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Similkameen Star 1901-09-07

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 ., .Voi.. II.   No. 24.
PRINCETON,   SEP. 7th, 1901.
LABOR DAY CELEBRATION.
AKeremeos Won   the Football
Match, Princeton th<
Ba;
rnnceton tne^
aseball. X
dance at the sc
until the we 'sin:
Today most of tl
home, though
and footraces we
ouse which lasted
s of the morning.,
ncetonians left fori
mptu   horseracingj
Tnesday night a  tired' out  but jolly
irowd of sports wended their   way   into
IcommTced to' fill"p'LSVy A
ngofthe
baseball
The
sing the
first
attraction
on the
P'
ogr
amn
othall  co
otest.
Th
ere
was
a
wine
1 blowing,
and w
ben
Kt
the
toss thev
ookac
van
tag
-of
toll
ck-WebsJj
dcont
rei
llv
d
y for
■alftl
ie home players who secured a goal
e'first half. The play was fast—and
nes furious—from start to finish. In
econd half the Princetonians with
vind at their back made repeated at-
>ts to even   the   score, * but without
: aftert
the
arid   Pri:
match
■nting
mlti
the
e, causing
the grand
The match was an exciting
•great merriment to tbe fans
stand.    Both sides had plaj
er saw the game before and consequently
" titers Were frequent, so much so that cut
local poet got off the  following  effusion
on the visitors' shortstop :
The shortstop got under the fly ball
And guaged its decent with each eyeball.
And said : " I learned quick
All this wonderful trick,
From grabbing the smoky Scotch highball."
For the home team captain Billy Lowe
as pitcher, and Joe Dandy was behind
the bat. Captain Podunk and Frank
Aiken composed the Princetoniatt ba -
tery. Seven innings was-qtrite sufficient
for both teams to obtain an inkling ofl
Uncle Sam's great game—and as the visitors won, it evened up their defeat of the
morning. The following warfe the players and their positions on me diamond :
Joe Dandy Catcher'' Podunk
Wm. Lowe Pitcher F. Aiken
Chas. Winters     ist base     M. Revsbach
Ed. Richter 2d baSe M.Cruickshank
Jos. Richter 3d/base  J. C. Mcintosh
Chas. Lowe       SHbrtstop P.F.Godenrath
Wm. Richter    r   L. F. j. Anderson
R. A. Hawtry        C. F. V. Rvder
S. McCurdy" R. F. C  Revelv
The   celebration   closed with   a jolly
Is, though uncon-
make frequent stops en route home. These
brief halts were invariably opposite the
sign cards of the Hotel Jackson and
Hotel Tulameen, and were accompanied
by one of the party delivering himself by
saying " Well, here we do go "—and the
party would proceed to klatwa—home.
PEINCESS JULIA MEMLOOS.
¥
Princess Jnlia. tl^Ja(*kAereditary scion
of the Similkameen Indians, crossed the
Stygian Ferry Sunday evening, after a
protracted illness of several weeks duration. Julia was barely 30 years of age,
and well known throughout the valley.
She was the only daughter of Ta'ye
Moye's, the late Chieftain of the Similkameen tribe. Though she leaves a young
son, it is doubtful if he will ever be elected head of the tribe. As befitting Her
rank the funeral ceremonies were elaborate. Her body was laid in a casket covered with white satin cloth, which was
placed under a tent at the Catholic mission. Here it remained all Monday and
up till Tuesday afternoon. The members
of her tribe meanwhile brought potlatch,
which was piled around the coffin. Shortly after two o'clock a procession was
formed, which marched to the Indian
burial ground on the east side of the
mouth of 20-Mile Creek. The body was
interred in the fenced off plot in which
Julia's ancestors were buried. The ceremony concluded, the Indians left the
mimaloose illahee, and returned to tbe
mission to enjoy the potlatch as is their
custom.
Mrs. Chas. Richter arrived at Keremeos on Tuesday evening from Kelowna,
where she has succeeded in gaining
strength rapidly under the care of Dr.
