of March work will be
started and the road rapidly completed.
"I can thoroughly appreciate the importance of the road after visiting the
country," continued the inspector,
will be the principal road through your
section and will be of immense benefit to
everyone, for besides cheapening freight
it will afford a quick short route to the
Boundary and Kootenay districts. Yes,
we must push that road through at once.''
Messrs. Killeen and Stevenson left this
morning for Spences' Bridge.
Mr. M. P. Gordon has been requested
for the mayorality of Kamloops, by a
number of the leading citizens, and
he has accepted.
James Darcey is spending a few days in
today.
Mr. and Mrs. George Child left Nicoli
on Friday's stage for England.
J. Donnely drove Messrs. Stevensoi
and Killeen, "the road agents," from
Spences* Bridge to Princeton.
John Bromley will be foreman
on construction when work s
again on the Princeton-Keremeos wagon
road.
Dr. Sutton, of Nicola has been confined to his room for the past week with
a sore foot caused by stepping on^
prickly-pear.
Another cold    snap   has   struck   the
Nicola Valley, day before yesterday
reached 26 below zero at Nicola Lake
and 32 below at Lower Nicola.
Messrs. Chas. French and Dave Day
began the hauling of Cook & Co's eighty
odd thousand shingles from the Allison
townsite to Princeton this week.
Messrs. Clay and  Olin  are busily
gaged delivering lumber from   Cook &
Co's saw mill,  on  One-Mile creek,
Copper mountain.   They have a contract
to deliver 25,000 feet to the Sunset mine.
The moderating of the weather today
will have a bad effect on stock running
out on the range. The rain and sleet
will cause the snow to crust and tnaki
hard for stock to get down to the grs
So far the ranges have been open and
stock have been doing unusually well.
It is with rekrgt that the Star an
nounces the <ieatft of A1pVgr»W fVmi-i»<
of Nicola. Heyfci one~ot'tne early pioneers in the district, having established
himself at the point now known as Coutlees over thirty years ago. Mr. Coutlee
was a French Canadian by birth and
came west early in the 6o's. He expired
on Sunday morning last, at the ripe age
of75-
The Similkameen   Butchering Co. had
a force of men at work yesterday putting
up ice for their summer^use.     The
was taken from the Sinrflkameen rive
the east end of Bridge street and i
splendid qualifh',?being perfectly clear
and of about twfcnty inches in thickness.
Chas. Barber and C.  O. French are also
preparing to put up 8 or 10 tons for their
private use.
Mr. C. p. French lost his valuable
full blooded Irish setter "Jack" this
morning from poison which some miscreant placed out last night. There are
a lot of useless curs running wild round
town which would be better shot but
valuable animals are just as liable to
get caught.    It is certainly a sneaking
.temptible trick to lay out poison in
n, where it is liable to do   irreparable
damage.
WEEKLY NEWS ITEMS
Happenings   of a Local   and
Foreign Nature.
Progress on the Similkameen Bridge-
News of the School—Telegraphic
Notes.
m^r-^i   >
Similkameen Bridge.
Contractor McAlpine is doing good
work on the new bridge. The timbers
are all framed and have been hauled t<
the bank of the river where they will b<
put together. The false work can be pu
in any time now as the river ii
frozen solid at the point where the bridge
crosses the stream. Another month will
see the structure completed.
C   Electric Light for Princeton.
A scheme is on foot to provide/trinc
ton and district with electrict fjflght ai
power. Mr. E. Allison has applied i
1000 inches of water on Go_dWer ere
about 7 miles frop^/bowfi.     He inform
the !
loutto
rid that.
•JMSga
will be installedljeaidwater crgeek h
suflncien. fall at the locatio^fo genera
350 horse power all the. year around, tl
creek having a natural fall of nearly 4
feet.
A Statement-
The following is a statement of expen
.ditures of  the   Chr.stuias   subscription
fund and also the expenses of the Christ
mas ball lunch.
Total amount of subscriptions  foo.oc
Tickets sold     10.0c
Total   40.0c
Cost of toys, present, • X     15.0c
Candies, nuts, apples, .ml incidentals     15.55
Total expenditui
for the lunch,
Total...n./.\  4060
Number   of  djaildren    receiving
present...         55
Respectfully,
Mrs. W. Haegerman.
?*s!?       Princeton School.
Mr. C. E. Thomas, s.eretary of the
Princeton school board, received a letter
today from Mr. Alexander Robinson,
Minister of Education, stating that a
grant£fji4Qoer vgar would be allowed
for incidental expenses to the Princeton
school. The townsite company's building will be remodelled next week and on
the arrival of the teacher, arrangements
will be made for the formal opening of
the school, j !^jffi&jiM*2;
President R. A. Brown, of the Sunset
Mining Co., is expected to arrive in
Princeton early next week.
A Daring
Bobbery.
A repo
rt comes from Vancouv
er that
the Ham
son stage w
as held up r
ecently
by maske
d highway
men and %50c
stolen
passengers,
and the stro
ortHeex
press compa
ny, which co
y value, was
itained
taken.
There is
10 clue to
the identity
of the
robbers.
