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The Similkameen Star 1900-09-01

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™§ SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
Devoted to the Interests of Princeton and the Similkameen Country.
Vol. i.   No. 23.
PRINCETON, B. C, SATURDAY, SEPT., ist, 1900.
$2.00 Per Year
NEWS OF THE WEEK
Westminster Lacrosse Team
I        Winning Applause,
Boilers Hen Canght in a Trap—Clive
Pringle Returns to the Boundary
from Europe.
A Montreal despatch, under date of|
H\.ug. 21st, contains the following concerning the Westminster lacrosse team,
Lhichison a tour of the east: Th*
Leathers of the British Columbia lacrosse team, who arrived here yesterday,
e created quite an impression in
ise circles. Expert lacrosse opinion
f, fearful that the Montreal team
e its hands' full tomorrow afternoon
etain its laurels.
fThe details of the Westminsters' schedule with the eastern teams   are   as   fol-
Westminster vs. Montrealers, August
22nd.
Westminster vs. Quebec, August 25th.
Westminster vs. Shamrocks, of Montreal, August 29th.
Westminster vs. Capitals, of Ottawa,
September ist.
Wesiminster vs. Toronto, September
3rd.
Westminster vs. Tecumsehs, of Toronto, September 8th.
The Westminster team won the two
first matches, defeating the Montrealers
and Quebecers easily.
The Boer war still hangs on, with
very little of importance . taking place.
A Krugersdorp despatch of the 25th inst.
relates that on the previous day
mandant Delarey appeared before Ban]
Station with a large force and s
the garrison, commanded by Lord Albemarle, to surrender. The garrison
fused. In the meantime, General Dewet
took advantage of this ruse and crossed
the river towards the Orange River
Colony.
Lord Roberts has left Pretoria and has
fixed his headquarters at Wondenfon-
tein, where the bulk of the enemy's army
are supposed to be.
Buller reports that the Boers laid a
trap for his cavalry on August 23rd,
opening with several guns at fairly short
range. The English guns silenced the
Boers, but when the firing ceased and
the pickets were being placed for the
night, by some mistake the companies of
the Liverpool regiment advanced 1,500
yards into a hollow, out of sight of the
main body, where thev were surrounded
by the Boers and suffered heavily.
Clive Pringle Beturns.
Clive Pringle hlls returned home after
a three months' vacation spent in   Eng-
I land.   He did not take in the Paris   ex-
I hibition, but spent his   holiday in   Lon-
I don and the   provinces.    While   in   the
old country he attended the meetings of
the congress of the chambers of commerce of the empire, being with F. J.
Piuucane a delegate from the local board
of trade. The feature of the congress, he
said, was the endeavor of the delegates to
frame a resolution embodying some principle of preferential trade between the
mother country and her colonies. The
outcome was not successful, but a strong
committee was appointed with this object in view. Mr. Pringle says that the
mineral resources of the province are beginning to be appreciated by mining
operators in London. This has been
brought about more than ever by the
success attained by Whittaker Wright in
his flotation of the various subsidiary
companies of the B. A. C. The shares of |
these companies are now all at a premium.
He anticipated seeing quite an influx ofj
mining engineers and others from ac
the water to investigate the merits of the
country in the near future.—Greenwood
3 this
PURELY  PERSONAL.
The Lost Horse boys wer
Vic Ryder was in town the first of the
week from 20 Mile.
Mr. Arthur Hickling returned from
Victoria by Wednesday's stage.
Mr. Barber, who has been on a visit to
Oregon, returned home this week.
Mrs. James, proprietoress of the Granite
Hotel, was in town one day this week.
Mr. Fred. Revely has returned tc
town after a fortnight's prospecting trip,
Mr. Robert Stevenson^and son arrived
in town on Wednesday from Summit
camp. *
Mr. J. P. Cunningham has returned
from a brief visit   to the   coast, by the
Rever Murray of Nicola^beld  divine
£
:ed audience.
The Misses Allison and Haegerman
were visiting at Mrs. Thynne's the latter
part of the week.
Jas. Hislop's Hope-Princeton road survey party started out today. Mr. Hislop
will follow tomorrow.
Mr. W. A. Campbell, manager of the
Lost Horse mine, arrived in from the
coast on Wednesday's stage.
The Murray boys came up from 20 Mile
last Saturday where they are working on
the government leserve survey.
As will be seen by a notice elsewhere
county court will be held at Princeton on
the 17th inst, before His Honor Judge
Spinks.
Sister Ruth,  of Vancouver,  who   has
been nursing at   Mr.
for the past n
Friday's stage.
Mr. George Phillip, of Mr. A. E.
Howse's staff at Nicola, who spent a
month at the Prinbeton store, during
Mr. Howse's absence, returned home on
last Sunday's stage.
t   Mr^W. J. Waterman's
tnth^eturned   home   by
ARE HARD AT WORK
Miners and Prospectors Busy
Sawing Wood.
News of Copper Mountain—Summit
Camp Looking Up—Work on
Kelly Creek.
A glance at the mining records this
week will show that, although there has
been no great amount of new locations,
quite a number of good finds have been
recorded. Transfers have also been few.
But it is satisfactory to note that a goodly
amount of assessment work has been
in the various camps, and development
work will be pushed vigorously in a
good many instances.
COPPER MOUNTAIN.
Mr. C. B. Harris, of the B. C. assay
office, Princeton, paid Copper mountain
a visit the early part of the week, and
is well pleased with all he saw at the
different mines. The crosscut on the
Sunset, from the 150 foot level, is now in
70 feet, and in ore that requires no sorting, it being well mineralized. As development work progresses, one is more
than ever convinced of the worth of the
property. Work will be pushed n
vigoronsly than ever.
About four hundred feet north from
the Sunset, is the Sunrise. The shaft
down some 35 feet, from which a crosscut
is to be started. The ore found here is
practically the same as that found in the
Sunset, which goes to show the immensity of the ore body of the latter.
The Sunrise is a. very promising location,
and will no doubt improve with development. This property is owned by Messrs.
Burr and Jones.
The Oriole, the property of Messrs.
French, Day, and Snowdon Bros., contains an exceedingly fine showing in
copper pyrites, and the shaft, which is
at a depth of 35 feet, is in solid ore. The
owners justly think they have as good a
property as is to be found on the   moun-
Both the Red Eagle and Triangle Fraction are making good showings.
Among those who are doing assessment
is Bpr^Thomfls.^»w--thP_T^y   g§ which
promises well.
The owners of the Canadian Belle
group are making arrangements for extensive development on their group of
claims, and some good results are confidently looked for.
SUMMIT CAMP.
Mr. Robert Stevenson has returned to
town from Summit camp, where he has
been overseeing the assessment work on
his claims. The ore in this camp carrys
gold, silver and leadTand*assays running
as high as $200 in g1>ld ands silver are reported.    Mr. Stevenson is quite satisfied
with his property and thinks this will
prove to be a very rich camp. Several
other parties are also doing assessment.