Blythe. She left for Loomis, Wash., on
Thursday morning on a two weeks visit
to her parental home. Mrs. Richter's
health has improved wonderfully, and
her many friends in Princeton will be
glad to hear of her recovery. Her hui
band met her at Penticton, and will accompany her on her trip to her old home
at Loomis.
THE   CABINET   STAKES.!
Brown Wins   the 'Race—Joe
Martin's Nominee Appointed  Minister of   Finance.
A late message announces the fact that
J. Brown, M.L.A., for New Westminster]
will succeed the Hon. J. H. Turner as
Minister of Finance in the British Col
umbia Government. The Hon. Richard
McBride is repoited to have vigorously
opposed the selection, but Premier Dunsmuir stood firm and insisted on Mr.
Brown being appointed. The news will
not surprise anyone who has closely
matched late development in the political arena. Mr. Martin's influence with
Premier Dunsmuir made it almost a certainty that preference woflfdbe given to
Joe's choice. Some interesting developments will follow the new appointment,
as the government will undoubtedly
loose a   large following   by their  latest
LOCAL AND   PERSONAL.
The Provincial Mineralogii
v^
The Provincial mineralogist's party
turned to town Wednesday morning from
the Roche River country. Professor W.
F. Robertson informed the Star that
after leaving Kennedy mountain an examination of the claims at Roche River
camp was made. Thence they proceeded up the river to the source, taking in
the schist, granite and slate belts. Mr.
Robertson expressed himself as well
pleased with the section visited, and was
firm in the belief that prospectors would
be rewarded by making a thorough examination of the slate belt. Incidentally
—the Professor mapped out the country
at the_headwaters__gf the river, taking
notes ofthe levels en route. He is con
vigged that he has found a pass suitable
for the construction of a railway*TRrough
the Hope range, and has sent a report
with the sketch maps and data to the
chief engineer of the government survey
party.
The Provincial mineralogist examined
Granite Creek on Thursday, and proceeded up to Otter Flat, from which point he
will journey to Aspen Grove camp, taking in Boulder and Kelly-Creeks. Unfortunately his time will prohibit even a
cursory examination of Summit City
camp. This is most regrettable, as Summit is unique in many respects, being the'
only camp in the district in which galena
ores are found. On the whole Mr. Robertson 'sSvisit to the Similkameen should
be fruitful of good resnlts, as it will
bring before the public in an official waj,
information of a reliable character of the
ips within its bounds.
Morton Revsbach of Yale, is again in
the city.
George Freeman has returned from
Summit City camp.
Mr. and Mrs. Keller of Osoyoos visited
town on Wednesday.
W. Yates has returned to Hedley from
a  lengthened   trip to Victoria and  the
PR-.Y. Smith, of Boulder Creek and
Fred W. Burn of Nelson registered at the
Hotel Tulameen on Monday.
Miss Cplina Black, arrived on last Saturday^ stegeroxoke charge of the School,
which she opened on Tuesday. ~"     ■
Andrew Laidlaw of Greenwood, and D.
R. Young of Nelson, are expected to arrive in Princeton during the week.
Rev. George A. Cropp, of Nicola Lake
preached to an exceptionally large attendance at the school house last Sunday.
Mr. & Mrs. C. JE. Shaw and Lieut. J.
Edwards Leckie, of Greenwood, passed
through town Wednesday en route to
Summit City Camp.
A number of Indians from the   Nicola  1
Valley passed through town en route   to
Hope, on their annuaj>tferry-picking and
trading expeditioir^/N^
A. Murchie, photographer of 518   Cordova Street, Vancouver^bas been   spending the week in town&paking his   head-  |
quarters at the H<^1 Jackson.
J. H. Jackson left for Hope yesterday 1
morning en route for Harrison Hot I
Springs, where he hopes to effect a cure ]
from poisoned oak, from which he has |
been suffering for the past month.
Alexander Sharp, M. E., arrived in
Princeton yesterday. He will take charge
of the interests of the Vancouver Coal
Syndicate which has extensive holdin
on the Similkameen and   '	
Mr. Sharp intends doing explora-
• — the properties.
