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Similkameen Star 1900-04-14

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 SIMIIKAM
PRINCETON, B. C, SATURDAY, APRIL 14th, 1900.
$H.oo PkbVYear.
KENNEDY MOUNTAIN
A  Twin  to   Copper, Moun-
Properties that are Being Worked-
The Dewey and Red Buck Have
Fine Showings.
Nine miles from Princeton,
Ight bank of the Similkameen ri
lennedy Mountain.' The mound
time it would rival its fam|
across the river, Coppei
Enormous deposits of rict
sktast Saturday aft
Qt Nicola Lake, J
tentionofthe
work has beei
VaST-i
nrittel
that development' will take place
much larger scale, and a number of c
owners are hard at work doing suffi<
improvement on their properties
prove the extent and richness of the
mineral. The Olympia and Dewey
owned by the McRae brothers, are show
ing up magnificently; on the Dewey
especially, the boys have discovered a
large body of heavy sulphide ore c;
ing rich copper values. On the. Red
Buck Chas. Revely and George Allison
have run a large open cut, uncovering a
deposit of splendid ore assaying well,
both in copper and gold. The Kennedy
Group, consisting of the Ingersoll Belle,
Majestic, Copperania and Bornite'h;
all fine surface showings, and with tfKctW
more work will prove valuable property.
The Copper King, owned by Gus Pow-
alls and Chas. Bonivere, is probably
,  of the most   promising claims on
mountain.   Development work consists
of three shafts, the deepest being 21
Rich copper sulphide and borriite  show
all through the rock.' J.";«fis&^i|i
Nest Egg and Copper Cap:    Pollock
and Freeman have   been  working
the Nest Egg during the. winter with
good  results.
Other promising claims are the Princeton and La Reine, owned by the Vermilion Forks Co.; the Peerless,  owned by
E Burt Irwin; the Brooklyn, owned by
Messrs. Howse, Burr and Jones, and thi
Invincible, owned by Win. Knight.
Church Services.
Rev. T. Neville of Nicola will hold
divine services at Hotel Jackson to-morrow morning at 10:30 a. m., and at Granite creek at 7.30 p. m.   Everybody Wei-
*
NICOLA NEWS.
About four mi
Burt Irwin has
Juniper and NJ
of Nicola Lak|
working on th
plairus.    Surfac
sulphide.    Burt intends running a. tu:
to tap the lead at a depth of 100 feet.
y afternoon court was held
Justices   Lauder
rascha
ippa
S that
. fighti
r*C©rbett
t Cha
with
.runkand had be<
rother when Corbett interfered and
ed the fight. Corbett was attacked
and lost four of his eight lower mol-
Ones he brought from Scotland.
jndiSn was fined jU0.0trand~~E5.5a
or one month in the chain gang,
ey being asked who supplied the
ered, "Gearge sriJth_J:h
orge Rushbrooke was in
d in. He denied suppl)
th the whiskey. Court
adjourned until Monday morning to produce witnesses. On Monday at 11 a. m.
the case was resumed against Rushbrooke, when on the evidence of Charlie
and "Stewart" he was fined foo.oo and
$[5.50 costs, or three months at Kamloops.
Rushbrooke was given four days to find
the money
ngCha
GRANITE CREEK NEWS.
Mr, J. Kennedy is in charge
Co.'s store.
Judge Tom Murphy met wil
accident on Wednesday last. Mr. Murphy was working on his placer claim
about two miles from tojya, better known
as Murphy's tunnel, when the whole
bank above him gave way, hurrying him
up to the neck in wash and mud. It
takes more than a common slide of a few
hundred tons of earth to extinguish our
old friend the Judge, however, and keeping his mouth, clear of the debris he
coolly directed John' Amberty, who
wcrking with him at the time, how to go
about digging him out. After two hours
imprisonment the Judge was released
from his painful p6sition, badly crushed
and with two ribs staved in. ' We are
glad to be able to report that he'is rapidly recovering and does not anticipate any
serious results.
H. Howell, late foreman of the Volcanic mine on the North Fork of Kettle
:, owned by "Sunset Brown," is ini
ELECTION DAY SET
Heavy Fighting Reported in
South Africa.
The Prince of Wales to Visit Canada.
—Labor   Troubles   in   Rossland
I   "Settled: .
George C. Tunstall is appointed Sheriff
of Yale, vice A. G. Pemberton resign
Labor troubles in Rossland are en
Queen Victoria is having
1 Ireland and is delightec
1 gay time
The Prince of Wales will visit Caj
this year.
The Kettle River Valley R. R.
was defeated in the House of Commons
by a vote 39 for and 83 against.
Heavy, fighting is reported from the
front. The London Daily News received
a telegram from Pretoria that a battle has
been fought at Brandford, in which 600
British troops were killed and wounded
and 800 taken prisoners.
April ii—Gen'l Brabants column had
an engagement at Wepner, lossing
killed and 41 wounded. Heavy fighting
taking place today in which British
forces are holding their own.'
V Fifty more men are wanted for Strath-
cona's Horse to go to South Africa
Victoria,   April   10th—Special—The
Legislature was formally dissolved today
The elections will be held  on June 9th
w Legislature is   summoned t(
July 5th.
The liberal Convention in Vancouver
resulted in a fizzle although Joe Martin
is reported to have had a strong following. A vote was taken as to whether the
Cassiar delegation be admited. Result
tie, 139 to 139.
PURELY PERSONAL
Rev. T. Nevrfl&4rove, in from Nicola
Gen'l-Manager Brown of the Sunset is
expected to arrive today.