Mr. Charles Law, of Vancouver, a well
known mining man of wide experience,
is at present at Summit, and as acquired
considerable property, which he is highly
pleased with." Considerable assessment
work is also being done on Kelly creek,
where many fine   surface showings  are
j^    An Unfortunate Affair.
What may prove a rather serious affair .
took place yesterday on the way to Cop-V
per mountain between Mr. M. A. Voigt
and some of the employees of the Lost
Horse ^mine. The parties, who were
mounted, met, when some very warm
words were exchanged, resulting in Mr.
Voigt and one of the other party dismounting and settling the dispute with
their fists. The fracas lasted for some
minutes, when the combatants were separated. However, a messenger from
Coppor mountain rode into town this
morning in search of Dr. ^hillgns, saying that Mr. Voiet was_in_a very precari-
ous cbndiBoTrr~THe"doctor's. return with
a. report on his condition is anxiously
awaited.
Chief Commissioner Coming.
Word was received from Mr. Denis
Murphy, M. P. P., this week stating that
he had received the petition forwarded
to him from Princeton, asking for the
immediate construction of the government offices, and that it would receive its
prompt attention. He also stated that
himself and the Hon. Mr. Wells, chief
commissioner of lands and works, would
be in Princeton shortly to look into the
needs of this constituency. A right royal
reception should be awarded these two
gentlemen who are so desirous of looking
after our needs.
DISTBICT LOCALS.
Burt Irwin came in from the hills on
Thursday.
Rev.  Mr.   Ladner,   chairman   of the
Mr. P. Ladner, of Ladner's Landing,
who has been spending a day or two in
Vernon, left for the Similkameen on
Wednesday last.
Work on the two-story house on Harold avenue is progressing .satisfactorily
and will he ready for occupation by the
first of next month.
Pete O'Rielly, of Nicola, has located a
very fine looking claims six miles out of
Nicola on the Granite creek road. It is
a gray copper and shows up a lead six
feet wide.
Mr. Berry, of Kamloops, died a week
ago last Friday, and was buried last
Sunday at Nicola Jake. He leaves a wtjfe
and child to mourn his loss,,
Tbe Rev. Mr. NevilhX'of Nicola^ will
hold services tomorato as follows: At
Princeton, at iyuj&V; in the Harris Hall,
and at Granite Creek in the evening at
.7 p. m. He is accompanied on XjAS visit V,
by his wife.
LITEST FROM WESTMINSTERS
CRACK LACROSSE TEAM.
A despatch from the coast, received by
today's stage, contains the intelligence
that the Westminster lacrosse team defeated the Shamrocks at Montreal on
Wednesday last.    Hurrah for the west!
 THE   SIMILKAMEEN  STAR.
f Provincial Notes
Development is to be resumed on the
Hartford, in Phoenix camp, shortly, and
It is understood a machinery plant will
be put in.
It is reported from Victoria that a dis
interested Government Engineer >ill bi
at once sent to locate a wagon road to the
Mt Baker mining district.
An appropriation of $8,000 has beer
promised by the government for the
building of a wagon road up the West
Fork from Westbridge to Beaverton.
The C. P. R. has established a station1
at the Grand Forks smelter. The telegraph wires have been strung along the
spur.   The station will be called Gra:
John A. Manly is having platted,
will soon pnt on the market, a new
ditio
bri
licit
Mid of the North Fo
swery, on the east si
of the
This new tract will contain about eighty residence lots.
The Provincial Exhibition will be held
at New Westminster, October 2, 3, 4, 5.
$20,000.00 in prises. Tug of war, horse
races, aquatics, naval and military sports,
gymkhana, lacrosse, baseball, band tournament, magnificent illuminations, grand
concerts, and special attractions.
The Dominion government have been
approached, through our member, to define the actual location of the International Boundary Line. It has been suggested that at the same time the Boundary line between the Yale and Westminster mining districts be also defined.
Constable J. Scott, accompanied by
Mr. McLeod, went up to Lake House, a
few miles beyond the first summit, on
the Yale road from Chilliwack, recently.
They were in search of two Indian girls
who left the Coqualeetza Institute. They
were not successful, in securing the cul-
RobertWood returned to the Boundary from Victoria recently, where he
had been trying to get an appropriation
for a wagon road from Westbridge to
Beaverton. Mr. Wood has received a
promise of {8,000 for the proposed road,
and work will be commenced on it in the
course of a couple of weeks.
It is announced that the Miner-Graves
syndicate will immediately put in a private telephone line from Grand Forks to
Greenwood by way of Phoenix. There
will be about a dozen private phones on
the wire and the chief use it will be put
to will be in communicating with the
company's big mines at Phoenix.
Grand Forks is to have a road into
Franklin camp. The project has been
on foot for some time and now there is
no longer any doubt of its consumation.
The money has been appropriated by the
government and is now immediately
available for the commencement of the
work of building the road.
ew steamer "Minto," (Capt. Jeff.
\) plying the Fraser and Harri-
:rs between Chilliwack and Harrison came down from Harrison|last week
on her trial trip and for inspection. She
will make daily trips from the Chilliwack
steamboat landing to Harrison, connecting with the C. P. R. trains east   and
I
T
\/ Ai
Among those who formed part of the
garrison so long besieged in Mafeking was. Harry Brennen, for many
years an ejjgnedriver on the E. & N.
railway. Mr. BreTTfleVsknowledg?' of
engineering was turned to good account
during the siege, he being   placed in |
charge of an armored  train, which
dered good service in the earlier stages of
the war.
To have the river stocked with salmon
has been a problem which has been under consideration for some time by the
citizens of Nelson and also by the provincial government. It is known that
salmon come up as far as Bonnington
Falls, but they have never been known
to come any farther, Many of the people are recommending the placing of
run at the falls.
S. B. Algiers of Rossland was recently
committed for trial by Magistrate Boult-
bee on the charge of perjury, preferred
by John^L. Morrish, superintendent of
the Velve±_mines, on Sophie mountain,
Morrish swore that the boarding-house
occupied by 50 men, 'four dwelling
houses occupied by
stables constantly used by hoises stood
on the upper fraction of the Velvet group,
which Algiers relocated under the name
of the Velvet Fraction. Allen G. White,
manager of the Leiter mine, corrobor-
•AV^MiVSWW^^^^^S
Just Across the Line.
The Columbia Telephone and Telegraph Co. now has its wires almost into
Loomis, Wash.
The newtownof Molson, on the western bordern of the reservation, and about
twelve miles from Chesaw, already has
fifteen or twenty business houses, and
more opening up. Among the buildings
being erected is an $8,000 hotel.
A contract for placing the new machinery in the large^addition to the
Northport smelter has been
Spokane firm. The three
and large boilers must be irt readiness by
the 10th of November, whenf the smelter
11 then have a capacity of twice its
present size. Something like 500 men
will be required to keep the smelter run-
full blast, which means a pay roll
of about {40,000 per month.
There is now somewhat over 40,000
tons of ore in the Northport smelter
yards. The ore is coming in more rapidly
than it can be treated. In ten days or
such a matter the new boilers will be on
the ground and set up when the three
furnaces will be run steadily except for
repairs. The foundation for the new
smokestack is well under way. For the
last few days furnace No. 3 has been
handling 14 tons per hour or 336 tons
per day.