The question of placing an organ in
the school house for use of all church
denominations is being mooted. The
instrument would go^-a long way to
making the servicep^feore attractive. A
commitee of ladWhas the matter in hand
and will doubtless be successful in raising funds if a canvas is made.
Charles E. Thomas, J. P., held court )
early in the week.when CharlesSquakam
was brought before him on irff-ormatioii '
of Percy Rowlands, charged with asault. 1
His Worship assessed~"E!ie Indian *io I
For being drunk an additional fine of
$5 and costs was also/imposed making a )
total of $18.50. When Charley dug up (
after some rustling on the outside, he
overheard to   remark.    "By   Yesus. V
The officers of the Similkameen Valley
Coal Company, the local syndicate which
recently put through the deal in Toronto
for a portion of its holdings in the Similkameen district, has received word that
the amount of the cash payment has
been deposited in the bank in Toronto
and will be available when the property
has been accepted by the Toronto people's
expert, who will leave for the Similkameen early next month.—Tribune, Nel-
but I'n
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
^2
IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS:
Robert  Stevenson  was  Customs Collector Forty
Years Ago.
Stevenson of Princeton, received the ap-
it of Collector of Customs, with
adquarters at Osoyoos.     It was during
" Colonel," as he is now fondly call-eel
"-}   I  was at that time just entering manhood
pernor's uniform even to a cockade hat
cl the clos»st attention of his audience. He spoke slowly and distinctly.
He first told of his intention to build a
wagoijj»ad from Hope over the Hope
mountains down the Similkameen valley
to Osoyoos, thence round Anarchist
mountain to Rock Creek.   It was to be
E.G.PRIOR&CO..
LiniTED LIABILITY.
A FULL STOCK OF
supp
afford means of easy intercourse betweei
the coast and the diggings. He als<
promised to build_a_J*u**d*g*
f Rock Creek, and,—to quote hi*
Farming Implements
Always on hand.     You can always get MACHINE EXTRAS for any MACHINE
SOLD BY US.     Every kind of Vehicle in stock from a
Bain Wagon ^jgjjggn Light Road Wagons
'    WRITE US FOR PRICES,
YOU WILL FIND THEM RIGHT.
WE CARRY THE FAMOUS
flassey-Harris Binders, Mowers, Rakes, Ploughs, &c.
KAMLOOPS,       =       B. C.
factor of the Hue
listoric Rock Creek
lys British Columbia
y, and the governor
uglas, a former chief
s Bay Company. II
> his notice that the miner
:ek were causing trouble, s<
the adjourinneut-of the fir?
irliament of^ih^Legislativ<
: started for Hope, aud com
er. Word was received of the governor's
intended visit, and I was on the lookoui
for him, as I felt that the boys would
make it nasty. I met the party near
what is now Hoosier's, and the governor
requested me to"£o ahead and notify ti e
miners. This I did, but nearly every
man jack of them absolutely refused to
meet him.   In fact certain of them went
so   far   as   to   lock UP   " ^npca. hall
whe-e we usually held our meetings.
On the governor's arrival in camp I told
him of my illsuccess in getting the boys
together. He onl^4aughed and told me
that bright and early next morning to go
| up the creek and tell everyone that a
'-public meeting would be held at which
vhe would be pleased to listen to allcom-
| plaints.   This I cheerfully did, begging
!and imploring the miners to come to
camp. During my absence the governor
forced open the door to the dance hall,
:   foi
things in shap.
when the time cam
to the doors. Sir J;
to all complaints
speak. His conn
dressed as he was it
.nee of Judge Cox got
the evening.    Well,
: the hall was jammed
imes listened quietly
and   then got  up to
landing presence—
the full regalia  of a
arp was down from his headquarters at Olalla, British Columbia.