F. P.  Cook of Cook &  Co.,  Granite
;ek and Princeton, is in the city.
i. H. Parkinson, P.L.S., left for Fair-
:w yesterday.     He intends   breaking
all records for a round trip between that
city and Princeton.
George W. Corey, a nephew of Chas.
Harris, arrived in the city this week.
Mr. Corey is from  Detroit, Mich.,  and
has followed the mining . business for
: years, having had considerable ex-
Mr. Ernes
Wate
the
Princeton Townsite has returned from
California. Mr. Waterman intends-open-
ing the townsite office on Monday next,
and will become a resident of Princeton
from that date, as he intends furnishing
a comfortable living room for himself in
the building until he can complete the
building of his residence on Vermilion
Messrs. Burr, Jones, Johnson and Wil- \
lerson returned to Princeton yesterday
from the Kootenays. Messrs. Burr and
Jones are part owners of the Sunrise adjoining the Sunset on Copper mountain,
and also own a number of other properties on Kennedy mountain and the adjoining district. Mr. Johnson has interests in this section, while Mr. Willerson
is taking his initial trip through the
Similkameen. The boys will make headquarters in Princeton this si
Jack and the Bear.
Mr. Dan McKay of Granite creek sends
us the following blood curdling story of
Jack Thynne's escape from a ferocious
grizzly:      .
Jack had left the Debarro Hotel at
Otter City, intending to stroll quietly
down to Granite Creek to attend a political convention that was taking place in
the city. He had only got a mile from
town, however, when he found the right
of-way disputed by a huge she bear with
two cubs. Jack was never known to ask
for more than half the road, but unfortunately in attempting to pass her bear-
ship he inadvertantly stepped on one of
the cubs. This aroused the wrath of the
mother, who at once started after Jack
with open jaws. It was a bad position for
our worthy friend to be placed in, but he
was equal to the occasion. He, in his
early college days had held more than
one championship for long distance running, flew for his life down the road to
Granite. It was a terrible race. Sometimes Jack was ahead, sometimes the
the bear. But five miles of a hilly road
proved a little too much for Jack, and
just as he reached the Tulameen bridge
his wind deserted him, but not his presence of mind. A friendly tree stood by
and catching an overhanging limb, with
a supreme effort he swung himself into comparitive safety.
The best efforts the bear could make
to reach him with her claws resulted in
the loss of one of Jack's moccassins.
After being treed for two hours his continual shouting brought Dan McKay to
rescue, whe wrenching a pole from
the bridge drove the bear away and released the grateful Jack from his uncomfortable position. Mr. Thynne immedi-
ttely borrowed Judge Murphy's elephant
fun and started after the bear to recover
lis lost moccasin.
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
"TOM" ORAHAN'S LATEST.
I An American who proposes to have a
ovel exhibition at the Paris :Exposition!
jiis yeat is -"Tom" Crahan, one time
ambler,and .-saloon keejier .of Helena,
llqiit. 'ITojU" run his course ihi Helena,
fcttttfor^goldjin the .Klondike country,
|W dually concluded that there could
lot be a better moneymaker than a movri
Lg-pictitrc exUlbition.;'of a Klondiker's]
Ixperlenees from start to,:nhish, to^be|
presented at the Paris .^Exposition. He;
Lad $10,000 when everything was cleaned
up, and he proposed to risk this In the"
venture, says the New York Herald.
I He had little education, no experience
In the work, and no acquaintance in the
East The first man he thought of was
Edison, and he went straight .from
the Klondike to Menlo Park. There he
was admitted, and fearful that Mr. Edison
would pass out without his recognising
him, he asked who owued ;i coat lying
Ion a chair near him. He was told that:
it was Mr. Edison's. After a long time a
man came from an inner room and pickled up the coat.
+*Are you Mr. Edison ?" inquired Cra-
ihan, not knowing of Mr. Edison's deaf-
I   No answer from the man putting on'
I the coat.
I    "Are you Mr. Edison?"   Crahan in-
I quired again.
| The man was into the coat without
answering, and Crahan became angry
and desperate. Catching him by the
arm he almost shouted at him;
'!If you are Mr. Edison, I've come seven thousand miles to see you, and I want
to see you."
This vigorous appeal brought a response, and Crahan hauled a lot of nug-'
gets out of his pockets and began to ask
questions. Mr. Edison at once became
interested. Crahan unfolded his scheme.
Mr. Edison promptly "turned it down,"
because, as he said, there were already
too many moving-picture shows and the
Edison people had quit making kineto-
scopes. But Crahan was not to be turned from his purpose, and he forthwith I
told Mr. Edison that he wanted twoj
machines, and he would pay the money I
for them himself. Mr. Edison was will-
iug to make them on such terms, and he
not only agreed to do so, but he went a
little further and took stock in the enterprise. This was an endorsement good
enough for anybody, and Crahan went to
New York and Chicago, and before many
weeks he had pledges for subscriptions
enough to warrant him in pushing his
plan for all it was worth, and getting
ready for actual business.
The American preliminaries being completed, he went to Paris, where he metl
Director General Peck, of the American
exhibit, to whom he stated his case, and
he was sent to see the French authorities.