It is said freight is coming in fast to
Republic. The most of it comes over
the Kettle Falls road, and as it is only
about half as long as that by way of Maraud Grand Forks, good time is made.
The average time for freight is about twe
half days from Meyers Falls tc
Republic. The rates are about 1% cents
per pound. When the cut-off is completed and the rest of the road slightly
improved, which will be within four
weeks, it is believed that the rates will
be reduced to 1 cent per pound.
A plat of Kipling, the government
jwn to be laid*out*y TamJin & Adams,
has been placed on exhibition. Twenty-
lots have, up to date, been reserved
by intending purchasers. Kipling will
be the agricultural town of the new
country to be opened October   10  next,
" until that time its exact location will
be a mystery. There wiil undoubtedly
be a good chance for a town to be established in some pirt of the centre of so
rich an agricultural country, and Kipling will make a good trading point.
New General
Store
We carry a well assorted stock of Clothing, Gents' Furnishings, Blankets, Boots and Shoes, Stationery, Tinware, etc.
We sell none but the Purest and Best
GROCERIES
Try Our "HONDI CEYLON" and RAM LAI/S
 Indian  Teas	
Just Received
Another Consignment of Boots  and Shoes, Shirt* and Underwear'
CALL AND SEE THEM.
Bridge St.
Rennie A Bell
PRINCETON LUflBER,
SHINGLE and PLANING MILLS
A. E. HOWSE, Prop.
Hill and Office
Bridge Street,
PRINCETON. B. C.
$IMILKAMEEN
BUTCHERING QO.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Dealers in Heats.
Orders Filled for- any Point in the Similkameen Valley.
Cm Rummers,
PRINCETON BRANCH. manager.
I Footwear
That will Last and at the same
time cost the least money is what
most people look for but seldom
 FOR GOOD HONEST VALUE IN	
! BOOTS .* AND # SHOES
That will Wear and Last a visit to the Prospectors Supply Store should be made. We have a large
assortment with Prices that are bound to please.
j o. e. thomas, #*«*.   Pfospectof s Supply Store
 THE   SIMILKAMEEN   STAR.
SECRET   SOCIETIES    RE-UNION.
,\ Second Annual Re-Union Held at Na-
» naimo—Important Business.
At the second annual re-union of secret
societies held at^Nanaimo  on   the   nth
day of August, 1900, when   prominent
workers of the mystic craft had gathered
S together from   the   cities  of Nanaim
Vancouver, New  Westminster  and Vi
toria, an opportunity was presented and
reference made to the action of the  re-
:S presentatives   of the British   Columb e
J -,—-^ Medical Association residing at Victoria,
in refusing to attend the members of the
various secret societies of that city.   I
m appears that the societies have been pay
\ty $3 a year for each rp«*"ihpr in standing t<
the metlical officer appointed by th<
lodge in consideration of his attendance
and medicines to the members. No
son has been assigned for the action
taken by the doctors, but it is assumed
by society men that the medical proft
sion desired to increase the amount of
sick benefit paid by the lodges from $7 to
$10 per week and allow the individual
members an opportunity of choosing
their own physician, thus dividing the
practice more evenly among the doctors.
On the other hand, it is claimed by
ciety men that the privilege of choosing
lodge physicians, and it is a practice that
the societies have enjoyed for many
years, has proved the most satisfactory,
both to the lodges and the members
thereof. The small sums set aside monthly from the individual member provide
for those who may fall for the time being
from the ranks of •wage-earners, an<
certainly seems reasonable that the producing classes would be in a better position to contribute to such sickness than
the afflicted one. Another great objection which the lodges have to the practice the Victoria physicians wish to establish is the confidence   existing  between
T patient and doctor.   Certain   prescribed
^ illnesses will nullify not only the medical
attention but also the sick benefits   pay
(V-/ able to members.   Lodges have been re
0*JQl fused by private doctors to   disclose   th<
condition of certain members, urging
that such would be a breach of etiquette
and of no concern to the lodge. It will
be easily seen how difficult is the task of
safeguarding the lodges against such
evils. The Victoria societies have been
fortunate in securing the services of three
physicians to carry on the work in face
of the opposition created by the medical
association, but are unable to obtain additional assistance until the present medical act is amended, conferring as it does
the powers of examination of new arrivals
by a now very interested board,
matter has been placed in the hands of
_ the government for over a month and
yet there are signs of dealing with the
subject. Representations have again been
made within the past week that the 1
ter may be dealt with before the present
session is ended. To strengthen the
r*~        hands of the   committee appointed   by
fjnn&.ii the federated board, the following set   of
resolutions was read by the president of
the federated board of secret societies,
Mr. W. H. Price, and was carried by the
meeting unanimously:
Whereas the legislature of the province
' (v^ J of British Columbia have enacted   legis
lation conferring special privileges upon
the learned professions, and
Whereas the powers and privileges so
conferred were for the purpose of qualification and the protection of the public
"w&jiiijj interest, and
v   ' Whereas the action of certain profes
sional classes has been  directed  against
. the accustomed and legitimate active uses
of benevolent societies and   inimical   to
the best interests of the public welfare,
Whereas difficulty exists in obtaining
medical practitioners to carry on the
work of the benevolent institutions, and
Whereas the B. C. medical act excludes
from practice in British Columbia graduates from all colleges and universities
unless they pass the examination provided by the B. C. medical council,      .
Therefore be it resolved that the combined benevolent societies of British Columbia here assembled protest against the
unjust discrimination of the B. C. medi-
nd
raliz
the   B.   C.
legislature to repeal, during the present
session, obnoxious clauses in the medical
act and admit upon the provincial medical register all practitioners possessing e
medical diploma from British or Canadian, colleges or universities, holding a
license to practice in any province of the
Dominion of Canada, and
Be it further resolved that we vigorously protest against class legislation and
ask that equal privileges be given the
members of the legal and dental profes-
Be it further resolved that copies of
these resolutions be presented to the
premier, Hon. Jas. Dunsmuir, and also
to the local press.
Moved by W. J. Gower, Victoria; seconded by Wm. Bennett, Nanaimo; assented to by S. H. Williams, Vancouver.
It was also further decided to hold the
next gathering of the societies at Vancouver in August next, when it is expected that the brethren will ^prepare a
program worthy of themselves and creditable to the city of which they are so
justly proud.
Prospectors
....STOPi
If you want to Outfit
cheaply and quickly,
do so at the	
KEREMEOS STORE
WM. HINE & Co.,
make money by buying
your outfit at the point
you start prospecting.
Mining Supplies
of Every
I French & Day
TINSMITHS \
PLUriBERS
GUNSniTHS
...PUKP DRIVING DONE-.      '
Our Camp   Stove is the Boss for  1
Prospectors. (
Repair work, of Every Descrip- 1
ffi^if''   tion. ,
Hotel Princeton
JAMES WALLACE, Proprietor.
PRINCETON'S PIONEER
& <£ HOTEL & *&
The Resort
For Prospectors and Mining Men.