The/fobbi
lg took place
a short
distance
M/theto
vnofAeassiz
There
stage. They threw up their arms and
made no opposition. One robber went
through the passengers' pockets, while
the other covered the passengers. The
provincial police left here to-night to
work on the case. From descriptions of
the rebbers given by those who were
held up, it is certain they were the same
highway-men that have been holding
up Van- cou
LATE TELEGBAPHIC NEWS.
London, Jan. 8.—Serious storms con*
tinue to sweep Europe, causing serious
damage to property and great loss of life,
Chicago, Jan. 8.—Philip D. Armour,
the multi-millionaire, and head of the
great meat packing establishment that
bears his name, is dead of heart failure,
aged 68 years.
Vancouver, Jan. 8.—Vancouver has 30
inches of show on the level. Some roofs
have collapsed. Business is seriously affected. Local shipping is suspended.
Should a quick thaw come serious damage may be done.
Later, Jan. 11.—Nearly three feet of
snow covers the ground here and at
Nanaimo. The heavy fall of snow has
caused great damage to property.
HEBE AND THESE.
An Ottowa despatch says: It is as
good as settled that Mr. C. Foley, who
ran as the Labor candidate in Yale-Cariboo at the last general election, will be
selected to replace Mr. Ralph Smith on
the Chinese commission.
Premier Dunsmuir and Attorney-General Eberts, acompanied by Mrs. and
s Dunsmuir, are now journeying to
Ottawa. They are accompanied by
car C. Bass, chief clerk of the Attorn-
General's department^nd^R. E- Gos-
II, the Premier's private secretary. It
understood tfiatVWOHr"W. C. Wells
will join the party liner at Ottawa.
Says the Ashcroft Journal: "Let us
lay all joshing aside, and insist on a good
road to Cariboo and a road from Quesnel
to Stewart's lake. Cariboo and Omineca
deserve well of the province and the
purse strings must be loosened up. Look
out for the deep diggings of Cariboo
next season as well as its hydraulic
ss*. Let us have a road we can travel
." The Journal's effort should be
heartily seconded by the people of the
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
Canadian Pacific
Navigation Co.
Time   Table  No.  55
L TO VANCOUVER daily, excejJ
mouoay, ai i o'clock a. in. Regular frcighl
' Hti.-«mcr will leave Victoria at midnight on Tne*
day and Thursday and Vancouver at midnight oi
Wednesday and Friday.
VANCOUVER TO VICTORIA. dnUy, at I, or o
arrival of C. P. Railway No. i train. Kegula
freight iteatners will leave Victoria at ta p. m. oi
Tuesday and Thursday and Vancouver a t i a p. in
on Wedneaday and Friday.
NEW WESTMINSTER ROUTE.
j I.EAVE VIC
ISTER, I.uih.L-i
Friday at 7 a.
TORIA and   way   ports -
urday at 7 o'clock a. ra.
Steamer Beaver leave* 1
or Chilliwack aud waj
Thursday and Saturday al
v WES'X
Hidings,   Tuesday,
. m., connecting at
ALASKA  ROUTE.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
 ABB	
SOO LINE.
DAILY TOURIST CARS
ST. PAUL
TUESDAY and SATURDAY.
TORONTO
WEDNESDAY
Montreal and Boston.
» pass Spencev Bridge as follows:
—IMPERIAL LIMITED 22-03
Pamphlet fumishe
J. E. COYLE,
W. MAXWELL,
AGENT
:. Spences Bridge
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the
st day of December, 1900, a bounty of
wo dollars ($2,00) will be paid for every
oyotc killed in a settled district .of the
province, subject to the conditions of a
otice dated tbe 22nd of August, 1894.
By Command,
J. D. PRENTICE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
20LI1 November, 1900.
UNDER authority of Order in Council,
passed December 30th, 1899, the Honourable tbe Minister of Mines has been
pleased to sanction, and I do hereby give
notice that I have appointed Georgg^ur-
ray, of Nicola, a Deputy MiningRecorder
of and for—the District known aT the
neighborhood of Nicola in the Kamloops
and Similkameen Mining Division, with
Sub-Recording Office at Nicola.
G. C. TUNSTALL,
Gold Commissioner for District.
Q. flURDOCH
Blacksmithing
and Horseshoeing
Shop on Harold Avenue.
PRINCETON,    B.   C.
TAX NOTICE.
ASSESSM ENT ACT AND PROVINCIAL
REVENUE TAX.
Similkameen Division of Yale District.
Noticb is hereby given that in accord-
If paid on or before June 30th, 19
On so much ofthe ill
;   Upon such execs of incu
halToY one
ii dollars, the following r
■W2
On so much of tbe income of any p
exceed*one thousand dollars, the follow]
viz.: Upon such excess, when the san
'more than ten thousand dollars, one
quarter of one per cent.;  when such
thousand dollars, one and or- *■-'
dollars, one and three-quarterl
Provincial Revenue Tax, J3.00 per <
lalf of o
wenty U
HUGHHUNTBR/
inuary lath, I
COAL LICENSE APPLICATIONS.