They asked $60,000 for the privilege he j
sought; but Crahan was not giving upj
every thing, .and he got them down to
$30,000, at which figure he closed with
them, putting up a part of the money in
cash on the spot. The Paris business concluded, he returned to New York, employed a photographer, and, beginning
in that city, be went to the Pacific, taking pictures all along the route of important and notable things. Thence
from Seattle he proceeded up the famous!
inside scenic passage to Skagway,
the White Pass to the Yukon, and down
the river to Dawson and into the mi
getting pictures of all the phases
miner's life and the route leading to it
This work being finished, the indefatigable Crahan returned to New York and
set his men to work on the final preparation of tbe pictures for exhibition. He
is flying back and forth between the two
oceans, with  occasional trips to Paris,
Not the Example He Wanted.
A builder in Glasgow, hearing that his]
employes did not begin work at the prop-
me, came to the yard one morning
half an hour late and saw a carpenter
standing with his hands in his pockets
and a pipe in his mouth.
Simply asking his name, which he
found to be Malcolm Campbell, he called him into the office and, handing him
four days pay, told him to leave at once.
After having seen the man clear out of
the yard he went up to the foreman and
told him he had made an example ofl
Malcolm Campbell by paying him off for
not starting at the proper time. 'Great
Scott!" exclaimed the foreman, "that
chap was only looking for a job."
and when the Exposition opens in the
French capital "Torn" Crahan will be
Boers May Save Her Trouble.
A firm in Liverpool, being delighted at
the Idea that one of its employes
called upon to join the mcrvta, at <
volunteered to pay half his wages to his
wife in bis absence, says the Post At
the end of the month the woman appeared, and the money was at once given her.
* "What.?" she said.   "Four pound?"
"Yes." replied the senior partner, "that!
is exactly half; sorry you are not satisfied."
"It isn't that I'm not satisfied. Why,
for years he has told me he only got 16
shillings altogether, and—and—if the
Boers don't kill him I will."
Had Enough.
The Rev. Alexander MacColl, of Brair-
cliffe Manor, N. Y., a young Scotch
preacher, told a story in reference to a
en of his native town at a dinner at
the Marlborough the other night, says
the New York Times, which shows that
contentment is a virtue really existent, in
lejarSes.
One of the inhabitants of Glasgow,
where I was born," said he, "was making
his way homeward on a certain evening,
and taking a good deal more than his
share of the pavement, when he encountered a Glasgow Town Councilman walking along in a respectable fashion. The
Councilman, noticing our friends unbalanced condition, stopped and shouted
with rathful dignity:
"> -What df ye want ?'
'To this his fellow-townsman blithly
" 'I want—naething!    I'm as fu' 's I
Blacksmithing
and
Horseshoeing
Wagon Repairing a Specialty.
Shop on Harold Avenue.
PRINCETON, B. C
G. Tlurdoch
TAX NOTICES.
Similkameen Division op Yale District.
NOTICE is hereby given, in accordance with th
Statutes, that Provincial Revenue Tar and a
taxes levied under the Assessment Act, are no*
e Similkameen Division ol
' my office, Princeton.
e collectible at the ft
If paid on or before June 30th, (900:
Three-fifths of one per
Two and one half per c
ent. on assessed value of
One-half of one per cer
On so much of the ineo
t. on personal property.
me, of any person as ex-
"ncc-mef when't W*£i
s over ten thousand dol-
lars, and not more than
wenty thousand dollars.
one and one-quarter of one percent*; wl en such
excess is over twenty th<
isand dollars, 1 ne and
one-half of one per cent.
If paid on or after xst'
Four-fifths of one per cent, on real pro] erty.
Three-fourths of one
per  cent, on  1 ersonal
property.
s, the following rates,
viz,;   Upon such excess,
when the sami: is not
more than ten thousand
dollars, one a id one-
twenty thousand dollars
one and one-ha r of one
and dollars, one and th
ee-quarters of one per
Provincial Revenue Ta
;h hunter,
Princeton, March jtst, 1900.                           i-i£
CLARHS STAGE
UNE
leaves Kamloops for Quilchena and
Nicola Lake every Monday.
Leaves Nicola Lake for Kamloops
every Friday at 6 a. m.
PRINCETON ROUTE.
Leaves Spences Bridge for Nicola, 1
Coutlees, Nicola Lake, Granite
Creek and Princeton every
Thursday at 6 a. m.
Leaves Princeton for Spences Bridge I
and intermediate points every
Sunday at 7 a. m.
Carry flail and  Express.
SMOKE
Tueketts
TOBACCOS, CIGARS and
^CIGARETTES.
"They are the Purest
^certainly the
Dest in the market.
Geo.LTucheti&SonCo.
HAMILTON, ONT.
SIMILKAMEEN
BUTCHERING QO*
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Dealers in Heats.
Orders Filled for any Point in the Similkameen Valley.
Princeton Branch      Cm Summers,
A. t HOWSE,
General
Merchandise
The Largest and Best Stock of
General Merchandise in the Similkameen.
Agent For The
Sherwin William's Co.,
PAINTS, OILS and LEADS.
 There are none better.	
Mining Supplies a Specialty
A Complete Line of Hardware
Builders' Supplies and Tools of
Every Description.
Just Arrived
A Carload of Nails.
Mining outfits
can be furnished
on the shortest
notice.
Parties coming
to Princeton-.
having Baggage, H. H,
Goods, or Freight of
any description
CAN ADDRESS
same in my care to
Spences Bridge on
the Canadian Pacific
Railway, where my
Freight teams load
regularly for
Princeton.
Freight of this description
is always ^jiven the preference and will be rushed
through to destination.
Stores at
Princeton and Nicola*
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAB.
i    COOK & CO.
Princeton's
Pioneer Store.
AGRfCllLTlBU NOTES.