First Class Dining Room and Bar.
No trouble to talk to guests. Political
matters laid over for the present. The
Chinese Question the Important topic of
the day.
Mongolian Sympathisers Excluded.
Riveted Steel Pipe.
. —3, of Stool Wafer Plpo for City	
d Quartz Mining, made up complete, or we will furni
Lied to be riveted at destination.
n Suppy, Placer, Hydrulic
ARMSTRONG & MORRISON,
OFFICE AND JVORKS, I
VANCOUVER, :
COOK & CO.
Princeton's
Pioneer Store.
 STORES  AT	
PRINCETON   and GRANITE CREEK.
S. A. HARTMAN
ROSSLAND, B. C.
MINING AND MINES
PROMOTER OF STOCK COMPANIES.
We have first class connections and can find the necessary capital to
work and develop meritorious copper propositions in the Similkameen
country. If you have a good claim with a fine showing we will find
you a buyer.    We cordially invite your correspondence.
Respectfully,
Office: 43 Columbia Ave. S. A. HARTMAN.
 u^4 -
THE   SIMILKAMEEN  STAR.
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
PRINCETON,  B. O.
TIE PRINCETON   PUBLISHING €0,
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
Domestic, One Year	
Foreign, One Year	
Payable Invariably in Advance.
Subscribers will confer a favor on this offici
promptly reporting any change in address o
regularity in receipt of the paper.
Advertising rates furnished on application.
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.
"Certificates of Improvement'! notices, $5.00 to
$10.00 for legal life ofnotlce.
Pour weekly Insertions constitute one month
advertising.
Agricultural Exhibition!.
Salmon Arm Sept. 20, 21.
Vernon Sept. 25, 26, 27.
Kamloops Sept. 26, 27, 28,
Saanich Sept. 28, 29.
New Westminster.. Oct 2, 3, 4, 5.
Ashcroft Oct. 2, 3, 4.
MISLEADING  STATEMENTS
,     For a couple of  months   pasl
/'fanciful advertisement, like the following, has  caught the observant
eye of readers in the Victoria Times,
which is written in all a town bootn-
! er's stirring style:
AU,ISON> TOWNSITE.
THE COMING BUSINESS CEN
For brilliancy of thought and
imagination the above would probably hold first prize. To the closest observer in this district no
building has been going on in said
boom town since some, two months
and a half ago, when they completed their only two buildings in
town, viz., a real estate*office and a
cottage. As for their being connected with Copper mountain by
wagon road it is mere balderdash,
unless, they call a blazed trail a
wagon road. It is a query in our
mind why, if jj said boom town has
so many natural advantages, it
should resort to such misleading
statements. If they could only take
a kodak view of their "imaginary
town" instead of the "real" one,
what a big advertisement it would
be.
Mrs. Maybrick, who has now
served eleven years of a life sentence in Alesbury prison, is again
attracting attention, and it is understood another effoat will be made
for her release. The other day a
representative of the Associated
Press was permitted to see her,
when she expressed indignation at
the attacks made by the Liverpool
Post on the late   chief justice   of
England, Lord Russel of Killowen,
former counsel for the prisoner,
The late chief justice was a firm
believer in Mrs. Maybrick's innocence. The unfortunate woman
has strong hopes that the time will
soon come when her long years
captivity will cease and she will be
restored to her mother and country.
\   EDITORIAL COMMENT.   I
Adventists say the war in China
marks the beginning of the end of
the world. One thing is certain,
it marks the the jumping off place
for a score of lives.
The Vancouver News-Advertiser
seems to be surprised that the government have not introduced a re
distribution measure this session.
The Turner combination are not
likely to do anything so foolish.
The Kamloops Standard has
forked itself up into quite an
alarming state of excitement over
the alleged broken pledges of the
Laurier government. The symptoms are really bad.
Miners will be interested to know
that the Dominion government has
decided to no longer enforce the
system of retaining tontpelf alternate
placer mining claim/lon gold-bearing creeks in the Yukon.
Mr. Helmcken, M. P. P., has introduced into the provincial house
a bill to enable voting machines to
be used at elections throughout the
province. The majority of the government supports would fill the bill
nicely.
Sir Charles Tupper, Bart., has
expressed himself as quite confident
that the Conservative party will
sweep the country at the next Dominion elections. No one would
like to see Sir Charles, the victim
of misplaced confidence or in any
such humiliated condition.
The Conservatives of the province are holding a convention at
New Westminster, when it is expected the faithful will receive a
new coat of warpaint and be turned
loose for the coming Dominion battle. The paint will need to be put
on pretty thick to keep out the
frost that is in store for them.
It is understood Mr. Wm. Mac-
Clain, thesocialist labor leader, who
made such an—not a horse—of
himself in connection with the fishermen's strike on the Fraser river,
recently, is going to oppose Mr.
Aulay Morrison, the popular member for Westminster district in the
Dominion house, at the coming
federal elections. He is said to be
backed by the fishermen's union.
The laboring classes would do well
to put such a professional agitator
under a barrel.
The strike of the machinists
the employ of the C. P. R. is still
on. The men on the western di
vision are demanding more pay,
which so far the company refuses to
grant. The matter is to left to
bitration, which it is hoped will
patch up the difference in a manner
satisfactory to both parties.
The differences that were between
Capt. Tatlow, member for Vancouver, and the government, which
caused the captain to withdraw
from the government caucus on the
day the estimates were brought
down, have been smoothed over,
and Vancouver's third member
again safe within the fold. It is
not stated how much taffy it took
to do the job.
The Province in common with all
of the newspapers and most of the
people of British Columbia, constantly refers to the B. C. legisla
ture as the provincial parliament
and to the members thereof as M.'i
P. P. As a matter of fact it is not
a parliament at all but/? legislative
assembly and th«>3lnembers should
not be dxsign^red Myl\ P. but M.
ment itr Canada and that is at Ottawa. The Ottawa parliament, by
the way, includes both the house of
commons and the sensate, although
careless writers and speakers usually distinguish between the two.—-■
Province.
On another page will be found a
copy of the proceedings of the second annual re-union of the secret
societies of the province held at
Nanaimo on the nth inst. The
chief business under discussion was
the action of members of the British
Columbia medical association residing at Victoria, in refusing to attend the members of the various
secret societies of that city. Several resolutions were passed and
copies ordered to be presented to
the premier and also to the press.
They certainly seem to have a
grievance, which the government
will duly consider, and endeavor to
set right.
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE.
n the matter of the estate of HugbvMc-
ninrmiH,   fop   ynnperpr,    lately    of   the
village"of PrincetonMn the County of
Yale in the Province of British Columbia, miner, deceased.
Notice is hereby given pursuant to the
rustees and Executors Act, of the Revised
tatutesof the Province of British Columbia.
I97, that ail creditors end others having claims
laid Hugh McDi
John A. Kirkpatrick, Nelson, B.   C, the  Ad-
nistrator of the persanal effects of the said deceased, their Christian and surnames, addresses
' descriptions, the  fuU  particulars  of their
ature of these
held by the
And further t
1   In
lentioned date
te  the  {
of th
■  de
1th er
»£«
is of whi
b he
shall
fhei
aid Adr,
111
ot
able for the sa
d assets <
ther
eot
ny person or p
hall not have b
Dated the 18th
JOHN A
"llR
iPATI
Administratoi
for   Hu
lid,
COUNTY   COURT.