NOTICE.
lereby given that I intend to apply t
prospect for coal over the followin:
Initial post marked Crowd Dip
id running to chains lurfth, then
1 ted ist day of January, 1
CLAIMS
STAGE
LINE
Leaves Kamloops for Quilchena and
Nicola Lake every Monday.
Leaves Nicola Lake for Kamloops
every Friday at 6 a. m.
Carry flail and  Express.
Leaves Spences Bridge for Nicola,
Coutlees, Nicola Lake, Granite
Creek and Princeton every
Thursday at 6 a. m.
Leaves Princeton for Spences Bridge
and intermediate points every
Sunday at 8 a. m.
FRENCH St DAY
Tinsmiths, Gunsmiths, and Plumbers
Boat and Shoe Repairing.
Repair work  of    Every   Description.
JOHN LOVE & CO.
DRUGGISTS AND
STATIONERS.
Presriptions ^Carefullyjp Compounded.
Orders by mail or stage promptly
SMOKE
Tucketts
TOBACCOS, CIGARS and
CIGARETTES.
TThey are the Purest
^certainly the
Dest in the market.
Gco.LTuchcn&sonco.
HAMILTON, ONT.
G. L. ALLAN
WHOLESALE
DEALERS IN
Boots and
,* shoes .*
VANCOUVER, B. C.
. Try Our Own Mining Boot.
It is just right.
Palace]
Livery
Stable.
ffc
KEREMEOS, B. C.
Saddle Horses to all Points in the
Similkameen District. i^S? Travellers from the Boundary District
can secure horses through to
Princeton.
Run in Connection with
the Keremeos Hotel.
 THE     SIMIL
MEEN     STAR.
I
MINERALS IN CHINA
EXTENT  OF THAT  GREAT  EM-
PISE'S COAL MEASTJBE.
Greed of Capital Incited by the Cheapness and Servility of the Labor
Population.
Tbe mineralresources of China
will form an ' important considera
< tion in the payment of war indemnity. The Chinese will not stand
an increase of taxation, the reformation of the corrupt official is a
work of years, and the most of the
money demanded will probably hav
to be secured by concessions. There
is no doubt but that China has
enough minerals to pay its war
debt a thousand times over. It has
long been considered the richest
coal country in the world, and the
railroad surveyors have discovered
coal and iron everywhere. The
Germans have found diamonds in
Shangtung, and mines of gold and
silver are being operated in several
places at a profit. Still, no one
knows just what China contains,
and the Powers will undoubtedly
take advantage of the situation and
demand a careful geological survey
ofthe Empire.
Some of the biggest fortunes of
the next twenty-five years will came
from the development of China's
mines. The country is a very cave
of Aladdin, which needs only the
genii of modern progress to display
it to mankind.
First take the two great industrial metals, coal and iron. China
has one of the best labor populations of the globe, and in this age
of steel, with coal, iron and modern
machinery, it will be a factor in the
world's manufactures. Pumpelly
says it has the greatest coal fields
on earth. There is coal and iron
in every province, and several of the
provinces are as rich as Pennsylvania in these minerals. Not far
west of Pekin there is a great coal
bed which extends along the fronr
tiers of Chi-li, through the province
of Shan-Si, and thence down
through Honan and Hupeh, into
another vast coal and iron district
in Hunan on the south side of the
Yang-tse. There are important
coal fields in eight of the provinces
below the Yang-tse-Kiang, and
especially in the province of Yunnan.
Yunnan is about the size of California. It lies right on the border
of Burmah and will be reached by
the railroad which is projected from
Burmah to China. The Yang-tse
river forms a part of its northern
boundary, and through it the coal
can have access to many thousand
miles of waterways, reaching hundreds of millions of people.
The mines have been worked for
ages. The province is mountainous and the coal, both bituminous
and anthracite, lies on the edges of
a great plateau in the center : of
Yunnan, at an elevetion of a mile
above the sea. Other beds are near
the Yang-tse and Siang rivers.
They are said to be easily worked.
In the mountains just back of Kioa-
Chau there are thousands of Chinese mining coal. They work 12
hours a day for from 6 to 10 cents.
The mining is primitive. The coal
is dug out with picks and carried
from the mine in rawhid__sacks on
the backs of mgn. It is then put
into baskets on wheelbarrows, from
two to three baskets being fastened
t on the shelves which jut out on
each side of the the wheel,
It is in such barrows, pulled and
puahed by men, that the coal is
taken to the market. Some of the
wheelbarrows have sails. Only a
little can be carried on a barrow,
and the freight rates are so heavy
that it coasts $6 to bring a ton from
the mines to Riao-Chau, a distance
of 70 miles. Coal worth $2.25
ton at the mines sells for $7 a ton
a few miles away.
The Yang-tse-Kiang is one of the
most wonderful rivers ofthe world,
The biggest ocean steamers can
sail up into China as far as New
York is distant from Chicago, and
with its tributaries it furnishes
more than 12,000 miles of navigabh
waterways. There are vast coal
deposits, which could be made ac
cessible to the Yang-tse-Kiang.
There are thousands of abandon
ed mines both along the Yang-tse
and in other parts of China. One
of the greatest troubles is water,
The Chinese have no good pumps,
and as the water comes into the
mines they leave them. Shafts are
seldom put down more than 200
feet.