How to Break a Colt
The first thing to do when breaking
L colt is to teach it to stand haltered, an
I then to lead.   This should be done whe
| the colt is six or eight weeks old.
g would then place it in a pasture near
railroad if possible, so it would get a«
customed to the cars.    When about two
years old I wonld break it to ride.   After
it is broken to ride I would break it
£ work to a wagon.   It should be worked
I with an old horse that will not get excited.    When breaking a colt to drive,
cart should be used, and if the colt kicks
use a kicking strap.
... The harness should fit a horse comfortably, and when broken should be repaired and not tied up with old strings
or wire. A horse will work better if the
harness fits him well. Each work horse
should have a collar of his own that fits
'him, and not be obliged to wear "any
old thing." When I buy a collar I always get one large enough to wear over
a pad. I like the hame hook one-third
of the way from the bottom of the hame.
—Correspondent Indiana Farmer.
Horses Becoming Scarcer.
Farmers are beginning to realize that
there is a great scarcity of horseflesh
everywhere. There has been an unusual
demand for good farm teams, for the cropping season now at hand. During the
past five or six years one could drive all
through the country and scarcely ever
see a colt, and this short supply is beginning to be feit in the market. There is
yibt one stallion to be found now where
fix or eight years ago there were a dozen.
The old teams are about worn out on
many farms, and this makes an increased
demand on a short supply. Two years
ago what was generally called a plug
could hardly be sold for anything, if cold
cash was to be the consideration, but now
they are in demand, for anything is bet-
than nothing.
It was the wise farmer who kept right
along breeding good ■ animals in spite of
the discouraging outlook of three or four
years ago, for he now has on hand some
thing that will bring him a profit and he
need not look up a buyer. In fact, buyers seem to be more numerous than
horses.
Good brood mares are especially in
I good demand now that the horse's future
begins to be bright again. In fact, the
owner of a large, trim, clean-built mare
can get bis own price, if he is willing to
Bfrt with the animal at all. It is to be
hoped that this increased demand will
»6t cause farmers to so far forget them-.
selves that they will start in again breeding scrubs, as a great many were doing
when the price of horses went down below cost of production. If the owner of
a plug mare feels that he is bound to go
into the breeding business, he had bettei
keep along in the mule line and in this
way allow the inferior stock of the country gradually to run out. A small mule
will sell more readily and bring more
money than a small horse colt any time
or any where.
It will not be long until good horses
will be selling at old time prices, and
those who go into the business now and
breed with a definite object in view will
be in the best shape to realize good profits
when they have a surplus ready for the
market.—Pacific Homestead.      '  '
Hunters'
Saw and Planing
Located 3 Miles from Princeton.
A fall stock.,...
Of Rough and Dressed
Lumber.
The   Driest   and Clearest in the
country.
POST OFFICE
....STORE
C. E. THOHAS, Prop.
A full line of
Groceries
Hardware
Boots and
Shoes.
Post Office boxes for rent,
Blue Ribbon Tea
 IS THE	
Most Delicious in the Market.
When a prospector returns to camp after a long
day in the mountains, there is nothing he looks
forward to more than a cup of
<**# BLUE RIBBON TEA.
THE.
HOTEL JACKSON,
PRINCETON, B. C.
JOHN HARRY JACKSON, Proprietor.
All stage lines arrive at, and start from, the Hotel Jackson.
Everyone recommends the HOTEL JACKSON as Headquarters
when visiting the Similkameen Mining District. The Hotel Jackson is the place to start from for Copper and Kennedy Mountain,
Friday Creek, Roach River, Summit, Boulder Greek, Big Sue, 20
Mile, and all other mining camps.
If you want Good Meals, Good
Liquors and Good Beds, You
can be Supplied at the
Hotel Jackson
Hotel Princeton
JAMES WALLACE, Proprietor.
PRINCETONS PIONEER
*» «* HOTEL a* <*
The Resort
For Prospectors and Mining Men.
Hrsi Class Dining Room and Bar.
No trouble to talk to guests. The Boer
War and Fighting Joe's campaign discussed every evening.
Come and hear the Phonograph.
Seeds and Drugs
FRESH, NEW and GOOD.
The   Largest Garden Seed Dealers in the
PROVINCE.
send for THe Nelson Drag mil seed Co*
Catalogue.
-100 Cordova St., VANCOUVER, B. C.
 TBI SIMILKAMEEN STAB.
8
n
y
Sid
P
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
PRIKOETOM,  B. O.
THE PRINCETON   PUBLISHING CO
J-
ANE
ERSON
-   '   Manager.
D
reign
«K
tlFTION
RATES.
..*oo
i variably
n Advance.
Advertising rates furnished on application. •
Legal notices 10 and 5 cents per line.        (
"Certificates of Improvement'! notices, $5.001
$10.00 for legal life of notice.*
Four weekly insertion* constitute one month
The government of the province
of. Ontario *irevidently alive to the
necessity of fostering -the growth of
her mining interests by introducing a progressive mineral policy.
Such an example should be followed by the government of British
Colunjbia on very much larger and
broader lines;'for the future of our
province lies in the development* of I
her mineral resources. There are
several districts in British Columbia where the mining interests have
been sadly neglected. In our immediate neighborhood there are
several rich mineral belts which, if |
the country had adequate transportation facilities, would be extensively worked. The Similkameen mining division haa-contributed .over
$30,000 to the revenue of the province during the past three years,
and so' far has practically received
nothing in return. With the construction of roads, trails and bridges
giving easy access to the different
mining camps, the government
would be more than repaid for any
expenditure by the greatly i increased revenue the dismct would return.