Saturday, remaining only for a day. He
brought in the most favorable reports oi
the outlook for mining, and has good
reasons for believing that the, coming
great mining boom in the Dominion will
centre along the great copper belt,
stretching from Keremeos to Princeton,
that is known as the Similkameen district. This district with its bright outlook is only some thirty-five miles from
Loomis, and while activity at that point
would be of no direct benefit to this
place, still it would have a marked influence for good by attracting attention
to this whole upper country. Thorough
prospecting has determined the existence
of large and valuable copper deposits
through a belt ten or twelve miles* long,
with the celebrated Nickel Plate mine
and adjoining properties at one end and
the Keremeos mines at the other. Between the two extremes the same character of ore, running largely to sulphides,
has been discovered, promising to make
the territory a large contributor to the
copper output of the country. Much
work is going on, and double exertions
are stimulated by the prospective railroad
which is to pass through that
Within another year Mr. Sharp
dent that mining will be in operation
over the district on a very large scale,
with most fortunate results for investors.
—Palmer Mountain Prospector.
Princetonians.*.*-**
When in Phoenix
The Victoria Hotel
st Class in Every Respect.
B. TOMKINS,
We Manufacture and Keep in Stock
EXHAUSTERS,
FANS,
BELTING,
VALVES,
FITTINGS,
THAWING POINTS
BOILERS,
ENGINES,
PUMPS,
ORE CARS,
ORE BUCKETS,
GRIZZLIES,
BLOWERS,
And Everything for the Mine, Marine, and Sawmill Trade.
VANCOUVER - ENGINEERING - WORKS.
[SucCESS&R TO ARMSTRONG & MORRISON.]
IRON FOUNDERS, BOILERMAKERS AND MACHINISTS.
Office and Works:    Foot of Heatley Avenue, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Rennie &Bell
 FOR	
Men's
Clothing
 OR	
Anything;
in the  line of
Groceries.
G. L ALLAN
Boots and
<* SHO^S \*
VANCOUVER C-
Try Our Own Mining Boot.
It is just right.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
HEDLEY CITY
District, British Columbia.
The centre of the Mining Industry of Middle Similkameen.
The following Mines are in operation within one half mile.
NICKLE PLAT^^^^^; •'   ';f§||
The KINGSTON        J|:-'   /    Jl;
The Rollo
The Sunset
Golden Lily
end Many Others.
Lots now on the market and selling like hot-cakes.
Buy early and get the choice.    Prices ^Jl^is
fK ' $WO to $1501 ..' "i
In three Payments:^- 1-3 Cash;   1-3 in Six months;  1=3 in Twelve months,
R. I PARMINSOIN, Geifl MfllV
HEDLEY CITY and FAIRVIEW, B.C. I
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STA-.R
Sep. 7th, 1901.
TME SIMILKAMEEN STAR
PRINOETON,  B.  O.,
THE   PRINCETON   PUBLISHING  CQ,
SUBSCRIPTION B
Domestic, One Year,    -    -    -
Foreign, One Year,   -    -    -
Payable Invariably in
. Subscribers will confer a favor on this office by
promptly reporting any change in address or
rreguiarity in receipt of their paper.
and 5 cents per li
ertificatcs of Improvement not
legal life of notice.
REDISTRIBUTION.
Now that the census returns for
British Columbia are available
there can be no excuse offered for
further delaying the redistribution
of seats in the Provincial Parliament. When we find Rossland
ranking in population with the
cities of New Westminster and
Nanaimo and compare the representation it has in the legislature with
the cities on the coast, we get a
good example of how shamefully the
interior of the province has been
treated in not having anything lik-e
its proportion of members. Vancouver Island,with about 35,000 of
a population is represented in the
house by over one third of the total
number of members, while four
( members from the interior (representing the Rossland, Nelson, Slocan, and East Kootenay ridings)
are all that is allowed to a district
much larger ip-areaand population.
A comparison of the census returns
for 1891 with those of the present
year prove that the great increase in
British Columbia's population comes
almost entirety from the mining
districts in the interior, and yet we
find those districts with a population of over 40,000 people represented by only 4 members of the
legislature who have no place in the
cabinet, while Vancouver Island
with a less population occupies 14
seats, 3 of .which are filled by
ministers of the crown.