The old American firm of Russell
& Co., when they owned the steam
ers on the Yang-tse, got all their
coal from Kukiang. There was an
expolsion from fire damp, and the
Chinese thought that the devil had
gotten into the mine, and it is shut
to this day.
If you will take your map of
China, and look at the province lying west of Chi-Li, bordered on the
morth by Mongolia and on the west
b}r the winding Hoang-Ho, you
will see the Pennsylvania of the
Chinese empire. It is the province
of Shang-Si, which is said to contain the greatest and richest coal
area on the globe. It is just about
as big as Illinois, and it has four
times as many people. It contains
iron and limestone in vast quantities, and in the future it will probably be the greatest manufacturing
and steel-making section of the
world.
The anthracite seams are unbroken over an area of more than
13,000 square miles. They are of
a thickness from 25 to 50, and of an
average of 40 feet.
The bituminous coal fields of
Shan-Si have an area of i2,<
square miles, or as great as that of
Massachusetts and Connecticut. A
part of this rich territory has been
gobbled up by big capitalists.
The concessions ofthe Pekin syndicate include the rights to all the
petroleum of Shan-Si, and to a
large part of its coal and iron.
Their concessions extend over a
territory greater than the whole of
New England and form perhaps the
richest coal concessions  ever made.
New  York Stocks.
Quotations from New York Every few
Minutes.
Telephone 239. P. o. Box985
E. GARDINER-JONES
STOCK AND SHARE   BROKER
tackinnon Building VANCOUVER, B. C.
Headquarters for all stage lines.
Hotel M!8®1
J. H. JACKSON, Sole Proprietor.
PRINCETON, B. C.
DINING ROOM UNDER PERSONAL SUPERVISION.
ONLY THE FINEST BRANDS OF LIQUORS AND
CIGARS AT THE BAR FIRST-CLASS STABLE IN
CONNECTION.
JJJflpTatrons of the Hotel Jackson can keep posted on the mining
Development ofthe entire Similkameen.
The James Robertson Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Manufacturers of Lead Pipe, Shot, Traps, White
 LEAD  PAINTS,   Etc	
Jobbers In Wrought, Cast or Steel  Pipe   and Fittings, Metals  and Steam
Fittings.   Write for Quotations.
HEAD OFFICE
MONTREAL,  QUE.
iranche* Toronto, SUJohn,
THE JAMES ROBERTSON CO., LTD,
nipeg and VANCOOVE1
BOMS
Now is the time to secure your Winters Supply of
Foot Apparel. Avoid sickness by having your
Feet properly dressed with the Best.
Boot and Shoes,
Rubber Goods, Etc.
In the Market.   We have a large and well assorted stock which we are selling as Cheaply as you
"ild have to pay for an Inferior Article.
PROSPECTOR'S SUPPLY STORE.
O. E. THOMAS, Prop.
Similkameen   Butchering*   Co.,   Princeton,   B. C.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Dealers in Heats.
Orders Filled for any point in the Similkameen Valley.
C. SUMMERS,
Manager Princeton Branch
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
January 13TH, 1901
THE^ SIMILKAMEEN^ STAR
PHbllsbcd Id the interest tl PrlBccton and tic I
JAMES ANDERSON, M,
Published Every Saturday by the
PRINCETON PUBLISHING COMPANY.
PRINCETON, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Vol.. I.
JANUARY, 12TH, 1900.
No. 1
Domestic, One Year, fa.oo.    Foreign, One Year, $300.
Payable Invariably in / dynncc.
Sul scribers will conic,' a favor on thi* office by promptly report.
in): imy change in addre** or irregularity in receipt of the paper.
'as furnished on application.    Legal notice*
1 p.r lint.' •-'Certificate* of Improvement" notices,
for legal life of notice.    Pour weekly intertion* con-
on th
Th
visit of Chief Superintendent Killeen to
ton in connection with the construction oi
ineeton-Keremeos road will be highly aped by every settler in the Similkameen
. When work was stopped in Novem-
t, fully a month before the weather be-
evere enough to interfere with construc-
he question asked by everyone was
?" So far no satisfactory reason has
iven, and if Mr. Killeen can discover the
iuse of the delay he will be conferring a
ti the Lands and Works Department and
people living in this section,
appointment of a chief inspector andsup-
:nt of roads, trails and bridges, was a
scessary one and has been warmly ap-
by the business and mining men through-
sections where Mr. Killeens visit has
i in several radical changes in the meth-
:onstruction, which have been in vogue
It may come as a decided shock to several
road superintendents, foremen and other officials,
that from now on, the chief qualification necessary for employment on government work will]
be practical ability and not political pull or the
friendship of some government official. Far too
much money has already been squandered
throughout the province in useless work, done
by methods which have been discarded twenty
Iu a late editorial in the Vancouver News-
Advertiser we notice that Mr. Carter-Cotfon is
given the credit for several beneficial changes
about to be instituted in the policy of mainte-
ence of roads. For our own part we cannot see
why the late Chief Commissioner should take
any credit for changes which may be made by
the present administration. His appointee, the
present public works engineer, has never shown
any transcendent ability in the department and
has certainly carried on public works in the
Similkameen section by ways that are strange
and peculiar. In the dark ages his methods
might have been considered original, but they
certainly cannot stand the light of the twentieth
century. If Mr. Cotton had conceived so many
original ideas about road building and maintenance, surely his Faithful henchman would be
informed of the same, and if so why has he not
during his past two years tenure of office introduced the changes that Mr. Cotton had so originally conceived ? We are always ready to give
credit, where credit is due, but we cannot bring
ourselves to believe that either Mr. Cotton or
Mr. Gamble deserve even the slightest praise
for the introduction of new methods of road
work or for the appointment of the new chief
superintendent who has proved himself such a
boon to districts which have suffered long under
the past administrations.