; The following is taken from a late
editorial   in   the   Toronto  Globe.
. The British Columbia grovernment
would do well to follow such , a
policy:
"The Ontario Government realizes that the development of,the
mineral wealth of the province is
fraught with great importance for
the commercial, financial' and agricultural interests of Ontario. The
indications point to the probability
of this industry becoming in Ontario second only to that of agriculture. The necessity, therefore, of I
having a sound business policy
touching mineral development is
obvious. The Mining Bureau ofl
the government has been brought
into close touch with the Commissioner of Crown Lands, and the
Hon. Mr. Davis, as well as the
Ministers, are taking an active
and intelligent interest in the mining industry of the province. The
establishment of mining schools has
done much to promote a knowledge
of mining and minerals, and the intimation given by the Prem^tow
deputation from the university the
other day, that consideration would
be* given next year to the needs ofl
the Provincial University in j
nection with the departments ofl
mineralogy and geology, is further
proof of the importance which the
government attaches to the mineral
policy of Ontario.
Inadequate Postal Facilities! The
same old cry that has arisen from
every new town in British Columbia. Princeton-at the present time
jis suffering from the want of a post]
master-general at Ottawa, who can
ppreciate the conditions.in. a growing mining camp. Although strong
representations have been made to
Mr. Mulock, both by the postoffice-
inspector at Vancouver and Mr.
Hewitt Bostock M. P., asking for
an increased mail service, he has
1 fit to ignore the request. One
mail a week from Spences Bridge,
20 miles distant, constitutes the
mail service to a point where over
300 people receive mail. The small
of $400 per year was asked for
to run a twice-a-week service,' and
for some unaccountable reason has
not yet been granted.
Mr. Bostock has been asked to
again press upon the post office department the necessity of attending
to this matter at once, and it is to
be hoped the extra, service will be
granted without further delay.
The citizens of Princeton should
heartily co-operate with one another in endeavoring to make the
celebration of Her.Majesty's birthday the most successful ever held in
the Similkameen. Last year the
24th of May was the occasion of a
rery large gathering and a splendid
programme of sports was provided.
Princeton has grown considerably
since then, the population has more
than doubled, the city is now firmly
established as the metropolis of the
district and it is most fitting that
the celebration of the 'Queen's
Birthday' should be held in Prince-
TOWN. A large number of prospectors, mining men and capitalists
will be here during the month of
May; let the people get together
and show them what a live community can do towards fittingly
celebrating the 81st anniversary of
the birth of .the best and greatest
Queen the world has ever known.1
Denis Murphy of Ashcroft and
George Washington Beebe of Agas-
sizare the two gentlemen in the
field desiring to represent West
Yale in the provincial parliament.
Mr. Murphy comes out as an independent enndidate, while Mr. Beebe
is a memberj%1$Le Hon. Joe Martin's cabinet. THgy*citizens of|
Princeton have not the honor of the
acquaintance of either gentlemen,
DUrulare to extend to both a hearty
invitation to visit the city, and will
guarantee to give to them ample
oppertunity of explaining their
views on the present political perplexity.
BOER AND BRITISH TRAITS.
led in Cape C
 Pilgrim Father!
buth Rock, and have been
 first party of Dutch fa	
now Cape Colony.    So in this fateful year
Dutch are completing the third century oft]
sojourn in South Africa.    It was not howe      .
till 1651 that they erected a fort on the present
site at Cape Town.—New York Sun.
We are informed and .believe upon the
authority of some comic publication,
whose name we now disremember, that
the following classroom colloquy once
took place between a schoolma'am and s
New York boy: iffWhen was Philadelphia
founded?" "In 168a.". "What happen]
then?".   "Nothing.!'    Ji
The Dutch have had the run of South
Africa for three hundred years. The1
visible works of their genius and their
energy are these: They have founded
two States, the Transvaal Republic and
the Orange Free State. With 120,000
square miles of territory the Transvaal
Republic has a population of 350,000 It
has a public revenue of about $20,006,-
000, and spends it. Its people have put
only 50,000 acres of its soil under cultivation—less than a tenth of one per cent,
of the total area. It does not produce
food' enough to support its people. Its
exports, except of gold are inconsiderable.
The Orange Free State has an area of
nearly 50,000 square miles, and a white
population of less than- 100,000. The
annual revenue of the State is $2,000 000,
and its expenditures less. About 250,000
"of its soil are under cultivation.
Its total foreign .trade, exports and imports combined, amounts to a little over
$15,000,000 annually.
Men of the English race have had the
in of North America not quite so long!
i the' Hollanders have had the run of
South Africa. In 1620 some dissatisfied
Englishmen settled in Massachusetts.
Other Englishmen had already settled in
Virginia. In numbers and cash they
feeble folk, but they and their de-
cendants and those who came after them
have cleared the country up a bit. A
republic of about 75,000,000 people has
grown up. These people do not import
much foodstuffs. Sometimes they export 150,000,000 bushels of wheat in a
year-; they also have other things to sell,
including manufactures, until other na-
up a bill of more than a
billion dollars every year for their goods.
They have tamed a country of 3,000,-
10 square miles, and they are now, as a
favor, taking care of some outlying dis-
By the way, the Dutch had a chance to
do these things. One of them discovered
the North River and this island. They
settled here in New York some years before the Puritans landed at Plymouth,
(J^Tney governed this town until
the English took charge of it in 1664.