The County Court of Yale, B. C. win be hold
Honor Judge Spinks.
JOHN W. PECK SCO.
Wholesale Clothing
 and	
Mens' Furnishings.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Correspondence Solicited from the Trade.
Careful   and   Prompt   Atention   to all
LETTER ORDERS.
Parkinson &
feiuerstonhaugh
FAIRVIEW, B. C.
PRINCETON, B. C.
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYORS
CIVIL ENGINEER
and NOTARY PUBLIC.
H. A. WMLLANS, M. D.
PHYSICIAN
and
SURGEON.
MiGill Graduai
Prlncoton, B. O
W. J. WATER1TAN, M. E.
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C
J. CHARLES McINTOSH,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
AND
 NOTARY PUBLIC	
PRINCETON, B. C.
 J AMES HISLOP.
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEEE.
PROVINCIAL LAND S
#
m
..Princeton, B. C....
 THE   SIMILKAMEEN   STAR.
Xjl
'%
LATEST WAR NOTES
Russia, Germany and Japan
Declare War on China
And Ask Other Powers to Withdraw
—France Looking for a Scrap—Boiler's Men Caught in a Trap.
A Chee-Foo despatch, under date of
Aug. 25th, says it is rumored on good
authority that Russia, Germany and
Japan have declared war on China, and
will invite England and the United
States to withdraw.
The Pall  Mall   Gazette  of Londc
echoes the voice of the  other  leading
newspapers of that  city when   it  says,
"That the French government is preparing for war there can be no longer  any
Late news by the way of Berlin  state
that large masses of Boxers are  still
the southern part of the capital, and that
a force of troops under Prince Ching
in the Imperial city.
The diplomatic feature of the Chinese
situation iu Washington takes precedence
over both the naval and military features.
The most unsatisfactory development,
far  as  the   pacific   programme   of the
Washington goes, was the receipt  of
despatch   from Admiral Remey, conve
ing the reports which had   reached   him
of a disagreement between t
der of the Russian forces in Peking and
and the other internationals.   The
of this despatch was   not  made   public,
but it is understood  that  the   Russian
commander had forbidden
tion with the   Chinese, on   the   ground
that Russia was  technically as  well
practically at war with China.
Now that the allied forces have entered
Peking, the necessity for the
ance of concord among the powers is
pressing. Yet fears are increasing that
the strain of conflicting interes
bitions may cause a cleavage among the
nations interested. This has been demonstrated already by the individual action
of Russia in seizing the present opportunity to extend her frontier into Man-,
churia, and the recent incident regarding
the landing of British troops at Shanghai.
Parrots That Talk.
The story is told of an Idaho preacher
who once owned a talkative 'parrot, and
like most parrots it could swear. To
break the bird of the habit the preacher
had striven for months, but in vain.
Finally he adopted the "sure remedy"
proposed by one of his laymen. He was
told to have a tub of water ready and
when he caught the bird swearing again
to take the bird, cage and all and swing
them around his head swiftly for a few
moments then souse the whole business
into the tub of water. This appeared to
be the pure article—just what the preacher was looking was looking for. He
hurried home and got the tub of water
iu readiness, then awaited polly's
criticism. It came in a hurry. "Hello,
Polly ! P-o-l-l-y ! Ha! ha! ha ! Damme, damme! Polly wants a cracker!
Damme!—" The preacher waited for no
more. He grabbed the cage and with
mighty effort swung it above his head,
and, after making several sharp twists
and turns, brought it full force into the
water. When he regained his wind he
carefully took the cage out and placed it
beside the tub, then in his kindest and
most gentle voice asked: "How does
Polly feel   now?"   The  parrot  looked
crestfallen. She winked and blinked
and shook herself, but said nothing.
When she had regained her perch and
straightened out her tail feathers she let
out several of the most unearthly wi
whoops the preacher had ever heard. But
the divine was undaunted and repeated
his kind words of a few moments before:
"How does Polly feel now?" "Bnr-r-r-
up! Haw! Haw! Oh-I'm-all-right,-
but-where-in-hell-were-you -when-the-cy-
clone-struck us 1" said Polly.
Blue Ribbon Extract of Lemon is x
from the natural fruit.
Princeton   merchants all   carry  Blue
Ribbon Extracts.
NOTICB.
Certificate of Improvrtnent.
VIRGINIA, ALABAMA »ND NOONDAY  Mil
eral Claims, situate in the Similkameen Mil
Whekb Located:—On Conner-Mountain.
AKE NOTICB that I, John D. Anders.....
" of Trail, B. C, Free Miner'! Certificate
to. U39356, for myself and as agcut for John 8
:iute. free Miner's CertificateSo. 33677-*, (Trw
eea) intend, sixty-days from the date hereof, to
pply to the Mining Recorder for Certiflcal
'—   the   purpose of obta
P.I,.
Crown Gra
tsofth
md farther U
'eel a in
under
J. D. ANDERSON,
NOTICE.
Corticate of  Improvements.
MaFEKING and kimberlky fraction
MINERAL CLAIMS, situate  in   the   Osoyo<
' Where located:—CamjjJBwMey.
TAKE NOTICB, that I, R. H. Parkinson (Fr<
Miner's Certificate No. B58865) intend, sixty da]
rom the date hereof, to apply to the Mining R
.ion 37, must be commenced before tl
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 21st day of July, 1900.
Notice is hereby given that thirty days after
date I intend to apply on behalf of the Dominio:
Consolidated Mines Company, Limited, of _£aii
view, to the Chief Commissioner of Lands an
WSrks for a special license to cut and carry awa
timber  from   the   following described  tract  0
minion Consolidated Mines Company's north
east corner" and planted at the south-east come
of the Western Hill mineral claim, thence   sout
Dated at Fairview. B. C, this 33rd day cf July,
' RICHARD H. PARKINSON, P. L. S.,
NOTICB.
Certificate of Improvement.
FRISCO MINKRAL CLAIM, situate in the Similkameen   Mining Division of Yale District.
Where Located:—On Copper mountain.
TAKB NOTICE that I, J. DTAnderson, P. VS.
of Trail, B. C., acting as agent for David A. Stew-
Gardiner, Free Miner's Certificate No.' B279205
John \v\ Nelson, Free Miuer's  Certificate No.
19740A, and Reuben R. Shuttleworth. Free Miner's Certificate No. B7446, intend, sixty days from
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for
a certificate of Improvements, for the purpose oi
obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.
??J1>,
ice that
:h Certificate of Iinproven
JNO. D-
:d this 18th day of May, A.
e the
.-ty days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase 240 acres of land, as follows :. Starting from a post planted on the south
NOTICB.
Certificate of Improvements.