• • •
The greatest encouragement to capitalists to
invest in our copper mines, is given by the reports from the producing mines for the .past
year. Copper holds its price firmly in the market and indications show that for several years
to .come the present high price of the red metal
will be maintained.
A notable feature in the copper trade in the
past year is the relatively small increase
shown by the monthly reports of the producer,
Thus the statement of Mr. John Stanton, whe
acts as statistican for the companies, gives for
the United States in November a total output
°f 53i276 long tons of fine copper, which is only
259 tons more than in December of 1899, a
gain of 1.1 per cent. For the 11 months ending
with November the production reported was
246,763 tonst which is greater than that of tbe
corresponding months of 1899 by only 8,545
tons, or 3.6 per cent. Moreover, the reporting
companies showed an actual decrease last year
of 855 tons, or 0.4 per cent., the gain coming entirely from the outside sources—the smaller non-
reporting mines and the' smelting companies—
which are credited last year with a gain of 9,-
400 tons, or 33.6 per cent. It appears, therefore, that the active demand did not stimulate
production in the older mines as might have
been expected. A parallel result is shown in
the important European mines, the total production.from these for the 11 months having
been 81,848 tons, or almost the same for 1899 ;
the difference being a decrease of 32 tons.
• • •
The finding of extensive coal deposits such as
1 have in the Similkameen and Nicola Lake
districts, opens up wonderful possibilities in the
establishing of a great industry. Mining for
the "Black Diamond" has built up'Nanaimo on
Vancouver Island. Several busy towns have
prung up along the C. P. R. Crow's Nest
Route which are entirely supported by the coal
nes. The wonderful extent of the coal fields
in that district can be imagined from the following statistics :—
The Crow's Nest Coal Company are paying
taxes at the rate of $25 per acre on 10,209 acres
of coal land.
They are working on a block of 480 acres
which will yield 400,000,000 tons of coal, at
3,000 tons per day the output will last 40 years
or an average of 1,000,000 tons per year.
:is estimated that the 10,209 acres will with
scientific mining, produce 90,000 tons per acre,
a grand total of 718,810,000 tons, having a
valuation of $1,837,620,000 less cost of mining
and interest of capital invested.
When it is considered that the coal supply ofl
B. C. at the present time is greatly exceeded by
the demand and that there is a great scarcity of]
coal in all populous centres on the American
continent today, the value of our coal deposits
cannot be overlooked. With two first-class
markets, the Boundary country and the Pacific
coast cities, the Similkameen coal fields will, as
1 as railroad facilities are afforded tbe district, become the most important producers n
the province. The most important point to
be considered in the working of coal mines is
the distance from the mine to the consumer.
With adequate transportation the coal mines
around Princeton will be situated at an equal
distance from the smelting points in the Boundary and the cities of Vancouver and New
Westminster. The haul to any of these points
will not exceed 150 miles and will place our
mines in such a position that they will be able
to compete successfully with any of the coal
producing centres in British Columbia.
BUSINESS and PROFESSIONAL CARDS
W. J. WATERHAN, M. E.
p. a. s. m. a, 1, n. e., Etc
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C.
J. CHARLES McINTOSH,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
AND
 NOTARY PUBLIC	
PRINCETON, B. C.
PARKINSON & FETHER-
STOiNHAUGH, r*m§™«£,\ c.
Provincial Land Surveyor,
Civil Engineers
and   Notary Publics.
 JAMES HISLOP..
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEER
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
•Princeton.B. C	
PRINCETON ASSAY
OFFICE,       C.  B.  HARRIS,
Assayer and Chemist.
Will Guarantee Accuracy and Return Report of -
Assay on Stage Bringing Sample.
Bridge Street.,    PRINCETON, B. C.
LINDLEY & FOSTER,
Taxidermists   and Furriers.
The Best Price* Paid for
\i'A Johnson St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
ASSAY OFFICE AND ORE
TESTING  WORKS .	
W. PELLEW-HARVEY,
Assaying and Complete Mining Smelting Tests Made from
Small Samples up to Ton Lots.
Assayer in charge of the
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT ASSAY OFFICE
ets^iw&iafl.   "    VANCOUVER, B. C.
JOHN W.   PECK & CO.,
Wholesale Clothing
Mens'   Furnishings.
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Correspondence Solicited from the Trade.
Careful   and   Prompt   Attention to all
LETTER ORDERS.