Convinced that it was hot going to be
much of a place, the Dutchmen swapped
it for Dutch Guiana, or Surinam, down
1 South America.
We have no doubt that the two states
1 South Africa will be a good deal more
heard of in the coming century if British
civilization becomes the dominant force
than would be the case if the northward
progress of that conquering and produc-
race should continue to be barred by
the tranquil and contented Boer farmers.
The decendants of King Philip would be
smoking their pipes in Eastern Massachusetts today if Englishmen had not
robbed the red men of their right to hold
and occupy about 3,000 acres per capita
which to fight and loaf. The Mata-
beles would be fighting and loafing in
their country a hundred years from today,
other force that that of Boer civilization were set at work to make history
South Africa.—New York Times.
J. CHARLES MCINTOSH,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
AND
-^"filOTARY^ PUBLIC	
.RRINCBTON.B.C.
W.J. WATERMAN, N. I.
p. a. s; m. a.'i, n. e„ Etc.
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C
H. A.   WHJJLLANS, M. D.
PHYSICIAN
and
SURGEON.
McGill Graduate. Princeton, B. C.
...JAMES HISLOP....
MIKING AND CIVIL ENGINEER.
PROVINCIAL I.AND SURVEYOR.
... Princeton, B. C...
PRINCETON
ASSAY OFFICE.
 C.B.HABBIS.
Assayer
and
Chemist*
Accurate results Guaranteed. Reports will be returned on stage bringing samples.
Correspondence Solicited.
Regarding   Mining   Properties  in  the
simlikamecB District.
Properties   Carefully  Sampled and  Assayed.
R.H.PARKINSON
FAIRVIEW, B. C.
PRINCETON, B. C.
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR,
CIVIL ENGINEER
and NOTARY PUBLIC.
Surveys on the Similkameen Promptly
Attended to.
 r
'% M
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAB.
TOWN TOPICS.     j
t     For High Class Groceries go to A. j
I  Howse.
I     If you want a good mixed drink go to
I the Hotel Jackson.
I     A new supply of Jessop steel has arm
I ed at the Howse store.
I     For the best Paint, Oils and Leads i
i; the market go to the Howse store.
I    The finest and best fitted Bar in th
Similkameen is at the Hotel Princeton.
H   30 Mile' Creek.     Two y$ interests for
Sale. Apply, Cook & Co., Princeton.
I For RbnT—Blacksmith shop and
^stable. Apply, Cook & Co., Princeton.
H For Sai,B or Rent—-Stevensons' Hay
Mdeadows. Apply, Cook & Co., Prince-
Hon.
I J A. E. Howse can supply you with the
Hrery latest in shirts and gent's furnish
flings.
■ Bennet's Patent Fuse, the best in the
■ world Can be purchased at the Howse
I    If you want to go prospecting, the P.O.
lajtore can fit you out with everything you
require.
Yesterday being Good Friday and a
holiday the government assay office, lawyers, doctors, surveyors, and real estate
> offices were closed. Mr. Hunter made a
trip to his oiAyJiome at Granite Creek,
while the*^|£D_professional gentlemen
I spent a qtn^raay-in the city.
I ' xfle Princeton sawmill started cutting
lumber again today. The building boom
which is now on made it necessary for
Mr. Howse to add to his already large
stock of rough and dressed lumber.
Harry Richardson is in charge and has
a force of five men at work.
Two nack tpins from Keremeos came
to Princwon this week bringing baggage
and light freight. One was from the
Palace Livery stable at Keremeos in
charge of D. J. Innis, while our old
friend Wild Bill piloted the other safely
over the trail. Bill is expert packer and
has the record of rawhiding the first ore
shipped from the Slocan mines. ..
PERSONALS.
Ex-Gov. Bewdney returned from the
coast on the last stage.
Bob Cramer is home again. Bob is ii
terested in several good properties in tl
district, notably the Ada B. on Copp<
Capt. W. Holmes and Mr. J. W. Dryden
drove in from Granite Creek on Thursday. The Capt. is manager of the Granite Creek Gold Mines Co., while Mr.
Dryden fills the same position for the
Boston and British Columbia Mining Co.
Both companies intend working their extensive placer properties on Granite
Creek this season.
FROM THE RECORDS.
MIN1NO. LOCATION5.
CHRISTINA!—Onion Creek—Andrew and
Christina Johnsonand E. Todd.
Lucky Todd—Same.   |§j|3Hfe|
Manitoba—Copper Mountain—M. A.
Voigt.
Ibex—Copper Mountain-^. C. Voigt.
ASSESSMENTS.
Union Jack Fraction and Shamrock
—Five Mile—Luke Gibson.
Oriole—Copper Mountain—Jas. Snow-
don.
Muldoon—Friday Creek—Mira Monte
Co. Ltd.
Sun    DOG—rCopper   Mountain—A.   E-
transfers.    I
Royaw, Monarchy and SociETY-Ken-
nedy Mountain1—Samuel Spencer to
T. R. Hardiman.
Keremeos—Skaist Mountain—David
James to A. M. Coulthard.
Boer—Hope Summit—Chas. Richter tc
A. M. Coulthard.
"Summit"—Hope Summit—David James
to A. M. Coulthard.
Similkameen—Hope Summit—C. Summers to A. H. Coulthard.
OTTER FLAT HOTEL
THYNNE& DEBARRO.
PROPRIETORS.
City Baths
n Y	
anc* Saving Parlor
P. V. HEATH, Prop.
SHAVING,  HAIRCUTTING,
SHAMPOOING, SINGEING...
Two large bath rooms are being fitted
up and will be ready for use in a
few days.