If our present government (which
has not yet been endorsed by the
people) has a proper spirit of fairness in its composition it would
bring down a redistribution bill
early next session, which would
treat all portions of the province
alike, and go to the country for endorsement on the rearrangement of
seats. But we are afraid that the
composition of the Dunsmuir government is such that there is no
hope of its rising to   the   situation
and making a move which   would
be endorsed by the whole country.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
Jupiter Pluvlus had his innings
during the week,  and for a time
made things chilly for Old Sol.
Premier Dunsmuir is evidently of
the opinion that Brown is a better
color than Green. This will cause
John Huston to see red.
The season is rapidly drawing to
a close and yet there is no sign of
work being started on the Roche
River and Summit City trails.
"Verily, Verily, the prospector in
the Similkameen has a hard trail to
hoe !"
Provincial Mineralogist Robertson has also discovered a pass in
the Hope mountains, through
which he claims it would be quite
feasible to build a railway. This
should be sufficient to convince the
Government that the present survey
is nothing but a farce.
An official letter has been receiv^
ed by Mr. Chas.ThomasJ.P., from
the Attorney-General's department
in Victoria stating that^the Lands
and Works department have been
ask#f to build a lockup at Prince-
ysX. The building will occupy the
lot behind the court house and construction will probably be started
early next month.
Postmaster General Mulock, has
returned from Australia, but is evidently too busy to attend to such
a small matter as the mail service
in the Similkameen, He may have
matters of greater importance to
look after but should surely be able
to give some portion of his valuable
time to arrange a service which
would bring some credit to his department, instead of the execration
which is now being hurled at it
by everyone in this section.
An entire week has passed and
gone and not a word has been
heard from §mj£h Curtis and J[ames
Anderson, w/B>a are locating railway
routes for Jsime^J. Hill. The last
heard from them they were somewhere in the Hope mountains, 3950
feet above the sea.—The Nelson
Tribune.
Your information is incorrect
Bro. Houston. The Star has reason to believe that the only party
now in the Hope mountains locating railway routes, is working in
the interests of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, a corporation
which you supported so faithfully
during the last session ofthe legislature.
James Hislop P. L. S. has started men
to work on the Dram claim on Whip.aw
Creek doing assessment work.
Messers. Shier and Aldous are making
an examination of the Copper mountain
properties this week.
The Wilson Bros, have uncovered a
splendid ledge of fine arsenical iron ore
on the Rocky Point claim on 30 mile
creek. The property is situated on St.
Mary's Canyon, well up the mountain
towards the Nickel Plate. The ore found
is undoubtedly of the same character as
that on the Nickel plate ledge, carrying veins of rich gold bearing mineral in
an immense ledge of low grade iron and
copper ore. It is without doubt the most
important strike made in 20 mile camp
this year.
BUSINESS and PROFESSIONAL CARDS
Q. flURDOCH
Blacksmithing
"* Horseshoeing
Shop on Harold Avenue*
PRINCETON,    B. C.
JOHN LOVE & CO.
DRUGGISTS AND
"STATIONERS.
d CAMP MCKINNEY
A full line of Drags, Stationery, Drug-
ists Sundries.
Presriptions ^Carefullyj» Compounded.
Orders by mail or stage promptl"-
Prospectors
„:zstopi
If you want to Outfit
cheaply and quickly,
do so at the ]
KEREMEOS STORE
WM. HINE & Co.,
You can save time and
make money by buying
your outfit at the point
you start prospecting.   |
Mining Supplies
of Every
ASSAYERS'   CARDS.
PRINCETON ASSAY
OFFICE,       C.  B.  HARRIS,
Assayer and Chemist.
Assay on Stage Bring-foe Sample.
Bridge STREET.,     PRINCETON, B. C.
PELLEW-HARVEY,
BRYANT&QILMAN
ASSAY OFFICE U4 ORE TESTING WORKS.
Assaying and Complete Mining Smelting Tests Made from
Small Samples up to Ton Lots.