I   Wan't ALL WORK
I    VV Ull  l Promptly Executed
Your       We can save you money
Watch   on your Repairing.
Repairing.
W. J. KERR, Kamloops, B. C.
 January i3Th, 1901
THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
HOTEL
HEREIHEOS
JONH NEIL,
Proprietor.
Stables in Connetion.
a
This hotel is Situated at
-4he Gateway to the
Similkameen valley, j»
Well Furnished Rooms.
Bar and Dining Room
Service First-Class.
w
We Cater Specially to
Mining Men
and Prospectors
GRAND PACIFIC
HOTEL  KAM100PS, B. C.
'The nearest h<
f Railway Statio
the
Head-
.; ^uu.^.o .v. n.J people
' | coming from Nicola and
'the Similkameen.
Good Rooms.
Good Table
Good Liquors,
P. 1. BAR1WT, Prtp.
LATEST MINING MAP OF THE
LOWER SIMILKAMEEN
JfWTTH ASPECIALLY
PREPARED REPORT
OF ITS DIFFERENT MINING CAMPS; AND A COMPLETE TRAVEL I. ER'S GUIDE
COMPILED AND DRAWN BY b^ K,
^ ^ FR ANK   BAILEY.
FOR  SALE AT   THE
STAR  OFFICE.
PR^fCE   $2.00   PER    COPY.
Through the Week.
Invitations are being issued for
the annual ball given by the management of the Driard Hotel at
Nicola Lake. The dance will be
held on Saint Valentine's day, February 14th, and Mr. and Mrs. Joe
Richards are sufficiently well-known
as entertainers to guarantee a splendiferous time to those who are
present.
A grand sheet and pillow-case
dance is being arranged and will be
held at the home of Mr\ and Mrs.
W. J. Waterman, on .Monday, February nth. A\ coraial invitation
is extended to everyone in the di
trict. Granite\/-reek and Otter
Valley are included and everyone
in that section is especially invited
to attend.
A. F. Procter, the C. P. R.
gineer who built the Balfour extension, left Sunday for Abbotsford on
the Mission Junction branch of the
main line. A day or so ago the
gineering outfit used on the Balfour
extension and intended to serve a
crew of 22 men was shipped to the
same point. No announcement has
been made as to the C. P. R.'s ob
ject in putting this location party
into the country in the depth ofl
winter, but it is believed that the
management has decided to head
off the Victoria, Vancouver & Eastern road for wh:'ch the Mackenzie-
Mann people hold a charter. It is
thought likely that the location
party will run a line southeast from
a point on the Mission Junction
road through the Hope mountains
to connect with the Boundary road.
—Nelson Tribune.
The open invitation given by Mr.
and Mrs. W. J. Waterman to the
people of Princeton and neighborhood, to attend a dance at the Waterman home on Tuesday evening last,
was accepted by a number of our
citizens. The cold weather kept
quite a few at home, and they certainly missed a treat.
The spacious living room, 28x18,
was cleared for dancing, and the
>ic supplied by Messrs^ Knight
and Thomas on the^piccolo and
banjo kept the merry crowd busy
until the early moaning hours. A
splendid supper Was served at midnight and righVwell did the party
w their appreciation of the good
things provided. Mrs. Waterman
proved herself an excellent hostess
and used every effort to add to the
pleasure of her guests, making
everyone feel thoroughly at home.
Among those who were present
;re noticed:
Mr. and Mrs. Bell, Mr. and Mrs.
Lawrence, Mr. and Mrs. Richter,
Mr. and Mrs. Schlisler, Mr. and
Mrs. E. Allison, Misses Louise
and Carrie Allison and Miss Dun-
Messrs. E. Thomas, B. Thom-
W. Thomas, C. Thomas, J.
Wallace, W. Wilson, T. McAlpine,
J. McAlpine, D. Day, C. Revely,
B. Hall, J. Allison, H. Irwin, W.
Knight, Dr. Whillans and J. Anderson.
FOR SALE,
icres Nicola Valley.     Crown  Grant.
Price {1350.   Apply E. A. Harris,
35 Fort Street, Victoria,
t Star Office, Princeton.
New Century
<& GREETINGS «*
190 1.
HTO THOSE seeking bargains in
Fresh and Newly arrived goods
we would call your atention to a
few staple lines, which will be of
special interest.
DRY GOODS.
Fine assortment   Laces,  Ribbons,
Etc., just on hand.
CLOTHING
Halifax Home Spun Pants—Direct.
Made to Order.
GROCERIES.
Ram Lai's Tea—Complete   ssort -
ment of Staples.
A. E. HOWSE'S
# BIG STORE ^
PRINCETON.
"TRIM" ZL ORE CAR
We are the Sole Manufacturers for Canada
ofthe "TRUAX" which is the best Ore Car
in the World.
te dumped without opening
P. O. BOX 51.   TBI.. 250.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
ARHSTRONG & MORRISON,
IRON AND STEEL WORKS.
S. A. HARTMAN,
Mines and
Mining. ..
ROSSLAND  B. G. Ja
1901.