PRINCETON, B. C.
■HI RafhAi* H
m uarucr|j|||]
Shopf
HUGH COWAN, Prop.
The First Barber Shop Established in the
Similkameen.
STYLES IN HAIRCUTTING.
Opposite Post Office.     Princeton, B. C
Hotel Driard
NICOLA LAKE.
JOHN CLARK, Propr.
Headquarters for Mining Men and Prospectors.
An Ideal Summer Resort.
JOB RICHARDS,
The Sunset Copper Mining Co., LM.
Owning and Operating
The SUNSET Mine.
On Copper Mountain, Similkameen Mining District.
Everyone who has seen the property renders a unanimous verdict*
The Biggest and Best»Mine in British Columbia*
Now is the TIME to BUY Stock in this Wonderful
iline. It is an investment! No Speculation! Ore
enough in sight to return ioo per cent, on amount
invested.   BUY TODAY before advance in price.
APPLY TO
Rm Am BROWN,
President and Gen'l Manager
Sunse%,Shares Will Make You Rich.
B    PRINCETON or Grand Fonts.
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAB.
■ TWENTY MILE GREEK,)
II Or the Golden Belt of the  Famous
Similkameen.
lis In the heart of the Similkameen coun-
9 try about 25 miles below Princeton, a j
B stream, small in summer but a raging
4) torent in the spring, finds' its, tumultu-
H ous way to the river Similakameeu.
0t Four years ago outside of the abori-
,,g gines the stream in question was seldom
Ijij thought of; now mention its name—ears
U3 are alert—attention is secured.    To be
H brief the stream is the famous Twenty
ypj Mile.   Commonplace the name may be,
■ yet wonderful is the mineral belt that
Twenty-Mile long has drained and divid-
H ed, for the ore laden   gneiss   extends
H across the Twenty Mile until cut off by
3, the granite.   So steep are the walls of |
B* Twenty Mile creek that to prospect them
H thoroughly it would take a balloon. But
L it is suprising how the persistent pros-
H pec tor has worked his way over slides
H and precipices in the cliff that would
H dazzle a mountain goat. Two well-known
a residents of Princeton attempted to de-
ithe
all of Twenty Mil'
good progress, when suddenly a sheer,
drop of 50 feet lay below them. They
were non-plussed for a moment, but on
consultation decided to cut a nearby
tree, stand it on its head and shin down
the butt end. The scheme worked like
a charm, but after shinning down past
the first 50 foot drop and proceeding a |
short distance, another drop suddenly]
confronted them. This time no succoring tree stood by to lend its grateful
help. So up the tree and cliff they had
to climb, over slides and treacherous
places. They were a tired pair when
they reached camp on Twenty Mile.
The mineral belt of Twenty Mile is a
hard one to prospect. Beside the precipe
itous walls the summit is strewn with
fallen timber, often five to six feet deep, j
WHAT THE BOYS ARE DOING.
Tommy Gorman and Jimmie Marks
were doing an assessment on Lookout
mountain. They were working on a
small, but promising, lead of arsenical
Geo. Cahill was over at Fairview for a
short trip. Mr. Yates, a Twenty-Mile
multi-claim holder, left on Friday morning for Kruger mountain. Mr. Yates is
reported to have made several sales
lately.
Peter Scott,*the father of Camp Hedley,
is busy proving up on his promising
property.
Goo. Aldous and Jim Slater are up
Twenty Mile working on the No. 1 mineral claim. The No.. 1 is situated about
two miles from the mouth of Twenty
mile. It lies on a contact of stratified
porphyry and granite. Solid arsenical
iron ore caps the exposure which lies at
a pitch of about 45 degrees, being well
defined on the face of the cliff. A body
of ore tapped at where they propose
driving a tunnel would give a depth of
about 1000 feet, making a remarkable
tunnel and dump site. Geo. Aldous left ]
for Princeton on Saturday and returned
on Tuesday to Twenty Mile.
Messrs. Coyle and Murphy arrived on
•Thursday and proceeded to camp on
Twenty Mile creek. They propose doing
. considerable work on Red Mountain.
Messrs. Todd, Johnson of Nelson, Wm.
Wilson and Ole Olson returned from
West Twenty Mile on Tuesday. They
report their claims showing up well with
a remarkable ore body. Todd and Johnson have gone up to Todd's Boulder |
creek strike. Ole Olson is going to prospect for Ole.
ON YOUR WAY TO
PRINCETONU
You will Find a Comfortable Resting Place at the
15 Mile House
'BRADSHAWS'
Well Stocked Bar and Excellent Dining Room*
HEADQUARTERS FOR 20 MILE
CREEK MINING CAMP.
KEREMEOS, B. C.
D.J.INNIS,Prop.
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen District.
Travellers   from  the Boundary
District    can    secure     horses
through to Princeton.
Ran in Connection with Keremeos Hotel
&M
Stable in Connection
Princeton Feed stables
BUDD & CO., Proprietors.
Cay uses or High Priced Race
Horses Equally Well Cared lor.
THE MOST COMMODIOUS HORSE
Opposite Hotel Jackson. HOTEL IN THE SIMILKAMEEN o» j»
New General
mmmStOre
We are just opening our new store and have
received a large consignment of Gothing,
Gents' Furnishings, Blankets, Stationery, etc*
We Have a well assorted stock of NEW GOODS
and are in a position to attend to your wants. We
shall also carry a full line of First-Class
Groceries
which are expected to arrive in a few days.
Bridge St.