Assayer In charge of the
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT ASSAY OFFICE
VANCOUVER, B. C
W. J. WATERHAN, M. E.
p. a. s. m. a. 1, n. b., etc.
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C
J. CHARLES McINTOSH,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
AND
 NOTARY PUBLIC	
PRINCETON, B. C.
RICHARD H.PARKINSON
PRINCETON AND FAIRVIEW.
Provincial Land Surveyor,
Civil Engineer
and   Notary Public.
 JAMES HISLOP	
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEEE
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
.Princeton,B. C...
JOHN  W.   PECK & CO.,
Mens'   Furnishings.
VANCOUVER,  B.; C.
Correspondence Solicited from the Trade.
Careful   and   Prompt   Attention to all
LETTER ORDERS.
I   Wan't *"• WORK
1    TYUU  k Promptly Executed
Your       We can save you money
Watch   on your Repairing.
Repairing.
A full Line of Watches and the Latest Styles ot
Jewelery always on hand.
W. J. KERR. Kamloops, B. C.
B. C.JPOTTERY CO.
Manufacturers ot
CHIMNEY PIPES, SEWER PIPES, ETC
VICTORIA, B. C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
WILL  BUILD  A
BLOCK.
R. G. Shier, of Vancouver, is
Pleased   with    Princeton
and the Mines.
R. G. Shier, of Vancouver,-.was an.-s
val on last Saturday's stage and has b
spending the week here faktfijf'^W
gamps tributary, to 'to\yn. Mr. Shier was
one of the first outsiders to purchase real
, estate, when the townsite was placed upon the market, and was fortunate enough
to secure lot 20 in block 8 at 'the'" cornerj
of Fenchu^ch .Ayeiine~ail.d Bridge Street.
store arid office building for rental purposes. Speaking to a STA-R representative he said :—•' This is my initial visit to
Princeton and I am exceedingly pleased
with the town. When I took a flyer in
the purchase of a lot I had of course to be
g&j'<R0>y Jb'fh^SrMf rfthink, my: invest- -
tendtb^bmld.anditis not at all Unlikely
that I shall, make my headquarters here
also and go into business. 'The location
t>f Princeton, as the geographical centre
and government's headquarters for the
Similkameen assures for it a bright future. What appealed to me greatly was
the number of private residences here.
It shows-that the place is a desirable one
to live in, and that its citizens have confidence in* its "future.
" I must also confess that I was genuinely surprised at the- remarkable 'showings of copper-gold ore on Copper and
Kennedy mt>ti|ntains.   Qn the former, by
rfli31fi§ent icfoflSafi H^I^T bytfie 'st'ran-
ger of its possibilities in the future. Naturally the questions of transportation
and the treatment of ore are to be solved.
The ore is there beyond any doubt, as the
surface showings are the largest I have
seen in the Province, and I speak with
some degree, of knowledge, when T say1
have visited, most of -the camps between
Fort Steele and Princeton. The construction of a railway between the coast
and the Kootenay's is an absolute necessity in the development and upbuilding
of the Similkameen. When this is done,
and; Copper mountain and the other
camps have railway connections, you will
find that the solution of the treatment
problem yiJKsoori. befffforked .but. The
ores are undoubtedly low grade, and to
make thempay, they will require to be
. mined and smelted on a large stale. This
will necessitate a big pay roll, all of
which being directly tributary to town,
will result in the place becoming a most
substantial city.
" The fact that the government has de-
citled to make Princetpn the headquarters for the Sfmilkomeen district also impressed me. The government office -and
county court building is one of the best
of its kind, for the money-expended, in
the Province. While the architecture i*j
open to some criticism, the workmanship is highly creditable to .the builders.
The Provincial jail should be put up at
the rear' of the buildihjif Mfl*sifrHtan<lecf
by a high stockade fence. ■ This i believe-
is now being discussed at Victoria.