We have first class connections and can find the necessary
capital to work and develop meritorious copper propositions in
the Similkameen country. If you have a good claim with a
fine showing we will find you a buyer. We cordially invite
your correspondence.
Respectfully,
Office: 43 Columbia Ave. S. A. HARTMAN.
THE DRIARD HOTEL
JOB RICHARDS, Manager NICOLA   LAKE.
Headquarters for Mining Men and Prospectors.
An Ideal Summer Resort.
Dining Room Service Unsurpassed. Only the Choicest Brands of Liquors at
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
5 *
(*  The Nearest Point to the io Mile  T
* Creek Mines.
| Woodward's
...HOTEL
f
i
I
I
i
5
J
5
e
I
ff Headquarters for Smith's Stage *
<? i
LOWER NICOLA.
Via Lower Nicola.
RTAHLlv ROOMS.
Provincial Notes
The new machinery for the Republic Reduction Company's mill
passed through the city this week,
says the Grand Pork's Gazette, and
is now well en routed to the great
reservation camp. This machinery
is being rushed through as rapidly
as possible as it is impossible for
tbe mill to take any amount of
custom ore before this crushing apparatus is in place. Then the mill
will soon be brought up to 'its full
capacity of 200 tons daily.
I Granite
5 Creekmm
..Hotel
MRS. JAMES, Proprietor.
The nearest poiu
richest Silver Les
in B. C, 'Summ:
There is more gold »u v
Granite Creek than has «
yet been taken out. ,
if >;
jold in !
£ Stopping Point for        I
v Princeton stages. *
ft I
Prospectors
....STOP 1
If you want to Outfit
cheaply and quickly,
do so at the	
KEREMEOS STORE
WM. HINE & Co.,
money by buying
outfit at the point
tart prospecting.
Mining Supplies
of Every
Despite the cold weather, which
makes open air labor somewhat unpleasant, the work on the Columbia
river bridge at Robson is progressing satisfactorily. The Gunn outfit has got down to business in good
style, and the east abutment is now
eight feet high. Yesterday the
piles for the east pier were driven
and the tops cut off to construct the
caisson in which the foundatf
will be built. The bottom of the
river proves to be a fine gravel,
sembling hard pan, into which the
piles are driven from 12 to 15 feet.
McVeigh & Poupare are making
good progress with their work on
the approaches and will probably
finish the contract in a week or two.
Some delay has been experienced
in procuring the exact sized timbers
required for the stringers.—Tribune.
J. P. Graves ofthe Miner-Graves
syndicate was in Montreal recently.
He states that he has made a contract to deliver 700 tons of copper
matte per month in New York and
200 tons additional in Liverpool,
England. This would mean an income to the syndicate of $ 1,500,00c
to $2,000,000 per annum. Graves
further announced that a charter
would be obtained next session oi
the British Columbia legislature for
granting a consolidated mining,
smelting and power company with
a capital of fifteen millions. Ten
properties are included in the amalgamation—Knob Hill, Old Ironsides, Gray Eagle, Granby smelter,
Grand Forks and Carson townsites,
sawmills, electric plant, etc. Concerning dividends, Graves said as
soon as reorganization is effected
the company will be in a position
to discuss matters.
At a meeting of the directors oi'
the Winnipeg Mines, Limited, held
at the mine recently, it was decided
to notify shareholders ofthe levy oi
the first assessment of one cent a
share. Richard Plewman, secretary of the company, stated that by
the end of the month the regular
force would be back again at the
mine, and the development more
vigorously pushed than ever.
The additional machinery ordered has arrived, consisting of a 30-
horse power boiler, a 16-horse power hoist, a 100 gallon a minute
pump and 2000 feet of rails. After
the installation of this plant devel-'
opment will be resumed on the recent strike at the 300-foot level on
the North No. 2 vein. From this
vein the last shipment made of 22
tons gave a net return of $36 per
ton, it is said, principally in gold.
It is said that future shipments will
be sent to the Boundary Falls pyritic smelter, on account of the adaptability ofthe ore for this method oi'
treatment, the Standard Pyritic
Smelting company having offered
the management a pretty low rate.
THE
SUNSET
COPPER
MINING
COMPANY
LIHITEO.
Owning
and
Operating
The
SUNSET
Mine
On Copper
Mountain,
Similkameen
Mining
District.
}
ft
Everyone who  has  seen the property
RENDERS
A UNANIMOUS
VERDICT
The Biggest and Best Mine in British
Columbia.
NOW IS THE
TIME TO BUY
STOCK IN
This Wonderful Mine. It is an investment ! No Speculation ! Ore enough in sight to return 100 per cent, on amount
invested.    BUY TO-DAY before advance in price.
Sunset Shares Will
Make You Rich.
FOR FURTHER MFORMATION APPLY TO
R. A. BROWN,
PRINCETON or Grand Forks, B. C.
y
J
 January I2TH, 1901
TITE     SimflVKA"M?WEN    STA'R.
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR A PRIVATE
BILL.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that application
will be made to the legislative assembly ofthe
province of British Columbia, at its next session
for an act to it corporate a company with power
or double line of railway of standard or/narrow'
gauge for the purpo.se of conveying passengers
ys ofthe Chilli-1
ud Sinillkameca.-
kutaries thereof;'
NOTICE OF   APPLICATION
FOR A PRIVATE
BILL.