" FRACTIONAL   MINERAL CLAIM,
Osoyoos   Mining  Division, of
.Yale District.
solidated Mines Co., Ltd, Free Miner's Certificate
No. B5622, intend, sixty days from the date here-
->f, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certifi-
ate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtain-
ng a Crown Grant of the .howrWni >
And further take n
rtificate of Improven
i   M   I   M   it   M   >k
i   «   i   i    it   &   &
THE   HOTEL
TULAMEEN
GEO. W. ALDOUS
=PROPRIETOR=
PRINCETON,   B. C.
M. P.Gordon,
MANUFACTURERS   OF  AND
DEALERS IN AW KINDS OF
FURNITURE, CARPETS, OILCLOTHS, WINDOW SHADES, CURTAINS, CAMP BEDS,
CORNICE POLES, PICTURE FRAMING..*.*
ESTIMATES FOR HOTEL, OFFICE
AND ALL OTHER FURNITURE
FURNISHED   ON   APPLICATION.
Kamloops, B.C.
The James Robertson Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Manufacturers of Lead Pipe, Shot, Traps, White
 _ —LEAD PAINTS,   Etc	
Jobbers in Wrought, Cast or Steel Pipe   and Fittings, Metals  and Steam
Fittings.   Write for Quotations.
THE JAMES ROBERTSON CO., LTD,
inches Toronto, St. John,
; and VANCOUVER.
I Princeton Meat Market i
WARDLE & THOMAS S
[ Orders for Mining Camps promptly attended  to >
t and delivered. |
 4^
THE   SIMILKAMEEN  STAR.
NOTE AND COMMENT.
JUST SO :-A few years ago you haidly
ever heard of the Boundary country, and
now you can not pick up a newspaper
anywhere without finding from half to
three or four columns devoted to the
mineral wealth of the district. And stil
there are people here who can not realize
that a newspaper is of any benefit.—Grand
Forks Miner.
r Br'
iymp
r the
Boors does not |
liness toward England; the American
people are not unfriendly toward the
people of any nation. This sympathy is
due to the fact that, as stated in our
iclieve in the principle   of
Canadian Pacific
Navigation CO,
Time   Table   No.   BI
Taking Effect, June 15th.
VANCOUVER ROUTE.
VICTORIA TO VANCOUVER daily, cxcep
Monday, at 7 o'clock a. in. Regular freigh
steamer will leave Victoria at midnight on Tuea
day and Thursday and Vancouver at midnight 01
Wednesday and Friday.
drily, at 1, or 01
freight steamer
'   No.
self-g
refathers, the
lid
principles
Thii
A Mulish P
mules are awaiting shipment from Seattle
to the Philippine islands. Of course the
war is over, but then, dontcher know, the
mules will do no harm there anyway.—
Cascade Record.
Setting a Good Example: A petition is being circulated in Kamloops,
signers of which say: "We solmnly
pledge ourselves before God and our fellow citizens that we will hereafter have
no dealing whatever with Chinese—
neither to buy from them, sell to them,
nor employ them, and will use every
lawful means in our power to induce
others to do the same."
a p.tn,
[Tuesday and Thursday and Vancouver
on Wednesday and Friday.
NEW WESTMINSTER ROUTE.
LEAVE VICTORIA  FOR  NEW  WESTMINSTER, Ladder, Lulu and Islands. Monday Wednesday and Friday at 7 a. m.
LEAVE NEW WESTMINSTER . FOR VICTORIA and way ports—Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday at 7 o'clock a. 111.
Steamer Beaver leaves NEW WESTMINSTER
for Chilliwack and way landings, Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday at 8 a. m., connecting at
Mission City with C. P. R. from Vancouver.
Returning, leaves  Chilliwack   for  New Westminster, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday at 7 a.
m., connecting with boat for Victoria.
NORTHERN ROUTE.
nships of this Company leave from Evans,
ALASKA ROU
Steamships of this Company
changing tl
notification
:st, 7th,(14th and 20th of each
: later trips to Quatsino and
Jompany reserves the right  ol
Palace Livery
.* STABLES <*
KEREMEOS, B. C.
D. J. INNIS, Prop.
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen District.
Travellers from the Boundary
District can secure horses
through to Princeton.
Run in Connection with Keremeos Hotel
Special Stage
A Special Stage will leave
Spences Bridge for Princeton and way points every
Monday morning at 6 a. m.
arriving at Princeton Wednesday at noon.
Returning: Leaves Princeton Friday morning at 6
a. m., arriving at Spences
Bridge on Sunday.
JAS. SMITH, Propr
JOHN LOVE SCO.
DRUGGISTS AND
STATIONERS.
F.ORVIEW and CAMP McKINNEY.
Presriptions ^Carefully jp Compounded.
CLAIMS STAGE
LINE
Leaves Kamloops for Quilchena and
Nicola Lake every Monday.
Leaves Nicola Lake for Kamloop,
every Friday at 6 a. m.
PRINCETON ROUTE.
Leaves Spences Bridge for Nicolas
Coutlees, Nicola Lake, Granite
Creek and Princeton every
Thursday at 6 a. m.
Leaves Princeton for Spences Bridge
and intermediate points every
Sunday at 7 a. m.
Carry flail and  Express.
'«£*
me Sunset Copper Mining Co., lm.
Owning and Operating
The SUNSET Mine.
On Copper Mountain, Similkameen Mining District.
Everyone who has seen the property renders a unanimous verdict*
The Biggest and Best Mine in British Columbia*
Now is the TIME to BUY Stock in this Wonderful
nine. It is an investment! No Speculation! Ore
enough in sight to return 100 per cent, on amount
invested.   BUY TODAY before advance in price.
APPLY TO
Rm Am BROWN,
President and Gen'l Manager
Sunset Shares Will Make You Rich.
PRINCETON or Grand fonts.
 THE   SIMILKAMEEN  STAR.
I Mining *News $
fc
Two carloads of ore from the Golden
Eagle, North Fork of the Kettle river,
were shipped last week to the Trail
smelter. The first shipment netted $21.85
, The Dunsmuir corporations are now
advertising for 500 white colliers and
mine workers for their concerns in the
Nanainio, Wellington and Comox district, respectively.
Mr. McBride has, as minister of mines,
promised, in response to a request of the
Kootenay mining boards of trade, that
his department will at once arrange for
the regular publication of government
bulletins as to the province's mining output, these to be sent out, if possible)
monthly.
The Miner Graves syndicate has been
experimenting with a diamond drill at
Phoenix lately with good success. On
the Banner claim of the Grey Eagle
group the continuity of the ledge was
proven at 200 feet. The boring will be
continued until a depth of 500 feet is at-
£      tained.
The Le Roi No. 2 is now shipping
regularly. It will ship for the first month
3,500 tons. Later the output will approxi-
mate 10,000 tons monthly, The ore
jfLpJi) shpet at the west end of the Annie is the
richest in the camp. It is seven feet
wide at 150 feet depth, and runs at an
average value of over $50.
Messrs. Harry Snibley aud Archie
Chisholm, two well known prospectors,
have returned to Grand Forks from
Franklin camp, North Fork of Kettle
river. They report having made a big
copper-gold strike at the mouth of
(Has! Franklin camp.    In  McKinf£y camp, a
few miles from Franklin, the   McKinley
claim has been bonded for $70,000 to the
Denver Smelting Co.