" The proposed privgtg: bank to be
started by George R. Jackson, of Victoria, is a step in the right direction. Such
an institution is needed, and pending the
opening of a regular chartered bank
should do well. Financed as it will be
by reputable business men and capitalists of Victoria, it will meet the requirements of the town and district for some
time to come," he concluded.
Palace     por
Livery'lit-
Stable.
KEREMEOS, B. C.
Saddle Horses to all > Points in the
Similkameen District, ^'n*; Travellers from the Bonndarj* District
can secure horses'' through to
Princeton.
w
I Cotthectibn with
. the Keremeos HtJfel.
GRAND PACIFIC
HOTEL KAMl00P8' B-1
The nearest hotel to the
Railway Station. Headquarters for all people
coming from Nicola and
the Similkameen. ■${$$&
"Good Rdfcms.
Good Table
Good Liquors,
P. A. BARNIfART, Prop.
COR   SaLE-
r   Extra dry
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
WITH WHICH IS AMALGAMATED
THE BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEAD OFFICE—TORONTO.
PAID TJP CAPITAL,    -      -      -      -      $8,200,000
BESEBVE JBTJND,  ■-:■•■•      -      ■      -    2,000,000
Aggregate Resources over $65,000,000.
HON. GEO. A.  COX—President.      '■"'Tv-SiP
B. E. WALKER, General Manager.    J. H. PLUMMER, Asst. Gen. Manage
IL0ND0N OFFICE-60 LOMBARD STREET, E. C.
The Bank, has 68 Branches extending throughout Canada and elsewhere, ii
eluding the following in British Columbia and the Yukon District:
Atlin,        ..   .»-.- Greenwood, Neison,       ■..-•-••■■•
Cranbrook, Kamloops, New Westminster,
DaWson, Nanaimo, ' Rossland,
Fernie,       f ii|$$f£v$
';;   BRANCHES IN THE UNITED STATES:
VANCOUVEk,
New York,   San Francisco, , SEj
le,   Po
Savings Bank Department. Interest at 3 per cent, per annum will be allowed
from August ist,, 1901. Gold dust purchased, and every description of banking
business transacted.
W. H. PEGRAM,
Manager Kamloops Branch.
FRENCH & DAY
Tinsmiths, Gunsmiths, and Plumbers
Baat and Shaa Repairing.
Repair work   of    Every   Description.
0O<^^»T<-»^»^»<J^»^»^»<*^* ^» ^
Princeton Meat Market
WARDLE  & THOMAS
Orders for Mining Camps promptly attended
to and delivered.   ,
Hotel Tulameen
;    The Largest and Most Home-    1
like Hofeon'Princeton is now
open for the travelling public.    \
Our  bar  is  stocked with the    j
j    Best  of Wines,; Liquors   and.  j
Cigars.    Special efforts will be
made in the Cullinary Department, and tables  will be Turn-    \
\    ished with the best the market   I
\    affords.
PRINCETON,;B. C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
£
The Hanging of Nordstrom.
Calling for mercy, Charles W. Nordstrom was lashed to a board and launched
from the gallows to eternity in the gar-
rot of King county's courthouse, Wash.
The mahwholnunlered William Mason
nearly_ioj*£atsago finally expiated his
years' imprisonment, he realized his fate
The little gathering of officials, clergy-
been invited stood with sober faces and.
watched the details of the affair, which
were carefully planned and perfectly carried out by Sheriff Cudihee and his depu-
waking.   "It's ■
Sheriff Cudihee.
vation Army las
When they to
he soljjy.l aloud
again and rocked him-
e." They had gathered
realized it all now. He
His screams were heard
elow. They_j2icke&him
and carried him to the
sheriff aud his deputies, and told him the
judge wanted to see him upstairs. He
went willingly.   He had grown to take
the platform and sobbed. Quickly thej
strapped him to a board. The sheriff had
expected this. He moaned, "Why dc
you kill me? I never did anything.'
As he uttt red the last words they stood
him on the trap. A deputy sheriff pulled the black cap down.   Another adjust-
JOB
PRINTING
OI Every Description
Neatly Executed
at the
•
OFFICE
THE DRIARD HOTEL
JOE RICHARDS, Manager NICOLA   LAKE.