Rennie & Belli
Princeton   Meat   Market
WARDLE & THOMAS
Orders  for  Mining  Camps  promptly attended  to
and delivered.
Palace Livery
I STABLES <£
Granite
creeh
Hotel
D. McKAY
This Hotel has always been Famous
For the Excellence of its table.
The nearest point'^rWhe
richest Silver I*ead mines a
in B. C, '.Summit City."
There is more gold in Granite Creek
than has yet been taken out.
Princeton
Lumber...
SHINGLE and
PLANING MILLS
A. E. HOWSE, Prop.
m
H
Hill and Office
Bridge Street,
PRINCETON..
Day & French
TINSMITHS     |t:
PLUflBERS
GUNSfllTHS
Our Camp .Stoiye is the Boss
Prospectors. (
Repair work of Every Descrip-  \
".   'tB*. i
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
KEREMEOS!
The Centre of the Similkameen District.
A Mining and Agricultural Centre. . . .
...LOTSNOW ON THE MARKET...
BUSINESS STREET
THIRD AVE., 100 Feet Wide, Lots 30x120:
CORNER LOTS $150; Inside Lots $100.
/'YnoiTD CTTDTTCHTC corner lots $100.00.
KJ1 rlcK o 1 Knn 1 o inside lots $75.oo.
TERMS:   1-3 Cash, Balance in Three and Six Months.
I BEALEY INVESTMENT & TRUST CO.
For Further Information Apply to:
R. H. PARKINSON, Fairview.
^jc^^E. BULLOCK WEBSTER, Keremeos,
LIMITED.
em^iAgmntm Greenwood, B. C.
LocaiAgents: Tftc Princeton Real Estate, Mining and Assaying Office.
IMINING  NEWS.,
Aspen Grove District.
The "Cincinnati" group is situated
qHlree miles north-east of Dodd's ranch on
\SHPper Butte mountain. It is without
djfcbt the most promising property in
tMdistrict. J. and S. Bate and J. Armstrong, who own the group, deserve
grea credit for the manner in which they
haVeMeveloped the claims. The boys
started work early last fall and have
kept hard at it ever since.
On the Cincinnati claim a series of
open cuts have been run in on the ore
body, the largest being over 15 feet long.
•A smft 20 feet deep has been sunk on
the'upper end of the claim, the bottom
0/ ^hich was in rich ore, when it had to
be discontinued owing to the surface
water preventing further sinking. A
tunnel was then started which has now
been driven over 80 feet Work of this
sort jcertainly merits success and there is
no doubt that the boys will realize a
^handsome sum for their property, as
assay values from different portions of
the ore body show from 8 to 16 per cent,
copper and $12 to $24 in gold and silver.
H. Schmidt has returned from Dakota
and has started work on the "Big Sue"
|claim, probably the most remarkable
outcrop in the country. An immense
boil of, rich grey copper assaying as high
as 22 per cent, cropping out on a bunch-
(j^rass hill, rewarded Mr. Schmidt after
six week's careful search. Evidently
such a showing was known - to exist, as
Mr. Schmidt had a knowledge of the
country he was looking for, that could
have been obtained only from some per-
son who had an intimate acquaintance
with it. Development on the Big Sue
will be watched with great interest
bids fair to be one of the richest copper
lodes ever discovered,
Job Printing
Of Every Description
at the STAR office,
PRINCETON, 6. C.
KEREMEOS
LIVERY
...STABLE,
W. HINE & CO., Props.
First-Class Saddle and Pack Horses.
Feed and Livery Stables.
Stage Line to Fairview.
We take the Best of
Care of Transient
Trade.
Bring; Xpur.:i horses to
Us.     We   guarantee
 prompt attention.
...Branch at Fairview...
Prospectors
....STOP!
If you want to Outfit cheaply
and quickly, do so at the	
...KEREMEOS STORE.,
WM. HINE & Co.,
You can save time and
make money by buying
your outfit at the point
you start prospecting.
Mining Supplies of Every
DESCRIPTION KEPT IM STOCK.
JOBN EOVE SCO.
DRUGGISTS AND
STATIONERS.
F.URVIEW and CAMP McKINNEY.
A. full line of Drugs, Stationery,  Drug-
ists Sundries.
Presriptions ^Carefully.** Compounded.
HOTEL
KEREMEOS..
JONH NEIL,
Proprietor.
Stables in Connection.
This hotel is Situated at
the Gateway to the
Similkameen valley, jt
Well Furnished Rooms.
-Bar and Dining Room
Service First-Class.
w
We Cater Specially to
Mining Men
and Prospectors.
WM. GUTTBIME
PROSPECTOR
and GUIDE....
Has a thorough knowledge of the entire
Similkameen Country.
Address Princeton, B. C.
'zibjUami
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
THE VERMILION FORKS MINING
AND DEVELOPMENT CO., Ltd.
.# OWNERS OF Jt
The TOWNSITE     |
of PRINCETON.
••.Lots for Sale—
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers* The business centre for the
following mining camps:- Copper Mi, Kennedy Mt** Friday* Boulder* Granite and 20 Mile Creeks* Summit*
Roche River, Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove*
Enormous Agricultural Area to Draw from.
Splendid Climate Pure waler
Government Headquarters for
<&   Similkameen District*   «£
PRESENT PRICES OF LOTS FROM
$2.00 TO $10.00 PER FRONT FOOT.
SIZE OF LOTS 50x100 FEET AND 33-100 FEET.
Prices Will be Advanced! 1st May,
Send for map to
W. J. WATERMAN,
Resident Manager V. F. M. & D. Co.

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