"^BK ^The Rossland Miner gives the  follow
ing as a partial list of the dividend pay'
ing mines of British Columbia : Camp
McKinney paid, up to June, 1899^.^311,
965 ; the Fern, up to June, 1898, $1,000
the Hall Mines, Limited, up to May,
1899, $120,000; the Idaho, up to January,
1899, $292,000; the Last Chance, up to
April, 1899, $45,000; the Le Roi, up to
November, 1899, $1,305,000; the Queen
Bess, up to July, 1899, $25,000; the
Rambler-Cariboo, up to December, 1899,
$60,000; the Reco, up to January, 1898,
$297,500 ; the War Eagle Consolidated,
up to .February, 1900, $545,250;
Ymir up to November, 1899, $30jpoo
The Seattle Post-Intelligencer has
recent issue some suggestive details 1
cerning mine prospects in the Mennt
Baker or Chilliwack river district, and
also regarding the care that is -being-
taken by American owners, to be on
safe side should some of the good or promising claims be found to be within
British Columbia. The article runs as
follows: Good tidings of the rapid advance of mining operations in the Mount
Baker gold fields were taken to Whatcom on Thursday by H. G. Anderson,
who arrived from Red mountain, via
Chilliwack and Vancouver, B. C. All
miners who have visited this camp say
that it is very rich. The Gold Basin
ledge on Red mountain, in which Chas.
D. Lane, of San Francisco, and J. O.
Carlisle are interested, is said to be a
veritable bonanza to the owners. Ore
taken from the Gold Basin ledge runs as
high as $3,000 per ton. The gold can
be seen with the naked eye and stands
out in beads on the quartz. The Red'
Mountain Geld Mining Co. has a large
force of men at work driving a tunnel in
to tap its ledges. Cabins are being built
for winter quarters. It appears that the
location of the international boundary
line is in question, and fears are entertained that Red mountain and other
mountains in that vicinity may possibly
be in British Columbia."
Proposed Increase in Tax on Mines,
A memorial, signed by a number of
persons and companies interested in the
mining industry, says the News-Advertiser, has been forwarded to the government at Victoria, pointing out the detrimental effeet which is likely to be
caused the principal industry by the proposed doubling of the_jtas^oaJ:he output
of tEe mefalliferousmines. of  the   prov-
The memorial states that while British
Columbia is rich in mineral deposits and
has everything necessary for their development, nothing can be achieved without capital, and -that must come from
abroad. War and unsettled conditions
in other parts of the world afford an
portunity for directing attention to
openings in British Columbia for mining
enterprise, while the labor troubles which
existed here last year have happily
ended. It is, therefore, considered that
to make a change in the taxation of
mines at this time would be most i
portune and tend to create an impression
that there is no continuity or fixity
the government's financial policy, and
consequently that it is risky to in
money in this province.
WM. BEAVIS,
—GENERAL BLACKSMITH
Expert Horse-shoer.     Wagons and Agricultural Implements Carefully Repaired
ALL WORK GUARANTEED.
Opposite Keremeos Hotel.
 KEREMEOS, B. C.
£fe&y amA; m**ks
Granite
Creeks,
.. . Hotel
MRS. JANES, Proprietor.
This Hotel has always been A
Famous For the Excellence f
of its table. J
The nearest point to the r
richest Silver Lead mines «
in B. C, 'Summit City.' $
There is more gold in f
Granite Creek than has J
yet been taken out. h
Stopping Point for h
Princeton stages. f
HOTEL
HEBfJHEOS..
JONH NEIL.
Proprietor.
Stables in Connetion.
This hotel is Situated at
the Gateway to the
Similkameen valley, jp
Well Furnished Rooms.
Bar and Dining Room
Service First-Class.
, w
We Cater Specially to
Mining Men
and Prospectors.
Pioneer
Barber
Shop a*
PRINCETON
ASSAY OFFICE
\<%<%<% <£%<%<%<%<%<%<%■<%<%
The Nearest Poinf
Woodward's
...HOTEL
LOWES NICOLA.
The shortest route by 10 Miles to
Princeton from Spences  Bridge is
Via Lower Nicola.
The table is supplied   with  produce from our own gardens.
COMFORTABLE ROOMS.
Headquarters for Smith's Stage ;
HUGH COWAN, Prop.
Flie...Bath...Rooii
Opposite Post Office.
Princeton, B. C.
..C. B. HARRIS
Assayer
and
Chemist*
Accurate results Guaranteed. Re
ports will be returned on stage bringing samples.
Correspondence Solicited.
Regarding    Mining   Properties   in   the
Similkameen District.
Carefully   Sampled   and   !
For the Best
Table
Board
In Princeton try
MRS.IWM. HAEGERMAN'S
NEW BOARDING HOUSE.
The Freshest and Best Eatables
the market affords always kept
on the table.
Board By The Day, Week or Month.
I\ir i ALL WORK
yy Q,lXt Promptly Executed
I 1/Ul We can save you
XSla+r\\   money on y°ur
"▼ *HA"II REPAIRING
Repairing
A full line of Watches and the
Latest Styles of Jewelery always
on hand.
W.J.KERR,
<<__Kamloops, B. C.
 3=3=
THE   SIMILKAMEEN  STAR.
w
Important.
As the Progress intimated   last  we
the chief commissioner of lands
works purposes to visit Chilliwack sh|
ly after the close of the session   of the
legislative  assembly.   The   minister  of
mines has also promised to come if possible. The Progress would like to see our
ministers royally entertained, as the people of Chilliwack so well know how to do
it, but they must take time by the   forelock and not leave matters  of organization until the last moment, when details
might be overlooked.   To  this  end we
suggest to our reeve  that   he   take   the
matter in hand looking towards the   im-
The duties of this committee  would   be
to see that the ministers are fittingly bil-
sion to   our adjacent  mining  locat
and generally to give them such a he
Among)
the Editors.
TheK
ireffto the
Snew°?own   O
n Wash
ngton, wl
iere a newspa
e starte
1 by Edit
or Batterson.
rounding atmosphere.—Cascade Record.
Women in Duck Trousers.
Now comes the woman who wears
white duck trousers, says the New York
Sun. Quite a number of them have been
seen recently aboard yachts near Larch-
mont and New Rochelle. One woman
who returned recently from a cruise on
the sound with her husband confessed
that she wore them. "The reason the
yachting women take the new style,"
she said, "is because it is much cooler
and then our skirts are not dragging in
the water in the bottom of the boats as
the
le
afon
if sailing and must say tha
bout more quickly in trousi
World-Wide Pick-TJps.
against the Chinese of Grand Forks
iled. The white steam.laundry has
1 down, beaten   by Mongol   cheap
One hundred a nineteen invalided
Canadian soldiers landed at Quebec on
Saturday, the 23th inst., by the steamer
Lake Ontario. The returning soldiers
received a very hearty welcome.
The Empress-Dowager of China and
Prince Tuan are reported captnred.