Headquarters for Mining Men and Prospectors.
An Ideal Summer Resort.
un Service Unsurpassed. Only the Choicest Brands of Liquors at the Bar
Owning
and
Operating
The
SUNSET
Mine.
On Copper
Mountain.
Similkameen'.
Mining
District.
Everyone  who  has  seen the property
I^Senders
ffUNANIMOUS
jpRDICT
The Biggesi^and Best Mine in British
Columbia. \
NOW IS THE
TIME TO BUY
STOCK IN
This Wonderful Mine. It is an investment ! No Speculation ! Ore enough in sight to return ioo per cent, on amount
invested.    BUY TO-DAY before advance in price.
Sunset Shares Will
Make You Rich.
FOR FURTHER IMFORMATION APPLY TO
R. A. BROWN,
PRINCETON or Grand Forks, B. C.
 Notice of  Forfeiture.
Notice of Forfeiture.
NOTICE.
OTICE—Thirty days after date I it
NOTICE.
orth bank ofthe J
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
FOR   SALE.
Sawmill Machinery as Good as New.
Princeton Goal
NOTICE.
A   SITTING of the County Cour
The Vermilion   Forks
Mining Company
$6 per Ton at the Pit,
or 50c. per Sack
KEITH   & TOWNLEY
REAL ESTATE AND MINING BROKERS
COMMISSION   AGENTS.
LEADING HOTEL IN PRINCETON
J. H. JACKSON,   Sole  Proprietor
:e Wanted and We Will.'
Find a Purchaser for Y
perty.     |TWc have S
I
In the Hills?
1
s®
m
. Borrsapondanaa Invited.
If so you will need to know where to go for your CAMPING M
OUTFIT and SUPPLIES.    We Make it Our Business to M
Prospectors and Hining Hen lfpil
W
\   jM  -.        Generally, find that it pays for them to do their trading at the
Vancouver,  ii PROSPECTOR'S SUPPLY STORE.
 •'——     II O. E. THOMAS, Prop.   H
1
CANADIAN
 ANB	
SOO  LiNE.
it
mmMi : : limited
COAST TO COAST IN4DAYS.
FIRST-CLASS
TOURIST SLEEPERS.
—EAST   AND WEST—
m.
ALASKA,
CHINA,
JAPAN,
AUSTRALIA.
CLAIMS
STAGE
IM
es  Kamloops  for  Quilchen;
Lake  for  Kamloops  everj
Nicola, Coutlee's, Nicola I
at 6 a. m.    Leaves
every Sunday at 8 a. m.    Carry M.
Similkameen   Butcher=
ing Co.,
RICHTER & SUMHERS,
PROPRIETORS.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Dealers in Heats.
Orders Filled for any point in the Sinrilkameen Valley.
LIVERY, FEED STABLE and PASTURE.
J. E. BOYLE, W. MAXWELL,
A. G. P. A. AGENT ^
VANCOUVER, B.C. Spences Bridge | *WA*VV*V
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen.
 fl"
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
The Townsite  of
<j*J*J*J<J<i<J<J<J<J<J<J<J<J<J<J<J<i<J<J<<i«;
I
\   I
1 PRINCETON !>
WJl <m><m><J<^<m)*^.im*^.<m*<m*<mK*<J<J<m><*<*
m
mm
Lots for
• • • ^/cllv • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $ JO.
Per Front Foot.^*£
Size of Lots 50xJ00
Ft. and 33x100 Ft.
Terms: J-3 Cash;
Bal. 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent, per annum. *£
British Columbia,,
*<^<^o*\>*\>*^*\>*\>*\>%^*\>*\>*\>*\>*\>%>*^*\>%^*\>*\>*^
Government Head-
quarters For the SimilkSRiccn District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tulameen and Aspen GroveJ
FINE CLIMATE
and PURE WATER
ENORMOUS AGRICULTURAL AREA TO DRAW FROM
Send for Map and Price List to «£ <£ *£ <& *£
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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