Province of Bi
for a Private
river, thence following the Ott
tion with the Tulameen river t<
("oliowing the Tulameen river j
frrincetoU or as au alternuth|
Adjunction of the Cold Watei
Following the valley of the Nil
Hong the south shore ofthe si
Quilchena Creek, thence foliov
:old Water and Nico
it Cold Water river u
henc<:.ei»twl_ltbroiJa
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR A PRIVATE
BILL.
maintain and operate by steal
other kind or kinds of motiv
double standard track gauge
id southerly tli
of B
1  from
westerly through tl.. ...
the Nickel Plate camp and Twenty Mile creekl
and also a branch westerly through the Similka.
meen valley to Princeton in the said province:
with pdwer to construct, equip, maintain and
nection   therewith, not   exceeding   twenty-five
miles fn length, and all necessary roads, bridge s
lferaph  1
a all
all kinds of plant ft)? the/.-purpdae of Supplying
light, heat, electricity and any kind of motiv<
power ; .and with power to expropriate lands foi
the purposes of the company;   and to acquir<
lake traffic or othe:
u wagon 1 oads and trails to ft«-
e _same; and levy aMcT^dlleigv
rights, powers or
s ioth day of Dec,
.J^rfecCRAis.
NOTICE OF   APPLICATION
FOR A PRIVATE
BILL.
-NOTICE is herety given that application wil
Otter Flat at the junction of said Otter and Tulameen rivers in a south westerly direction following the Tulameen river up the Tulameen Valley
for a distance of Thirty miles; and with further
length from any point or points on the main line
rdadl to, be used Mi the construction jbf such raifc
way aha in advanWoTthe same andtb feyy Infi
collect tolls from all persons using and all freight
passing over any such roads built by the Com-
ESS£SSS9'jeLbfJ^.0-jSir construction ofthe
incidental rights, pbwers"6f 6Hvfleges as may be
j—=-e to the above objects or
nyjjfffien
nated-aT
a this 26th day of Nov
APPLICATION FOR PURCHASE.
•Dated this 20th'di
icty days aft:r date, I intend to   apply  to the
COAL LICENSE APPLICATIONS.
NOTICE.
I* hereby given that I int
Commissioner of-Land*
koftherwS   five miles above Princeton running thence so,,
east 80 chains, thence north
COAL LICENSE APPLICATIONS.
NOTICE.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that thiry. days after
late, I, John Harry, Jackson, of the Town of
Princeton, in the town of Princeton, in the Pro-
rince of British Columbia, Miner, intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Work*,
for a license to pros?*, t for coal on that <*&%*
rutameen river'about three miles from the Town
of Princeton, in the Similkameen Mining Division of Yale Districtjjindwhich is more partial-
NOTICE.
Thirty days after date I intend td apply totl
ommissToner      c
f La
tids
and
of ii. C,
oSpect for
nthe
land:   Common
t the
ial Po
running west 80
:hai
s; th
hence 80 chains
don
then
ideof
he north
fork of Granite c
' T. H
MT
Datec
at Gran
te Creek, B. C„ Dec. 7
NOTICE.
THIRTY days
after date we int
■ndt
0 apply to
licen
pect for coal on
th*.!
ndern
len-
CERTIFICATES.  OF   IMPROVEMENTS.
NOTICE.
f Sat under the provisions of the Game
Act, 1897, Chapt. 88, Sec. 15, it shall be
unlawful for any person to catch, kill,
destroy or pursue with such intent; ■
throughout the Province:—cariboo, deer,
wapiti, commonly known" as elk, moose,
hare, mountain goat and mountain sheep,
from the ist day of January to the 31st
day of July inclusive. By Order.
KAMLOOPS, ASHCROFT, YALE AND
SfSiftKAMEEN  MINING DIVISIONS OF YALE       £fJ£fi
DISTRICT.
NOTICE is hereby given that all placer
claims legally held in Kamloops,
Ashcroft, Yale and Similkameen Mining
Divisions of Yale District, will be laid
over from the ist day of November ensuing, to the ist day of May, 1901.
•G. C. TUNSTALL,
Gold Commissioner.
Kamloop. Oct. 28th, 1900.
 THE     SIMILKAMEEN     STAR.
January 12TH, 1901
ra^^^^^Sli'^R^B^^^Si
The  Townsite  of
CETON
British Columbia,
M             \    M
Lots for
• • • A^dlG • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $10.
Per Front Foot..*.*
Size of Lots 50x100
Ft. and 33x100 Ft.
One acre Residential
Lots.** «* at .* Jr a*
Terms:   1-3 Cash;
Bal. 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent* per annum. «*
*'■            "     •      '                        !■',*•          ,     ,           ,-=
*              *
1
Government Head-
quarters for the SlmilMameeii District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Simil:
kameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain,
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove.
FINE CLIMATE
and pure WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM.
#####* w wwwwww
Send for Map and Price List to «* «* .* ** a*
W. J. WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.
5 i«>^^rf3c£kks>'>

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