Lieut. Cardua, formerly of the Staats
artillery, who was convicted of being a
ringleader in the plot to abduct General
Roberts and kill the British officers at
Pretoria, was shot Friday afternoon last.
Bob Fitzsimmons knocked Sharkey
out in the second round, before the Coney
Island Sporting Club, on the night of the
t4th inst.
Hotel Driard
NICOLA LAKE.
JOHN CLARK, Propr.
Headquarters for Mining Men and
pectors.
An Ideal Summer Resort.
GRAND PACIFIC
— HOTtL. ..•
KAMLOOPS, B. C.
way Station
all people c
"ing fro!
Good Rooms. Good Table
Good Liquors, ' Good Sta-
jt biing in Connection. J*
P. A. BARNHART, Prop.
SMOKE
Tucketts
TOBACCOS, CIGARS and
CIGARETTES.
*T*hey are the Purest
j^ certainly the
D est'in the market.
Geo. LTucketts son Co.
HAMILTON, ONT.
CAN A    AN
PACIFIC
"Imperial
Limited"
DAILY TOURIST CARS
ST. PAUL
TUESDAY and SATURDAY.
TORONTO
WEDNESDAY
Montreal and Boston.
Trains pass Spences Bridge as follows:
West Bound East Bound
5:51 IMPERIAL LIMITED 20:16
10:45 KAMLOOPS   LOCAL 17:4
Pamphlet furnished free.
E. J. COYLE, W. MAXWELL,
Spences Bridge
«
n
DEBARRO & THYNNE
PROPRIETORS.
Otter Flat Hotel
THE FINEST BRANDS OF WTNES, UQUORS AND CIGARS.
FISHING AND HUNTING RESORT. BO-TS KBPT
boats kept FINE BOATING ON OTTER LAKE.
*P
Nearest Stopping Place and Supply Point for Boulder Creek, Kelly Creek,  Slate
Creek, and Summit Mining Camps Mining Men and Prospectors can outfit at
Store in connection with hotel. •
Headquarters for all stage lines.
Hotel Jackson
J. H. JACKSON, Sole Proprietor.
PRINCETON
DINING ROOM UNDER PERSONAL SUPERVISION.
ONLY THE FINEST BRANDS OF LIQUORS AND
CIGARS AT THE BAR FIRST-CLASS STABLE IN
CONNECTION.
Jgl^Patrons of the Hotel Jackson can keep posted o
Development of the entire Similkameen.
the mining
 THE   SIMILKAMEEN  STAR.
FROM THE RECORDS.
Following is the business done in   the
Mining Recorder's  office   for  the  past
m
MINING LOCATIONS.
Exchange—Neil Mel
Old Tom—Geo McCosker
Yale—Iv Holmes.
Liverpool—W H Holmes.
Angler—G H Murphy.
Hokey No. I—Peter Swanson.
Hokey No. 2—Chas Emberg.
lomxey Creek—
[andy—J Mai
-J Ma
1 A Plasance.-
and A Plasance
Aspen Grove—
B C—Wm Chisholm.
Lucky Boy—J W Young.
Copper Mountain—
Alabama Fraction—C M Snowdon.
Rio Grand—Thos Arnold and  M  R
Morrison.
Champion Creek—
Willowside—Wm Britton.
Whipsaw Creek—
Doughnut—J P Mahan and A Wright
ASSESSMENTS.
United—M A Voigt.
Verde—M A Voigt.
No. 2—M A Voigt.
Union Jack—Jas Darcy-
Humbolt—Geo L Wolf.
Ada B Fraction—Chas Willarson.
Gold Crown—Chas Bounevier.
Alice—Jas Jacobs, et al.
Big Dutchman—Jno Bate, et al.
Yankee—J A Hinshaw, et al.
Canadian—R J Armstrong, et al.
America—S J Bate, et al.
Canadian   Boy Fraction—D McRae
etal.
Canadian Belle—D McRae, et al.
Alpine— " "    ,*
Arlington— "
Copper Glance— " "
Azurite— " "
Imperial—Geo Cowan.
Celtic Chief—Chas Connell.
Empress—      ,       "
Copper Reef—J E Jacobs, et al.
Coj^er Bunch—    " "
Copper King—      " "
TRANSFERS.
Vancouver—Jos B McArthur to Prescott
Campbell, 7-32 interest.
Marsh  Lake—Angus    McGillivray  to J
Fleetwood, %• interest.
Melba—Alex McDonald to George Howe,
Drumluman and Mountain View—Wm
Rowe to John Williamson.
Mable Fraction, Brooklyn, Key  West—
I Edgar E Burr to H L Jones, y% in-
Shamrock—IJ E Bate to J W Dryden.
Battle Axe—I R J Armstrong to J W
Blue Ribbon Extract of Lemon is made
from the natural fruit.
COUNTY   COURT.
Register County Court of Yal
|«L LALLAN!
WHOLESALE
DEALERS IN
Boots and
# SHOES ^
^ VANCOUVER, B. C. |
I \
L    Try Our Own Mining Boot.    9
It is just right.
MAUERY'S
Drug Store
We carry a full stock of Drugs
Proprietory Medicines, Toilet Preparations, etc. In fact everything
that an Up-to-date Drug Store
ough  to have.
Blacksmitfdtig
and
Horseshoeing
Shop on Harold Avenue.
PRINCETON, B. C
Q. flurdoch
The Centre of the Lower
Similkameen Valley, 45 miles
from Princeton. A Mining
and Agricultural Centre. <& m
LOTS NOW ON...
...THE MARKET
BUSINESS STREETS.
THIRD AVE., 100 Feet Wide, Lots 30x120.
CORNER  LOTS   $150; Inside   Lots $100.
OTHER STREETS.
CORNER LOTS $100.00.    INSIDE $75.00.
TERMS:
Terms: One-Third Cash; Balance Three and Six
Months Time.
For Further Information Apply to
R. H. PARKINSON, Fairview,
jpjpjpjpj*E. BULLOCK WEBSTER, Keremeos.
BEALEY INVESTMENT & TRUST 0).
LIMITED.
General Agent*   GreenWOOd,   B.   C.
Local Agents:
The Princeton Real Estate,
Mining and Assaying Office.
JiHOttOS.
 THE   SIMILKAMEEN  STAR.
THE VERMILION FORKS MINING
AND DEVELOPMENT COm, Ltd.
OWNERS OF THE TOWNSITE OF
PRINCETON
..•Lots for Sale...
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers* The business centre for the
following mining camps:- Copper Mt, Kennedy Mt, Friday, Boulder, Granite and 20 Mile Creeks, Summit,
Roche River, Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove*
Splendid Climate and Pure water
Enormous Agricultural Area to Draw From
Government Headquarters for Similkameen District
~^==^=^^=^^Pteseat Prices of Lots»°"=a" —-j°"g"g^
From $2.0010 $10. per front loot.
& <& *£    Size of Lots 50x J00 Feet and 33x 100 Feet*    «* ^ «nt
Send for map to
W. J. WATERMAN,
Resident Manager V. F. M. & D. Co.

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